By on May 8, 2019

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

The large-car class is a weird place these days. Not exactly a ghost town, but not exactly a hotly contested segment, either.

Rear-drive remains the purview of the Dodge/Chrysler bunch, while the rest of the segment consists of entry-luxury cruisers (Toyota Avalon, Lexus ES) and semi-sporty cars such as the Acura TLX, Nissan Maxima, Buick Regal GS, four-cylinder Kia Stinger – and now the 2019 Volkswagen Arteon.

Finally reaching our shores after a delay due to unspecified homologation hangups, the Arteon is positioned as the brand’s flagship, and it is in some ways a successor to the late CC.

Volkswagen gave us a crack at driving the Arteon, offering an opportunity to figure out exactly where it fits in the market.

(Full disclosure: Volkswagen flew me to California, fed me, and put me up in a hotel so that I could drive the Arteon. The company shipped a bottle of wine to each journalist, as well.)

The CC comparison is natural, though differences are many. The Arteon has a five-inch longer wheelbase and stretches a couple inches longer, overall, while also being a bit taller and wider. There’s a bit more rear headroom and legroom, and significantly more cargo room. The hatchbacked Arteon rides on the MQB platform that underpins so many VW products these days.

Those with long-enough memories will recall a time when the CC offered a manual transmission. Three-pedal fans won’t find that option here – whether in front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive, the Arteon has an eight-speed automatic transmission. The sole engine is a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that makes 268 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque. Adaptive damping is standard.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

The Arteon’s styling is handsome without being overly aggressive. It’s not as conservative as the Jetta’s duds, but Volkswagen clearly felt that flowing lines and gentle curvature was preferable to a more extreme approach. It works well enough that at least one SoCal tourist gave me a thumbs up as I hunted for a photo spot.

On-road, the Arteon feels better balanced than the GS and offers up less body roll than the last GT Stinger I drove, while feeling a bit more well-rounded than the Maxima. Understeer makes itself known if you overcook a corner, and the steering is well-weighted if not completely communicative.

Ride is smooth, but well, California roads aren’t exactly pockmarked. I reserve full judgment until I can get my mitts on an Arteon in the Midwest.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

The biggest letdown is the engine. While there’s enough power for merging or passing, acceleration isn’t even close to head-snapping. At least the throttle and transmission are responsive. Still, a little more oomph would be appreciated. While Volkswagen’s new flagship is a pretty well-balanced machine, the experience would be more enjoyable if VW offered a tad more punch.

Inside, the cockpit is par for the VW course – black, functional, and with controls laid out logically and simply. Seats are all day comfy, rear-seat room is adequate for taller folk, and road/wind noise is well filtered.

My test vehicle was a top-trim SEL Premium R-Line with all-wheel drive, meaning it had digital gauges that were clear and easy to read. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard, while nav and Volkwagen’s Car-Net system (remote unlocking, crash alerts, speed alerts, and other tech – it’s similar to OnStar) require you to step up to higher trims.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

Speaking of, here’s how the trim levels break down. You can choose between SE, SEL, and SEL Premium. SE and SEL trims are priced at $35,845 and $39,995, respectively, with each adding $1,800 for all-wheel drive. The AWD-only SEL Premium checks in at $44,945.

Standard features include 18-inch wheels, adaptive damping, dual exhaust, LED headlamps and taillights, heated front seats, leatherette seating, tri-zone climate control, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, satellite radio, and keyless entry and starting.

The SEL trim adds items such as adaptive front lights, panoramic sunroof, stop/start, leather seats, nav, digital gauges, remote start, and the most basic level of Car-Net.

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

Pick SEL Premium and select features include AWD, 19-inch wheels, power trunk, rear-seat climate control, heated steering wheel, paddle shifters, massaging driver’s seat, cooled front seats, heated rear seats, premium audio, a more in-depth version of Car-Net, lane assist, park distance control, and area view.

The available R-Line package includes unique black bumper trim and spoilers, paddle shifters, different interior décor, R-line badging inside and out, a stainless steel kickplate with R-Line logo, a black headliner, and either 19- or 20-inch wheels. With 19s, the price tag is $1,265 for the package, while with the 20s the tab is $1,765. Destination fee is $995 across the board.

All told, the SEL Premium AWD/4Motion car I drove with the R-Line trim and 19-inch tires clocked in at $47,205 with destination. Fuel economy is listed at 22 mpg city/31 mpg highway/25 mpg combined for front-drivers and 20/27/23 for all-wheel drive cars.

