By on August 11, 2018

2017 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro - Image: Toyota

It’ll be a sad day when Toyota parts ways with the 4Runner SUV, but at the present moment there’s no plan to strike the long-running, body-on-frame model from the lineup. You will, however, pay more to get behind the wheel of the 2019 4Runner’s ballsiest variant.

At the extreme opposite end of the size scale, Toyota wants to make it cheaper to bring home a Toyota that’s actually a Mazda.

Let’s start out with the 4Runner — or more specifically, the 4Runner TRD Pro. Toyota’s burly, family-friendly off-roader sees a significant price jump for 2019, indicative of extra equipment added to the trim for the coming model year.

According to order guides seen by CarsDirect, the 2019 4Runner TRD Pro stickers for $47,460 after a destination fee, or $3,340 more than the 2018 model. Elsewhere in the 4Runner range, prices only climb by $100. For that added dough, buyers see added capability. Toyota gave its TRD Pro models upgraded kit for 2019, with the 4Runner riding an inch higher and boasting improved suspension components. (Read a full run-down here.)

The 4Runner remains a very important product for Toyota, selling 12,444 examples in the U.S. in July alone. As one of the last “true” SUVs, the model, despite growing increasingly long in the tooth, saw its volume grow this year. Sales rose 26 percent in July, year over year, while volume over the first seven months of 2018 climbing 5.3 percent.

Image: Toyota

The diminutive Yaris Sedan, known until this coming model year as the Yaris iA (except in Canada, where it was always the Yaris Sedan), is a rebadged and mildly reworked Mazda 2 once sold under the Scion banner. It’s a complex lineage. For 2019, Toyota decided to grace the little car with a design refresh so mild, it’s almost identical to the 2018 model. (Some might say it is.)

Pricing most certainly is not the same as 2018, as the base Yaris L Sedan drops $500, stickering for $15,370 after destination. That makes it the cheapest Toyota in the stable. Toss in an automatic transmission for another $1,100 should you find manuals confusing and scary. Why the price drop? Well, the value proposition is an age-old thing, but those buyers stand to see last year’s standard alloys replaced with 15-inch steelies. Moving up a grand in price nets you an LE, which returns the alloys and adds other niceties like smart key and push-button ignition.

Higher up the trim and content ladder (there’s now a ladder — unlike before), the top-flight XLE model commands a price of $19,470, or just $150 less than the base Corolla L. You’d have to be a big Mazda fan to spring for the smaller car in this comparo.

[Images: Toyota]

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50 Comments on “Upwards, Downwards: The Prices of Two Very Different Toyotas Head in Opposite Directions for 2019...”


  • avatar

    Toyota is the world’s largest carmaker and is basically immune to criticism. Ford is ranked fifth, and deserves all the criticism it gets.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Let me rephrase your comment:

      “I read this article about Toyota, and all I could think of was how much ford SUUUUCKKKSSS!”

      Little obsessive, aren’t we?

      Btw, Toyota isn’t the biggest. VAG is.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        Toyota and Renault/Nissan are neck on neck mid-year, with VW third. BUT… there’s barely 100,000 units difference on a volume of well over 12,000,000 vehicles. Too soon- and close- to call for ’18 yet.

      • 0 avatar
        pdog_phatpat

        “Btw, Toyota isn’t the biggest. VAG is”

        I’m thinking someone else here has quite a large VAG. Sandy at that.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      @ $47K for a 4Runner and $56K for a Ford Expedition I have no intention of buying a body-on-frame SUV from either company… and @32K for a basic Jeep Wrangler it will be a cold day in August before Jeep sees any of my money either

      SUVs have gotten too damn expensive

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        @Lie2me

        you do know most people don’t pay sticker price for cars right?

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Of course, but the higher the sticker price the higher the rock-bottom, out-the-door price

        • 0 avatar
          EX35

          Actually, you pay close to sticker for a T4R (not sure why, it’s kinda overrated) and the new expedition hasn’t been out long enough for much of a discount. I imagine most transaction prices for expeditions are $65k+.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            ” I imagine most transaction prices for expeditions are $65k+.”

            source?

