Monza, CarryAll - It's Back to the Past for GM China

Matthew Guy
by Matthew Guy
monza carryall it s back to the past for gm china

Chevy isn’t just bringing back retro nameplates here in its home market. Sure, the Blazer is set to appear in this country next year, while the Malibu and Impala have been back for ages.

Over in China, GM is dusting off two more nameplates – the CarryAll for a crossover and Monza for a sedan. Why should you care? Because the CarryAll bears styling very much like the Blazer, portending a shift in design language for future bowtie crossover machines in this country.

Essentially, the CarryAll appears to be a Blazer that was put into a taffy puller until it was long enough to accept a third row of seats. GM says the CarryAll is 196 inches long and rides on a 113-inch wheelbase. The General hasn’t yet released dimensions for the Blazer. The China concept is said to have an “independent six-seat layout” which this author takes to mean three rows of two with buckets in the middle row. Two rows of three-across bench seating is highly unlikely.

For comparison, the five-place 2019 Ford Edge has a 112.2-inch wheelbase and casts a 188.8-inch shadow. The Explorer stretches 198.7 inches to accommodate three rows on a wheelbase just half an inch longer.

The dimensions make sense, then. Your author thinks there is little chance of the Blazer gaining a third-row in this country, as it would probably just serve to cannibalize sales of other machines in the Chevrolet portfolio. Still, this CarryAll is worth talking about since it is now the second crossover to have “Camaro-inspired” styling. One is an aberration, two is notable, and three – should a third one appear – will make a trend.

This is not to say the Tahoe will suddenly sprout Camaro headlights atop its bulky hood. The Traverse and Trax, though? Maybe. Companies do seem to enjoy endowing all their machines with a corporate face.

Elsewhere, our Associate Editor was quite excited to once more see the Monza name on a GM car. Described by the company as a sedan with a “youthful aesthetic,” the RS model shown here is apparently aimed at younger car buyers in China. The photo doesn’t tell us much, so check out the video below for more detail.

Here is a picture of a 1978 Monza, just ‘cuz.

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  • 3SpeedAutomatic Auto insurance renewal every six months. Ten year old car, good driving record, own my own home, excellent credit score, no teenagers on the policy, etc, etc, etc.Yet, I pay thru the nose!!!!!Adds on the morning news brag about $500k settlements.I paid less when I lived in New York State.
  • Jim Bonham Full EVs are not for everyone, they cannot meet all needs. Hybrids do a much better job of providing the benefits of EVs without most of the drawbacks. I have a hybrid sedan with plenty of room, plus all the bells and whistles. It has 360 hp, AWD, does 0-60 in just over 5 sec.(the instant torque is a real benefit), and I get 29 mpg, average. NOT driven lightly. I bought it used for $25k.Sure, it's a little heavier because of the battery, motor, etc., but not nearly as much as a full EV. The battery is smaller/lighter/cheaper and both the alternator and starter motor are eliminated since the motor assumes those functions. It's cool to watch the charge guage show I'm getting energy back when coasting and/or braking. It's even cooler to drive around part of the time on battery only. It really comes in handy in traffic since the engine turns off and you don't waste fuel idling. With the adaptive cruise control you just let the car slowly inch along by itself.I only wish it were a Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV). Then, I'd have A LOT more EV-only range, along with even more of that instant torque. The battery would be bigger, but still a fraction of the size of a full EV. I could easily go weeks without using much, if any gas (depending upon my commute) IF I plug it in every night. But I don't have to. The gas engine will charge the battery whenever it's needed.It's just not as efficient a way to do it.Electric companies offer special rates for both EVs and PHEVs which lower your operating cost compared to gasoline. They'll even give you a rebate to offset the cost of installing a home charger. You can still get federal (up to $7,500, plus some state) tax credits for PHEVs.What's not to like? My next daily driver will be a PHEV of some kind. Probably a performance-oriented one like the new Dodge Hornet or one of the German Hybrid SUVs. All the benefits, sound, feel, etc., of a gas vehicle along with some electric assist to improve fuel economy, performance, and drivability. None of the inherent EV issues of cost, range anxiety, long charging times, poor charger availability, grid capacity issues, etc. I think most people will eventually catch on to this and go PHEV instead of going full EV. Synthetic, carbon-neutral eFuels, hydrogen engines, and other things will also prevent full EVs from being 100% of the fleet, regardless of what the politicians say. PHEVs can be as "clean" (overall) as full EVs with the right fuels. They're also cheaper, and far more practical, for most people. They can do it all, EVs can't.
  • Ron rufo there is in WaSHINGTON STATE
  • ToolGuy @Chris, your photography rocks.
  • ToolGuy No War for Oli.If you have not ever held a piece of structural honeycomb (composite sandwich) in your own hands, try it.
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