By on March 17, 2019

While the Trump administration is carefully considering whether or not imported vehicles qualify as a threat to national security, and prepares for trade negotiations with Japan, Toyota is being very careful about how it comes across in America. Last week, the automaker announced plans to add about 600 jobs across the Southern United States — raising its proposed American expansion by another $749 million. In total, the company is expected to expend $13 billion inside the U.S. by 2022.

“In a time when others are scaling back, we believe in the strength of America and we’re excited about the future of mobility in America,” Jim Lentz, CEO of Toyota Motor North America, said of the decision.

Throwing some casual shade at other automakers who are cutting down their domestic workforce is a sound PR strategy but, according to Toyota, its increased investment has nothing to do with global or industrial politics. 

“We’ve been part of the cultural fabric in the U.S. for over 60 years,” Chris Reynolds, Toyota Motor North America’s chief administrative officer for manufacturing and corporate resources, was reported to have said on March 14th by Automotive News. “In a time when others are scaling back, we believe in the strength of America.”

Sounds like Toyota believes in the strength of America… and doesn’t want any of it focused against the business.

CEO Akio Toyoda spoke to Washington on Friday, reportedly claiming discussion of imported vehicles as a security threat makes him “feel sad.” But Toyota has pledged its support of a new trade agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada, and was eager to see productive negotiations begin between Japan and America.

From Automotive News:

Toyota, whose American factory work force has grown to be about half the size of GM’s, could soon find itself forced to invest even more in the U.S. if it wants to avoid tariffs that would raise the prices of some vehicles. Reynolds and CEO Jim Lentz said they are eager to learn whether the Trump administration will indeed declare imported vehicles to be a national security threat and go forward with tariffs, so they can determine whether additional production needs to be shifted.

But they also said the company, which imports about half of its U.S. sales volume, won’t make any knee-jerk decisions either way.

“Our investment cycles go beyond any particular political cycle. We need to make decisions based on what we think the market needs rather than the policy direction of the moment,” Reynolds said. “All of this activity, I hope, shows that we’re a plus factor to the economic national security of the United States.”

Back in 2017, Toyota said it planned on investing $10 billion into its North American operations over five years. Since then, that sum has climbed to $13 billion. Toyota also recently said it would utilize the $749 million to expand facilities and/or add jobs in Huntsville, AL; Buffalo, WV; Jackson, TN; Georgetown, KY; and Troy, MO.

[Image: Toyota]

 

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101 Comments on “Toyota’s Trying to Remain Non-threatening in the U.S....”


  • avatar
    aajax

    So unfortunate to have an anti-consumer, protectionist mindset in the White House, especially when the president is willing to usurp the power of Congress to set taxes. I would like to see much more exposure of this folly coming from automotive journalists, AAA, etc. You are part of the Fourth Estate, too!

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Hey, aajax, take it easy. Yell up the stairs for mom to bring you another hot pocket and a 6-er of Mountain Dew to calm your nerves. A major motor vehicle manufacturer making the decision to invest more funds within the United States will not be the end of your world. Tighten up that jammie drawstring a bit and surf over to catch some cool YouTube vids to lighten up your world. Jeeze…

      • 0 avatar
        jatz

        Bullnuke, I just spit my Beech-Nut into a can instead of a total stranger’s face.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        +1 bullnuke

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Going ad hominem instead of talking about the issues is weak.

        Tariffs are taxes which raises the price of consumer goods and are ultimately paid for by the American households. Republicans used to hate taxes.

        Tarriffs are also an impediment to free trade. Free trade used to be a Republican plank.

        And, yet, you guys go around insulting people instead of talking about the issues.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          So if adding tariffs raises prices, why doesn’t removing tariffs lower costs?

          • 0 avatar
            James Charles

            MBella,
            I hope your comment is an assumption. I don’t know what experience you have encountered regarding import taxes and tariffs.

