By on June 19, 2019

2019 Honda Accord Sport front quarter

2019 Honda Accord 2.0T Sport

2.0-liter turbocharged inline four, DOHC (252 hp @ 6500 rpm, 273 lb/ft. @ 1500 rpm)

Six-speed manual transmission, front-wheel drive

22 city / 32 highway / 26 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

28.7 (observed mileage, MPG)

11.7 city / 9.4 highway / 10.7 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $31,630 US / $34,976 CAD

As Tested: $31,630 US/ $34,976 CAD

Prices include $920 destination charge in the United States and $1786 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

It’s back, baby! Enthusiasts cried in 2001 when, amid The Fast and the Furious fever, Honda pulled the plug on their bigger sports coupe offering, the Prelude. It wasn’t selling well, as the Civic had grown to fit American tastes, and the beloved Acura Integra had just been supplanted by the more powerful RSX. Still, there are enthusiasts who lament the loss of the beloved coupe.

While I detest the “four-door coupe” moniker being applied to sedans with a steeply raked backlight, it doesn’t take a big stretch of imagination to see a coupe atop this page if you squint. Thus, I’m calling it – this 2019 Honda Accord 2.0T Sport is the return of the Prelude. The postlude, perhaps.

2019 Honda Accord Sport profile

OK, maybe I’m being too clever. Honda has always offered a manual transmission in their flagship family sedan, after all, though they’ve never had a true Sport model with a significant (60!) horsepower bump over the standard trim. Now, with a turbocharged K20C4 engine closely related to (and built at the same Anna, Ohio factory as) the powerplant in the impressive Civic Type R, the Accord Sport 2.0T becomes a legitimate sports sedan.

2019 Honda Accord Sport front

The looks are what we’ve come to expect from the Accord, with just a few subtle tweaks for the Sport 2.0T model. The big change is the 19” alloy wheels, up two inches from those fitted to the standard Accord. I particularly like the dark finish applied to the polished bar connecting the headlamps, normally chromed on the regular car. Further, I love the Still Blue Pearl finish on my tester – we need more cars in this world that aren’t black, white, grey, gray, silver, silver-gray, silver-beige, or the like.

2019 Honda Accord Sport rear

While it’s now quite familiar, I’m not completely in love with the fastback styling on the Accord. Paired with the Soichiro Kink of the rear quarter window, the long sloping roofline adds a good bit of visual heft to the tail of the Accord. I’m reminded of when my kids were young, and they’d toddle around with a loaded diaper, sagging. Only from certain angles, of course, but I still prefer a more traditional three-box profile.

2019 Honda Accord Sport rear quarter

Typical Honda sensibility reigns inside the cabin. These photos may be deceiving – the material on the seats may be shiny, but it’s a cloth material of some sort. It’s comfortable, and cool to the back of the thigh even when it’s been baking in the sun, but the texture makes me concerned that it might snag over time. The front seats are heated in this Sport trim, and are somewhat biased more toward comfort over support in the corners.

2019 Honda Accord Sport front seat

The eight-inch touchscreen works nicely, with no perceptible lag between touch inputs and response. Mercifully to those who’ve endured Honda touchscreens from a couple years ago, there is a dedicated volume knob at the bottom left. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are standard.

2019 Honda Accord Sport rear seat

As the number of new cars with manual transmissions have dwindled, automakers seem to have forgotten the biomechanics involved in shifting – at least when designing cupholders. Too many cars have a cupholder/shifter interface that will cause the driver to hit any drink while shifting. Not here. The Accord has a deep well in the console aft of the shift lever that perfectly holds a large drink – no kidding, a 44-ounce plastic cup from White Castle fits without coming close to interfering with the action of the excellent shift lever.

2019 Honda Accord Sport interior

Rear seat room is quite good. My bride, at five-foot-nine, fit easily behind me without scraping her knees on the seatback. The kids, thus, had all the room in the world. Trunk space is plenty – why do people buy crossovers when a more-efficient, fun to drive sedan has 16.7 cubic feet of space? Do we really need to carry everything all the time?

Don’t answer that. I know, I have a minivan and a midsize SUV in my personal fleet. But I must believe that I could manage nearly every motoring task in my life with a sedan, and at some point, I’ll have to put my bank’s money where my mouth is.

