By on November 19, 2018

Here’s the thing: as readers and writers – and not CEOs held responsible for a raft of employees and shareholders – we can play armchair quarterback about product planning to our heart’s content.

Jeep is currently in the throes of selling their wares with the speed of proverbial hotcakes. Responding in kind is Ford, who is seemingly on the cusp of introducing a couple of Bronco rigs as Wrangler and Renegade fighters. Here’s the question for you – would GM make bank if they brought back Hummer?

In case anyone around here has a very short memory, let’s hold a quick history lesson. Hummer began marketing vehicle all the way back in 1992, when it foisted a civilian version of the military Humvee on the American public. The effort was helped along by Hollywood elite and White House Plumbers alike.

Later, GM bought the joint, proceeding to produce H2 and H3 machines based on other General Motors trucks and SUVs. Sadly, it became a pariah for the tree-hugging crowd, a popular punching bag for the argument we were all using too much of the world’s fuel. This, and the economic downturn, led to whispers in Ren Cen about the possibility of binning the brand. GM’s embarrassing sojourn through bankruptcy took care of the rest after a search for a buyer turned up empty.

By the way, it annoys me to no end when GM and its brands tout themselves as “celebrating 100 years” or whatever. Technically, they’re not even a decade old. The current General Motors Company is legally distinct from the original General Motors Corporation founded in 1908. The old GM is now called Motors Liquidation Company and hasn’t made a car since 2009. Anyway.

Big, square brutes are now firmly in vogue, as evidenced by Jeep who’s breaking its own records month after month. Ford will likely do well with their new Bronco and its variants. If GM were to bring back Hummer, marketing three or four SUVs and crossovers plus a midsize pickup with modern powertrains and technologies, they’d probably find themselves with a very popular brand.

Agreed? Or am I completely off the mark?

[Image: Wikipedia]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

85 Comments on “QOTD: Would Hummer Sell Today?...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Would Hummer sell now? Probably. If GM had been in better shape, I think there’s a good chance they’d still be around.

    But then again, just because something could happen doesn’t mean it should happen. We’re better off without the brand.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I don’t feel a hummer branded product would do any better than something completely new. Or couldn’t they make off roady variants of their current offerings? No real reason to bring back hummer.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      As an SUV built on the Colorado, specifically ZR2, I think it could be a nice niche. “Offroad” brands seem to be even more lucrative than “offroad” models these days. Cue Land Rover, Jeep and Subabru.

      Everybody and his uncle now building “4×4” (awd) vehicles, ever more watered down, has resulted in consumers trusting brands like Jeep and Subaru to stick to slightly higher ground.

      The brand Hummer may be too inseparable from the excesses of the mid 00’s housing boom in people’s minds, to have any net positive equity at all, though.

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    Yep. Everyone is obsessed with buying SUVs. The tree huggers used to chain themselves to stop SUV production lines, now they’re running their kids to soccer practice in a 3 ton truck.

    Squared off SUVs are fashionable, even things like Suzuki Jimnys look like toy Hummers.

    They can’t really tie in to military vehicles anymore. Perhaps it should be a GMC rather than a separate brand?

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      I always thought GM was stupid to make Hummer a separate brand with its own dealer network. Hummer could have been the “professional grade” image builder for the GMC brand, which were nothing more than expensive Chevies when the Hummer H2 came out. GM could have also linked the military heritage of the GMC duece and a half and DUCW (Ducks) from WWII with the Gulf War Hummer. So much brand synergy and cost economies and GM decided not to do it – no wonder they went bankrupt.

      • 0 avatar
        NeonNoodle

        I get what GM was trying to do in replicating the Jeep formula – build an “off-road” dedicated brand, connected to actual military service vehicles, and even use the originally applied affectionate nickname of the vehicle (Jeep/Hummer).

        But, would a Hummer sell today? The vehicles, updated appropriately for today’s 4WD/AWD obsessed market, absolutely. But, branded as “Hummer”? Absolutely not. The greenies/anti-SUV crowd effectively destroyed the “Hummer” name and it wouldn’t work in today’s marketplace. Too many people wouldn’t be caught dead in one, and that’s the opposite of good branding. Also, the reality is a vehicle brand sharing a name with a sexual act, was probably never a great idea.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “The tree huggers used to chain themselves to stop SUV production lines, now they’re running their kids to soccer practice in a 3 ton truck.”