Volkswagen has cooked up a perfectly well-rounded sporty large hatchback that really only lacks in one area – acceleration. And even that flaw is relatively minor. As noted before, punch is plentiful for most maneuvers; it’s just not gonna push you back in your seat. Problem is, who is the Arteon buyer?

2019 Volkswagen Arteon

Is it someone looking for luxury on the cheap? Someone who sees the Arteon as a bargain Audi A7? Is it the Maxima buyer who wants just a bit more driving fun? The four-cylinder Stinger intender who still can’t wrap their head around a grand tourer from Kia? The ES 350 buyer who doesn’t find the (quite good) F Sport satisfying? The Avalon buyer who doesn’t want to be stereotyped as someone who eats dinner at 4 p.m.?

Another problem the Arteon faces is that the Honda Accord and Mazda 6 are about the same size and can be had for a lot less money, fully loaded. Sure, VW will position the Arteon as offering more luxury content and having the advantages of being a hatchback – size and price and performance aren’t all that matters – but for the buyer who doesn’t care about a car loaded with content, and just wants a sporty, large-ish car, this poses a problem for Volkswagen.

Still, should you find the content mix appealing, you won’t be disappointed. I don’t know who the Arteon buyer is, but he or she will be getting into a balanced sports/luxury vehicle that offers up plenty of entry-luxury features, particularly if you’re willing to shell out additional funds.

The Arteon wouldn’t be the first car, or even the first Volkswagen, to be a perfectly fine vehicle in search of a market. Building a solid product is one thing; finding the right buyer is another. If VW can do the latter as well as it’s done the former, perhaps the Arteon will be better remembered than what has gone before.

[Images © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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44 Comments on “2019 Volkswagen Arteon First Drive – A Fine Car, but for Whom?...”


  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    Oshawa news: 300 of 2600 jobs saved. Conversion to stamping plant, and vehicle testing.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    This is VW’s Regal Sportback. Good looking, well packaged, roomy, hatch hidden by sedan shaped car.

    Like the Buick Regal Sportback, the Arteon is aspirationally priced to ensure it’s eventual failure.

    To GM’s credit, at least the GS trim of the Sportback has a V6 which helps to differentiate it from the Accord. Arteon needs either the VR6 or the Audi supercharged V6, preferrably the latter. Add the V6, keep 4Motion, and the Arteon can be VW’s quasi A7 on the cheap. Most Audi buyers wouldn’t consider it because of the badge and VW loyalists can keep it as their little secret.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The Regal Sportback starts $10K less than this goofy looking thing. This pricing from VW is pure crack pipe, especially compared to its actual full-size competition.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        …This pricing from VW is pure crack pipe, especially compared to its actual full-size competition…

        Yup. When you go through the checkmarks has some things the Buick LaCrosse didn’t have, doesn’t have some things the LaCrosse did have, and fully loaded you’re to Avenir money, with about 40 less horsepower and worse MPG in AWD trim, and missing a cog.

        Ya, I get it, the LaCrosse isn’t a hatch, neither is the Maxima, ES350, Avalon, all listed as potential competitors (and would have been listed as potential LaCrosse competitors).

        This VW is awful tardy to the big sedan party, and just isn’t going to sell without a big mountain of cash on the hood.

  • avatar

    The interior is seriously underwhelming for that sort of cash. This is one of those cases where they don’t up the ante on the interior much over the base version costing $10,000 less.

    And here’s where I point out that the top trim Arteon is $3,000 away from a GS 350 AWD. The A5 liftback is also $44,000. I don’t think VW knows what they’re after with this model, and I think they’re over-reaching. Typical really for anything they deem as “flagship.”

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Why would I buy one of these over a GS 350 AWD? I wouldn’t.

      • 0 avatar
        Whatnext

        Because it hasn’t been hit with the Lexus ugly stick?

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          The Arteon is plenty ugly. I think VW managed to find a grille that’s somehow more offensively ugly than the Lexus Predator maw. And from every other angle, it’s just boring.

          I walked past one in Seoul a few weeks ago, bored and offended is how I would describe my impression.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “The Arteon is plenty ugly. I think VW managed to find a grille that’s somehow more offensively ugly than the Lexus Predator maw.”

            I wouldn’t buy either one, but I’d expect you’d be in the minority on this opinion.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Agreed on minority opinion.

            I wouldn’t pay the kind of money VW wants, but I think it’s miles more handsome than any *current* Lexus.

            (Except for those ghastly and entirely optional wheels.)

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Count me as one who thinks this is the better looking car, but styling aside, I’m sure the GS is the better car, period.

            I’d sure as hell feel more confident owning the Lexus after the warranty is up, too.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            Fair enough. Lexus sedans have been wearing the look long enough that I don’t notice the Predator much any more (it’s a different story with taller CUVs, where the thing is right in your face).