            I can tell you in Australia in 1991 the price for a Nissan Pulsar was $20 000 (average wage $35k pa). In 2018 it was $22 000 (average wage $85k pa). Even factoring in efficiency gains during production the removal of a 15% import tariff had affect.

            As you can see the vehicle price rose 10% over 27 years and income rose about $250%.

            The tariff removal has had a similar impact across all vehicle types.

            That’s our real life experience.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Removing tariffs does lower costs. That’s one of the reasons why free trade makes both nations better off (in aggregate).

            For instance, all of the steel-using industries in the US (most of US manufacturing) would have lower material costs if Trump repealed his 25% import tax on steel.

            And, yes, the economists told us all this would happen, and accurately predicted the response of our trading partners to the other tariffs.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          ” A major motor vehicle manufacturer making the decision to invest more funds within the United States will not be the end of your world” rather goes to the issue at hand re: Toyota. I find it refreshing that vehicle manufacturers of the current days must readily bend to the current political and legislative winds of governments to maintain their businesses which is probably a good idea to exist as profitable entities. This particular occurrence should not be something upsetting to anyone located in the US – maintaining/creating business in the US at the expense of overseas manufacturing concerns is probably a positive overall. It is a bit disingenuous to hoist the “but – Tariffs!” flag on this to tar those currently in government as it has been used or threatened before regardless of the US political party in power or by other countries that have historically used these protective measures. Thank heavens that the old saw, “What’s good for GM is good for America” Engine Charlie days are long past – we now live in dynamic multi-national times. “anti-consumer, protectionist mindset in the White House” is nothing more than a “spit of the old Beech-Nut” on the folks working for Toyota and its suppliers in the United States.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          “Tariffs are taxes which raises the price of consumer goods and are ultimately paid for by the American households. Republicans used to hate taxes. Tarriffs are also an impediment to free trade. Free trade used to be a Republican plank.”

          Some of us have a longer historic memory. The Republicans used to be protectors of US industry, and pro-tariff. Going back to the days of the nascent American textile and then steel industry competing with the UK in the days of Carnegie. The “Free trade” open borders libertarian ideology within the Republican party is much younger, relatively speaking.

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            The free trade plank and laissez faire tradition is much more recent and therefore more relevant.

            Yes, back in the gilded age before the Trust-Buster era, GOP was more protective of their monopolies, but that was quite remote.

            This is like going on about how Democrats were the party of slavery back in the 1850s and through the Civil War…it’s a popular trope, but irrelevant.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Protecting/subsidizing domestic industry to maintain an advantage globally is now irrelevant? Go ask China how much of a “trope” it is.

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            For the purposes of this discussion, the gilded age Republican Party’s trade and tariff proclivities are irrelevant.

            Which we both know is what I was referring to.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Yeah, and the point I’m making is that tariffs and other protections of ones’ industrial,ag, and tech sectors are as relevant as ever in the modern day. Just claiming “hey Republicans haven’t stood for that in the past” is silly and useless, and as I demonstrated just looking elsewhere in a party’s past can show other precedents.

          • 0 avatar
            stingray65

            gtem – you beat me to it, but of course in the good ole Republican tariff days there was no income tax. I might go for that trade today.

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Who said Trump was a Republican? He’s more of a populist than anything else.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            He did. And his party did, since they now bow in fealty before him, its Never-Trumpers having left the building in disgust.

        • 0 avatar
          Reino

          Often overlooked historical fact: the United States survived and flourished for 133 years on tariffs alone before the income tax became the norm.

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            Yeah, and that ended in 1913, just about the time America became a world power rather than a regional player. Things change.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        If I wanted to read Alex Jones’s nonsense, I’d track down wherever it is he’s spewing it these days. Don’t need it here.

        Christ. can’t even have a disagreement these days without instant character assassination.

  • avatar

    We are into full dysfunctional family now. Don’t make dad angry, he’ll make it rough on all of us….Meanwhile, in the reality world, my Acura is made in Ontario, my VW was hecho en Mexico, and my Mercedes…by Cletus in Alabama. Toyota is just staying out of the cross hairs of the toddler in chief.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      Well said. I’m also reminded of the corporate and institutional pussy-footing to avoid McCarthy’s and HUAC’s radar in the early ’50s.

