By on April 29, 2019

Map from the January 1971 U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Interstate System Route Log & Finder List. "The routes and route numbers shown are those designated as of October 1, 1970."

There are some Q-Ships which are designed to simply eat up the miles. Despite the proliferation of cheap(er) airline tickets, there is definitely a group of people who would rather drive to their cross-country destination than get in a metal sky tube with a hundred other humans. Fair enough.

Your assignment, should you choose to accept it: select a machine for our fictional friend so they can drive themselves from New York to L.A. in comfort. It can be a brand new vehicle, but that stipulation is not a necessity. You’ll see why after the jump.

It’s well known that Jonathan Ward and the team at ICON have crafted some of the finest 4×4 rigs ever to turn a wheel on the face of this planet. In addition to all that awesomeness, they also take on the occasional off-beat build, applying the same level of fastidiousness to it as they do their $222k FJ creations.

Which is why I select this ICON Chevrolet Caprice for our fictional friend, just in case you’ve forgotten the question of the day (it’s okay if you did; today is Monday, after all). Powered by 430 horsepower LS engine, the team left no stone unturned when fitting this car for a life on the highway.

Anyone with even a passing knowledge of 90s GM tat knows the acres of plastic used in the construction of these things, all of which was binned by the ICON team and replaced with finely crafted metals. Even those wheels, which look like stock cop steelies, are actually aluminium and upsized to clear the aftermarket brakes. And that interior? Fantastic. Be sure to click the link below and walk yourself though the picture gallery.

So what’s your unlimited budget pick for a blast across America?

[Images: ICON Reformer]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

133 Comments on “QOTD: Cross Country Cruiser?...”


  • avatar
    millerluke

    Charger SRT – 485hp can get you a great cross-country trip…

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      The charger/challenger are great road trip cars- I’d say a regular RT may be a bit better. Very easy going at cruising speed. Plenty of power. Good balance of compliance and handling.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Road warrior here…can easily rack up 50,000+ miles/year on a car and have done the cross-country trip multiple times in various Hondas, Acuras, and Mazdas.
    I’ve done the trip a couple of different ways, so there’s a couple of different cars to choose from.
    If I need to barnstorm – get from Point A to Point B quickly but comfortably, with few stops for gas and stretching, and has to be able to hold some luggage for the couple of days, I love the look and feel of the new A7 so I’d go that route. If the new one is anything like the A6, it will just eat up the miles, get around 30mpg on the highway, and look stunning in the process, especially with some mandatory detours in the mountains to carve up some roads.
    If I have time, like a week or two to kill, and I’ve done this trip following the old Route 66 where it still exists, it has to be a ragtop. Everyone knows I’m a huge fan of the MX-5, and that would be the car I’d take on this trip. It has the creature comforts to make the trip bearable, enough luggage space for an overnight bag and a backpack (doing laundry along the way is a must), amazing fuel economy, and is just so much fun to barrel down America’s Mother Road. There are still parts of it that exist in the Mountain West, so there will be some fun to be had along that part of 66. And if you swallow your pride and hop on the Interstate that follows the last part of it to Santa Monica, you’ll be rewarded with the Pacific, the PCH, and the warm Southern California sun beating down on you after a long, hard drive. Pack light, live a little, have some fun! That’s what the journey is all about!

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Absolutely. This is where a German sedan shines.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        You’re right – today. But a cross-country trip in an American RWD sedan of 1960s-1980s vintage got the job done very well. I’ve driven from Providence RI to San Diego and reverse several times, the first time in a 1965 Impala (4 round trips), a 1968 Mercury Montego (2 trips), and a 1980 Buick Regal.

        The Impala was cheapest (33 cent gas), the Montego was most comfortable ( AC and a co-pilot to share driving), and the Regal had the best ride (with better AC). While I had no problems, an American RWD V8 was the best bet for economical repair.

      • 0 avatar
        newenthusiast

        Not just the German sedans.

        While my former vehicle, the Q7, was not a great city car at all, it was (by a large margin) the best long distance cruiser I ever had. With the kids and all of our stuff for long weekends or week long trips to national parks, it was quiet and comfortable and was never lacking for power to pass, even while towing. I’m not sure about the newer design, having not been in one, but there’s a 2014 Q7 Prestige in damn near the same color scheme as my old one for sale near me…..tempting…..but I live on an island now…..so…wouldn’t really ever get to do a drive like that.

        To your point about the sedans however, my wife’s former E46 did 2 moves across the country and she said she actually preferred the way the car drove doing that than as a daily driver. I’m not sure anyone other than her would enjoy a cross country drive in her current 1-series though.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      My head sticks just a bit too far up in the countercurrent of return air in a Miata. Froze the back of my ears off at speed. S2000 was perfect for those long trips. Even in the cold, as the tight cockpit warmed up almost instantly.

      911s are great too. The rear seat well lets the aircurrent circulate much deeper than in pure two seater ‘verts, so it doesn’t hit the back of my head the same way. But it’s draftier in cold weather than the S2000 was. And has a windshield raked more backwards over your forehead, so it doesn’t have quite the open speedboat feel of the S2000.

      Older, large cruising ‘verts are even nicer as pure convertibles, as their windshields are almost frameless by today’s standards, and are much more vertical. Yet tall enough to provide a calm air pocket for the front row. But for sporty and ‘verty, the S2000 is still numero uno.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Voted with my wallet, last gen LaCrosse with the 3.6L in top trim with all the option boxes checked. It is a tremendous highway cruiser, enough power, good handling despite the heft, can carry my crap, and gets over 30 MPG on the highway while driving 75 to 80 all day long. Oh, and you are almost invisible on the road in a plain Jane white sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      This is my current car as well. All the options boxes checked – except mine is red ;-). Can confirm it does everything you mentioned. This would be my recommendation if you’re watching your budget.