            The Arteon is unique though, and sticks out. But it doesn’t do either of these things in a good way.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, a *base* A5 Sportback is $44,000; comparably equipped to this Arteon (nav, premium sound, Virtual Cockpit, etc), you’re looking at about $55,000. The Arteon’s going to have a far better warranty, and doesn’t cost an arm and a leg to service, so maybe they’re going after the “I love the Sportback but would rather not drop that much” crowd, which I think is about 664 buyers strong.

      Yeah, I don’t get this car either.

    • 0 avatar
      volks92

      I can see people cross-shopping this with A4/3 series/C-Class and the value is there when you compare to them. It’s a tiny market for this type of car and it’s probably just brought to North Market to increase plant utilization. No point engaging in a price war in a dying segment.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “…stainless steel kickplate with R-Line logo…”

    You mean sill plates, right?

  • avatar
    R Henry

    I am sure the dozen or so buyers will like their Arteons very much.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Yes, there are tens of people who have been waiting for this car. Despite the fact that it’s more attractive than some entries, it’s too expensive and saddled with a lame turbo 4 as the only engine. Why it doesnt offer a 6 cylinder at this price is bewildering.

      • 0 avatar
        MoparRocker74

        V6? Equally lame. VW has offered V8’s before and for these prices FCA will happily sell you either of two 4-doors that actually ARE sporty with enough power to blow the paint off of this. If inoffensive and leisurely are what you want, just buy a cammccord and pocket the savings.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “VW has offered V8’s before”

          The Arteon is a transverse engine vehicle. VW isn’t going to spend money to make a sideways 8-cylinder in 2019, and even if they did I can’t imagine what a pit of despair the maintenance & reliability would be.

          People wanting a V8 would be 100000% happier with the FCA products. On the VW I think they’re better off just cutting $5k off the price.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          And FCA would probably sell quite a few of what Mopar’s talking about, if…

          1) They updated the styling and the interior.
          2) They gave buyers an AWD option on their V-8 models. Winter tires are a hassle that most folks who would drop this kind of money don’t want.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I REALLY WANT A BRAND NEW V8 AWD CHARGER!

            (Sorry I’m gonna go for a walk now.)

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          I just had a 2019 Charger R/T as a rental that I lived with for 292 miles in the Bay Area. It was the premium offering from Nu for $22 a day, my total rental after tax 4 days was $149 – a really good deal.

          For me, the Charger was not “near luxury” premium (to me that would have been the Chrysler 300 parked next to it). The active exhaust was glorious when you stepped on the skinny pedal and a droning horror on I-80 heading east toward Sacramento. The driver seat was heavily bolstered and very comfortable. The passenger seat was a 4 motion manual affair. The car delivered 18-1/2 MPG combined, mostly city – so about on par with the EPA rating and I was very heavy on the skinny pedal. The ride was competent, but again, not near luxury and the car bucked and wobbled on rough pavement at normal highway speeds.

          To me, the Charger R/T answers the question, “what would the Pontiac G8 be in a different universe where Pontiac and Holden lived on, and the VF platform evolved to the VG.

          Bottom line, I don’t see the Charger competiting in this space and I don’t see VW shoppers cross shopping the FCA LX car offerings.

          If I wanted a 5-door, RWD, V8 sedan with a cartoonish hood, loud exhaust, and a very driver oriented cabin that takes some comfort away from the passengers, the Charger would be my first choice. Come to think of it, it is the only choice.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            A Charger with the basic V-8 isn’t going to be all that much quicker than the Arteon, and AWD isn’t an option at any price.

            The uprated versions will cure that problem, but not everyone’s into the look.

            I see the Charger as more of an alternative to something like an up-level Impala, versus a Euro-sedan wannabe.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I guess it depends on what “all that much” translates to for you. I’d expect the Charger R/T to be about .7 faster than the Arteon to 60 and to 1320. That’s enough of a difference for FCA to get my money but not every sedan buyer weighs acceleration as high on the shopping list as I do.

            Generally though I agree that the two cars aren’t going to compete with each other.

          • 0 avatar
            John R

            Uhh…If we take the test car’s price for granted ($44,945) and this is as hot as the Arteon can get a base Scat Pack Charger ($39,995) would walk away from it.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            @John R

            You’re looking at the single metric of 0-60 and 1/4 mile time.

            ES350, Maxima, Avalon, 4-cylinder Stinger, LaCrosse bargain shoppers don’t care about that. You can’t convince me that ES350 buyers care, if Maxima buyers really cared they would know the LaCrosse with the V6 is faster to 60, Avalon buyers sure as Hell don’t care. Anyone buying a used Audi A7 won’t even look at a Charger for snob appeal alone.

