By on May 9, 2019

Dyson, the UK-based maker of innovative vacuums and fans, plans to launch an electric vehicle in about two years’ time — a promise backed up with over $2 billion in funding and the poaching of former Infiniti president Roland Krueger, who now heads the company’s automotive division.

The fledgling automaker doesn’t want to be an also-ran in the still-fledgling EV field. As the clock ticks closer to a real, physical car, new patent drawings reveal what it may look like.

The drawings, submitted in a late-2017 application but published only this week, appear to show a crossover. Surprised? Probably not. The drawings suggest the first Dyson vehicle will boast three rows of seating, a low center of gravity, and a truncated nose designed to present as little frontal area as possible. Its wheels, like those seen on the BMW i3, may be of the skinny, oversized variety. All of these measures aim to reduce aerodynamic drag, improving range.

The aluminum body Dyson previously copped to helps in that regard, too.

Still, the drawings are just that. In an email to employees obtained by Bloomberg, company founder James Dyson said the patent images are not a sure-fire glimpse of the final product. Rather, they represent “a glimpse of some of the inventive steps” the company is taking in its design process.

If you want to see an artist’s rendering based on the patent images, head on over to Autocar.

The secretive company plans to produce its vehicles in a Singapore assembly plant, though what type of battery will propel the unnamed vehicle remains a mystery. Dyson is very interested in solid-state batteries, said to harness significantly more energy than traditional lithium-ion packs, and has filed patent applications in the past for their design. Still, that technology — touted by the likes of Henrik Fisker — is in its infancy.

To date, no mass-produced electric car contains solid-state batteries.

[Images: Dyson]

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30 Comments on “As Patent Drawings Emerge, Dyson’s Electric Car Takes Shape...”


  • avatar
    NoID

    If this doesn’t latch into a charging station at night, and contains no vacuum or fan-based technology to enhance dynamics and handling, I will be very disappointed.

    Also, how will it handle pet hair?

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Buy a Dyson Auto, because all our other products suck.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      There other products don’t really suck, and that’s the problem. Moreso they blow.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        I never really tried to buy a Dyson, because they are so expensive, but I get the idea that the fans are designed more to make buyers feel cool than they are to actually cool them. They have a reputation of being mostly overpriced hype, with little substance. That sounds like a pretty decent resume for another electric car hustle.

        Hopefully, British taxpayers will be saddled with this one. Maybe Dyson can sell some to Norway. They give great subsidies to electric car buyers. Norway exports its oil to be burned in more primitive countries which don’t care about the environment as much as Norway does.

        I really hope Dyson builds it, just so I can make fun of it with “suck and blow” jokes and watch as it inevitably slides into bankruptcy. Maybe Tata will buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The only products which is important to focus on in fully financialized dystopias, are stocks, bonds and prospectuses. That’s where the money is. The occasional other whatever, is just part of the advertising budget.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Flying magazine just had an article on a company that makes a battery that has 70% more energy than traditional Lithium Ion. No word on charge times or cycles.

    NoID, like the old Chaparral 2J?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I hope their electric crossover is better than their $400 hair dryers that last 1 year. My experience with their hair dryers and vacuums has not been good.

    • 0 avatar
      A Scientist

      Lol. I’ve made comments before that if their cars are anything like their vacuums, they’ll be 4x the cost of the competition and work half as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Drew8MR

        Dyson vacs might work better if they were constructed with considerably more precision,but they currently rely far too much on seals between averagely fitted molded plastic parts. I think the entire design is flawed due to clogging issues,but at least you could eliminate the annoying air leakage and crappy brush and clutch designs. But as far as vacuums go, simpler is better and the old upright or canister bagged design is simply far superior.

  • avatar
    labelnerd

    Chiming in with others…..our vacuums SUCK…..so let’s make a car, that could kill people. Great idea!!

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    No transmission, so no worries about plastic gears disintegrating. But they could utilize plastic bearings and axles to maintain their reputation.

  • avatar
    ScarecrowRepair

    Solid state batteries are presumably otherwise known as capacitors, I bet.