      Unlimited budget, I would probably get an MB 550 S-Class – with all the boxes checked. Wouldn’t worry about the gas – because if you can afford the car, you should be able to afford the gas

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      I still have yet to drive one of those, but it strikes me as a great realistic choice for this enterprise. An uncle who’s a retired mechanic bought a used second-gen LaCrosse (say, a ’12-ish purchased in ’15-ish) and has had a good experience with it so far. He lives in a small town, and a lot of his driving is 40 to 70 mph on state and county roads, so a big sedan is a great choice.

      Any problems with yours, APaGttH or Blackcloud_9? I’d like to see GM move to dual injection on the 3.6 and a higher roofline for better rear headroom, but that’s a near industry-wide criticism from me.

      – – –

      I’d have to do categories for my answer:

      MONEY NO OBJECT – A Lexus LS or one of the big Germans. I’d actually want to test drive their sibling midsizers, though, since cars in general have gotten so big. I’m not sure there’s much to be gained in moving up from an E-Class to an S-Class, for example. If the trip entailed a lot of lower-speed driving, I’d love one of the pillarless Mercedes. Sunroof open and all windows down is a great way to go in those, but preferably below 45 mph.

      SENTIMENTAL CHOICE – A late teens Pierce-Arrow or 1926 Cadillac. Recreate a road trip my grandmother, her siblings, and her parents would have taken. Grain of salt, as those cars were fantastic for their day but probably would get fatiguing pretty quickly. (Were she still alive, my grandmother probably would suggest her ’78 Caprice Classic as her favorite car from ’10s into the ’90s. Cruise control and good HVAC are a big deal, as well as a closed body.)

      CLASSIC AMERICAN – A ’61-’64 or ’65-’66 DeVille, a ’64-’66 or ’67-’68 Imperial; or a ’61-’65 Lincoln Continental.

      ANY SORT OF STYLISH GRAND TOURER – Must actually be comfortable, though. A Citroen SM might be at the top of the list.

      – – –

      Ultimately, though, I come back to sedans in the LaCrosse category as something I’d pick as the realistic choice. Impala/LaCrosse/XTS, Taurus/MKS, Avalon/ES, or Azera/Cadenza. Probably any of them would be a great highway cruiser. Ditto the RWD Charger/300.

      – – –

      Pending our schedules, I may be copiloting an aunt’s mint 9-3 Aero convertible on a 9-hour drive later this spring. We’ll see how that goes.

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        Featherston,
        Mine is a 2017 Lot Queen sold as new in 2/19. It had 130 miles on it so I got full manufacturer’s warranty. Considering it has every option on it except AWD I’m a little surprised some electrical gremlin hasn’t popped up. But it has been mechanically flawless and I’m driving it a lot – a little over 4k miles in two months of ownership.
        The only thing I’ve noticed is that the center console creaks a bit when the car’s interior gets warm. I attribute this to it sitting in the California sun for close to two years on the lot. I’ll get it checked out when I bring it in for it’s first oil change.
        I really wanted the 17 or later because I thought the previous gen was just bit “blobby” looking for my taste YMMV.
        As for headroom, I’m 6’4″ and have no trouble sitting upright in it and it has the sunroof. Which at my height is a deal breaker in a lot of cars. Headroom is tight for me in the back seat but I suspect anyone 6’1″ or under shouldn’t have a problem.
        Let me know if you want learn anything else. I’m ready to ramble on endlessly about this car.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          I don’t disagree with your “blobby” assessment of the ’10-’16 model, although it doesn’t really bother me. Unless it’s a ’63-’65 Riviera, “inoffensive” is kind of my mental standard for a Buick. What is odd to me is that I like the contemporary XTS and Impala better than the Buick. My expectation would be that the first of the three to debut (the LaCrosse) would have the purest and most attractive styling.

          I’m 5’10” but tend to sit up very straight when I’m vetting cars with the “sit behind myself” test. I’m old enough to have logged a lot of back seat time under formal rooflines, so it bugs me to a nearly irrational degree if my scalp is touching or nearly touching the back window or headliner or if the doorframe or C-pillar is in line with my eye and temple. This is a failure of almost every sedan on the market, so don’t take it as a knock on the LaCrosse in particular. Front seat headroom, as you’d expect, is fine on all of these vehicles for me.

          Interestingly, Cadillac and Chevrolet show some autonomy in this regard. I didn’t love the Impala back seat I sat in at a recent auto show, but the Cadillac was OK. Apparently I was just the right size to benefit from some minor differences in the XTS’s headliner and seat dimensions. I haven’t sat in the rear seat of the ’10-’16 LaCrosse since it debuted, so I’ll withhold a definitive judgement.

          Congrats on scoring a lot queen. I have a couple of friends who’ve had great lot queen ownership experiences.

          • 0 avatar
            Blackcloud_9

            The XTS was on my list of cars when I was shopping. I didn’t find it nearly as engaging to drive. The XTS drove nicely but that was all. I attribute this to the Buick having an 8-speed trans vs. the Caddy’s 6. Also the Buick is about 400 lbs lighter. So, it feels more sprightly – if you can use the term on such big cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Nailed it, but I’d add other road-sofa Buicks like the Park Avenue, the Lucerne, and especially the LeSabre.
      I have an ’04 LeSabre Limited with almost every option. Two years ago, I packed my family of 4 into it and took a 5000-mile jaunt out to the west coast and back. It managed an overall average of 28.5 mpg including a lot of 80-90 mph and tooling around town at our destination. Even my lanky teenagers couldn’t complain about the LeSabre’s rear legroom. The trunk held all of our gear plus extra pillows and blankets and 2 coolers. There were no mechanical issues, despite it being an old car with well over 100k. It blasted across Nebraska cornfields and Nevada deserts with equal aplomb. The A/C kept us cool in 105 degree heat and it even handled Cal 299 from Redding to Eureka pretty well. If you know that road, you know I’m giving the car a supreme compliment.
      All this in a car I paid $3,150 for.
      And if it does break down, any dink town in America big enough to have a dealership row has a GM dealer that knows exactly how to fix it. Try that in an Audi!

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        You’re not wrong about the mechanical aspect, Mike.

        Power steering intermittently failing on a Seville? A small-town GM Chevy-Pontiac-Buick (nowadays just Chevy-Buick) was able to repair it with parts that, ostensibly, were for a Bonneville or LeSabre. And a good, permanent repair.

