By on March 1, 2019

It already does, in a sense, but you’re only punished for exceeding a posted speed limit if the long arm of the law catches you in the act.

Flashing lights in the rear-view or a photo radar ticket in the mailbox can ruin our day, but the relative absence of cops and cameras on most roadways means most of us can still “make good time” on our journeys. However, with pedestrian fatalities on the rise (and governments across the country looking for easy fixes), some lawmakers might find inspiration from Europe.

Just the other day, Ronnie told us of the decision by European Parliament to mandate speed limiters on all cars. Are you willing to drive Miss Daisy, all the time, to help your fellow man?

Depending on how negotiations shake out, within three years European drivers could find the government sitting rigidly in the passenger seat, berating their every move.

From Ronnie’s piece:

The speed limiters, which go by the euphemism Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA), use GPS data and possibly traffic sign recognition to determine a road’s speed limit and then limit engine power to match that speed. While it’s possible to just press harder on the accelerator and go faster, if the car exceeds the speed limit for several seconds, an audible warning signal will sound, along with a visual warning displayed until speed is reduced to the legal limit.

Ever driven that first block without your seatbelt on? Those warnings get annoying in a hurry. It’s possible that some crafty European drivers will find a way to disable the warning, but what if that becomes another offense? What if law enforcement, your local government, and your insurance provider are made aware of speed violations and speed limiter tampering as a way of enforcing proper use? It’s not too wild a thought.

In the pursuit of safety (still a worthwhile goal, don’t get us wrong), many advocates are willing to tout dystopian solutions, and many lawmakers are just as willing to sign on. In Europe, especially. It’s no wonder Black Mirror is a UK program — just look how the country responded to Ford’s Mustang ads.

Here in North America, countless cities have already lowered default speed limits, only to entertain calls for further lowerings. 25 mph, then 20 mph … then what? The heat will soon be on to find a better solution, and the focus of advocates and lawmakers could fall on the vehicle itself.

Is this European experiment a future you’re willing to accept, or is it a step too far?

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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86 Comments on “QOTD: Are You Willing to Let the Government Ride Shotgun?...”


  • avatar
    IBx1

    Never.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      How dare the government regulate how people drive on government owned roads. That is almost as bad as the government trying to get involved in people’s Medicare. And yet the same people are fine with government thugs breaking into people’s houses with no-knock warrants and putting them in jail for decades for what they possess in their private homes.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I would not support any politician that wanted to pass mandated speed limiters. I’m pretty squishy on most political issues but on car stuff I have some “red lines”.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    The European Parliament? You don’t say.

    I’m sure there are Brits biting their tongues about this news while smiling about Brexit.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      It will be like the Catholics vs. the Anglicans in Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life. Just like the Anglican could use birth control with his wife, but does not because he is Anglican and does not have sex, the inbred chavs that supported Brexit could have a car without a speed limiter, but won’t be able to afford a car because of Brexit.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Never. But my children will.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Yes, your children will, and you with it. I can’t wait to see the whining in 10 years when people realize their hands-off approach to promoting conservative values had big consequences. Enjoy the bus, your new diverse urban neighbourhood, and soy beef substitutes!

  • avatar
    eCurmudgeon

    The end goal is pedestrianism and public transit.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Call me when Trump starts taking the bus, or walking, from the White House to Mar-a-Lago… Or when President Bernie does the same…Or AOC. Or, even the local donut grazers.

      The goal always was, always is, always will be; none other than “you equal, Me more equal.”

      No different from gun control. It’s not about “Me less guns.” Just “you less guns. Me more guns. you equal. Me more equal.”

      Anything else, is just obfuscation.

  • avatar
    Sloomis

    This is America. We let Big Business run our lives, not Big Government. You can bet sooner or later we’ll have the exact same thing here at the decree of the insurance companies — mandatory speed limiters and data trackers, cars that won’t drive unless everyone is belted, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I doubt companies like Hagerty and Grundy are going to make everyone install data trackers or seatbelt interlocks.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Companies like Geico & Progressive would love to penalize anyone who doesn’t.