      The difference is the MPG sticker. Us “tree huggers” pay a lot of attention the the MPG sticker.

      After the CAFE rules changed to the footprint model, CUVs ceased being jacked up offroad-poseur monstrosities, became roughly as efficient as a similar-sized car. Us “tree huggers” look at the MPG sticker and see that what amounts to a station wagon doesn’t have any disadvantages compared to a similar sized car, and we buy the thing with the extra room.

      Another thing that’s changed is that my college friends are no longer being sent to Iraq to fight for oil. They’re being sent to Afghanistan and Iraq for other kinds of clusterf*cks, but it doesn’t seem like it’s about oil in quite same way it was in the early 2000s. There’s nothing quite like having a friend or classmate being sent into harm’s way just so some urban cowboy can drive a Hummer to an air conditioned gym.

      Conspicuous consumption has not magically become fashionable in the environmentally conscious parts of the country. It’s just that modern CUVs no longer represent conspicuous consumption.

      The Hummer represents conspicuous consumption. The only guy who drives a hummer in my town is our perpetually failed Republican candidate for moyer. Both his “car” and his political campaign are generally a big f*ck you to the vast majority of the townspeople, which is why he never wins. He’s my neighbor, and he’s a [email protected]@ss.

      Again, conspicuous consumption is still gouache and irresponsible. It’s just that, because the MPG stickers have changed, CUVs (and softroad SUVs) no longer represent conspicuous consumption.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Gas was $2.259/gal RegUnl at the local Circle K and expected to go much lower, the owner told me.

        Just in time for Thanksgiving travel. And travel we will.

        I picked up our rental F150 this afternoon, topped it off and filled four 5-gal jugs with RegUnl.

        All set to hit the road.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Yes Hummer would sell. Used copies are still fetching silly resale for the age/condition they are.

    But let’s just be more honest GM. Pay “The Simpsons” royalties and just build the dang Canyonero like we all know you want to.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      GM probably doesn’t need to, but someone like Nissan with the Armada would do well. As soon as Canyonero is mentioned, the song is usually stuck in that person’s head. You can’t get that kind of advertising normally.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “Used copies are still fetching silly resale for the age/condition they are.”

      I always thought Hummer died because everyone who wanted one (and could afford one) already had one.

      Maybe a few thousand more in the market would shift the balance between supply and demand.

      I sure wouldn’t be caught dead in a Hummer.

      The funny thing is that Jeeps get put into a different category in people’s heads. I don’t claim it’s rational, just that Jeeps represent something different culturally. Perhaps it’s because Jeeps are known more as hackable DIY projects than conspicuous consumption? Donno. Whatever it is, it’s not rational. That’s branding for you, I guess.

  • avatar
    luxrage

    I think Hummers are definitely a blunt representation of that post 9/11 uber-patriotism we had for a few years where everyone was amped up on natoinal pride (so to speak) in the fight to find the WMDs and the War on Terror. The hummer H2 and the Ford SYNus bank-vault concept were perfect examples of the mindset that you needed something that looked big and militaristic to show the might of the USA to all that could see. Take all that with a grain of salt because I was young at the time but that was the impression I got from the whole endeavor seeing friends in 6th grade being shown “time to bomb saddam” in class and hearing God Bless the U.S.A.
    by Lee Greenwood played everywhere. Hummer H2s embodied everything from that era for me.

    Mind you, I still see plenty of H3s where I’m at, but I don’t think Hummer would have the wind in their sails this time around for pushing so many vehicles without the strong AMERICA #1 undertones they had before, but they would probably sell a few if they were competent offroaders.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “…that post 9/11 uber-patriotism we had for a few years where everyone was amped up on natoinal pride (so to speak) in the fight to find the WMDs and the War on Terror.”

      That’s when I got kicked out of the Republican party for insufficient bloodlust.

      Not a good association for me personally.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    The Hummer H3 (pictured) would sell, I still like them, but I’m not too sure about the big H2. My neighbor has one and it still looks pretty ridiculous to me

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Did the H3 ever get a V8?

      I can’t help but look at an H3 and sadly shake my head knowing its a 1st gen Colorado/Canyon underneath. I believe most H3s were built with the I-5 weren’t they?