2019 Honda Accord Sport dashboard

And, god, this would be a fun one to sign a note on. Few things are more enjoyable than dropping a gear or two on that serpentine road down by the river to power through a tight bend, and the Accord Sport 2.0T makes performance so accessible. All 273 lb/ft of torque are available at 1500 rpm, so it’s easy to get up to speed no matter what gear you’re in.

Oh, and it uses regular fuel, rather than the premium high-octane stuff needed in the high-po Civic Type R. I wasn’t particularly light on the right pedal, and still managed to get 28.7 mpg in my week of driving.

2019 Honda Accord Sport center stack

The steering is nicely weighted, giving plenty of feedback as to what the road is doing. The ride can get a bit harsh due to the 235/40-19 tires – I’d prefer a bit more sidewall on a daily driver to lessen the impact of potholes. As far as I can tell, the brakes fitted to all non-hybrid Accords are the same size, so dropping to an 18-inch wheel should be feasible, if not the 17s mounted on the base trim.

2019 Honda Accord Sport gauges

And, yes, I spent a few minutes shopping replacement wheels and tires for a car I don’t own. That’s how much I enjoyed this Accord Sport 2.0T. This is the part of the review where I’d post a screenshot of the build-and-price tool showing how I’d spec MY car – this is it. This is exactly, down to the paint, how I’d buy my Accord.

I’m not certain that the Accord Sport will prove to be a replacement for the Prelude, but I’d argue that it’s in the spirit of the original. Plenty of performance in a roomy, understated package is what the Prelude was – and is exactly what this Accord delivers today.

2019 Honda Accord Sport wide angle

[Images: © 2019 Chris Tonn]

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80 Comments on “2019 Honda Accord Sport 2.0T – The Long-Awaited Sixth Generation Prelude Si...”


  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’m happy this exact car exists. I’m not sure anyone really needs any more sports sedan than this.I’m curious if not having a mechanical lsd caused much torque steer, vs . the less pretty Civic SI.
    I’d think if I were in the market this Accord vs Jetta GLI would be a tough call to make.The GLI would can drink 87 octane as well and has the lsd .
    I think if I made the Accord Sport mine I’d -1 the wheels to 18s though.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Accord 1.5t is bested by the Malibu 1.5t in handling department.

      Even the Malibu 1.5t is quicker than the Accord 1.5t in Motor Trend handling test:

      “The Malibu lapped our figure-eight course in 27.4 seconds averaging 0.63 g through the process and managed 0.84 g average during lateral acceleration tests”

      2018 Accord 1.5t only registered a lateral grip of 0.81g versus 0.78 and a figure-eight time of 27.7 seconds at 0.61g

      A Malibu 1.5T can be had for US$13,000 good luck finding Japanese competition that inexpensive.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        The Malibu with the 1.5T is a car sent from hell, I will take a iron Duke celebrity every day of the week over that turd. Besides no one brought up the 1.5T in this article except you.

        There’s good reason a Malibu can be had for 13k, it’s a POS.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “The Accord 1.5t is bested by the Malibu 1.5t in handling department.”

        This sounds like an argument from a Mazda fan. No one interested in handling or acceleration is going to be shopping the 1.5L versions of the Accord or Malibu.

      • 0 avatar
        johnds

        The 1.5T is the basic engine to get Aunt Thelma to Church on Sunday, or young Tabitha to the mall. The Malibu 1.5T is for Enterprise and Avis to shuttle customers around Orlando or Los Angeles Airport.

        If you needed power to best anyone you order the 2.0T.

      • 0 avatar
        formula m

        Malibu is a joke and probably discontinued in the near future if not already

    • 0 avatar
      bry_doc

      I daily this same car (albeit in boring white) and can attest to the lack of torque steer. The car pulls hard and straight. The dreaded “one wheel peel” is an issue however, especially in traction limited situations. One area I disagree with the reviewer here is in regard to steering feel—there is simply none, like the wheel is completely divorced from front wheels. I’ve wondered if that is why there is no perceived torque steer. The manual transmission is a shifter rebuild (bushings, spring, short throw adapter) from amazing and doesn’t hold a candle to the 10AT in driving enjoyment. Who cares about tenths of a second. Finally, yes, there is cost cutting, but nothing like the laughable build quality in an (auto only) GM product.