            Also, the volume trim 4Runners in my area usually have about 3-4k on the hood before haggling.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Average transaction price of a 2018 Ford Expedition XLT 4X4= $51,582
            https://www.truecar.com/prices-new/ford/expedition-pricing/

            Average transaction price of a 2018 4Runner TRD Pro= $44,926
            Same source

            Average transaction price of a 2018 Jeep Wrangler Sport S 4×4 (JL)= $31,520
            Same source

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The $47K version is blinged out like a rapstar. Toyota do sell cheaper versions.

        SUVs have been reduced to high markup vanity plays in the US. Anyone who cares even one iota about value, gets either a pickup (possibly with a cap), or a CUV instead.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        Average transaction price for an Expedition Limited (the most common RETAIL configuration) is $62,545.

        Average transaction price of a 4Runner SR5 Premium (again, the most popular RETAIL configuration) is $38,790

        Average transaction price of a GMC Yukon Denali (again, most popular RETAIL configuration) is $67,176

        Same truecar.com source. SUV prices take deep pockets.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Also worth noting: take a look at 1990s SUV prices with adjusted for 2018 dollars. A 4Runner Limited that got you a moonroof and leather seats like an AR5 Premium today would be $51k in today’s money. $38k for a 4WD BOF SUV with some heated leather seats and a few other “basic” niceties that we expect is really not a bad deal IMO. I just wish Toyotas these days didn’t have awfully thin and weak paint.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Here’s your solution, gtem. Time capsules. Near-new mileage for 1/2 the original inflation-adjusted MSRP and you get the thick paint!

            https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1998-toyota-4runner-2/

            https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1995-toyota-4runner-7/

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Haha wow, really makes my purchase of my ’96 Limited with 99k miles back in 2013 for $6350 seem like a smart buy. And I think it was, as the going rate for a clean stock e-locked early 3rd gen (pre-99) like mine with low(er) miles and up to date on maintenance seems to have gone up to the $7500 range these days. I’m not looking for some kind of windfall profit here, but it’s neat to see that what I’m driving is starting to appreciate slightly.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    My only criticism of the Yaris IA is that gaping maw. They took a relatively clean design from Mazda and turned it into a confused fish. Also the mileage isn’t appreciably better over the Mazda3. I can’t imagine it’s that much smaller and have to ask why bother?

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      that seems to be Toyota’s lithmus test for its buyers’ vision.

      “how ugly can we make all of our vehicles and people would still buy from us.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Any TRUE Mazda fan wouldn’t settle for this bastardized model, they’d put in the minor effort to import an actual Mazda2 from Puerto Rico, where completely US legal versions can be bought no problem (if you don’t mind arranging shipping to the mainland).

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        I didn’t even know you could do that. The Mazda2 (Demio) is by far the more attractive of the two vehicles. I’ll admit my bias here.

        Side note: I went to the Minneapolis auto show this spring and was doing the little test drives they had set up. There were several vehicles on offer to be driven and I chose to drive a Camry, to see how it compared with my Mazda6, and the Colorado (with the 2.8? litre diesel), just because. I was talking to the Toyota representative as I was trying to figure out the smallest sedan Toyota sells. I made the offhamd remark that of course it was the Mazda2. He couldn’t believe I knew that. I only replied “have you seen it?”

      • 0 avatar

        At least Toyota and Mazda make cars.

      • 0 avatar
        tonyola

        But would mainland US Mazda dealers even touch a Mazda 2 for service or warranty work?

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      To Toyota’s credit, the revised fascia on the XLE trim with the driving lights and the lower chrome bar is an improvement that helps fill in the gigantic real estate of the guppy mouth. Yaris/iA is still probably my favorite “If I needed a cheap car with a new-car warranty” car. Haven’t driven one, but I’m almost certain it is more entertaining than a CVT Corolla, with less-tinny doors, and the interior can’t be anymore plasticy and depressing. Most people are size-focused and have no taste, so I’m sure the Corolla will still outsell it 100:1. However, I bet Yaris/iA sales will improve somewhat with FoMoCo and GM offerings out of the picture.

