By on April 8, 2019

2018 Toyota Tundra 1794 Edition, Image: Steph Willems/TTAC

What is it with all of this pickup news today? Where are all the new sedans?

Oh right.

Anyway, in a burst of efficiency-minded thinking, Toyota is reportedly developing a single truck platform to replace those found beneath the midsize Tacoma and ancient, full-size Tundra. Sources at the automaker say it’s close to completion, and will make its debut beneath the larger of the two vehicles.

This hot bit of info comes by way of Automotive News, which learned the platform carries the codename “F1.” Toyota has not confirmed or denied the report.

Moving both models (as well as, presumably, the Sequoia SUV, which rides atop a Tundra frame) to a single, versatile platform stands to save the automaker in development costs, while greater parts sharing would streamline the production process. On the unibody side of things, Toyota put a lot of effort into its TNGA architecture, which now underpins an increasing number of cars and crossovers. The sources claim the truck platform would eventually find use in all Toyota truck models, regardless of market.

Earlier this year, what appeared to be a next-gen Tundra (or test mule) appeared in spy photos with a very concealed undercarriage.

2018 Toyota Tundra rear quarter

Despite its relatively consistent U.S. sales volumes (the product of industry-leading loyalty among buyers), the Tundra’s advanced age is apparent to everyone. The current generation first appeared in 2006 as a 2007 model, gaining a significant refresh in 2014. Last year saw sales rise 1.7 percent in the U.S., only to fall 4.6 percent in the first three months of 2019.

AN‘s Toyota sources suggest the new truck platform could be ready next year for use on 2021 models. The Tundra would be first in line; the hot-selling Tacoma, last revamped for 2016, would follow some time later.

[Image: Steph Willems/TTAC, Chris Tonn. TTAC]

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29 Comments on “Report: Toyota Tundra, Tacoma to Share a Platform...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So does this mean they’ll be building a limited edition Tacoma TRD PRO with V8 from it’s big brother Tundra?

    Hey a man can dream.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Let’s not get too excited. It’s just a cost cutting measure, and it didn’t seem to do the Titan/Frontier/Exterra/Armada/etc, any favors.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I’m being a smart a$$

      • 0 avatar

        Well you did get a V8 Pathfinder, which is cool but not the most profitable thing I imagine.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          The V8 Pathfinders seem to have a higher survival rate than the regular ones. My assumption is that they are so “irreplaceable” people take care of them and keep repairing them when they wouldn’t do that to other vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Also the V8 Colorados, V8 Dakotas, V8 4Runners, V8 Durangos, V8 Explorer Sport Tracs, no doubt share the same survival rates. But that should tell automakers something.

            They usually “suffer” minimal penalty at the pump, if at all, since you don’t have to keep the gas pedal constantly buried deep in the carpet fibers just to get out of your own way.

  • avatar
    stuckonthetrain

    The project name “F1” is interesting. “F1” was also the code name for the LS400 development, wasn’t it?

    Is the Frontier/1st-Gen Titan the only precedent for a mid-size and full-size pickup sharing a platform?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    So essentially a 1st gen sized Tundra? I love the interior room of the current Tundra but there’s something to be said for that “perfect” size of the 1st gen Tundra. Plus a 5.7L V8 in that size truck just makes it more perfect.

    • 0 avatar

      Probably not. Like mentioned above I assume the goal is the same Nissan had with the F-Alpha platform which the current Frontier still uses. They can vary the width. F-Alpha was used for first gen Titan, Frontier, NV van, Pathfinder (previous gen), Xterra and QX56. Interestingly that did result in them cramming a V8 in the pathfinder but never the frontier.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      No it’s a modular platform, the sizes of different vehicles on the platform can vary wildly…

      The current Prius, Camry, and Avalon are on the same platform.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Those TGNA platform do not have to have structural integrity drive up trails, pull trailers double their weight, and support AWD.

        This might be the down fall of the legendary, reliable Toyota trucks?

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Big question is, will these new frames still have the Booty flopping “Twerking” ability?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=p1LO6uxy11I&feature=youtu.be

  • avatar
    Fordson

    So if Ford bases the 2020 F150 on the Ranger frame and Chevy bases their next Silverado on the Colorado, that would be OK?

    Just asking…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Based on current development costs they might have no choice.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        Well, let’s see – the top Ranger tow rating is 7,400 lbs. and the top F150 tow rating is 13,200. So, should be good, right?

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It makes (financial) sense, but compromises (Titan/Frontier?) are a given.

          Except a “narrow” and chopped F-150 shaved by just 6 inches on the left and the right, front/back and total height, with payload/towing numbers nearly equal to the F-150’s might be a better solution, if possible, and would put it just about the size of the current Ranger, except F-150 “Crew cab” rear seat legroom (and rear doors) would also need to be chopped.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It makes more sense for a company whose truck sales are lower, and split more evenly across 1)models (Tundra, taco, 4Runner, Sequoia, GX, LX, Prado, LC, HiLux…..) and 2)different markets; than for the big 3 domestics.

      The competition between the Big3 full size makes is so intense, that there’s little room for not microoptimizing the platform solely for them.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      I was thinking the same thing. If Chevy or Ford announced this every comment section would be LOL! But Toyota stuff is over priced when compared to discouting like the domestics and light duty, so it is ok for Toyota to throw a soft ball out there?

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      A frame is not a platform.

      The vehicles will definitely be different sizes, and so will have different frames. The platform has more to do with the body (cab), the engine bay, mounting points, and some common dimensions. But…plenty of vehicles share a platform and not a frame.

      The Silverado 1500 and Silverado 3500 HD share a platform, but have very different frames and are different sizes altogether.

      And, historically, cars that were BOF also displayed this tendency. For GM’s early E-body cars, the Toronado and Eldorado had a partial frame that was a wheelbarrow-like assembly and were FWD. But the Riviera had a cruciform (X) frame and later a full perimeter frame, and was RWD. But they all used the “E-body” platform.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Hilux and Tundra on same platform is a stretch.

  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    Everybody’s talking about the Tundra getting smaller but we all realize that it’s going to go the other way right? Models ALWAYS get bigger.

    Maybe we’re looking at the end of the midsize pickup in the US.

  • avatar
    James Charles

    I wonder if Toyota’s IMV platform will be used? This would make more financial sense than just a US centric option.

    The Hiluxes IMV platform is a strong chassis.


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