        Driver’s door mechanism broken on a 5-series? 90-minute-each-way drive to the nearest big city dealer, where they spent the entire day modifying similar but-not-quite-the-same 7-series parts as a replacement. And even getting an “emergency” appointment in the first place took some arguing, as BMW had to be convinced that climbing over the console or Bo-and-Luking it through the driver’s window were not appropriate medium-term options. (To that service dept’s credit, the jury-rigged mechanism worked fine from then on.)

        Audi-BMW-Mercedes is pretty mainstream in much of America, but there still are places where having a Detroit car (or an Asian make, if there’s dealership representation) is an advantage.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I too voted in a similar fashion; 14′ Premium I AWD.

      My only doubt on the car has been the choice of AWD. I do not achieve the 30 mpg on the highway, though I live at altitude and we really do not drive the car in the snow. The suburban does that job.

      Featherston; one of the reasons I opted for the LaCrosse was the rear seat leg room and comfort. I have two teenagers, one of which is 6′ 3” and he can ride in complete comfort in the back.
      For the budget buyer, the pre-owned Lacrosse is hard to beat for a highway hauler.

      For the budget is not option cat, I would think the Lexus LS would be the car to have.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I had no idea there was this much closet B&B love for the LaCrosse.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Would be more interested in a discussion of a cross country road trip in a vehicle at the opposite end of the price spectrum, say $2500 for a used older car. Consider risk of breakdown, roadside repairability and availability of parts, as well as long haul comfort of course. What would you check before the trip? What would you pack in the trunk as far as tools and spare parts? I’ve ridden a 45 year old air cooled barn-find Yamaha twin across the continental US, a car is playing on easy mode :p

    I’m not shooting for the stars, but a few memorable rentals that excelled as highway cruisers:
    2016 VW Passat 1.8TSI SE+tech- 40mpg indicated mpg with adaptive cruise set to 78mph the whole way to K.C, arrived with a quarter tank of gas still left after almost 8 hours of driving. Comfy seats, tracked straight as an arrow in that Germanic way.

    2017 Pacifica Touring L: 29mpg indicated after another 8 hour haul across the Midwest holding an average of 77mph for hours on end. Great ride/handling balance and comfort, plenty of power and even some pleasing sounds from the 3.6L Pentastar when wound out.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      Mercury Grand Marquis or Crown Vic – should be able to find a decent one in that price range. Dependable and parts are cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Good and easy choice, although I find the bench seats and their low positioning which are so fun and quirky on a quick spin around town really start to hurt the legs/back on longer drives.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Swap in a set of buckets from a Town car or P71 since they were designed for 8-12 hour shifts. Though of course seats are one of those things where one size simply does not fit all. Though personally I find the Town Car buckets as used in my Marauder to be quite comfortable for long drives, and have no problems with the P71 buckets either, both of which are much more comfortable for the long haul than the bench seat in what is no my son’s GM.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Thinking on it a bit more: Thunderbird LX with the 4.6L. Superior road holding and ergonomics, but much of the same mechanical stoutness and mostly as simple as the panthers.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          The first two cars I drove cross-country had bench seats. I was young and not bothered much in a ’65 impala, but I found a strap-on seat pad from Pep Boys made a big difference in the Montego. My last trip in a Regal was no problem – Buicks had great seats back in 1980.

        • 0 avatar
          dividebytube

          Yeah now that you mention in, the cloth seats on my 2001 MGM made my thighs fall asleep after a few hours. Not as comfortable as the Buick Roadmaster I drove for a few years.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Yep, my pick as well or a Lincoln Town Car

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        You couldn’t pay me to drive a panther on a trip. As gtem mentioned, the seating position is horrible, also expect about 23 mpg with conservative driving. “That’s not bad for a V-8!” I can hear you saying. It is when that V-8 will be easily outran by most modern V-6 sedans. The handling and sheer size make it a chore to drive anywhere but the open freeway (on my many cross-country trips, I have often chosen to avoid the interstate for more interesting sights and driving experiences).

        Yes, they’re cheap and relatively reliable, but I wouldnt want one.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          The question was if you had a $2500 budget to buy a car to take cross-country, what would you buy? I can’t think of a more comfortable, reliable car to take cross-country then an old panther

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            That’s my point, man, I find them very uncomfortable.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            I’d probably go 3800 H-body GM over panther, a true 30mpg highway is achievable, and you can find one with some kind of bucket seats that somewhat approach modern ergonomics. Older Maxima wouldn’t be bad either, stone-reliable VQ30, and maybe a bit of fun if you happen to find some twisty roads.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        YMMV on them, but I would also go with a Panther on that budget. I once did a trip from Chicago to Marquette (about 6.5 hours) with a CV and I liked it a lot.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      If I didnt have the Taurus already, my budget choice would be a 2002 Honda Accord EX 4 cylinder 5spd, less than 200k, preferably with cloth seats so I can enjoy having the sunroof open without frying on the leather. Make sure the timing belt is good and you are set.

      I might would choose a decent Ford Aerostar if camping or hauling lots of stuff/people were on the table. I’ve driven them across country before, the only thing that annoyed me really was in 1996 and older vans, the transmission wont downshift to maintain speed with the cruise set. In 1997, they finally upgraded to an electric system rather than vacuum, so the issue was solved. In my 1996 XLT, I simply pressed the “O/D OFF” button on the shifter when the speed dipped below 4 or 5 mph that I had it set at. Otherwise, they ride decent, pretty reliable, roomy and can even tow some if that’s on the agenda. Not terrible fuel mileage considering the versatility and capability they provide.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      An even more interesting context/twist: doing a fly and drive to bring back something rust-free from somewhere like California back the the Midwest/Northeast. Would you pack tools and some spares preemptively bought into checked luggage? Do a bit of assessing on the spot and spend an extra day in a bigger city buying a few spares or changing iffy looking belts and such? I’d love to do a trip like this.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Well for me I don’t have to deal with rust so not much advantage of doing a fly and drive to someplace for an older cheap car. Sure for a very very specific car that I want, but not for something in the sub $5k price range.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        I’d have a mechanic check it out before I bought, and have any repairs/maintenance done before driving it back. It would have to be a special model you’re familiar with to go that far for a $2500 +/- car and be willing to drive it back.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I’m thinking something Japanese from the 80s that rusted away long ago around here, or domestic, or German for that matter. For me the risk and unknowns are part of the adventure I guess, an opportunity to test my “on the fly” mechanical aptitude and improvisation skills. I was eyeballing an old W124 400E with 271k miles out in San Diego with a fairly complete service history and a dead power steering rack, sounds like a good candidate to drive across Death Valley eh? :p

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Well, after many hours spent in airplanes, I choose not to fly unless its an emergency. However, I am planning a similar trip, hopefully this summer.

