By on February 13, 2019

Ram 1500

A couple of liberties are taken with this one, as the Ram 1500 Classic technically has a trim one step below the Express model. With pricing, rates, and residuals being what they are though – well, it’s safe to say this version of the new old Ram pickup embodies a great deal of appeal to buyers in the Ace of Base wheelhouse.

In fact, this heartily equipped pickup is cheaper than a good many milquetoast crossovers. It’s almost as if Reid Bigland himself wants you to exercise your patriotism and park a truck in your driveway.

It will not have escaped your notice that Ram really (really!) wants to grab silver medal in the Great Truck Sales Race. By continuing to crank out copies of the last-generation Ram 1500, the company can increase its sales numbers by offering options that placate those who want the latest and greatest truck and customers who are budget conscious.

Here’s where the Express trim comes into play. Wearing a natty set of color-keyed clothes once reserved for more expensive models, this is a sharp-looking truck. It also retains the traditional gunsight grille, a styling cue that showed up prominently in the new-for-’94 models, just in case one is not enamored with the new R A M billboards.

Ram 1500

Priced at just $31,140 for a Quad Cab 4×2, this Ram is equipped with much of the gear that used to show up on costlier trucks. It can be argued that FCA needs to use up all the parts and pieces which only fit the last-gen Ram 1500 before the thing goes out of production for good. Don’t be surprised to see the company introduce even more “special edition” trims made up of never-before combined trim pieces until the stuff is all gone.

Power accessories, cruise control, air conditioning – all those features are expected at thirty grand and are indeed present and accounted for. Power heated mirrors are a surprise as standard equipment, as are front fog lamps and 7-pin trailering electrics. The lone concession – and it can be argued that it’s a big one – is that there is a 305 hp 3.6-liter Pentastar under the hood instead of a Hemi. If you can live without that V8 rumble, and aren’t towing the Enterprise-D, this mill and its attendant 3.21 rear axle ratio are dead simple to maintain and cheap to operate.

Ram 1500

Only a pair of colors are free gratis, including Bright White and the Flame Red shown here. In fact, sprayed in the latter hue, this bargain basement Express looks not unlike the big-buck Sport-trimmed models of not long ago. Seventeen-inch aluminium wheels wear 265/70 P tires. The 18-inch option has vanished. Guess they’ve used those up already.

Rebates and incentives aren’t usually noted in this series but are worth a mention this time around. The sticker price shown above can be easily pushed south of $30,000 in most markets and, thanks to the wizardry of rates and residuals, lease payments can be shockingly cheap. The 1500 Classic Express might not be the base model on Ram’s totem pole – but it sure is in terms of price.

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments and feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown with American options and priced in American Dollars. Your dealer may sell for less.

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18 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2019 Ram 1500 Classic Express 4×2...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    4×4 Hemi or no sale…

    Still a heck of a deal given that RAM actually wants to deal. The advertised prices for the Sierra Limited and Silverado Legacy are higher than the prices for the next gen trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I don’t think the old GMs going for more is a surprise, I think I’ve seen more new Rangers now then I have new GMs. If I was a dealer I would be trying to get everything I could out of the old trucks that don’t look nearly as hideous as the new.

    • 0 avatar

      Guys on the Forums and Fuelly seem to average over 21MPG combined with the penta star which might be a good reason to pick it. Up here in New England 2wd is a resale nightmare so the cost upgrade to 4wd is a no brainer.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I just googled this truck for fun, my local Ram dealer is offering a 2019 Ram Classic with FULL CREW CAB, HEMI and 4X4 $40K out the door

      That’s pretty good

  • avatar
    Hummer

    A couple years ago I posted on here several of these V6 extended cabs and V8 regular cabs for around $20k brand new, for a while manufacturer discounts had both discounts high enough to get new trucks for ~18k.

    I’m betting you could still walk out with this for $25k or maybe less today. It truly makes it hard to pass up when you know an CUV or car priced equivalently is going to have a whole lot less for your money and likely won’t retain value nearly as well.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      It depends where you live I suppose, but anywhere that gets winter a 2wd truck is a resale nightmare. Even if you never use it, 4×4 is probably worth buying unless you literally plan to run the truck into the ground.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I agree, trucks like this are a tremendous value. The only drawback, especially after a winter like this, is that it won’t go in most garages :(

  • avatar
    IBx1

    The V6 isn’t as bad as the extended cab versus an actual crew cab. The door handles on the outside are deceiving, as those back seats are cramped.

  • avatar
    ajla

    2WD me. There is no winter at all around here (I’ve had my air conditioning on all week at home) and I’ll never touch the 4WD knob.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    My only complaint are those ridiculous half-sized, front-hinged doors on the extended cab; totally impractical when using it as a working truck, even if they do make passenger access easier in tight parking. For a long time I considered these because I like their trucks, even if the ARE too big. But I could never get past those back doors. I have no need for full-time second row seating and that’s just about all any extended cab wants to offer any more. Those seats and their plinth take up usable floor space even when folded in most models. But when you’re using it as a working truck, you want easy access into the back from the driver’s door to grab a tool box or materiel you may be carrying for a job. You don’t want to have to walk back and forth around a front-hinged door every few seconds.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    I’d rather have my Big Horn 4×4 Hemi, but I could live with a 4×4 V6 Express. I liked the 4.7L V8, I had it in my Dakota, but I’ve driven one of these and they don’t need the 4.7 anymore with that V6 and that 8-speed.
    I’ve had extended cabs with the rear door hinged both ways (my Dakota had the rear hinged doors that were integrated with the B-pillars, my Ram has this style) and I think I actually prefer the front-hinged door like this. I found myself sometimes boxed in between the doors with the Dakota.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Ram is running flowery commercials extolling the virtues of the new Ram 1500, only to show a $149 lease special on the Ram 1500 classic at the end…

  • avatar
    gtem

    As new and uglier designs are rolled out, I like this generation of Ram more and more. I personally don’t like the painted bumpers, give me chromed steel! I appreciate that the 3.6L moves it along just fine for most owners, but I’d have to insist on a Hemi +4wd, thankfully with discounts or buying lightly used, even that configuration does not break the bank relatively speaking.

  • avatar
    MBella

    I just had a 4WD Hemi classic as a rental. I found it quite awful. They removed the 4WD Auto mode. In 4WD lock the front end binds way to much. I’m surprised people used to prefer these to the previous generation GM trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Believe it or not, MBella, you WANT that binding–that means a solid mechanical lock on the front axle for driving on soft roads and trails; it’s not meant for use on pavement unless that pavement is covered with snow and/or ice or mud. I’m not a fan of open differentials as they will let a wheel spin more than necessary and may not let the front axle grab if only one wheel has traction. Anyone who drives a Jeep Wrangler prefers that kind of solid lock over software emulation.

      I admit I have a GM truck myself (Chevy Colorado) but at least I have the newer computer system which brakes the free-spinning wheel to let the one with traction try to pull through. I don’t like it since I have owned a Wrangler but I was not willing to buy the new Gladiator because they don’t make the cab style I wanted.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Yeah, the base models actually get classic part-time cases with a true mechanical lock. Granted, not as useful in more typical mixed traction on-road scenarios, but if you venture offroad with any regularity, you’ll be thankful you have the classic setup.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    Just read an article about another parts bin RAM classic called the warlock.

    Looks good but not a fan of the rebel grille and it’s coming in at $52k cad msrp, which seems steep for what is basically a redundant model.


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