  • avatar
    vanpressburg

    Accord is a great car, but you can buy Lexus IS 200t for just little more money
    and it is RWD.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think the IS is somewhat underrated, but the Accord’s quicker than the IS200 (and, believe it or not, the automatic’s quicker than the manual), and the Lexus has a very small back seat.

      I’d gladly buy a lightly used IS350, though.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Regal Sportback 2.0T FWD is nearly as quick in Car & Driver testing, about an inch smaller on interior dimensions but has double the trunk space. The longer 4-year warranty is icing on the cake from Buick. Plus no road noise like Accord on 19’s.

      Not to mention the Regal can be had.for as low as $19K with discounts. Only middle $20’s for AWD optioned up.

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        Are any of the cars you mentioned available with a manual? No? Then I think you may be missing the point here…

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Actually, he does have a point – the 2.0T Accord is actually quicker with the automatic, so unless you’re a die-hard manual fan, there’s a good reason to pass on it in a car that sells on performance.

          Norm’s not too far off on the Regal either – it’s a very nice car. The super-cheap one he’s talking about will not be well optioned, but it’s plenty quick. So’s the Malibu 2.0T.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I’ve savored the go in my new Accord Touring sparingly — just a few times to help seat the rings.

            It’s a beast!

          • 0 avatar
            threeer

            I suspect few Accord people sit there and look at the automatic and think “gee, it’s quicker than a manual, so I’ll get that one, instead!” No…they’re more along the lines of thinking “I don’t want to be bothered with shifting myself, the AT is easier to drive.” And that’s fine. But let’s stop with the narrative that consumers are really buying AT’s for the better performance numbers. They’re buying because the majority of Americans decided long ago they didn’t want to be inconvenienced with shifting themselves.

            I’d love to be able to be in a position to afford a new Accord Sport (with manual). Looks like a fun package.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            That may be true with buyers who don’t care about performance, but I suspect someone who spends extra to get a model called “Sport” might just prefer something that goes faster.

          • 0 avatar
            tankinbeans

            FreedMike, I’m the guy that would specifically get the Sport because it can be had with a manual. The shifting action of which was wonderful.

            I couldn’t give two flying forks about performance.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            And that’s a good reason to buy one. To each his own!

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Norm, what’s the Regal GS running in terms of actual transaction cost, assuming you can find one? That would have been on a short list, but the black interior would have been a deal-breaker, as was the $40K sticker!

  • avatar
    ABC-2000

    I skipped the Turing just because of the 19″ wheels, I am driving the EX-L 2.0T with the 10 speed, what can I say, it has much more power then anyone will ever need, on any highway ramp entrance, when you accelerate a little hard, the front tires chirp on 1st, 2nd and 3rd gear and it happens so fast as it has 7 more gears to go.
    I don’t like that it will up shift at 6000 rpm in sport mode even in manual mode using the peddle shifters, I mean, 6000 is not red line yet.
    I had 2014 Sport and 2016 EX, this car is so different, so much better that I actually enjoy driving it! a family sedan!

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Yup, my test of the Accord Sport 2.0t 10 speed with its weird cloth upholstery, dark purple ‘n dirty- white seat bottoms in mine for some reason, was nothing but constant tire noise on the 19’s, far worse than my old LGT on Michelin A/S 3+. Put me right off. It didn’t bark the tires even full throttle from a stop though – it sorted of danced side-to-side at the front; maybe the engines loosen up a bit as they run in. The tire noise and inability to easily pick a gear and then hold it was another demerit, as was the slightly picky steering.

      Glad you like your configuration.

      I tried the Mazda6 turbo (Canada) mid level on 17’s same day as the Sport and much preferred it on the highway where it was amazingly silent. It managed a bit of roar from the tires on full throttle start. Much preferred its interior and manumatic to the Accord. However, I also tried out the 6 Signature on 19’s and came up with the same demerits as with the 19’s on the Accord Sport. Noise. Plus they felt greasy under power and the great steering became twitchier and more nervous on the same roads. Big wheels = looks only.

    • 0 avatar
      formula m

      I can confirm that the tires will chirp in the first 3 gears. The torque is pretty incredible with this new 2.0L Turbo from Honda.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        I did a “set the rings” romp in mine by dropping down to 50-ish on the freeway, and giving it the spurs! The transmission skipped down from 10th to 6th or 7th, and at the upshift, at about 75mph, the traction-control light blinked!