      Or of knee-jerk kowtowing to identity politics today.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Agree toddler in chief. Gets his jollies in name calling and attaching a dead Senator. Hopefully he is able to work out a trade agreement with China and some of our other trading partners. A tariff war will not benefit anyone. The fact that Toyota is increasing their investment in the US is a positive. While GM and Ford are both closing plants and laying off workers Toyota and FCA are both expanding their plant capacity in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      McStain was a POS, he deserves to burn in Hell for what he did in Vietnam and for his last moments in government trying to usurp the will of the people. Trump promoting businesses to invest and employ Americans really rustles a lot of jimmies.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Agreed. McCain was a dkhead.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Perhaps you guys could tell us your technique for withstanding torture for several years without “talking.” What’s your secret?

        Someone who spent his Vietnam years trying to score cheerleaders has zero business giving crap to ANYONE who actually fought there.

        • 0 avatar
          Sceptic

          Being a war hero is no impediment to being a jerk.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Lots of people who fight in wars are asholes. Fighting in a war does not give you immunity from criticism for the rest of your life. John McCain was a child of privilege who gravy-trained off of his old man to get into the academy and then performed horribly and was rescued again by his daddy’s coattails.

          McCain fought honorably in Vietnam and then went to Washington and was a prickly, two-faced diva.

          I love it when lefties pretend to love warriors, instead of spitting on them. Leftists worship McCain not because he fought in a war, but because he was a good republican presidential nominee LOSER, supported illegal immigration, voted against the repeal of socialist medicine and, most importantly, because McCain really hated Trump.

          RIP, McCain. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Funny, the only person spitting on warriors these days is Trump. I guess he’s a leftie now. Be sure to oppose him.

          • 0 avatar
            redapple

            thelaine:

            Agreed. McCain ‘s vietnam duty gets all respect. But under real study those were his only truly honorable days.

            Before that? Got into Navy because of daddy. Finished nearly in last.

            After that? He was a master RINO. Taught Paul Ryan how to be a better RINO. Give the communist democrats what they want and lose gracefully. Blamed Palin for losing against Borat Osama.

            McCain really got his jollies in his end days by sticking the screwdriver in Trumps bicycle spokes.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            TDS warps the brain.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Funny how TDS doesn’t make any difference between his rabid opponents and his rabid boosters.

            Physician, heal thyself.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            So says the guy who worshiped Obama for 8 years. Pot, meet kettle.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        19% of the people in this country voted for Donald Trump. Why do you all of a sudden think it’s ok for such a small minority to push its will onto all of us?

        (The good thing about hypocrites like you is you don’t take long to show your true colors)

        • 0 avatar
          Sceptic

          Because.. Constitution? Trump got 57% of eligible votes. Deal with it. The United States is ruled by law, not by “democratic” mobs. It is a republic you know. Something many Canadians do not understand.

      • 0 avatar
        vehic1

        Hummer: It’s #FakeBoneSpurs who is the #Stain and #Imbecile, and beloved of only the 40% – which is why he’ll easily be retired next year, tariffs or not.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    So if I understand you someone who served their country and was a POW who could have gotten released sooner because of who his father was but did not is someone who deserves to burn in Hell? McCain did not use the excuse of a bone spur to get out of serving in Vietnam. Nothing wrong with promoting investments in the US but slapping tariffs on all imported steel and aluminum regardless of country is good way to start a trade war. I don’t disagree with everything our President does but I don’t worship him as some do and I don’t think too much of anyone who speaks ill of the dead.

    • 0 avatar

      Really. #45 was pulling his pud in Queens while McCain was legit a POW…I don’t love McCain but grew up in NY seeing #45 as the filler the public access shows used when they couldn’t get a guest…..he’s not fit to be prez, and that’s not an idealogical stance…I’d disagree with a Rubio, or Bush Jeb ! prez, but I’d think them competent for the job.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Ironically, McCain was G.I. F*cking Joe to the so-called “right” when they ran him for president back in the day. Then he decided to – gasp! – speak out against a guy who spent his Vietnam years diddling cheerleaders. Hero no more, I guess.