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Especially Progressive, but, remembering way back (almost 30 years ago), GEICO famously paid for radar guns to donate to police departments.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Even worse, they ponied up money to the financially strapped company that was developing the new technology. The trade was the company had to give XXX number of units to GEICO who, in turn, gave them out to select PD’s where GEICO’s still limited market was. this was to increase the number of tickets and hence the ability to surcharge their customers. Gotta love unfettered capitalism *sarc/*

    • 0 avatar
      EGSE

      “cars that won’t drive unless everyone is belted”

      We tried that in 1974 with the ill-fated seatbelt interlock. I bought a Plymouth in ’74. The dealer did a mini-orientation before handing over the keys. One thing covered was opening the hood and showing how to defeat it. I did it by pulling the connector under the seat and jumpering the two wires. I always wear the belts because one day I *used them* and it saved me from serious injury at least. But I start the car first and then buckle up. A former boss (correctly) said that was to see if I was going anywhere first (I had a few hoopties).

      The pitchfork parade over the interlock was so strong it was repealed by an Act of Congress. With the passivity displayed by some folks I know it’s not clear to me that same public fortitude would manifest itself in the present day.

      • 0 avatar
        Sloomis

        ahh, but that was government mandated. Like I said, Americans would never put up with that, even in this day and age. But when our corporate overlords dictate it, that’s when we all roll over and passively accept it…

        • 0 avatar
          285exp

          Individual insurance companies and automakers can try to dictate whatever they want, and other insurance companies and automakers can sell insurance and cars to the ones that refuse to go along. I’m not worried about them, if they want to run their business into the ground, that’s their problem. It’s when the government dictates it that you have a problem, because then the evil capitalists have no choice, and neither do you.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          …But when our corporate overlords dictate it, that’s when we all roll over and passively accept it…

          You are 100000000% correct. We are pushovers when you give somebody something tech-ey and convenient and then the Overlords suck every scrap of data out of them. How many actually look at the agreement contract for an app? You might as well tell them your wife’s favorite position. They will find out anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      “We let Big Business run our lives, not Big Government.”

      Take away government, and “Big Business” is in no position to run anyone’s lives.

      Big Business control lives BY WAY OF their inevitable influence over all and any government. Without an insurance mandate, enforced by, tah-dah, who do you think…?: No “Big Business” subjugating you via insurance rates. Without government jackboots there, to drag you into court just because some ambulance chaser wants to shake you down….: No need to pay heed to insurance companies at all…. Turning those evil “Big Businesses,” into small businesses. Who then have no choice but to be good, not evil, lest everybody simply routes around them at their own unimpeded discretion.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Yes, and that is how things worked when there ware no gov’t regulations…SARC

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Do you remember it being different?

          Or are you just mindlessly regurgitating agitprop containing horrific tales of scary hobgoblins? While failing to recognize that hobgoblins are, in fact, as the pointed out, all imaginary.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Really? Did you think this would be a question worth debating?

    While certain government regulations (CAFE, required safety nannies) don’t bother me as much as it seems to bother the rest of the B&B around here, there is such a thing as too much government oversight and this one definitely qualifies.

    Did you really think you were going to see a comment saying “Mandated speed limits on my car? Yep, sounds good. Sign me up!”

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    NO THE POLITICIANS ALONG WITH THE EUROPEANS CAN GO F THEMSELVES. THIS COUNTRY HAS BECOME SO STUPID AND BLIND IT CAN’T EVEN SEE HOW MUCH OF OUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AS WELL AS FREEDOM WE HAVE LOST. A GOVERMENT THAT DOESNT ALLOW IT’S CITIZENS TO ARM THEMSELVES BUT ARMS ITSELF,CANNOT BE TRUSTED.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Ah, so because this was *proposed* in Europe, and not even passed yet, all the sudden our freedoms are threatened. I guess that proposed laws in Europe get put into place here automatically.

      Relax, bro. No one’s coming for your (insert your sacred cow of choice here).

      • 0 avatar
        DEVILLE88

        You’d be surprised how many things get proposed in Europe and end up here. I don’t have any sacred cows, i just have a passion for cars and driving them. the post was a lot deeper that you are looking.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Call me when it’s proposed here, then. Heck, call me when their legislature actually approves the item in question.

          If I spent my life getting riled about every stupid idea that passes through a legislature anywhere on planet Earth, I’d spend an awful lot of time riled.

          Until it’s a law there, it’s not an issue. And just because it’s a law there doesn’t mean it’s automatically a law here.