      Now an H3 based on the current Colorado/Canyon (or a 3rd generation that can’t be too far away) would likely actually be worth a dang to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Per Wikipedia available engines:

        3.5 L (211 CID) L52 I5
        3.7 L (223 CID) LLR I5
        5.3 L (325 CID) LH8 V8

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Those first 2 are “TURRRR-IBLE”

          Like “foot to the floor and pray” for merging onto the highway.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            @Dan- I doubt the typical Hummer owner/driver worried about merging harmoniously into traffic without disrupting it, much less pray about it.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            TURRRR-IBLE in an H3, I agree. They’re actually an OK engine in the Colorado. I’m a frequent borrower of a relative’s L52-powered Colorado, and the drivetrain is right as rain at 14 years and ~105,000 miles. My only quibble is that the torque curve is much higher up than was the case with the old 4.3 V6. The Colorado will kick down to 3rd quite frequently, which the 4.3-powered S-10’s didn’t have to (same transmission, lower torque band, and lighter vehicle). If you’re coming from a non-balance-shaft-equipped 4.3, though, the Atlas I5 seems like a sewing machine in terms of NVH.

            In an H3 weighing 1,000 to 1,500 lbs more than the Colorado of the day? I’m guessing the I5 is not great.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Featherston…

            That was largely my point. I don’t care if it runs for 200,000 miles on nothing more than oil changes – it’s too little engine for the porker that an H3 is.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      H2 is a blast to drive, I would buy a new one in a heartbeat.

      As far as the H3, the 3.7L is okay if you choose the 5 speed manual, which is also how you got a brand new H3T out the door for less than $30k. The 5.3V8 is where it’s at.

      Also remember that unlike the Colorado the H3 was full time 4WD so that was taxing the power plant.

  • avatar
    arach

    Of course they would.

    I’d drive one now if the interior didn’t look like it came from the 90s. The exterior has aged fine.

    A new version would probably look more like the range rovers/Jeeps and would sell like hotcakes. I’m honestly surprised they didn’t just take tahoe, give it the z71 offroad package, a few body tweaks and a new grille, and well it for 75 grand. (The z71 tahoe is already coming back in 2019, so take the Z71 edition and rebody it a bit and you’d have a hummer)

    I really can’t figure out why they haven’t brought it back. It really wouldn’t cost any more than the “special editions” they launch.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Simply because the Tahoe stinks as an off-road vehicle which is why GM never produced a hummer off of its bones to begin with.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        The H2 was based of the longer Suburban platform and it wasn’t al that great off road. The H3 was decent though.

        Thing is, does it matter? As long as it gives the pretense of a great off-roader people will buy them. People buy Wrangler Rubicons because they are the most capable from the factory and sometime those same people take them on GRAVEL DRIVEWAYS! Good thing the have a c=good crawl ratio.

        This is all a generalization of course. Some actually use them at places like Moab.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Incorrect the 3/4 ton Suburban lended it’s rear axle to the H2 but no other suburban chassis parts were used under the H2.

          H2 is an excellent off-roader, as someone that has put it as well as old IH Scouts through off-road torture I can say they excel at what they do.

          Also the H2 was shorter than a Tahoe.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Yep, they sure would, for the reason you already stated—big square brutes are in style—and because conspicuous consumption and opulence are also in style these days. Vehicles like that go well in the driveway of the 3 car garage of a McMansion and they’re good for towing the big boat.

    I say all that a bit tongue-in-cheek but I don’t mean any ill will by it. People are free to spend their money how they wish. They’re free to run up their debt too! ;)

    I think what is keeping them from selling, other than the obvious fact that brand doesn’t exist, are a couple reasons- economics and nostalgia (lack of nostalgia).

    Economics- the full sized ones are a bit too expensive for their sales volume to have staying power. I mean compared to the Jeep CJ, Wrangler (sorry, all ye CJ faithful), and their derivatives that have been selling for 70 years. The full sized ones were on the expensive side of the new truck market, and you need a little something more to maintain sales in that market segment.

    Nostalgia, and lack of it- sure, faux-military truck popularity comes in waves and these rode the wave of the 1991 Gulf War. But there is no love loss among veterans for the ubiquitous 1114 and 1151 versions of the mid/late-2000s vintage, memories of riding around Southwest Asia. There is no popularity wave from that, certainly not one that would translate into sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The funny thing about conspicuous consumption is that its fashionability is patchy.