        Forgive them, they know not what they do.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          McCain has instability and the deaths of many thousands on his hands, spanning continents. His voting record on domestic policies and POW years and everything else fall by the wayside for me. The guy was an unrepentant war-monger to the very end. Good riddance.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Those are valid criticisms. But Trump was questioning the guy’s war service, and that’s out of line, particularly for a guy who b*tched out on Vietnam himself.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      Agreed, Jeff/Speed/Freed.

  • avatar

    Really. #45 was pulling his pud in Queens while McCain was legit a POW…I don’t love McCain but grew up in NY seeing #45 as the filler the public access shows used when they couldn’t get a guest…..he’s not fit to be prez, and that’s not an idealogical stance…I’d disagree with a Rubio, or Bush Jeb ! prez, but I’d think them competent for the job.

    • 0 avatar
      James Charles

      Speedlaw,
      Thank you for your comment.

      You’ll find many who hold the views of the likes of thelame, bummer, etc have little respect of those who defended democracy. After reading this site for 6 weeks you can pick these selfish and insecure who most likely never served like the US president leet alone confronted conflict.

      It doesn’t matter what side of politics you are on, if you become a POW whilst defending the ideals based on freedom you not only deserve but you have earnt respect.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        BAFO, that is hilarious.

        Blowhard, is a rural locality 17.7 km (10.99827 statute miles) from Ballarat, in South Western Victoria, Australia. It is located between Creswick and Learmonth. Blowhard was once a prominent mining area.[2]

        The name blowhard is a term commonly used to describe a pompous person.

        Mt Blowhard Primary School was erected by the Education Department in 1878 and is still operating as a primary school. [3]

        At the 2016 census, Blowhard had a population of 84.[1]

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          What in god’s name are you yammering on about?

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Sorry you did not get the reference, but attempting to remedy your ignorance is not worth the effort.

          • 0 avatar
            James Charles

            Fordson,
            thelane and that other guy DenverMike appear to be the sites troll.

            Disturbing they are. Sooner or later the moderators will need to moderate them.

            But, In the mean time you’ll just have to consider them comics or clowns.

          • 0 avatar
            James Charles

            Fordson,
            thelane and that other guy DenverMike appear to be the sites troll.

            Disturbing they are. Sooner or later the moderators will need to moderate them.

            But, In the mean time you’ll just have to consider them comics or clowns.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Agree with you speedlaw. I respect McCain and that is not to say I agreed with everything he did. I don’t respect anyone that reverts to name calling and bullying. I don’t have to agree with someone to respect them but I do want a President that is respectful of the office and behaves like a Commander-in-Chief instead of a TV reality star. Pertaining to the subject at hand I just hope our President lets his own people negotiate the trade deals because I believe they are more competent. They need to hide his smartphone while they are negotiating.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      McCain was one of the last respectable Republicans.

      I’d like to see more respectable Republicans. There’s a healthy debate to be had between Americans who come from different backgrounds and have different interests.

      But, instead, we get childish Twitter insults from Trump, and while whole party falls all over themselves to be more like him. It’s longer shocking that our president has less dignity and a poorer grasp of American history than my 3rd grader — but could the rest of the Republican party please stand up and act like adults?

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “Respectable” in that he never saw a war he didn’t like? The man was a sociopath: “Bomb, Bomb, Bomb Iran!” In lockstep with the Hillary “We came, we saw, he died!” about Libya. This is the problem with American mainstream politics and casual observers:
        “well at least he acted respectably.” *supports arming violent jihadists*
        “Well he never said anything racist” *thousands of brown people die overseas after we destabilize their country, literal slave markets operating in Libya*

        The weirdest thing is the neo-liberal adulation of McCain, Bush Jr, and other warmongering losers like Max Boot (now a HuffPost contributor) in the era of Trump. What happened to being the anti-war party?