        Rust isnt as much an issue here in the Dirty South, it’s just that cars tend to yet used up. I can count on one hand the number of older Camry, Accords and Tauruses I see regularly. I can occasionally find a decent 90s Honda, but most have terrible paint, trashed interior and more miles than the space shuttle. Add to that the number of fart can mufflers and AutoZone intakes, and it’s quite Frustrating trying to find a nice 5 speed for a reasonable price.

        I’m interested in a 1992-2000 Civic EX coupe, 1992 (no auto-belts)-1997 Accord EX coupe, 1998-2002 Accord EX sedan 5spd, possibly an 88-91 Civic sedan.

        Searching out west yields plenty of examples under $2500. Not so much in California (as prices vary wildly), but Washington, Oregon, Nevada, etc.

        I’m hoping to take the GMC so I can tow something back, but I will take the Taurus if need be simply because I want to go to visit my people aside from car shopping. I’ve toyed with the idea of shipping a car or two back via train. I wouldnt mind an early Accord, first gen Prelude or maybe a Civic, either. I like the first few generations of Accord sedans, and I found a 1983 near Seattle that would be worth looking at.

        Of course, I like Fords too, and I miss having a Tempo. You can still find them up there, but manuals were not nearly as common as they were in Hondas of the era. I wouldn’t mind a first gen Taurus, 91-97 Explorer 4×4, or even the 1995 E4WD Aerostar I found.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      I have done cross-country trips twice in sub-$3000 vehicles. In 1996 in a $2500 SAAB and in 2004 (to Alaska and back) in a $1200 Volvo. Supremely comfortable for this purpose. The Volvo lost the friction material off one of its rear brake pads on top of the Going-to-the-sun road in Montana. Manual transmission made the drive down the mountain possible with some heavy-duty engine braking. And I had to hose accumulated dirt off its radiator when coolant temps started climbing in Idaho. The SAAB was trouble-free the whole way, passing MANY overheated vehicles on I-15 in Nevada in air conditioned comfort.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        If I’m picking a “cheap a$$” vehicle to do a cross country road trip give me a 1992-2005 Bonneville or LeSabre.

        Dad had a 1993 model SE with front bench and 3800. Ate up the miles like nobodies business.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          I have a 2005 LeSabre and you’re right, it’s a great highway cruiser. I already live in So. Cal. and visit relatives in RI/MA around Christmas, and I wouldn’t want to spend five days doing 600 miles/day in it during winter. I almost contemplated it after one unpleasant airport strip-search, but that’s too much driving, at the wrong time of year.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          Agree on the H-body love, PrincipalDan. My parents ditched a very troublesome German car for an ’88 (previous-gen) Bonneville SE. Pontiac had a few years there before the Cladding Era took over when, in the words of one of the contemporary pundits, they were getting more out of the GM parts bin than the other divisions. Our example really hit a sweet spot in terms of price/performance/comfort/reliability. Terrific, terrific highway cruiser and no slouch around town either.

          The LeSabre would be the better used buy: far more likely to be a cream puff owned by a little old lady than the Pontiac would be.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I like the mid-late 90s Bonniville. Even a Grand Prix would do, so long as it had the 3800.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @John

            Ajla will quickly remind you that H > W.

            ;-)

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            I’d take a Grand Prix over most of the H-body choices I think, it would have the best ergos and most competent handling. But finding a non-wrung out one is non-trivial around here. Maybe a Regal LS/GS of the same early 2000s era would be a decent choice too.

        • 0 avatar
          Russycle

          Add me to the H-body with a 3.8 camp. Comfy, quiet, decent MPG, decent handling for a big sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      For a $2500 or less choice, I would think the GM 3800 powered cars (A body?) are the only choice. Parts can be had at any Napa or pick n’ pull and for the most part they are more than durable.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        A good choice? Certainly. Only choice? Hardly.

        Totally an oddball non-collectible pair, but their condition speaks to me:

        sandiego.craigslist.org/esd/cto/d/la-mesa-1992-chrysler-lebaron/6876154060.html

        sandiego.craigslist.org/esd/cto/d/lakeside-1995-chrysler-lebaron-gtc/6875680892.html

  • avatar
    John R

    Either a current gen CTS-V or a Cherokee Trackhawk

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I’ve done a lot of highway driving in a Ford Fusion with the PHEV drivetrain. It’s been a great choice. For strictly highway cruising, you don’t need a big battery, so get the hybrid version in the Titanium trim and the sport seats. Quiet, smooth, and long (5+ hours) legged, it’s all you need.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Unlimited budget? The cushiest but least barf-inducing comfortable long wheel base car. Since full-frame cars aren’t being made anymore – goodbye, air-shock Buick Roadmaster – that means something like a BMW 7-eries or a Mercedes S-Class, or an Audi A8L. Or a Lexus LS.

    Something that can soak up the worst potholes and has the most comfortable seats for my 6’2″ frame.

  • avatar
    Jon

    Unlimited Budget: Yukon Denali or Audi A8
    $5000 Budget: Camry, Accord, something reliable.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Are you kidding? EarthRoamer RV

    https://earthroamer.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/home-1.jpg

    It’s on my ultimate bucket list

  • avatar
    watersketch

    Unfortunately during the period when I had the time and need to drive x-country I did not have the $$ to do it well. Today I would go for a Ford Expedition or a Chevy Tahoe.