  • avatar

    Was is wrong with “No Cars” Ford? Where is DW?

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Unsubstantiated rumors hold that he’s covertly having the time of his life in Texas this weekend, secretly enjoying the Cadillac V-Club DFW Chapter August Meet ‘N Greet Event… cleverly and convincingly disguised, of course.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    It amazes me that Toyota sells any new 4Runners at all. They are ugly, extremely dated, way over priced and did I mention that they are ugly? At this point, only Luddites would even consider one.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I see more people in their 20s and 30s driving 4Runners than old people. Almost a perfectly even split between men and women. The 4Runner has a timeless design, unrivaled reliability, great fuel economy, and doesn’t look like the horrible CUVs coming out of GM, Ford, Jeep, and even Toyotas own stable. It’s truly the last stand for a durable off-road vehicle not named Wrangler in the US.

      But yes the price is crazy for what it is, even the base model.

      • 0 avatar
        Ltd1983

        “great fuel economy”

        You had me until the claim that 19 MPG combined was great. The 4Runner is a lot of things, but efficient isn’t one of them. It gets roughly the same MPG as full-sized SUV’s with 100 more HP.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I find 19MPG to be great, it’s the same as the ungainly Traverse, Acadia, Explorer, pilot etc gets. All while being on an actual SUV that will hold its value and not be a complete embarrassment to drive. Not to mention it has an actual truck engine unlike Jeep or any of the crossovers.

          • 0 avatar
            Ltd1983

            All of those vehicles you named get around 24 MPG combined, and seat seven people.

            By “actual truck engine”, do you mean, massive, old, underpowered, and inefficient? I like 4Runners, but being a luddite about engine tech makes 0 sense.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            According to fuelly the old traverse averaged around 17-18, while the new traverse is averaging just under 20MPG, the pilot has been averaging about 20MPG. Also when did the 3rd row get removed as an option? Last I checked the 4Runner seated 7 as well.

            The 4.0 V6 is hardly massive by any definition, old doesn’t make something bad – frankly saying its old is an extremely poor argument when it’s a proven engine. It’s not an indictment by any means. It’s power numbers are a bit down at just under 300HP but I also don’t have to worry about the engine coking up from DI so I think few if any will notice the 30HP that it’s missing from modern choices when this is still running at 400k miles.
            Again how is it inefficient, its getting about the same fuel economy as crossovers that don’t have half the capability, reliability, or resale value.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “massive, old, underpowered, and inefficient?”

            So I take it then you’re a fan of the new Tacoma getting the direct injected 3.5 which is universally regarded as a gutless peaky turd in a truck application?

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          19 MPG is relatively poor and absolutely outstanding. It was just a blink of an eye ago that the body on frame benchmark was 15 mpg and a lot of them wouldn’t even do that.

          A decade of fracking and compounding Bernanke dollars later even 15 mpg wouldn’t hurt much anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        EX35

        You’re leaving out terrible onroad handling, weak engine, noisy, lackluster interior space, and reliability/durability that is great but not LC great.

        • 0 avatar
          sooperedd

          Land Cruiser at $80,000 SHOULD be a lot more reliable.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          “weak engine… lackluster interior space…”

          The 4runner even with its “ancient” 4.0L/5spd auto can match a Grand Cherokee with a newer Pentastar+8spd 0-60. It has a very soft throttle mapping so the first bit of pedal travel makes it barely move out away from a light. But make no mistake the 1GR-FE is a great motor with excellent low end torque characteristics.

          As for interior room, I’d say the 4Runner is full competitive with midsize crossovers if you keep the third row out of play (it is truly unusable in the 4Runner). But stick with the 2 row model and the 4Runner rewards you with a cargo area that is actually bigger than their own Highlander and comparable to the current Explorer and Pathfinder.