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Ha. Obama called his opponents “teabaggers” and went on TV shows to sing and dance. Dignity and respect? Please. The leftist press was on its knees to him and despises DJT. A president who behaves like a commander in chief? You mean like getting hummers in the oval office from an intern like Slick Willie and JFK did? Give me a break. Total double standards.

      Lefties LOVE loser doormat reptiles like McCain. Trump actually fights back and calls them all out on their lies, double-standards and bs. It’s about time. The left hates him because he keeps winning. Simple as that. If he lost, like loser McCain, he would be getting his hair rubbed on Jimmy Fallon’s show and everyone would think he was a good fellow.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        You’re seriously comparing the dignity and comportment of Obama with that of Trump?

        Little early to be drunk, no?

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          You owe me a new keyboard.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Great article on the importance of presidential dignity.

          https://amgreatness.com/2019/03/17/when-presidential-character-once-mattered/

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          It only matters when you are losing. When you are winning, you ignore it, rationalize it and down play it. It is just another talking point in the ideological war, and means nothing.

          It was all just “personal conduct” when Clinton was getting blown by an intern in the oval office.

          Publicly and repeatedly calling someone a testicle-sucker is all in good fun when your personal savior is saying it. Not undignified at all.

          Luckily, people don’t really care about this issue; they just want power for their side and will make whatever argument they think will work.

          This “dignity” meme is a joke. McCain the doormat had plenty of it. He can take it with him. With all of his faults, Trump fights. After wet noodles like McCain, that is sufficient.

  • avatar
    James Charles

    This highlights the dysfunction in the mismanagement of the US.

    Again this illustrates that the Big 3 are not compeetitive, not just globally, but in their own market.

    The US needs to phase in UNECE regulations, reduce the protective tariff on trucks and commercials.

    Toyota is proving they can operate in most any market and profit.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      +1, that would be to the long term benefit of everyone (Americans and RoW).

      The problem is that the gains of free trade are not distributed evenly through American society, and we have no social safety net. So those who are left behind by a changing business environment or by technological progress are truly and completely boned.

      • 0 avatar
        jatz

        “So those who are left behind by a changing business environment… are truly and completely boned.”

        Not keeping bones inside pants plays a crucial yet unacknowledged role in our ironclad poverty cycle.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “Not keeping bones inside pants plays a crucial yet unacknowledged role in our ironclad poverty cycle.”

          yet your ilk always somehow blame women for that…

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            Not me, Mr. Snarky Engineering Person!

            I supported two wives through completed PhD programs and never got either pregnant!

            Now, don’t you feel abashed?

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @jatz – “I’m not getting married anymore, every couple of years I’m just gonna find a woman I hate and buy her a house.” Author Unknown

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            I seriously know a guy like that. He likes Escalades.

            I try to get him to take his heart meds but he don’t listen.

  • avatar
    James Charles

    This highlights the dysfunction in the mismanagement of the Big 3

    Again this illustrates that the Big 3 are not competitive, not just globally, but in their own market.

    The US needs to phase in UNECE regulations, reduce the protective tariff on trucks and commercials.

    Toyota is proving they can operate in most any market and profit. Its good to see money invested by Toyota. But I wonder how much is lost by extreme right economic ideals.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    @BAFO – There’s a “protective tariff” on trucks and commercials?? Can you please expand on this???

    I’m perplexed… But I guess it’s a little different if an OEM setting up US assembly plants isn’t “union”, and of course it’s not just about wages and pay scales.

    Actually it’s the *lack* of US tariffs/regulatory barriers that the Big 3 lost so much of their dominance of the US market to imports.

    If a global OEM isn’t for sale in the US, they must be crappy cars. I’m sure you’ve heard of “Lemon Laws”. There’s no other reason, and US consumers are free to buy whatever imports make them happy, tiny engine, tiny car (Smart), to fullsize and gas guzzler (Chevy/Holden SS). All are welcome imports just the same.

