By on September 5, 2018

To mark the 120th anniversary of the birth of Ferrari founder Enzo Ferrari, the Ferrari Museum in Maranello is launching two new exhibitions showcasing the man and the machines he was particularly fond of.

The first display is a photographic journey entitled “Passion and Legend,” which follows Enzo’s life and times at Ferrari. However, the second exhibit, called “Driven by Enzo,” looks to be the more interesting of the two. It features the various four-seater models driven personally by Ferrari. While Enzo was known to test every vehicle the company produced, his penchant for the more-practical 2+2 frequently resulted in them becoming his daily driver. Interesting, considering the man supposedly only built road-going cars to fund his love of racing. 

Ferrari’s official museum is said to possess Enzo’s personal 1960 250 GT 2+2, which would be incredible to see in person. Other four seaters graced by Papa Ferrari’s sacred posterior include a 400 GT i and 412. Meanwhile, the Passion and Legend exhibit also plays host to various models that Enzo gave special attention to, or were significant in advancing the company.

Of course, it’s all in service of celebrating the man behind the brand and his lengthy legacy. Were it not for the ineffaceability of time, il Commendatore would have been 120 this year. The various displays include images depicting Enzo at various stages of his life — everything from childhood and early racing career, to his time as the patriarch of one of the world’s best-known automakers.

“It seems incredible to think that Enzo Ferrari was born in the 19th century,” said the late chairman and CEO Sergio Marchionne of the man. “His lesson is more relevant than ever and his modernity unquestionable. He was a man with extraordinary vision and ability to manage people and resources as well as a strong entrepreneurial spirit and exceptional courage. One wonders what he could have achieved if he had had access to today’s technical resources and knowledge. The mark that he left on the world remains a source of pride for all of us at Ferrari and for the whole of Italy.”

If you’re vacationing in Italy and happen to be a Ferrari fan, you might want to visit Maranello to check out what sounds like one of the better car exhibits in recent memory. The factory museum has said the displays will be available to the public through May of next year. And, if you’re hungry for more automotive history, Enzo’s birthplace and the Lamborghini museum are both about a 30 minute drive away.

[Images: Ferrari]

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4 Comments on “Ferrari Museum Exhibitions Mark Enzo Ferrari 120th Birthday, Showcase Bevy of Ultra-rare Italian Steel...”


  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    As a teenager , I was able to convince my parents to veer off of their intended path to visit Maranello,one of my best childhood memories. My brother and I were doing the driving that trip anyway, so we did have a say. My dad never liked driving in Italy as his family didn’t own a car and he didn’t learn until his 20s in the US.We had rented the only car that could fit a family of 5 with reasonable comfort, an E34 520i. My brother and I had never driven a German luxury car before and the talkative steering and composure at 80mph of the E34 was a revelation.
    I’d love to take my son there if he’s interested.He’s only 3 now

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Cim
      Good on you. Great – Great memory.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Hah I’ve got two good memories from my trip to the Maranello museum. The first is actually getting to see my all time favorite Ferrari, the 288 GTO and the second is watching the cleaning staff use what looked like Windex and a terry towel to clean the cars!!! Every car in the museum was in need of a paint correction.

      Unfortunately no 250 GTO’s in running form around but if you go to the second museum in Modena they have either the bare frame or a reproduction and the bucks used to form the panels or again a reproduction of the bucks. The Maranello museum is the more interesting of the two but Modena is worth a look none the less plus Sant’Agata Bolognese is up the road and you can hit the rather small Lamborghini museum at the factory and check out some nice cars along with the LM and of course a Miura and the Miura concept from when Chrysler owned Lamborghini IIRC among others.

      Really a good way to spend the day and hit up all three museums since they are so close.

  • avatar
    James2

    I wish Ferrari would build something like the silver or green cars at the bottom photo, cars that are less “severe” than a 488. But… I guess they would be called Maseratis these days.


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