      Conspicuous consumption is considered gouache and irresponsible in the college town where I live. One of our local Nobel Prize winners still drives the late 1990s Camry he bought new — and that’s pretty respectable.

      But, conspicuous consumption can be respectable the rural area where I grew up — just so long as you’re a local and made your money in the county. If you’re in the county where I grew up and a city person visits in an ostentatious vehicle, they’re a [email protected]@ss who hasn’t paid their dues.

      Conspicuous consumption is funny thing.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I tend to agree that it can vary widely from place to place.

        Oh by the way, I’m going to assume you’re easy to get along with in real life and the written word can sometimes come across in an unintentionally negative way, but phrases like “One of our local Nobel Prize winners” don’t exactly dispel the perception of elitism, and that perception scared a lot of voters who were probably otherwise on the fence, and that fear led to HRC losing the election. Juuuuuuuuuust throwing that one out there.

        So you know, in the words of Yoda, elitism leads to fear, fear leads to make the old republic great again.

        I do like the guy’s choice of car. Those were really great vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          I’m sure you’re right, but WHY is it that we celebrate know-nothing blowhards and shudder at the very mention of Nobel Prize winners? Doesn’t seem like a good long-term strategy for American greatness. There was a time when science was valued and promoted, politicians were thoughtful and well-spoken, and “public intellectual” wasn’t an oxymoron…and we went to the freaking moon.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Hummer would have sold very well for about the past 3 years; I feel their window is closing as everyone now wants a blobby miDsiZE CroSsoVEr with some anemic 1.5L engine and a 14-speed automatic.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    If you stuck them onto a tiny Korean platform and gave them tiny engines theyd sell well. Just look at the Buick Encore!

    Alternatively they could bring back the Hummer H3 truck, give it squinty headlights and 6 tiny grilles. Since bizarre styling sells trucks.

  • avatar
    Grenade

    TL, DR: An updated version of the old product (using the new GMT 31xx Colorado bones and the GMTK2xx Tahoe bones) has potential to sell. However, GM has a stupid dealer network to sell through and that would kill the brand, again.

    Longer version: Sure it would. Look at the success of the Colorado ZR2 and upcoming Bison. But it would have to be along side a GMC, Buick, Cadillac dealer. The Hummer dealership would not have enough volume to be a standalone dealer network. Maybe not even enough volume to even warrant its own brand. Perhaps a sub brand of GMC or something, kinda like Merkur was to Ford. But then again, that sub-branding stuff usually doesn’t work out too well. Those dealers would demand a car based cross over so they could match the moronic sales figures instituted by GM. Then the brand would be diluted and they’d have to kill it off again when gas prices invariably go up again.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Raptors still sell for $5-10K over sticker ($70K+!), more than 2 years after going on sale.

    SUVs are fast becoming the default vehicle.

    I’m frankly stunned that this hasn’t happened already. 1500 platform, legit offroad suspension, 35″ tires, 6.2L/10 speed, $50K base, up to $75K with options. No one here can tell me that wouldn’t print money for GM.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      A look at cars.com reveals plenty of ‘new’ 2017 and 2018 model Raptors languishing on dealers lots and plenty being discounted. I’m sure there are still Ford dealers hording their allotments in the hope of making more off of one fool than they can off of twenty five internet Escape buyers. That’s what killed off so many of Ford’s specialty offerings. I think you’re right that GM could sell Hummers today, but they could also sell twice as many Tahoes and Suburbans if they weren’t pricing them to discourage messing up their CAFE score.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Under GM’s current SUV pricing scheme, what you’re describing would likely be starting at $75K. A Tahoe LS 4WD is already $50K.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        @Todd

        Must be regional then. Around here in Indiana every dealer treats them like they’re made of gold (no test drives, no budging off ADMs, etc.) Even selling at sticker, the crew cabs are well into the $70s, so the broader point remains.

        @ajla

        You are unfortunately correct. I first had in my head a Colorado based/Bronco competitor H3-like vehicle for $50k, but later thought a 1/2 ton chassis made more sense and didn’t update my pricing. I think even at a $10k premium to a Tahoe, so $60k for a cloth seat base model and $80+ for a loaded version they would sell a bunch if the styling was done right.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Jack, everything about Ford must be negative, or it isnt true. He ran a shop, so, nobody’s got a clue except him.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            In this case I wish the negativity was true. I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to test drive a new Raptor since they came out.