    Way back I went x-country with a Geo Prizm and an Volvo wagon with a Uhaul, both of which made passing a nervewracking event.

  • avatar
    incautious

    i second the crown vic. If more comfort is wanted the lincoln town car

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Easy: Alpina B7.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    Nothing German, because a true cross-country trip doesn’t need the hassles of something failing every state or so.

    A Lexus LS of any generation would be great for this task.

  • avatar

    Mid to large German four door sedan

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    First choice, Ford Mustang. It’s America’s grand tourer.

    Practical Choice, Lincoln Mk-T, Because I don’t know the season, or the weather, it allows for long distance comfort, it gets you up out of road spray. and can tow a reasonable trailer if necessary, but is better handling than the Navigator.

    Jon had a similar idea with the Yukon Denali.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Obviously an Autopilot-equipped Tesla, preferably one with free supercharging. Let the car drive you supercharger to supercharger in electric silence. For free.

    I would pick one with cloth seats. That picture of leather seats makes me sweat just by looking at it.

  • avatar

    It probably wouldn’t appeal to our fictional friend, but my dream cross country vehicle right now would be a Sprinter 4X4. I have a side business selling on eBay and at hamfests (ham radio and electronics swap meets) and could haul so much junk, err, inventory in one of those. Plus tow a camper. Or a cargo trailer to hold more junk.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Volvo v90 wagon, plenty of room, and those Volvo seats would be welcomed by my but.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Model X

    https://www.tesla.com/findus?v=2&search=North%20America&bounds=73.64111303439442%2C-3.828125%2C-6.6874796466717115%2C143.828125&filters=supercharger&zoom=3

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’d have to go well maintained German sedan here, top pick a6 TDI , these things are going for less than 25k used barely broken in under 60k miles.
    On a budget GTMs Passat 1.8T or CC 2.0T 6spd manual, both have pretty big fuel tanks (20 gallons iirc).I’d consider an E350 v6 Bluetec but the oil cooler leaks keep me at a distance.
    For me it’s all about range,seat comfort and relative quietness for long trips.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Well there are a lot of depends in this question. How many people is a big factor.

    If it has to be available today and it is just me and my wife then the MKZ Hybrid in my driveway with the optional massaging seats is my choice, as long distance drives, though not necessarily all the way across country, were certainly one of the considerations when choosing it.

    Now if there are say 4 people and it has to be on sale today then I’d have to go with the Navigator.

    Now if we are talking making this trip in the fall or next year then the Aviator would certainly be in the running for 4 or fewer people and maybe the Corsair if it is just 2.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I gave my “cheap a$$” car suggestion above so I’ll stick to new/CPO here.

    I LOVE to drive over flying. Conference in Phoenix (500 miles)? Drive. 800 miles to Disneyland? Drive. Going to see wife’s sister and her family in Nashville? (1300 miles) DRIVE! From there to Columbus OH so my parents can see the grandkids and we can enjoy COSI etc? DRIVE!

    That’s why my next car choice is so important to me. I really enjoyed the Highlander for long drives other than the transmission tended to hunt quite a bit which I think actually HURT fuel economy on long trips.

    The Impala, XTS, and Flex stay in my mind for the ability to gobble up miles. But given the amount of crap that even two kids come with that also makes me look longingly at a TourX.

    If my wife was driving something bigger than a 1st Gen Terrain my choice wouldn’t matter so much but until she’s traded up – Daddy’s car for the family road trips.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I was staying at Ren Center last week and of course took the chance to check out their display. The Tour X is a nice looking wagon, and could make a great vehicle for this use case. However I just don’t know if I would have the guts to get over the long term reliability/cost of ownership concern of something that is both German and GM. As a rental yeah.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I admit it’s an automotive United Nations

        Built in Germany by a French company with “American” badges. Engine 2.0T EcoTec (GM corporate engine used all over the world in many applications), transmission 8-speed Aisin… etc. torque vectoring system that GM is beginning to use more widely.

        The greasy bits of the car are pretty much “parts bin” and not unique.

        But but but WAGON!

        My wagon madness knows no bounds.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      I fly whenever I can instead of driving. Unfortunately, I’m poor, so my airplane only makes 140 knots. It’s a grueling trip to make Albuquerque to Los Angeles in a day. Albuquerque to Nashville, I can’t even make in a day (Memphis at best). In addition, I don’t have IR, so I easily get stuck for weather.

  • avatar
    ajla

    For the overall question I’d go with a new SL550.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    ’76 Eldorado convertible.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      My dad always drove Cadillacs, back in the 70s we would drive out west from Chicago every summer to visit relatives. Those 70s era Cadillacs were an absolute dream to ride in long distance

  • avatar

    One of the V-12 Ferrari 2+2 GTs, starting with the 365 GT 2+2 introduced in 1967 which came stock with A/C, power everything, and a 12.5 cu. ft. trunk. I owned one for 8 years and it was a wonderful long distance cruiser. Later ones include the 365 GT4 2+2, 400 GT, 400i, 412, 456 GT 2+2, 456M GT, and the 612 Scaglietti which is the last one available with a manual trans. There are new automatic-only ones.

  • avatar
    relton

    What could possibly be a better cross country cruiser than a Bentley Continental GT? At least if your party is only 2 people. Fast, comfortable, quiet, and to some degree inconspicuous.

    Having traveled some in the Bentley, it travels better than any car I have experienced in 60 years of driving.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’d also add current Impala V6, 30mpg is my USDM pick- all day space , cavernous trunk, quiet, handles fairly well

  • avatar
    jack4x

    If I’m driving – an Audi S8 for a family trip, or a 911 Turbo for the wife and me.