  • avatar
    TimK

    Dyson knows volume manufacturing and marketing. Can they lever that into a EV play? It’ll cost them five years and $10B or so to find out — roll the dice time mofos.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      +1

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      As wealthier consumers are going to be the ones buying, Dyson is well suited to the marketing. Their successful marketing campaigns have managed to convince quite a few people to pay 4 and 5 times more than they need to in order to get a quality vacuum. That is a pretty big accomplishment as vacuums aren’t conspicuous luxury products. I think people are much more inclined to buy unnecessarily costly products if they are conspicuous signs of wealth, things that can be seen when they are in public, flaunt logos and draw attention…… not vacuums that sit in a closet for the vast majority of their lives.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    The concave shape of the nose cap is aerodynamically counter-intuitive and clearly a function of original Infiniti design. A convex shape, more bullet-nosed, would be far more effective and offer a unique appearance in today’s angular designs.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    So are their (or is it “his”, since it’s James Dyson?) vacuum cleaners junk? My wife would like to by one, to replace our 18-yo Oreck XL21 (paid $700 18 years ago, it’s got a 21-year warranty that doesn’t really cover much besides the motor). I’d like some reason why not to buy one. All I can tell about them is they use a lot of brightly colored plastics, that look pretty breakable (polystyrene, like a model car).

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      I’ve been looking to replace my old handheld Dustbuster, but all that seems to pop up is Dyson. Glad I read this thread. Have to keep looking, I guess.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I will say the Dyson is far superior to the Dustbuster, but that doesn’t necessarily make it better than another upright with a hose attachment.

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        The Black+Decker BDH2000PL pivot vacuum is pretty good. The battery lasts a pretty long time, and it folds for storage in a smaller place. The only thing is that it can sometimes get the flap jammed open by larger items, and then some dust can fall back out when you go to put it away. As long as you empty it regularly, it should work pretty well.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Best vacuum you can buy IMHO is a Miele. German, made to extremely high standards. All parts are repairable and replaceable, in contrast to big-box-store vacuums that last about one year and then go in the trash. Ours is over 20 years old. Buy quality once.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Your better off with a Shark at half the price. Does a better job and last longer.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I want one of those ones where hair isn’t supposed to get tangled up in the brush roller.

      My wife and my daughter both have long hair.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I’m sure it will suck like their vacuums. Judging by how many of these things I see out to the curb and in my buddies vacuum repair shop I certainly am not holding my breath for a car from this manufacturer.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Yes, I see a lot of Dyson’s out on the curb during garbage day. I realize things are not built to last but for the price you pay it should last longer. The $399 Dyson hair dryer lasted exactly 14 months and during the last 2 months it shut off after 2 minutes–this is a hair dryer that my wife and I used 3 times a week and not for very long. I liked the weight and it did a good job but for $399 I expect to get at least a few years out of it. Replaced it with a Conair at Costco for $19.99 which if it lasts a year it is still less expensive. I have an older hair dryer from Walmart that I used for 10 years that cost $9,99 which still works except the cool setting. I do have a Dyson vacuum but I use the Shark vacuum instead much better vacuum at half the price. I just don’t trust Dyson to make a good electric vehicle and for the same money or more I would rather have a Tesla at least they are a known quality. I would even choose the Bolt over whatever Dyson would make.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    I have both the DC8 and the V8 Absolute. Always use the Absolute! Dyson should make a great electric car since they have experience with lithium batteries but will not be cheap. Maybe compact crossover base price of $300K, full size luxury SUV $600K and luxury full size sedan $500K.

  • avatar

    Is it a radiator in front to suck the air? Does it has air filter or it is a bagless design?

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Sir James Dyson, possessor of the fruity voice, supposed patriot of the UK, strong Brexit advocate like any upper class nitwit.

    So after the vote, he decamps to Singapore, his new world HQ. The vacuums are already made in nearby Malaysia and Philipines, while Singapore is the high-tech home of the V8 (!) electric motor. A real conman who should be in the marmalade trade. By a twist of logic not decipherable to the Brits, he has invented some cock and bull story about making money in the Far east so he can invest in Britain in future. Must be the same logic that saw America’s consumer products companies decamp to China to exploit cheap labor and screw their countrymen back home out of a job.

    Singapore is also to be the assembly point of the Dyson EV. Likely bad design, non-existent quality assurance, approximate assembly, a strong advertising campaign, and maybe in a couple of years you too can have an inoperative Dyson clogging the driveway instead of the broom closet.

    I gotta say, Dyson has the measure of Musk in the smarm stakes, and 100% less interest in providing employment in his country of citizenship. Cynicism Central and the guy clears $400 million net a year on those rather poor vacuums.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Twist: it turns on a centrally located ball.


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  • HotPotato: Twist: it turns on a centrally located ball.
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