            I know it’s a shallow and superficial tactic, but I’ve tried showing up in the Viper and still been told I need to make a deposit in order to test drive. Heck I bought a new Super Duty this summer and the selling dealer still didn’t want me near their ($10K marked up) Raptors. Pretty ridiculous if you ask me.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            If you care that much, go on cars.com and contact the nearest dealer who still has 2018s eating up their floor plan.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    Yes they would!

    GM could heavily borrow from existing platforms for most of the models, and add more squared-off/military styling and off-road kit.

    They could also cover all the SUV/CUV bases:

    H1 – GMT K2XX (Suburban)
    H2/H2T – GMT 31XX (Colorado)
    H3 – C1XX (Traverse)
    H4/H4T – D2XX (Equinox)
    H5 – Gamma II (Trax)

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Crazy talk! When has GM ever sold vehicles by disguising an existing platform with superficial sheet metal changes/tarting it up and naming it something different?!?

      Next thing you know, somebody will try to tell me an Olds 305 is interchangeable and no better than a Chevy 305…

      :P

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        307

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Hey, there’s a rocket in my Chevy

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          We should all be so lucky. Lol

          The beef was there was an imposter where a Rocket belonged.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Yeah, but the Chevy engine didn’t have a name. If I remember correctly no one believed that GM built a separate engine for the Chevy and Oldsmobile, people just like seeing the name “Rocket” on their engine, but as usual GM got lazy and couldn’t even put the “Rocket” sticker on the damn engine and all hell broke loose

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            @Lie2Me

            Well, no, GM really did start putting Chevy engines in the Oldsmobiles. And they were separate engines. The problem was that they didn’t disclose it and people found out after they bought them. Since they expected an Oldsmobile Rocket engine—rightly or wrongly—they were outraged. This caused GM to have to put a disclaimer in its ads that said something like “May contain engines from other General Motors divisions” or something like that.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            As usual, you’re right. Although the Chevy 350 and the Olds Rocket 350 were interchangeable and produced about the same power they were, in fact, different engines

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Hummer was full douchebag. With Jeeps you can at least pretend to care about going off road or caring about the brand’s history.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      But it was glorious watching those D-bags try to drive their H2/H3 over a lake, fail, and sink to the bottom.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      That’s why it would sell. The brand was always a political flashpoint. If you were a Green you hated them. If you hated Greens, you loved them.

      Given today’s polarization of the American politic, Hummer’s would sell like crazy to a certain crowd – usually seen wearing a MAGA hat. And their money spends as well as anyone else’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Funny, GM had a brand with 3 off-road vehicles at its peak, all with BOF construction, all with TRUE full time AWD switchable 50:50, all H2s having rear lockers standard as well as LimSlip front diff with brake modulation capabilities, H3s available with F+R lockers. Off-road tires, undercarriage protection, history with no production vehicle bad spots going back to the 70s.

      Yet Jeep that produces 1 off-road vehicle and countless crossovers that can barely traverse a Wal-Mart parking lot speed bump is better off-road material?

      You make as much sense as the enviroweenies from 2003.

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    I believe that Hummer would sell today. It was great when it came out and say what you want……it’s a mans truck!! i would love a big yellow H2!!

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    By the way, it annoys me to no end when GM and its brands tout themselves as “celebrating 100 years” or whatever.

    Yep. 100 years…unless its time to recall one of those “Motors Liquidation” era vehicles or pay out a lawsuit.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yup, that’s yet another reason why I stepped away from buying another GM vehicle ever again.

      I loved my 1972 Custom Cruiser, 1976 Toronado and 1988 Silverado, but that was in another time in an automotive galaxy far, far away.

      Ne’er again GM.

  • avatar
    la834

    I don’t think Hummers would sell well today. Hummers, particularly the H2 and H3, were for poseurs; real off-roaders would be put off by the ridiculously poor outward visibility and buy a Jeep Wrangler instead. It doesn’t help that the Hummer’s image was hurt by their military counterparts proving unable to withstand homemade explosives. GM would do better to concentrate on the two truck/SUV brands they still have.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “It doesn’t help that the Hummer’s image was hurt by their military counterparts proving unable to withstand homemade explosives.”