    If I’m a passenger, I’m putting a good word in for the old school conversion van. Took a lot of family trips across the country in these growing up. Spacious, comfy, and plenty of options for rear seat entertainment.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    Have made the cross-country run a few times… budget pick would be a ’93-’98 Lincoln Mark VIII… quick, comfortable, and quiet… reasonably economical too… when I made the trip back in ’04 driving my ’98 Mark VIII LSC, I averaged 26 mpg running about 80 mph. Second choice would probably be a b-body Buick Roadmaster/Impala SS. These days… I’d still want a cushy ride… something that would soak up all those expansion joints… maybe a Navigator or possibly Tahoe, provided someone else is paying the fuel bill… otherwise a Lincoln Continental or MKZ.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I thought about a Mark VIII after I posted above and had to return to work (break was over so couldn’t go back and amend my statements).

      I tried like HELL to buy a ’93 Mark VIII a week ago. I called the dude and texted so many times. No response. The ad stayed live for a couple days and then was gone on the 23rd (my birthday). I really wanted to buy myself a Lincoln for my birthday lol.

      Truth be told, I’d rather have the post-refresh Mark VIII, but the pre- would certainly do. I still want one, been looking and cant find one that’s decent, not outrageously priced, and that isnt too far away.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        I recently put my 95 Thunderbird LX on CL just to see if anyone had an interest. A couple of people called but no bites.

        I wouldn’t mind replacing it with a Mark VIII but some of the ones out there are too worn, saggy air suspension etc. or too pricey where I can get a later Mustang or 3-series coupe for the same money.

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        I owned both early (Jewel Green) and late (black LSC), after also having a couple Mark VII LSC’s. Wonderful cars, the 7’s almost drive a bit smaller….

        For those worried about the air suspensions, there are “normal spring/shock” kits available pretty cheap. To me they make them sit slightly too high, but that is of course easily remedied.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Everyone in California needs to go look at ICON, way out of my class but they do amazing things and always have very well finished products in spite of the foolish current semi gloss or fake !PATINA! craze ..

    Not many here seem to realize that most don’t have much $ to spend on travel, I don’t so I’d just hop in one of my jalopies, I just spent three dayze traveling Nevada in a 1984 Mercedes W123 Diesel Sports Coupe three up, comfy and reliable, I’m sure my brother’s long wheel base S Klasse
    Mercedes would be better for some but I don’t like big vehicles period .

    Older Panthers or Chevy Impala / Caprice police cars are comfy long distance tourers, not my cuppa tea but I see them in the middle of nowhere all the time, tooling along happily .

    It’s not hard to modify the original seats in your vintage hoopty ride, my 1959 Metropolitan Nash FHC has a stock looking bench seat I can spend hours in despite broken back, neck, knees, arm so on and so forth .

    It rides well too and goes 75 + easily all day /night long, no AC tho’ .

    I’d think a basic shot bed American pickup would be good too .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      @ Nate – I am not a restomod fan at all – too many cars are being lost to Gas Monkey-ization and dopey trends. (“His money, his car, blah blah blah . . . .” Whatever.) That said, Jonathan Ward strikes me as a clear cut or several above the “murder it out and give it the right stance” crowd. I think he took down the video from his YouTube channel, but a few years ago he acquired a Chrysler 300K and was selling it on unmodified. Apparently he’d bought it as a starting point for a client’s project, only to realize he’d lucked into a much better car than he originally thought. Rather than a driver-quality non-letter 300, he’d acquired an outstanding example of a 300K. He said essentially, “This car is way too nice. I’m not modifying it. I’m selling it on to someone who will appreciate a great-quality 300K.” Good for him.

  • avatar
    texan01

    I’d do it in a 95-97 Explorer, preferably with the V8, but the OHV six was adequate. I would put 800 miles in the saddle in a day and not be tired. Even my 77 Chevelle is ok, but the seat needs to be like new, not the tired old broken down one I’ve got now.

    I would NOT do in a 04-14 GM S truck (Canyon/Colorado).

    I second the GM H-bodies, preferably with the buckets, and a stiffer spring on the throttle to make it easier to rest your foot on the gas.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Agreed on all points.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      “I’d do it in a 95-97 Explorer, preferably with the V8, but the OHV six was adequate”
      –I think it was SOHC by then, maybe it was ’96…….

      “I second the GM H-bodies, preferably with the buckets, and a stiffer spring on the throttle to make it easier to rest your foot on the gas.”
      –Pretty sure they all have cruise control.

  • avatar
    Ryan

    New Vehicle Preference for the trip:

    2019 Toyota Land Cruiser
    or
    2019 Subaru Legacy 3.6R Limited (Yes, I am a homer)

    On the cheap:

    2000 Lexus RX 300
    or
    2005 Acura TL

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Maybe an LS, though I haven’t been in a current one.

    Honestly, I’d pick a stacked XC60.

    Because that’s 3,000 miles of sitting on your ass, and the seats matter more than almost anything else, since getting “quiet, smooth, powerful” is *easy* these days.

    (I’m amused at all the people who think they want to sit in a supercar or racecar for 48 road hours in a row (call it four days if you don’t push too hard?)…)

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Had a very relaxing drive, through rain and at night no less, in a rental XC90 I was given last September. Excellent on the highway, abysmal ride on rough urban surface streets, surprisingly so.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    In a perfect world where breakdowns do not exist:
    2001 BMW 750iL

    Not a perfect world but doing ok:
    200 series Land Cruiser

    My current financial status:
    Lexus GS430 F or Kia Stinger GT2

    Hard times:
    2003 Maxima SE in 6MT

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Chrysler 300 SRT-8, or a minivan depending on if there are two or four going.

    A Suburban would work as well.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Yukon XL

    2014-2017 Caprice with Holden OE springs

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    After 1,000 miles, you’ll take anything without a choppy ride. That rules out most anything smaller that a fullsize car. I’ll do up to 20 hours straight in an F-150, only stopping for fuel/food/etc, and come out feeling fresh as a daisy. I won’t go cross country in anything less.

    • 0 avatar
      CannonShot

      The most comfortable road trip vehicle I’ve ever owned was 1998 F-150. The bucket seats in front were perfect. My dad just bought a newer F-150 (’15 or ’16) Lariat trim, crew cab. I was blown away by how nice it is. I’d love driving it cross country.