          • 0 avatar
            Sceptic

            What happens in Europe may and will affect America. To quote

            First they came for the Communists,
            and I didn’t speak up,
            because I wasn’t a Communist.
            Then they came for the Jews,
            and I didn’t speak up,
            because I wasn’t a Jew.
            Then they came for the Catholics,
            and I didn’t speak up,
            because I was a Protestant.
            Then they came for me,
            and by that time there was no one
            left to speak up for me.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      I think your caps lock is stuck on full auto.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I agree that this regulation is stupid, but can you point me to the constitutional amendment that declares driving as a right?

      Part of the stupidity in today’s politics is a general lack of understanding of how our gov’t works.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        And another example of the stupidity in politics is the unbelievably silly idea that because something happens in another country, it automatically has to happen here.

        On the other hand, if the European parliament proposes a law banning people from getting riled about laws happening in other countries, maybe people here will settle the heck down. After all, if it’s proposed in Europe, it has to happen here, right?

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        Well, we have a right to free association, and a right to peaceably assemble, correct? So if our government has zoned our cities and towns in such a way that mass transit isn’t serving a certain proportion of the population, and you need the use of a car to get around, and maybe there are no Uber or Lyft drivers in your area, then maybe you are being held back from the free exercise of your rights. These are the kinds of gray areas that get legal minds to start thinking.

        Now, nobody would say that everybody has the right to associate with your buddies on a beach in Hawaii every weekend, and the government needs to pay for your plane ticket. But, for example, if the state decided to set a driver’s license application fee of $1,000, then you bet there would be a lawsuit in short order.

        It’s sort of like gerrymandering. A state government can decide its own election districts. But there’s got to be some reasonable restraint, even if the letter of the law doesn’t spell everything out.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @SPPPP

          And a right to petition your government for a redress of grievances.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “But, for example, if the state decided to set a driver’s license application fee of $1,000, then you bet there would be a lawsuit in short order.”

          Well, that wouldn’t even get out of committee in any state legislature. These guys want to keep their jobs, and it’s the same deal in European democracies. At the end of the day, what we overlook in these little “see, it’s happening in Europe so it can happen here” food fights is that a) they have legislatures too, and b) not everything that gets proposed ends up on the books. If I had a hundred bucks for every kooky idea that’s been dreamed up by a legislator that didn’t end up enacted, I’d be retired in 32 minutes.

          Eventually, the voters are the ones who determine what happens. The only difference is that European voters have a somewhat different ideological mindset than American ones. That doesn’t mean they’re going to buy into this particular idea, and it certainly doesn’t justify people losing their s**t over Europeans considering it.

          • 0 avatar
            Sceptic

            Only the extremely naive believe that “democracy” has anything to do with the will of the people. Democracy has long been a rallying cry of plutocrats.

          • 0 avatar
            DEVILLE88

            You really are naive to think that “voters are the one’s who determine what happens” The voting process has become a huge mannipulated joke. These people we put in office nowadays could give 2 s!&*^ about the American people. They just want us to be cattle and thats what we are becoming. To be pushed around and have our freedoms trampled on by (fill in the blank)goverment organization. they will do what they want and only in the most EXTREME cases will the people fight back. You still have cops killing kids and getting away with it. They can break into your house and destroy everything find nothing then leave without so much as an apology. they can take your car,freedom,home,work and not even blink. I am glad that some here get it.

      • 0 avatar

        “general lack of understanding of how our gov’t works.”

        You mean dysfunctions?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    My insurance agent is an Independent Agent who represents many companies. He approached me about those little spy devices.

    I looked him straight in the eye and said calmly and firmly: “You don’t want to know, and I don’t want you to know.”

    In 25 years of driving the only accident I’ve had has been low speed and in bumper to bumper traffic. Speed limiter wouldn’t have helped, but autonomous braking would have.

  • avatar
    jatz

    Heh… in the winter, slow-pitch softball moves online.

  • avatar
    SirRaoulDuke

    It’s a step too far to the point I would be tempted to exercise my Second Amendment rights and refresh the Tree of Liberty.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “refresh the Tree of Liberty”

      Yeah, that trope is from a guy who spent the Revolution in a legislator’s chair and the people who quote it today would only shoot themselves in the Hoveround.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Over/under 0.5 commenters here honestly in favor of this?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Here’s a surefire way to rile people up for no f**king reason: pick out something that’s happening in some other country, and make people ask whether that should happen here. It’s nonsense.