        That engine/transmission combo is for reals! Runs like a scalded rabbit, and keeps the RPMs at 80mph right where my 2013 V6 cruised! (And at zero or even negative boost!)

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        > The torque is pretty incredible with this new 2.0L Turbo from Honda.

        Welcome to the 21st Century, Honda. You see, drivers actually like torque.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    What they really need to do to make me give up my V6 Accord coupe is to make the thing AWD like the Altima. I’m not buying an Altima but it really sucks that Subaru and Nissan fo it while Honda and Toyota don’t.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It has 4 doors, yep, just like a Prelude

  • avatar
    NeilM

    @TTAC reviewers:
    You really, REALLY need to list the vehicle’s weight in the data panel. Horsepower and torque don’t mean much unless you also know how much weight they have to haul around.

    @vanpressburg
    Yeah, but the Lexus is hideously, eye-searingly, anti-peristalsis inducingly ugly. It wasn’t just hit with the ugly stick, it was beaten to a pulp with it, then stomped on. The Lexus looks as if a murderously hungry alien being is bursting forth from the radiator grille. Where’s Ripley with her powered exoskeleton when we need her?

  • avatar
    deanst

    While it’s nice, the fact that a Toyota Camry can be had with 50 more hp and better fuel economy is disconcerting.

  • avatar

    I wouldn’t buy this because the front door trim doesn’t match the back. Front is carbon fiber effect, rear is blank plastic. Unacceptable cost cutting.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Honda’s just trying to give the back seat occupants something to aspire to.

      My main issue with this car was actually the seats, and I wasn’t fond at all of the front end styling.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      …and those poor 2nd shifters at Anna are no longer assembling the Accord

      • 0 avatar
        conundrum

        And Accords still outsell the bottom feeder Malibu by over two to one. 291K to 141K units in 2018 and all the Malibus are parked at airports not driveways. So what’s your point Norm? Posting blurts of unreality on every English-language car website in the free world? Where everyone knows you’re a free range Buick/GM nitwit and corporate cheerleading seems to have been your career for the last decade at least. Are the checks still arriving in the mail? Enquiring minds need to know.

        • 0 avatar
          formula m

          Geo-Storming’Norman must be splashing extra dex-cool in his coffee today.

          • 0 avatar
            Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

            That’s an insult to the Geo Storm, which despite its many faults was still better at being a car than Norm is in his self-delusional role as an automotive industry pundit.

      • 0 avatar
        johnds

        I wasn’t aware Anna was a car/vehicle plant.

    • 0 avatar
      johnds

      Honda has always done something like this, and if you look at different markets, the parts exist. My 2000 Civic was awesome, but I hated how they removed the power lock switch on the right passenger side, but I am sure some JDM model has it and I could have installed the part.

  • avatar
    ACCvsBig10

    Ughh another sport model saddle with only an all black interior, at least offer some “white, grey, gray, silver, silver-gray, silver-beige, or the like” colored seats

  • avatar
    Mike N.

    Both the Accord and the Civic are styled to look like they should have a hatch, but instead have tiny trunk openings instead. I find that infuriating, because a hatch is so useful. If KIA (Stinger), VW (Arteon), BMW (4GC, 3GT, 6GT), Audi (A5/S5/A7/S7) and Mercedes (AMG GT 4dr) can give you swoopy-coupy styling AND practicality in one body, why couldn’t Honda?

    @Corey Lewis: Wow, that is some serious nickel and diming.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I checked one of these out last fall when I was shopping cars, and this review’s pretty much spot on – with the 2.0T, this car’s a hoot. And here’s a fun fact: it’s considerably quicker with the 10-speed automatic.

    (Skip the base 1.5T Sport model, though – it’s a lot slower, and you’d be best off spending less on an EX or LX model)

    In the end, though, I just couldn’t vibe with the styling, and I wasn’t fond of the seats.

    • 0 avatar
      4drSedan

      Yep. I test drove both a 2.0 manual and a 2.0 automatic. I’d pick the auto. The manual has a really long throw. Both were a hoot to drive and felt entertainingly fast.