  • avatar
    Igloo

    Lincoln Aviator. On a budget, then a ’05 or 06 Nissan Altima; parts everywhere!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Best hope it’s not an Altima with a CVT and you have a long steep grade to climb!

      • 0 avatar
        Igloo

        5 speed manual or 4 speed auto, iirc.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Oh wow, I’ve been thinking for years the ’02-’05 Altimas already had CVTs for their automatics, the more you know! Apparently the 4spds aren’t spectacularly reliable either though.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Yes, I do see them often with trans issues, the CVT only made matters worse. I find very little redeeming qualities in most any FWD Nissan of the past 15-20 years.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            15-20? That’s still in prime Maxima territory! Granted they rust quickly and were feeling the cost cutting squeeze more than Honda or Toyota, but still very durable and satisfying cars, properly quick too.

          • 0 avatar
            jh26036

            As dull as it is, my family’s 2000 Altima base trim was at 220k miles or so before the original unopened transmission had real unsafe drivability issues (won’t shift into first). It was shifting pretty sloppy probably for last 30k miles but it always got to where we needed to go in relatively safe manner. I can’t fault a brand new $15k car for lasting 13 years. Even the AC still worked.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Even now, Nissans have sort of a curious “reliability” to them: there’s a good chance the car will run absolutely without fault for about 150k miles and then suddenly the CVT craps out and the car gets sent to the junkyard because a reman CVT+install is $4500 at the dealer. But it served entirely faithfully until that point. That was my sister in law’s experience with her 2010 Rogue that she ran up to 186k miles before sudden and catastrophic CVT failure on the highway. My brother swapped the CVT himself for about $2k in parts and it’s been fine since, up to 210k last I heard (much shorter commute now thankfully).

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            My 2001 Altima was well on it’s way to 300k, and although it had required some repairs, it really wasnt anything unexpected. I plainly told my brother (who owned it before me) that there was little chance of another Altima repeating that record. He ended up with a 2016 Fusion S and is happy with it.

            It seems like Nissan started sliding down hill after that. I would think that aside from some exceptions (Ford PowerShift for example), pretty much any mainstream car is capable of 150-200k service before a major repair is required. Long gone are the days when 100k was considered the end of the car’s useful service life. That being the case, Nissan isnt exceptional in reliability, and IMO, the general build quality and materials are sub-par. Before 100k, the dash is falling apart on my friends Altima (pieces and flakes are coming off, and there is no reason for it). By contrast, my parent’s 2012 Taurus with 120k looks damn-near new inside, with the exception of the chrome trim peeling off the shifter where their rings rub it.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    New: Toyota Avalon
    Used: Lincoln Continental

    Comfy seats, excellent stereos, decent mileage, lots of space

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Money No Object: New Rolls Royce Wraith.

    Budget: Late model BMW 5, 7, or X5 with 3 liter turbo-diesel (35d), comfort seats (best in the business), and adjustable ride control.

    Classic – 1947 Packard Custom Super Clipper with OD.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Budget: 1992-2005 Bonneville SC 3800 or the last Northstar.
    Money to spare: BMW 7 series pre Bangle E38.

  • avatar
    bgfred

    For my money, this is more a function of long-ride seat comfort than anything else… or even everything else combined.

    We have an ’08 SRX with 320hp V8 that I’ll be glad to loan to this “friend”. That engine is VERY satisfying on the open road, but I personally find the seats to be pure torture after an hour or so.

    I rented a car I’d frankly never noticed before for a long trip two years ago, and was so pleased by how my back felt after an 865 mile day on the road that I later hunted down a low mileage used 2016 Buick Verano which I bought for exactly this purpose for myself. Comfy, composed and quiet at (extra-legal) speed, and very immune to attention. Oddly satisfying thing to drive on the highway. Who knew?

    I will never buy a car again without spending at least three hours behind the wheel for this exact reason.

  • avatar
    mr_mike

    My Town and Country eats the miles up. Put a couple movies on for the kids, and just drive. No worries about space either… Only down side is that, at 6 years in, the bug guard on the hood vibrates at high speeds in certain wind… Otherwise, just get in a go, go go…

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Why mess around with lowlife? Those old ’60s Detroit barges had about zero sense of the straight ahead and had steering, even power-assisted, that had two or three inches of slack around center, two-ply rayon tires, drum brakes and top gear with a three speed automatic that let the engine rev high compared to today. The result was constant correction that tired you out and lousy mileage. My main memories of this behavior are from a ’65 Pontiac wobble-mobile and many road trips. The passage of time creates rose-colored remembrances that have about zero basis in fact.

    I’d have me a top Mercedes S-Class for the trip with the smallest wheel, narrowest tire option and let the chattering classes chatter. Given the choice of anything, why mess around with old Buicks? You’re only fooling yourself if you think they compete.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Cost no object? Maybach, baby.

    Having driven out West, there are parts of the West that I would feel rather odd driving in an expensive car. In reality, I would probably go for a Tahoe, Durango, or Explorer, especially if I was going in the winter.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I love a road trip.

    Comfort trumps everything else after a couple of hours. Good seats, enough room to stretch out, quiet, in that order.

    A big gas tank is nice. The 36 gallon tank in my F-150 has spoiled me rotten in that respect.

    Not getting attention is also nice. To all the people who say Panther, I say $3000 POS + out of state tags = roadside interview with another Panther driver. 150 mph German sports car, different process leading to similar outcome.

    You could do a whole lot worse than a Suburban.

    • 0 avatar
      philipwitak

      only done this sort of thing once. and i did it in a german sports-car too, but we never hit 150 mph.

      back in october of 1982, my wife and i moved from port huron, michigan to san diego, california. 2500 miles in all, which i drove in a ’64 porsche 356 c cabriolet. it was an adventure i will always remember.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Why is an older car bought for $3000 a POS? Aren’t you also running “out of state tags” on your F150? What an imbecilic post.

  • avatar
    DarkFuzzy

    This is something I’ve been doing for just over two years now, since getting laid off in 2017. More or less continuously. Crossing the US and Canada from coast to coast, visiting national parks in both countries, meeting people everywhere, and in general enjoying the sights.