    Call me when some legislature here takes this question up; until then, it’s a non-issue.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      C’mon, you know American progressives have tried to be carbon copies of European socialists since there were socialists.

      It’s not like there is no predictability here.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I know it’s comforting to think that everyone you disagree with politically agrees 100% with each other, and 100% with everyone in Europe, but it just ain’t true.

        • 0 avatar
          jatz

          And Atlanticism was never a thing.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “NATO member” never meant “able to dictate domestic policy to other countries”. I wouldn’t mind it if Germany was able to dictate our top-speed-on-superhighways policy, though.

          • 0 avatar
            jatz

            If you’ve just read up on it you know it was vastly more pervasive in American academia and government enclaves than merely the management of NATO.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Meaning, what, precisely – that people proposed more socialistic policies that are pervasive in Europe? Have at it, guys – just make your case to the voters persuasively, and maybe they’ll buy in. Nine times out of ten, they won’t, because Americans don’t like the 70% tax rates that come along with that stuff. Never have, and never will.

            By the same token, I’m sure Europeans shake their heads when they listen to us fret about being able to afford an ER visit, but would sure love to get taxed like we are.

            Proves my point…just because “it happens there” doesn’t mean it happens here. But it ultimately happens there because their voters want it that way. They can vote for more central government, or vote against it. Same thing here.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @FreedMike:
            Thought experiment: add your healthcare premiums to your taxes (both those paid by you and paid by your employer, since they’re both funded by your labor).

            Now, compare our effective tax rate to the European tax rate. When I did this, I found that the amount of money withheld from my paycheck is pretty comparable to what is taken out of European paychecks, the difference is that a big chunk of the money withheld from my paycheck goes to a private for-profit company.

            Turns out that we pay more than they do for healthcare on a per capita basis, except that individuals often go bankrupt over health issues, and we so not get the benefits of universal coverage.

            I realize this is an extraordinary claim for those of you who get your news from right-wing media, so here’s a link:
            https://www.healthsystemtracker.org/chart-collection/health-spending-u-s-compare-countries/#item-relative-size-wealth-u-s-spends-disproportionate-amount-health
            You can check their facts any which way you choose.

            So, are the European systems un-American? Yes, by definition — the way they do things is downright foreign, in fact. But are the Europeans stupid for doing it this way? Nope.

            It’s certainly worth entertaining the notion that we might want to copy their ideas — after all, we in America love our public schools, our public roads, our public fire departments, our public police departments, and our public defense. We also love our Medicare and our VA hospitals. Does healthcare for all belong in this list, too? The next time someone you know files for bankruptcy because of a medical issue, please entertain the notion that adopting some foreign ideas might be beneficial.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Europeans face obscene consumption taxes too. It isn’t all about income. We also provide the majority of their national defenses. They’re losing their national sovereignties because all their tax dollars are wasted on feels. They also ration healthcare, which we do not outside of the state run system called the VA. Don’t worry. There are enough malignant thinkers being produced by our ‘higher’ learning institutions that the day is fast approaching that we’ll be no freer than people in a Cambodian mass grave. AOC & Co. should be laughed out of coffee houses, not elected to congress. Once they’ve protected everyone from the injustice of their neighbors having more than they do, politicians will be living better than ever.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Luke42 – I read something similar. Taxes may be lower but once one factors in other costs, citizens of higher taxation countries often come out ahead.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @FreedMike – agreed. 100% clickbate and ironically, just after the Conservative Political Action Conference.

  • avatar
    chaparral

    No. If you watch some dashcam crash video compilations the really big crashes have one cause – inattention. I challenge you to pay enough attention to be able to name the 3rd from last car that came by in the opposing lane when you’re driving less than the speed limit + 10; I think I can manage that for about five minutes.

    • 0 avatar
      EGSE

      ” If you watch some dashcam crash video compilations the really big crashes have one cause – inattention.”

      True story from the squad…..

      On weekend duty at the station. Late 1980’s, warm clear summer day, no rain. Punched for a call to a rural, arrow-straight two lane road. One car MVA, Pontiac Fiero, into the ditch at high speed. Put the Jaws on the car, extracted two male personal injury patients, packaged ’em and transport to county hospital.