      I just can’t find an angle from which I can view this car and not conclude that it’s unabashedly ugly.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    white castle? bride? #humblebragging

  • avatar
    ajla

    2001 Prelude SH:
    [email protected]
    [email protected]

    2001 Regal GS:
    [email protected]
    [email protected]

    2019 Accord 2.0T:
    [email protected]
    [email protected]

    All the Honda fans I knew growing up that made fun of American engines can screw off.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      But but but but HP/L!!!!111!!

    • 0 avatar
      Gmr

      Let us be fair. The h22a was released into the wild in 1991. @190 up then, it was a bit overshadowing many cars.

      It’s not exactly fair to compare it to domestic offerings a decade later at the very end of it’s run.

      Even if you ignore the electronic 4 wheel steering in 1991 it offered a quite a bit of high tech shit for the time. Consider the 1991 ford mustang gt. This is what the h22a prelude blew away. The only failure of the prelude was Honda abandoning it after 1996. The 5th gen was just a horrible reskin with no innovation nor improvement beyond atts. It was ugly too. So let’s forget it ever existed.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        My point was that the power delivery of modern Honda vehicles is much closer to what was provided by GM/Ford in the past compared to past Hondas.

        • 0 avatar
          formula m

          Didn’t the Japanese make a 3.0L naturally aspirated V6 that put out 270-290hp in the early 90’s?
          I was a Monte Carlo owner/ GM summer employee in the early 2000’s while in college. Decent GM engines were available but matched to lame transmissions. When I replaced my Monte Carlo with a 2002 Nissan Maxima it felt considerable faster matching that 227hp V6 with 6spd manual than anything comparable at the time from GM ( where i worked)

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I test drove one a while ago and it was huge. I daresay offering nearly as much space as the 300, at least based on eyesight.

    I found it interesting that Honda’s suite of driver assistance features were also available with the manual. Love them or hate them, the manufacturers who drop them as soon as you add the third pedal could be pushing people away.

    I loved the power of the thing, but not enough to trade.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    That’s quite write-up, sounds like a great car–with a MANUAL too!

    And assembled in the US.

    Good job Honda.

    $32k is a lot though.

    2014 Regal Turbo
    259 hp @ 5300
    295 lb-ft @ 3000

    But automatic. Still, supportive seats, quiet, firm, fast, not too thirsty. An Opel Insignia with Buick emblems. Good car. Ever driven one?

  • avatar
    SteveMar

    I appreciate a good manual family sedan like any other auto enthusiast but this car, as with most Hondas these days, have been smacked by the ugly stick. Too many angles, cuts and attempts to look SPORTY and HIP. Really not necessary for a car that has sound basics like this. But Honda has decided that it needs to look like every dude’s Fast and Furious dream as opposed to the more classic affordable elegance they used to have as recently as the early/mid-2000s. Tacky tacky tacky. Please stop and just build good cars.

  • avatar
    lstanley

    Oooof, those rims. They look unbalanced and ready to fly off the car like automotive ninja stars.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    I found the Accord a bit too elephantine to be thought of as agile, so to call it a sport sedan is a bit of a stretch. It isn’t even nippy, as the Brits would say. Neither is the Mazda6 turbo. They’re both bordering on ponderous when trying to whip them around older city side streets at a good clip. Both give off an aura of not really wanting to be pushed on tight streets with lazy turn-in. Good power and acceleration with fine handling on long sweeping bends does not a sports sedan make. Chop off a foot of length and you’re starting to get there, and they’re both a bit soft in the suspenders department as well.

  • avatar
    millerluke

    I actually tried to get an Accord Sport 2.0T back in February. The only one they had on the lot was a 1.5T with CVT, and it kind of sucked. When I said what I wanted, the dealer’s response was “Well, we don’t have any, we’ll call if we get any in.” It baffles me, that I was ready to spend upwards of $35-40,000 (Canadian) on a car, and they won’t order one in for me. Bizarre.

    Same thing happened at the Dodge dealer, when I asked for a R/T… and at the Chevy dealer for an Impala. Only the Toyota dealer would order the car in, exactly as I wanted. Can’t understand it…

  • avatar
    Sceptic

    This article is spot on. I own 2.0T Sport and it definitely has the same vibe, the same DNA as the last gen Prelude I had. Even though the Accord I got is 10sp auto and the Prelude was manual. Now with wife and kids I get the deja vu of the Prelude. Same wide dash, similar seats, ride, low seating position. It’s a joy to drive. A lot of space for kids and stuff. Definitely not a luxury car, but great for fun commute and very practical. With this car Honda goes back to the 80-90s philosophy. Pure mechanical joy.