    All in my 2013 Ford Taurus SEL. It’s been a great, comfortable, cruiser with more than enough power that has also gotten around 30 mpg (highway) for the approximately 80,000 miles I’ve driven in that time. I’ve had to replace brakes and rotors and tires, and of course oil many times on the journey. But that’s a small price to pay given that I’ve gone from the eastern tip of Cape Breton Island to San Ysidro, and Vancouver to Key West, and all points in between. All of the lower 48 and 8 Canadian provinces. The Taurus has been a real trooper.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Second the Taurus. Drove my parent’s 2012 SEL to 3,000 (each way) cross country trip, it drove great, everyone was comfortable, plenty of room, handles like it’s on rails compared to a Panther, pretty good mileage and the cruise that slows the car down on downgrades was awesome when we ran out of flat lands. Go up the mountain and down the maintain without ever touching a pedal.

      Their Taurus has over 120k now, nary a mechanical issue. One set of tires, one set of rear brake pads, oil/filter regularly and a coolant change are all that’s been done to it.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        The current Taurus is indeed a very smooth and relaxing highway cruiser. Have had several Limiteds as rentals, always happy to get one. My favorite current Ford to knock down miles in? Edge Titanium 2.0T. Right sized, very comfortable to drive 10 hours in, very secure handling and comfy ride, adequate power and MPG from the 2.0T.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Sorry for the grammatical errors lol, that’s what happens when you’re trying to hurry up and get your point down. Haha.

        Gtem, I dont have much experience with Edge, so, good to know it’s up to the task should it come up.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Listed the cheap choices above, so…

    Black Label Continental or Navigator, I suppose it would depend on who’s paying for fuel, lol. Any colors besides black or white. The Conti looks sharp in red.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    My ’96 Thunderbird was a wonderful long-trip car when I was in college back at the turn of the millennium, as long as no one needed to be in the center rear seat straddling the driveshaft tunnel. Reasonably efficient & powerful enough with the 4.6L V8 & overdrive automatic; comfortable ride with the 70-series tires and soft-ish springs; quite big inside for a coupe.

    Though of cars I’ve experienced, my grandpa’s 1993 Sedan de Ville that he had into the 2000’s, and his current 2010-ish DTS were/are better than my Thunderbird was for comfortably racking up the miles. Honorable mention to the 1993 Cadillac STS my folks had.

    If I had to nominate something I have that I’d trust to drive a long way now, it’d be my 2017 Ram 1500. Very quiet inside, nice ride, 40/20/40 bench so my legs can sprawl without a center console to interfere if that’s what I want to do, and with the 32-gallon gas tank I’ve seen the computer estimate a distance-to-empty over 500 miles.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    If limited trunk space and giant grills aren’t a deal breaker, then a 2019 Toyota Avalon hybrid does the trick for cruising all day at 40+ MPG without attracting the attention of pretty much anyone.

  • avatar
    AutoFan

    I’ve done 3 cross country drives in my life. None in an ideal vehicle. 1st was in a Isuzu NPR moving truck hauling my ’92 Sentra SE-R to California. I got it up to 80 going downhill in New Mexico. And slept in the box part one night in a Walmart parking lot.
    The other time was in a ’69 Mercury Montego I’d inherited in ’03-’04. My dad and I drove it from Atlanta to San Diego. It had gone through a mechanical restoration, but we had to change a fouled spark plug in TX along with the fuse for the dash lights. It only had an AM radio, so we hooked up a CD player to some external speakers for entertainment.
    Last one was putting 3 people and luggage into a ’01 Focus ZTS 5pd. That was actually pretty comfortable. Good enough power, great gas mileage, working A/C and radio/CD player.

    But, if I were to choose an old-ish/cheap-ish car, I would go Volvo S80. Most comfortable seats I’ve ever sat in. Or VW Passat. Dream car would probably be Audi S7.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    For comfort a 2005-08 Jaguar Vanden Plas. On the cheap, a Lincoln Mark VIII.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    Hah! I know from personal experience which vehicle not to use for a cross-country trip in either direction – a VW Type 2. Made several trips both ways in the ’70s using I-70, I-74, and I-80 between Ohio and Idaho/points West. West to east – long and droning but could keep up with traffic as the tail wind from the prevailing winds allowed me to keep 70 to 75mph. East to West, miserable with headwinds and rising terrain. I particularly remember climbing into Wyoming from Nebraska using my onboard tool box propped on the accelerator as “cruise control” while in third gear for miles of the climb. Just the memory makes me twitch and swallow my tongue…

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    I want a nice blend of comfort, performance, range, relative anonymity, and ease of repair if necessary, so I’ll go Mustang Ecoboost Premium, 6MT. In the summer, make it a convertible. I want something that can be fixed in just about any town in the good ol’ US of A or Canada, and this fits the bill. I learned about this the hard way when my old SAAB broke down in rural Southern Illinois. No bueno.

    Second choice would be Accord Sport 2.0T with 6MT. Similar virtues as the Mustang, but more practical. Unfortunately, also less fun.

    If it must be used, a 2G Acura TSX is a good choice, especially with the Tech Package for the good stereo. I have a 2010, and it’s the best long-distance road trip car I’ve ever owned. It doesn’t dominate the highway like the old SAAB, but it’s bulletproof, efficient, and comfortable. It has 118k miles, and I wouldn’t hesitate to drive it cross country tomorrow.

  • avatar
    Illan

    ill take my 2013 Chrysler 300c SRT8 . this handsome beast was built just that and have fun


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Illan: ill take my 2013 Chrysler 300c SRT8 . this handsome beast was built just that and have fun
  • Vulpine: @DM: As is quite obvious, cancelling the Ranger made no sense at all; Ford sacrificed customers who, as yet,...
  • blppt: Next time point out to her that the person in the OTHER CAR might not want be a victim in an accident. Nor the...
  • downunder: I wonder if the exhaust gases were vacuumed into the back seat area with the roof off? The turbulence...
  • PandaBear: They can always use it as a subscription service so you pay a royalty for the use, this will likely cover...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States