    No other meaningful large market has such easy terms for potential imports. Obviously a win for US consumers, paying the least for cars, pound for pound, and the most reliable, thanks to that same competitive nature.

    • 0 avatar
      smartascii

      1) There is a so-called chicken tax on imported trucks and some vans. It’s 25%. It was imposed in retaliation for a European tax on chickens, which is where the name comes from. And, yes, trucks manufactured in the US by foreign companies are exempt.
      2) The big three lost market share to imports because the imports were what people wanted to buy.
      3) It’s very expensive to import cars here if they were designed for other parts of the world, because we have an extensive set of regulations which materially differ from other places, meaning that a car has to be engineered from the ground up for sale here. We definitely do not have “easy terms for potential imports,” which is why we can’t have nice things.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Thank’s, I just thought it’d be nice to hear “Chicken tax” from BAFO, for old times sake. Inside joke.
        But since you bring it up, what are the “nice things” we can’t have? It’s not like we don’t have the biggest selection from the most segments of any large meaningful market on Earth.

        I guess you can’t please everyone though.

        US regs differ from a lot of the world, it’s true, but not by much, and it’s never intentional, or underhanded. Compliance is “trust” based, instead of “document” or proof based, as with most other markets, especially Europe, but also Japan. Both markets have the same interchangeable regs, and those two have greater influence on most other markets.

        That’s how VW (TDI) scammed the EPA so stinkin’ easy.

        Actually it’s comical how Euro regs zig everywhere US regs “zag”. It’s clearly blatant protectionism. And obviously US regs came first, Europe just put their own unique, incompatible stink on them.

        Just name another large market that accepts right-hand-drive and LHD, amber or red turn signals… (that’s what I THOUGHT). Those aren’t a big deal, but neither are actual differences in regulations. And they’re just trivial compared to huge outrageous tariffs, or basically blocking (through taxes) autos with medium to bigger engines.

        Trump hasn’t set out to block imports (to the US), limit our choices, etc, but simply to give US built autos a “fair shake” around the world (perhaps a fighting chance), especially in Europe and China, including but not limited to “USA built” Toyotas, Hondas, Nissans, Hyundais, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        James Charles

        smartascii,
        You are correct.

        The US has different vehicle design regulations to everyone on the planet. The US vehicle market is only 15% of the market. A relatively insignificant share with little to no influence. This influence is further eroded by protective tariffs and regulations promoting the production of large vehicles that at best are niche products.

        Sooner or later the US will need to conform to what the market is doing and adapt. This will free up the Big 3 to produce vehicles that are wanted by others around the world.

        Toyota, other Asian manufacturers realised this in 1952 when the UNCEE vehicle harmonisation regulations began life. They had to do this to facilitate trade. It obviously works. This is proven within the US with Toyota, and others. I find it entertaining that BMW and Mercedes Benz are by far the most successful vehicle exporters in the US.

        The Big 3 are 100% reliant on fhe protection and trade barriers on pickups and the flow on savings with the SUV pickup truck station wagons. Without these the Big 3 are doomed.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAFO – Thanks, 15% of the worlds auto market lacks the influence of UNECE, and obviously most of the world’s automakers are going fall into UNECE regs by default. No brainer.

          Early (1950’s) UNECE didn’t deal with emissions or crash standards, the US pioneered those. Btw, UNECE didn’t even require Catalytic Converters until 1993 passenger cars.

          UNECE only dealt with standardizing car lighting, voltage, tires, belts, hoses, fluids, etc. Its just plain common sense, avoiding a complicated mess sourcing aftermarket replacement parts. US automakers somehow figured this out on their own.

          Whatever the regs, US consumers are 100% free to favor purchase of Toyota, Nissan, Honda, BMW, Hyundai etc, when it comes to medium and bigger vehicles (no different than smaller vehicles). These offshore based brands are “protected” no more, no less than the Big 3.

          US regs don’t differentiate and obviously “protect” Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Hyundai, BMW, etc, just the same, if you want to call it that.