    • 0 avatar

      “With this car Honda goes back to the 80-90s philosophy. Pure mechanical joy.”

      I’m sure it’s a fine car, but let’s not overdo it.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        It is closer in some ways than any Accord, save, perhaps, for the V6 6-speed Coupes from the last generation.

        In your post decrying the bean counting, did you mean that the doors in the back had all plastic? The worst thing is that the door sill is soft-touch up front, and harder in the back. Not too much different than the last-gen car.

        Only cost cuts I’ve really noticed are that the dead pedal is molded into the front carpet instead of a separate bolted-in piece, and the sun visors are a little thinner. (Both those pieces probably come right from the Civic; the carpet seems a little thicker than the previous car, though it’s still a better grade of felt, but my WeatherTech FloorLiners cover it anyway.) But despite the platform-sharing, there is still a huge difference in the overall interior feel in the Accord versus Civic. If that wasn’t the case, I may have looked elsewhere for the first time in 25 years for my next car.

        Cost cutting in general is endemic to every automaker nowadays.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    Did you have a hard time deciding between the Sport and the Touring? My friend likes her touring.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    This thing is a Prelude? Trash opinion.

    It sounds like a damn hairdryer; I miss the good, pure Hondas.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I owned a ’89 Prelude Si and the only thing here that is common is the H logo and 3 pedals. One of things that made my Prelude so great was the dash layout. This Accord suffers from iPad-stuck-dash syndrome so its an automatic fail. I test drove the previous Accord V6 Coupe and it was no Prelude either despite having the correct shape and number of seats.

      I now understand why people collect old cars, because a decade from now in my retirement years I am going want my ’89 Prelude Si back just to recapture how felt, drove, sounded and looked. Modern cars are great… but as the saying goes they don’t make ’em like they used to. At the time my Prelude was pretty much perfection, its only downside was Honda’s tradition lack of torque in small, high reving 4 bangers. During this same time period Honda was dominating Formula 1 with McLaren (Senna and Prost) so their engineering was second to none.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      Honda sells lots of non turbo cars, so if you miss them, just go down to a dealer and sort of stand in the lot.

  • avatar
    vvk

    The important question is: how pleasant is it to shift? Does it still hang rev?

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I’m happy this car exists. Bravo to Honda for the manual on the gold engine and trims.

    19s are insane though. I hope you can get the bigger engine on normal rims.

    I’m also curious about rev hang and how does the engine rev out? Run out of steam at the top like most turbos or old Honda fun up there?

    Agreed this and the GLI if you gotta have a manual sedan. Actually maybe those are the only two manual sedans left now? Trying to think what else. GM no. Ford no. Mazda dead. Subaru dead. Bmw no. Audi no. Mercedes no. Alfa no. Nissan no. Toyota no.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I think you can get an EX-L (missing the vented seats, auto-wipers, HUD, heated rear seats, nav, and adaptive dampers of the Touring), which comes with the 17” wheels, with the 2.0T, but the Sport is your only option if you want a stick. That 10-speed automatic is no slouch; they’ve probably done a couple software updates to it, because from day one, that transmission has been mostly invisible in its operation. I’ve had a few more noticeable shifts, but even those weren’t what I’d describe as “rough.” My 2013’s 6-speed auto was a little rougher, and made more clunking noises from new.

      You are right about the 19” wheels — if I would have had the option, I would have “minus-oned” the tires. Still would have cost more than the wheel/tire warranty I picked up.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    I have a hard time taking anyone seriously on TTAC when they say things like “X feature or Y styling decision, so automatic fail.” Have you driven the car? I have, and I have to say that the Accord is absolutely a home run – way closer in spirit to classic Honda than anything they have done in many years. This coming from someone who has owned and/or driven every fun Honda since 1988, including early Accord, Prelude, CRXsi, and even NSX.