          • 0 avatar
            John R

            @APaGttH

            I was responding to FreedMike’s comment, “A Charger with the basic V-8 isn’t going to be all that much quicker than the Arteon,…”

            If we compare on price it isn’t a contest. If we don’t it’s a slaughter – Charger R/T’s start at $35,995.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Nothing says “out of touch” quite as eloquently as large, FWD, 4 cylinders, low pressure turbo, slushbox….. and a name barely distinguishable from the late Senna’s….

  • avatar
    ajla

    It is a pretty car (which is relatively rare these days IMO) and I like that you can get it in metallic mustard colors. I do agree it is a little low on power and high on price though.

    In the past I think this would be a good upsell to Passat intenders, but I don’t know how many of those still exist.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Sales flop underway.

    Ain’t nobody gonna buy this thing.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    It’s an intriguing sedan, I like the sytling, the only adequate power doesn’t bother me.the standard adaptive German tuned suspension is a nice bonus. I can say this for sure, I’d rather have this a Maxima ,GS/avalon. With a 6yr warranty all inclusive, why bother with a 4cyl E class or a6?
    Most VW sans Golf R can be had way under sticker for the top line models. I remember the VR6 CC being a comparative bargain to a6, 535xi back in the day

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Eh, I can’t understand why anyone buys an E-class these days.

      Between the pricing and styling, why?

      (I’ve long been an MB fan. But the only ones I think don’t look like butts and might consider right now are the C and GLC.

      The G is always gonna be the G, but it’s too ludicrous to count.)

  • avatar
    Ermel

    Oh well. It seems to be selling okay at home (7,000 cars in its first full year is low by VW standards, but still nothing to sneer at), so there’s not a big risk in offering it overseas as well. The investment is paid for either way.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I appreciate the effort to create a one-piece-looking DLO chrome surround. There is a tiny overlapped seam at the C pillar post, it’s almost invisible.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Having seen one in person, it is quite an attractive car. Who’s the market? I believe VW said a 53 year old, professional with a university degree. Likely somone whose spouse has a CUV/SUV of some sort, and doesn’t want the flash of an Audi or BMW. Temember when bankers used to buy Buicks so they didn’t look as flashy as Caddy owners?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I don’t really get this car either. Nice looking, though. I wish we’d gotten the European Passat instead of this.

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      Agreed. Most of the same recipe in the Euro Passat Variant (wagon) R-Line would have been more interesting to me.

      https://www.motor1.com/news/307275/vw-passat-r-line-edition/

      I was more excited about the Arteon when there were rumors of a 400hp turbo 6 AWD version and some hopeful pricing in the low to mid 40s. Those rumors obviously didn’t make a ton of sense with the Arteon greatly eclipsing the S4 power wise for way less coin.

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    This is the least desirable new car I’ve seen for as long as I remember. High price, crappy VW reliability and resale, dead or dying segment, crap engine, dour interior, mediocre exterior. I genuinely can not think of a mid- or full-size car I’d be less inclined to purchase than this one. Only way I can see this selling is with absolutely massive discounts.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    “Someone who sees the Arteon as a bargain Audi A7? Is it the Maxima buyer who wants just a bit more driving fun? The four-cylinder Stinger intender who still can’t wrap their head around a grand tourer from Kia? The ES 350 buyer who doesn’t find the (quite good) F Sport satisfying? The Avalon buyer who doesn’t want to be stereotyped as someone who eats dinner at 4 p.m.?”

    Well, there’s five buyers right there!
    I like the car, though were I in the market for a four door I would probably go with a used A7 instead.
    Perhaps this is aimed more at the German domestic market, for whom Audi does not have as much of an upmarket image.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Probably built for me. I’d really like another Audi, but can’t afford one. Then again I can’t really afford this one either. Actually I’d probably get the TLX, AWD V6 for less, more reliable and cheaper to service.

    • 0 avatar
      oldsnwbrdr

      TLX is probably the best value in a premium sedan right now. Saw a gray R-Spec with red interior a couple of days ago that made me do a double-take.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    This is great looking car with two big problems, probably priced about $5k to high at each trim level and down on power by about 50 hp and 20 lb-ft from where people would stop complaining.

    A shame on both counts, wouldnt mind having one of these.

  • avatar
    mtr2car1

    VW builds 2 types of vehicles for the US; VW US (jetta, passat, atlas and current tiguan) and VW Global (golf, touareg, old tiguan and new the Areton).