          It’s the same with the Chicken tax. There absolutely no reason non-Big 3 (offshore based OEM) pickups and vans shouldn’t outsell Big 3 pickups/vans.

          SUVs are Chicken tax “exempt”, same as always. You forget same as always.

          Clearly some consumer preferences can’t be explained by “regs” or other BS excuses that you can’t backup with facts, or even common sense.

          But no doubt you wouldn’t be BAFO if you made any kind of sense.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    No worries. I really can’t think of anything that’s less threatening than Toyota’s product line!

  • avatar
    stuki

    Compared to the developed world, the US and Thailand offers cheap labor.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Hah! I worked for a Deutscher aktiengesellschaft that is an OEM supplier to several manufacturers in the US as well as world-wide. To the Unternehmensleiter, we gringos were considered to be their Mexicans – work long hours for cheap wages.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “We” have no choice. In the US, the capital required in order for workers to operate at German/Japanese levels of productivity, has been debased away since Nixon went full retard. In order to pay for “asset” appreciation for idle and incompetent well connecteds.

        Toyota, like other Japanese giants, seeing the writing on the wall wrt Japanese (lack of) fertility, have spent the past 2-3 decades focusing on developing production processes which don’t require a workforce and tooling of the caliber, and hence cost, of the Japanese one. Such that their cars can now be produced, to a crazy high quality standard, in Mexico, the US, Thailand, and other such places.

        This focus can, at first glance, make it look like they have “fallen behind” the Germans. But the difference is, German manufacturing processes aren’t exportable. They require German workers, German tooling, German supply chains etc. What they can outsource, is just routine assembly. Compared to Toyota, too many processes are too complicated to be performed by American, Mexican and Thai work and supplier forces. Leaving Germany no choice but to import, and hope to shape, future Germans. To the tune of millions, now that German fertility too, has tumbled to near Japanese levels.

  • avatar
    GM JUNK

    Tariffs? Not really a big deal.

    (edited for content)

    -TTAC Mods-

    • 0 avatar
      James Charles

      WTF?

      What country. NZ just had some right wing nationalist kill kids.

      US guns kills many kids.

      Many African nations are very poor with high infant mortality.

      The US has a high infant mortality rate, the worse among advanced nations.

      Why don’t you donate money to the Bill Gates foundation or other worthy causes to reduce infant mortality.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        People like him don’t actually care about children. It’s about control.

        Like Carlin said, “if you’re ‘pre-born,’ you’re fine. If you’re preschool, you’re f***ed!’”

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Calling Brenton Tarrant right wing is a lie. He was deeply disaffected with the right and the left. The people he murdered were the least progressive on earth. Why aren’t they the ones considered right wing extremists? Is it because the real enemies of the Marxists who move your lips are Christians?

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          +1 Todd Atlas

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          Um, probably because the people he murdered were in a mosque worshiping – they weren’t killing anyone or doing anything extreme – ?

          So basically he considered those people an acceptable stand-in for people whose actual activities he abhorred, for the purpose of making his statement. Just as you are.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            That moron gave the jihad abetters the best gift for which they could ever hope.

            Mosques around the globe rejoiced once the news teams drove away.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            “Um, probably because the people he murdered were in a mosque worshiping – they weren’t killing anyone or doing anything extreme – ?”

            As opposed to true right wing extremists like Tucker Carlson? Where did they stand on gay rights? On subjugating women? Give me a break. I understand how the Frankfurt School created people like you. I just don’t understand how you can function at all while being so completely irrational.

            Forty Christians were murdered in Nigeria in the same time frame as this mass murder. It wasn’t newsworthy though, because the Frankfurt School is all about removing the influence of Christianity and it would just ‘reinforce stereotypes’ to tell the truth.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            There are some incredibly WEIRD things going on with the NZ shooter. The guy traveled to Turkey several times around the time of the attempted coup against Erdogan, he also traveled to and hung out with a pretty radical offshoot Shia sect in Pakistan in 2017. I’ve seen a few claims floating around now (need further confirmation) that the mosque he shot up in turn is associated with a few radicalized New Zealanders who got blown up in Syria. The rabbit hole goes deep on this one.