    I also want to echo sentiments that the 10-speed auto is better than the manual transmission in this car. I know, I know, sacrilege! My daily driver is a 2011 E90 M3 with a 6-speed. I heel and toe every downshift because I love driving cars with manual transmissions. Nevertheless, I drove the new Accord 2.0t Sport 6-speed and the 2.0t Touring with 10-speed auto/shifty paddles back to back, and the 10-speed was significantly better. For starters, the manual shift action is entirely too light and rubbery, the throws too long, the clutch engagement spot too high, the pedal positions too far out ideals for heel and toe. It’s kind of an afterthought in feel and action. The 10-speed on the other hand, was impressive in its ability to bang off upshifts at part, midway and full throttle. It really keeps the turbo spooled without requiring you to push, and does a good job of holding gears mid corner. Even for a “Save the manuals!” type of guy like me, the auto was the clear winner. Oh, and don’t forget that with the automatic, you can use the adaptive cruise to go all the way to zero/full stop and back up without touching the pedals when in traffic – a significant feature for many cities.

    The one thing this car needs is an LSD. On the forums, I see that people have been adapting the Civic Type R LSD to the Accord, but only for the manual transmission cars. So far, I’ve not seen a solution for an LSD that targets the 10-speed auto. Perhaps Quaife will build one?

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      That full-stop ACC is sweet indeed! I’ve been in a couple jams since I’ve had my car, and it does almost as good a job as I would. (I really want that for the school zone I have to trudge through every day, where there’s always one sheep in front of me who will stay right at 20mph despite no kids around, and no enforcement; my former 2013 Accord’s ACC, as well as the ACCs on the sticks, will drop out at 22mph.)

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      > the 10-speed was significantly better. For starters, the manual shift action is entirely too light and rubbery,
      > the throws too long, the clutch engagement spot too high, the pedal positions too far out ideals for heel
      > and toe. It’s kind of an afterthought in feel and action.

      Crossing it off the list.

      The fact that the auto is better is absolutely irrelevant. No clutch no sale.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Honda is dead to me. The Honda of Legend is no longer. It’s literally a mere cut above KIA at this point, but has not figured that out yet.

    From horrific transmissions, to egg shell quality paint and sheet metal, to the horrific oil fuel dilution catastrophe owners are living through with the new 1.5 liter and 2.0 liter turbo engines (many have reported massive rising oil levels and as much as 20% gasoline content in their oil after a mere 3,000 miles post oil-change), Honda has fallen so far, so fast, that it’s hard to comprehend.

    I actually took a new Accord 2.0T for a ride. AWFUL ride quality and road noise (thanks to ridiculous 19″ wheels with tires having no sidewall and very little noise insulation), which is a total shame, because that car is capacious inside, cuts an Audi A5-like profile, boogies with decent steering feel by todays standards, and also has really good ergonomics and gauges as well as having a sh!tload of advanced active safety and driving assist features standard across the Accord lineup (stuff that would cost an extra $8k to $12k on most other vehicles.

    Add the mechanical woes and awful ride quality and NVH to the mix, and it’s a sad funeral procession for a once great automaker.

  • avatar
    micko4472

    I’m sure this is a lovely vehicle, if you like mini motors with turbos
    and lots of gasoline in the engine oil. Let me suggest that you find
    a previous generation Accord with a 3.0 or 3.5 litre V6 and a 6 speed
    manual tranny. Add some tires and shocks and go have some fun. Forget
    these mini-motor disasters Honda is peddling these days.

  • avatar
    rjg

    I don’t get the styling of this car. It seems like they could’ve made this car good-looking but thought, wait, no we can’t do that– gotta make sure the rear looks like it’s sagging and add a weird kink to the back window. If you’re going to copy the Audi A5/A7 just copy it — and while you’re at it copy the hatchback too! The only good looking car the make now is the Honda Insight — why didn’t they just make the regular Civic look like that?!

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Late to respond to this, but yes, Honda should have done a comprehensive restyle to the outside of the Civic in the vein of the Insight. The hood cut is much less noticeable than on the Civic, and especially the Accord (which has never had a cut, a consequence of sharing the Civic platform).

      My new Accord Touring is testament to that not being a deal-breaker, but the Sport Grille I added as a dealer accessory wouldn’t have been necessary if the Accord would have come out like the Insight; that Sport Grille softens the “unibrow” look of the stock grille, and softens the hood cut somewhat.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Even today, when In ee the current model in a parking spot, it looks awkward because the fastback ends up with a trunk, not a liftback that would provide much more utility! Plus, their is a weird flow in the rear quarter panel that keeps me from buying the Accord.


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