      I mean, the regular un-armored Humvees were no better or worse than any other un-armored small 4×4 military truck/jeep, they were never supposed to be bullet or mine-resistant. Even with that hasty up-armoring in ’04-’06ish, that was simply a quick band-aid until the MRAPs with their heavier armor and V-shaped hulls came along. And even those could be penetrated by a home-made shaped charge that basically uses a get of molten steel to cook everyone inside.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Would Jeep sell today?

    Hummer would sell OK. There is no need for Hummer.
    GM may serve the market by selling off road competent vehicles under GMC brand with unique models and by increasing the off road competency of the “All Terrain” trims.

    GMC absolutely is missing market demographic by not offering a Jeep Wrangler competitor. Shortened GMC Canyon with removable top sections and suspension capability of the Colorado ZR2 would sell.

    Ford is not leaving the “off road” market to Jeep. Raptor, Bronco, “Baby” Bronco, possible Ranger Raptor are all targeted to the demographic that serves Jeep so well.

    Will GM answer? Jeep is already siphoning off your mainstream SUV buyers and now they are going after pickup trucks.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Would Jeep sell today?

    Hummer would sell OK. There is no need for Hummer.
    GM may serve the market by selling off road competent vehicles under GMC brand with unique models and by increasing the off road competency of the “All Terrain” trims.

    GMC absolutely is missing market demographic by not offering a Jeep Wrangler competitor. Shortened GMC Canyon with removable top sections and suspension capability of the Colorado ZR2 would sell.

    Ford is not leaving the “off road” market to Jeep. Raptor, Bronco, “Baby” Bronco, possible Ranger Raptor are all targeted to the demographic that serves Jeep so well.

    Will GM answer? Jeep is already siphoning off your mainstream SUV buyers and now they are going after pickup trucks.

  • avatar
    King of Eldorado

    I see a niche market for the smaller H3; less so for the daily-driver-unfriendly H2. The niche is something less than full-on survivalist/prepper, consisting of people beginning to see the real effects of climate change. They see flooding and debris-covered roads from hurricanes and thousand-year rainfalls and want something they see as giving them a chance to reach safety. The H3 might not in reality be any better for this crowd than ordinary 4-Runners, Pathfinders, etc., which is why it would be a niche.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      I always figured the brand would sell to those who absolutely refuse to believe in climate change.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        I think you’re both right.

        Given the nameplate’s baggage, I’m pretty sure Hummers would sell only to those who want to signal that they don’t “believe in” a significant human role in climate change. Not a week would pass before every new Hummer got its first “Proud to be a Deplorable” bumper sticker.

        But I also think you’re right that, given the improved MPG that Luke noted earlier, CUVs (if not SUVs per se) do sell now to those who are concerned about such things. My town recently experienced an enormous sudden downpour accompanied by a freak tornado, here and gone inside an hour. Never in the 300+ year recorded history of my town has there been such a thing here. I had to make detour after detour to get around all the fallen trees, roofs, streets-turned-creeks, and so on. I had never in my life had the slightest interest in owning a real or fake SUV, and to my knowledge neither had my wife. But she traded her car for a CUV shortly after.

  • avatar

    I think there will always be a market for square-jawed vehicles. And expanding down the line with the Hummer Terrain and Hummer Enclave, they’d be fine today.

    People have so much hate and vitriol for the H2, when it was just a GMT800 with a different body on it. I’d bet 50% of consumers probably think it was an entirely new vehicle.

  • avatar
    Syke

    I seem to remember that Hummers were still selling rather well at the time of the GM bankruptcy. Their dissolution was pretty much political, the green influences on the government bailout put the pressure on that that brand had to go.

    I have no doubt that it would have continued to sell at least decently well over the last ten years, and very well over the past three or four.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    The irony is Hummer is tarred as the bloated, aggressive, gas-sucking enemy of the environment; while Jeep is the awesome go-anywhere vehicle that let’s environmentalists get out into nature to save it.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    A lot of things killed Hummer:

    * The H2 and H3 were bargain basement specials on GM chassis with part bin build
    * It was the whipping boy, right or wrong, during the age of Prius of everything wrong with Detroit
    * Bankruptcy killed any real product development

    Would Hummer sell today? In a reboot yes with enough differentiation and real investment in platforms. They’d sell great until CAFE, economic downturn, or energy price costs (or combination) ripped the rug out from under the brand again.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    For what it’s worth, I wouldn’t be upset that the company that owns the GM brands is legally a different entity than it was in 2009. They’re effectively the same brands.