    I know, I know, some are made on the same platform – but the reality of life, and if you’ve every owned a VW Global vehicle you would know, they are worlds apart.

    The Touareg and Atlas are not even in the same orbit and you would know that if you really spent time in one thru ownership.

    VW is not anything if not consistent; occasionally they offer up these super duper cars, then prices them too high, sells none and then has to discount them heavily to move the metal.

    For them it’s a rounding error, for consumers, you get the global goods at the US goods price – take advantage of it!

    • 0 avatar
      Whatnext

      It does surprise me VW didn’t bring the new Touareg over as their “flagship”. Sure it would be expensive, but so is the Arteon. Incidentally VW Canada only offers the Arteon in one fully loaded trim. The only options are the R-Line package and Driver Assist.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike N.

      VW will sell you a flagship Touareg. It’s called a Porsche Cayenne.

      Also agree on the difference between a US and “global” VW. The global versions are noticeably nicer feeling even when they ostensibly ride on the same platform or are even the same model.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbo1126

      US? The latest Jetta looks far more South American (no offenses intended).

  • avatar
    oldsnwbrdr

    I quite like this car, as a poor man’s A7 and I’m looking forward to driving it, but I’m disappointed with the interior and the need to climb several trim ladders to get essential features such as a decent stereo. And active steering (lane centering) doesn’t appear to be available at any price.

    VW is just following the lead of companies that price their “coupes” at $10K over their sedan counterparts. Despite the handsome styling the car does not present an attractive value proposition.

    • 0 avatar
      Whatnext

      It’s odd VW didn’t bring all the driver assist features that it has in Europe over to North America. Could they be just turned on via an update, like Tesla?

      There’s no question the interior can be dour in the standard Teutonic black, the Dakota Brown or Mistral Gray would make it better, though the seat’s stitch pattern doesn’t look a “premium” as the CC. The massaging driver’s seat was nice though. The Arteon doesn’t need to be a big seller in the USA, it’s offered in Europe and China. That’s why it surprises me VW would go through the trouble of putting the Aisin 8-speed auto for North America in place of the DSG, allegedly for smoother shifting. I wonder if the Aisin used in China as well?

  • avatar
    whynot

    I like the exterior, I wish it had the same interior as the new Touareg though. Interior design does not match price tag.

    Also wish US models had the sequential/dynamic/whatever turn signals

  • avatar
    gasser

    Should do as well as the Phaeton.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Oh, it’s a passat that’s slightly different

    And it’s an automatic-only 2 liter turbo 4-cylinder

    How compelling

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I have a 14′ Lacrosse in the same color. First glance, the cars are very similar in design language, tail pipes are almost identical for example.

    The Lacrosse has a 304 HP V6 and with the AWD is a stout 4140 lbs before I saddle up. I really enjoy my Buick, so don’t get me wrong, but no one has in my household has confused it with being a performance machine. According to what I was able to find online the VW here weighs in at 2130kg which translates to approximately 4686 lbs. So, you have a 500 lb heavier car with 36 less HP what will need a turbo spooled up to make it go. All for the bargain price of, call it, $45k.

    They should sell about 45 of them retail and the rest will be waiting for you at the national or Avis counter.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I think 4686lbs is the GVW, with the curb weight being around 3650. 4600lbs curb weight is Genesis G90 territory.

      The VW should run an ~6 second 0-60 time. Which is class appropriate, but not thrilling either.

  • avatar
    make_light

    At some point I hope to see an honest comparison of this vs Regal Sportback vs Stinger (vs upcoming Legacy Turbo, but that probably won’t happen). I think all of them look great, and one of them preowned will likely replace my A4 in a few years.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    They went too big. This should have split the difference of the Jetta and Passat in size, with the VR6 as an option. That would be worth forty something thousand and justify its existence against similarly priced Audis.

    VW is coming out of the gate with cash on the hood for these so they know they goofed.

    For my money the only interesting VWs are the GTI, R and the rumored SWB Atlas.

    • 0 avatar
      Whatnext

      The Arteon is designed as much for China as the USA. There the owner would have a driver, and wants lots of rear space. Hence the upsizing over the CC.

  • avatar
    John R

    “…and offers up less body roll than the last GT Stinger”

    I don’t know how severe this is but I can’t imagine that this isn’t something a set of better tires can’t fix.

    I’m struggling to find a reason to buy this over a comparably priced Stinger GT or Scat Pack Charger…

  • avatar

    Should be very cheap used, out of lease. I wager new one will be sold with $10K cashback or cheap leases. Like CC did before it.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    A great retirement cruiser when an eye-catching mustard one makes it to the used lot, I suppose.


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