      ED orderly puts both in a curtained exam area. We were filling out transfer paperwork nearby. Noisy ED became quiet, overheard the two guys arguing…”you had to wreck the f–king car.” “I wouldn’t of wrecked if you hadn’t been playing with my d–k you b!tch!!”

      Four responders run to a scrub sink in panic and soak down with bottles of Betadine.

      All EMS calls were “gloved up” from then on.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    So now I have to be approved by a moderator?

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      Happens a lot with their clunky WordPress software. I’ve had three with perfectly clean language snagged in the past couple of days.

      It ain’t you.

      Heh… make that 4 now.

  • avatar
    aajax

    1. I’d actually be fine with it, if speed limits were adjusted closer to reality like the ones in Europe.

    2. It would make a lot of small town police in Georgia very unhappy.

    3. Maybe to raise some money, we could allow people to opt out for a fee of perhaps $250 a year.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      #2 is the reason such a device would never happen.

      Plus since my current car doesn’t have it I just need enough parts to keep in running and thus I’ll avoid any such limiters in the future.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    I would like to see it tried in another country if only to demonstrate how truly and utterly disastrous it would be.

    Anyone who followed NASCAR over the past 25 years know what restrictor plate racing is like. Imagine that on the public highways. Would make an entertaining video channel.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    At my work all the company cars have a program that monitors speed and compares it to a GPS database of speed limits for roads. Exceed the limit for too long and an email goes to the boss with your name, vehicle, date time and location. They have documented that it has reduced the # of accidents since we put it in place.

    Would I want it monitoring me? Of course not.

    Would I want it for my teenager, employee, or the relative who totaled his car and now wants to borrow mine? – Yes I would.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      Pretty sane and I agree.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      This is why in my response above I said “never, but my children will”. The next generation will be comfortable with geofencing and electronic supervision and they most likely won’t mind enforced speed limits.

      • 0 avatar
        jatz

        Inescapable consequences of the population growing while the planet can’t.

        And your kids, whatever impingements they must accept, will still be in the luckiest refuge from the rest of the species.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      My dad was a trucker. when tracking devices first came out in the 70’s, they were very primitive. They were nicknamed “tattletale clocks”. This isn’t all that new. GPS, cell phones etc. make this an easy process. Some jurisdictions already use cell phone data to adjust traffic lights and speeds. Something like OnStar could easily track speed. It has already been suggested a few years ago to use such systems for that purpose.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’d be happier if there were more enforcement of the current speed limits by properly trained officers. I stick pretty close to the posted limits as they feel correct anyway. However, that doesn’t stop those with anti-social tendencies from riding my bumper even when I’m tucked in the right lane unless I’m passing. Take care of the tailgaters and left lane squatters first.

    And I’ll agree, European proposed legislation =/= United States proposed legislation. We’re have different needs and different priorities. For what it’s worth, Minnesota has recently bumped the speed limits up from 55 to 60 mph following studies about what it would mean for safety, actual travel speeds, vehicle performance.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    My Citroen has a speed limiter as well as cruise control. The limiter is preferable in town. It allows me to drive like a hoon without ever exceeding the speed limit.

    Mandated speed limiters might (hopefully) bring some long needed focus on individual speed limits. Those on British motorways have been increased to fight congestion. Those in the Northern Territory are quite high because of the long lonely roads.

    I wonder what would happen to Ferrari, Lamborghini, McLaren?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “In the pursuit of safety (still a worthwhile goal, don’t get us wrong),”

    Its just like the emissions obsession, the end game is complete elimination.

  • avatar
    Mike-NB2

    “Intelligent Speed Assistance” sounds a wee bit Orwellian. I have two nephews and I’ll be tucking away a lovely red Barchetta for them to enjoy after the motor laws are passed.

    But in the meantime I’m polishing up my torch and pitchfork to stop some arse from letting this happen.

  • avatar
    James Charles

    I wonder how many who are against speed limiters actually own speed limited vehicles and US manufacturer at that. The US has speed limited vehicles already.

    Do people realise all GM are speed limited to 250kph or less?

    My 95 Cherokee was speed limited to 190kph.

    The performance F-150, the Tremor was speed limited to 155kph. Some Ford Falcons were speed limited to 185kph.