    You might be upset that they threw away their legacy and significance to get to that point, however.

  • avatar
    tenrten

    Right on the money, I would buy another one in a minute I had a 2007 black H3 leather sunroof tow package 65,000 miles out of a set of tires brakes lasted a long time also could’ve used a little more power but it was like a tank in the snow, Machine gun windows large sunroof plenty a room for four people and I towed a Hallmark 7 x 12 double axle back-and-forth to Florida never had a problem

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Lot of people have no idea on the bones of the H2 I can see from the comments, similarly many should drive a vehicle before giving it a rash. My H2s are the best long distance travelers Ive been able to find, and resale value has been fantastic. The H2s and H3s are plenty capable off-road.

    My vote; please dear God do not bring back the brand, lest it become a Jeep clone and start building faux off-road vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Can you imagine a mini-Hummer like the Buick Encore or Jeep Renegade? I bet it would sell like crazy

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        With tears in my eyes I would vote “No” on a ressurection. I absolutely love every vehicle the Hummer brand produced but in today’s world the brand would be turned into the travesty that Jeep has become. I never want to see that happen so I would rather live without a new truck and soldier my old trucks on than see crossovers with the Hummer brand affixed.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    I have gotten this far into the comments and, no comments yet from Hummer?????

    I do recall that the H2 owners’ main gripe about H2 was, wait for it, crappy fuel economy. Big duh, buy a massive vehicle as aerodynamic as a brick, with likely the largest frontal area on a “light” truck and expect decent MPG?

    Current cafe standards, maybe even the proposed new more permissive efficiency standards would rule the H2 out.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’ve been busy, give me time man.

      I’ve never had trouble with the H2s fuel economy, it’s simple, with 37 in tires you get 11.5MPG – City/Hwy/Combined. Not too bad all things considered. Though the 08-09 H2s with the updated drivetrain averaged closer to 14-15MPG which is inline with 6.5L TD H1s.

      • 0 avatar
        Erikstrawn

        “11.5MPG – City/Hwy/Combined. Not too bad all things considered.”

        My GMT400 Suburban gets better gas mileage, and can carry more. In my view, Hummers were never anything more than a stuffed codpiece. I could never figure out the attraction. I’ve driven a HMMV, and I enjoyed it, but it was completely impractical and uncomfortable. I get that the civilian versions are softened up quite nicely, but what’s the real attraction? Why do you prefer it over a Chevy truck?

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Sorry no, the H2 has a 2200 payload, a Suburban most definitely cannot carry that.
          Your Suburban also doesn’t have full time 4WD, a 6.0, factory 35in tires, no aerodynamic design, does not weigh 6400lbs empty, (it may be 3/4 ton suspension and frame like the H2). Compare an H2 to a Suburban and the question becomes how does it do so well in fuel economy.

          Drive one, its that simple, take one on a road trip, the love and attraction is immediately obvious. A Chevy truck is incapable of doing the things a Hummer is capable of.

          • 0 avatar
            Erikstrawn

            I can guarantee you a Suburban drives just fine while loaded for bear and hauling a trailer. I don’t need full-time 4WD, but being able to select it while driving down a snowy road works just fine. The 6.0 I understand, but that’s available on a standard Chevy truck.

            You sound like you actually off-road yours, and I get it, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen a Hummer splattered in mud. I’d guess 95% of them are bought for show.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          “what’s the real attraction?”

          Same attraction that makes middle age crisis men and cougars spend a lot of money on Corvettes (that they’ll never drive fast), why testosterone-crazed boys put fart can mufflers and suspension kits on their sport compacts (then never autocross them) or build bro trucks (that will go offroading only when they hop a curb in the mall parking lot).

          In other words, it’s just something that some people want.

          I say more power to owners who use them to their full capability, but for the ones who buy them just to show off, I’m fine with that too.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • NormSV650: Probably the most miles it will see for the rest of the decade….
  • Inside Looking Out: Congratulations with your new car Corey. Did you have a plan B when planning the trip? It is a...
  • Dodge440391SG: My Dad bught a new 1950 Studebaker without a heater. It has been reported that my Mother was not...
  • ptschett: ‘Minnesota’ might be the problem there. When I was growing up in South Dakota the conventional...
  • NormSV650: Acura delays the Honda turbocharged announcment until another auto show.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States