          • 0 avatar
            James Charles

            gtem,
            Can you post links to substantiate your claims. Are they from some Russian misinformation site promoting right wing nationalist ideals? You know, to further disaffect Western democracy.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Here you go, Big-Brain BAFO:

            https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/16/asia/new-zealand-suspect-brenton-tarrant-about-intl/index.html
            “”Tarrant had traveled to Turkey multiple times and “spent an extended period of time in the country,” a senior Turkish official told CNN on Saturday.”

            “Tarrant is also believed to have spent time in northern Pakistan. Speaking to CNN on Saturday, the owner of the Osho Thang Hotel in Nagar, in Pakistan’s northernmost Gilgit-Baltistan region, said Tarrant had visited his hotel in October 2018. The hotel owner, who did not want to be named for security reasons, described Tarrant as a “regular tourist.””

            https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-03/family-demands-answers-on-australian-death-in-yemen-drone-strike/5497908

            “The dual Australian-New Zealand national who died alongside Havard in the strike was Daryl Jones, aka Muslim bin John, another Muslim convert who Havard met in Christchurch.”

            Anything else you need to have spoon-fed to you?

          • 0 avatar
            James Charles

            Who and what is a BAFO.

            Is this a right wing nationalist (in house) joke?

            It seems the right wing nationalists use BAFO as a term.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            Big Al FrOm australia,

            Please stop being a manic scourge here.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “right wing nationalist ”

            You keep using this term, is this supposed to insult me for some reason? It doesn’t.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Who and what is a BAFO.”

            you are not fooling anybody.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            You are fooling no one, BAFO

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      I’m sick for a couple days and I get to come back to abortion talk?

      Yeah….we aren’t going to do that here.

  • avatar

    Toyota is being a good corporate citizen. I have noticed the Camry has far more US content that comparable GM cars. Why can’t GM and Ford love America like Toyota does.

    • 0 avatar
      Hydromatic

      Toyota doesn’t love America — it loves money. In this case, the continued pursuit of making money requires showing some love to the tangerine-in-chief. Nothing more, nothing less.

  • avatar
    jatz

    Trump has been the Laetrile for working class Boomers dying of old age, aggressive socialism and 3rd World vengeance.

    Most of his core supporters now know he’s a flash in the pan who merely appropriated their very real and politically unrepresented grievances in order to fulfill his ego trip to the Presidency.

    But that’s the nature of terminal pain; it can blind desperate people enough to briefly believe that a lazy, rich-kid bully become billionaire shyster could ever truly care about the social class he’s made a career of stiffing.

  • avatar
    RS

    It was tariffs that got foreign automakers to build plants in the US in the 80’s. Harley got a tariff. The current (2015?) tire tariff expires next year, I think.

    IMO, tariffs are generally bad, but one sided tariffs that take advantage of the US are worse. It’s insane to bash Trump for trying to even the playing field. All previous administrations did the same.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The offshore brands, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, etc, didn’t build US assembly plants because of tariffs. What caused it was a temporary embargo on imported Japanese autos to the US. That was early ’80s, and they called it the Voluntary Import Reduction or something to the effect.

      Today offshore brands simply assemble cars in the US since it makes sense in many ways. Favorable low (non-union) wages, build/sell on location, currency exchange rates, etc, make it completely worthwhile.

      German automakers were not part of the VIR or any embargo, but they find it favorable building cars in the US and even shipping back, yes importing “German” autos to Germany. It’s that favorable and they still pay very high tariffs up on entering Europe… That really says it all.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t really care where the manufacturer is based. I would rather have a Japanese or South Korean based manufacturer that employs Americans than an allegedly American based manufacturer that manufactures in China. Do you honestly believe that Barra or the credenza guy care anymore about the American worker than a Japanese manufacturer?

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