    I do believe tougher licencing, training and policing is the better option.

    Short of competitive racing how many drive over 160kph…..ever? Maybe in a Germany.

    I lived in Outback Australia with no speed limit and guess what? You couldn’t sustain high speed driving because gas stations are just too far apart. The ideal speed for my vehicle was a paltry 140kph (88mph).

    Really I think there are those who want to hear themselves whine.

    To the whiners, setup a race car if you want to drive at high speeds and see how good a driver and tactician you think you are.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @James Charles – agreed. V6 Mustangs are speed limited. Tuners were overriding and grenading driveshafts.

      • 0 avatar
        multicam

        Lou, I remember that! I had a V6 Mustang of that era (2012). Though my tires were rated to go much faster than the car’s electronic limit, the driveshaft was a big heavy steel piece which wasn’t suitable for speeds beyond the limit (126 mph or so, if memory serves). I had the Performance Package which upgraded the tires to Pirelli P-zeroes. There were much lighter driveshafts available in the aftermarket for people who were so inclined. I never went that route, preferring to keep my vehicle closer to stock.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I learned years ago when my 99 S-10 was new that it had a similar device to a speed limiter. When I got to 90 mph my engine cut off and at just below 80 mph the engine came back on. At first I thought I had blown the engine.

    If we get something similar to the speed limiter on our vehicles it will be because the insurance industry is lobbying Congress. I am not in favor of this but I can see the insurance industry lobbying for this. I am not going to stay up nights and worry about this because it might not ever happen but if it does it will not be from the creative minds of Congress but from the insurance lobbyist who pay for the campaigns. For enough campaign contributions politicians will do anything.

    • 0 avatar
      James Charles

      I do believe most manufacturer speed limited vehicles are mainly drivetrain restricted. GM a decade ago decided 250kph was enough.

      A pickup, most SUVs and CUVs are not what I would describe as performance orientated. Since the popularity of these vehicles has risen to the levels they have, speed limiters would not concern the populace in general. If speed was a primary concern for them these types of vehicles wouldn’t t dominate the market.

      Most who complain I think are all the”glass half full” types. Anything and everything is an issue to them.

      If speed limitation was 70 or 75mph, I could understand.

      Let’s first see what the limitations are.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    It’s hard to imagine nonsense such as speed limiters and automatic ticketing based on GPS tracking ever coming to these shores. If it ever happens and Americans aren’t forced to turn in or retrofit their old vehicles, the future rolling automotive stock in some parts of American is going to look like Havana’s with people keeping their 2010-2020 model cars running with elbow grease and prayers.

  • avatar
    Ion

    So when the w205 first came out we had issues with the Garmin navigation cards. Issues like the cars going up the map sideways, being 3 roads over, and in 1 case being in the Hudson River. I’m sure the EU law will take in to consideration such issues. Wink wink.

    That said I see a lot of people who have those insurance monitors plugged into their OBD. If they’re willing to let their insurance company spy on them they’ll probably let the government do it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Eventually most vehicles will be self-driving and if that is the case they will automatically be speed limited. I doubt our roads will look like Havana–most people will adapt to self-driving and speed limited vehicles except those of us who are car enthusiasts. Most people don’t even know how many cylinders their cars have or where the oil dipstick is if it has one as long as they have built in wi-fi and electronic gadgets.

  • avatar
    Charliej

    I live in a small town in Mexico. The speed limit on the highway through town is 24 mph. That equates to 40 kmph. The speed limit on streets away from the highway are limited to 20 kmph or 12 miles per hour. No one seems to mind. The 40 kmph speed on the main road is seldom reached as the traffic is bumper to bumper for most of the day. We are 30 miles south of Guadalajara, a city of several million in it’s metropolitan area. A number of people from Guadalajara come through town every day causing traffic jams with walking pace traffic. The back streets set at 12 mph are cobblestone and very rough so no one speeds there either. When I take the car going to the other side of town, two miles away, it takes forty minutes to drive it. I usually just jump on the motor scooter and go that way. Two miles in about seven minutes. Two wheels is the way to go in heavy traffic.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I think if ANY laws are enacted, it should be to increase penalties for people not paying attention at the wheel and far better drivers training and adherence to the rules and etiquette.

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  • Adam Tonge
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