          As for reliability/durability, I’d hardly use “it’s not as good as a LC200” as a serious demerit as that’s like complaining that a Mustang GT isn’t as fast as a Ferrari. The 4Runner is proportionally the most registered model with 300+ miles in the United States, wrap your head around that one and get back to me.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        You don’t have to be old to be a Luddite. And BTW, the 4Runner gets poor fuel economy, but that’s to be expected for it’s class.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      If your plans are to do off-roading beyond the capabilities of an Acadia but not up to the point where you need a dedicated swamp buggy, what are the vastly superior options to what Toyota offers?

    • 0 avatar
      Lightspeed

      4Runner has the highest resale value of anything. Go to bringatrailer.com and see what 20-25 year old ‘Runners are selling for. It’s a bona-fide classic, they can charge whatever they want for a new one.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “It amazes me that Toyota sells any new 4Runners at all. They are ugly, extremely dated, way over priced”

      I may be a bit of an edge case in that I use mine off road, but really if you’re looking for a reasonably sized family vehicle that can leave pavement in stock trim and yet not be miserable on pavement this is the only game in town. What else is there to compete against it? The Grand Cherokee is similarly sized but in the Trailhawk trim you need for the clearance and geometry of a base 4R, it’s a $43K 5000lb porker with a goofball airbag suspension that somehow manages to both outweigh the 4R and have less cargo room, smothering the advanced V6 and 8spd auto into acceleration and fuel economy figures that match the “extremely dated” Toyota.

      Outside my narrow criteria, the case becomes less convincing against a bunch of other midsized CUVs. But with the resale and durability of these things being what they are, you still can’t quite call it a stupid decision. Durable goods, man.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        You might want to check your facts. Although curb weights are similar, the V6 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk is rated 5 mpg above the 4Runner on the highway. And it’s also the quicker vehicle, probably mostly due to the 8-Speed automatic compared to the ancient 5-Speed in the 4Runner.

        And you can’t even begin to compare the features and tech on those two vehicles. Hell, you still have to twist a key on all but the Limited trim 4Runner. No thanks….not in 2018.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Acceleration and weight facts check out. Look up C&D instrumented tests of the ancient 5spd 4R and a Trailhawk GC with 8spd. 0-60, 30-50, 50-70, quarter mile, braking, cornering, go ahead and try to find a metric in the Jeep’s favor.

          And it still has a much smaller cargo area and weighs more despite being a unibody, and needs airbags for ground clearance. I couldn’t care less about twisting a key or gap in tech features because I’m buying a vehicle, not a bauble.

          You act like I didnt consider any of this before making a decision.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Quite frankly, I wouldn’t trust a vehicle that relies on a vulnerable air suspension for clearance out on the trails:

          http://www.toyota-4runner.org/5th-gen-t4rs/251010-do-i-dare-ask-grand-cherokee-trailhawk-3.html#post2910870

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Mexican Mazda rebadged as Toyota… with Toyota drivetrain?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Yaris

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Is it weird to anyone else that Toyota sells a made-in-France car called “Yaris” and a made-in-Mexico car called “Yaris” and the two are entirely unrelated?

    Or is that just me?

  • avatar
    mikey

    I’m a 36+ years GM Canada retiree . Presently I own two Fords… These days with ferrying my grandchildren around, Ive entertained the thought of an SUV/CUV.

    I did take out a former daily rental Tahoe out for a drive. Very nice, but reluctant to buy a daily rental. I have driven my daughters Grand Cherokee extensively. The G.C. is a beautiful vehicle. My friend drives a loaded Acadia.. There again absolutely gorgeous vehicle..

    IMHO, and only IMHO…The BOF Tahoe/Yukon is by far the most superior SUV..bar none.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “The BOF Tahoe/Yukon is by far the most superior SUV..bar none.”

      They’re good, no doubt, but that’s quite a claim. On the lower end of the price scale I’d pick an Armada over a Tahoe, the 5.6L Nissan walks all over Chevy’s 5.3L, and has much better ground clearance/angles compared to anything that’s not a pricey Z71 variant. On the higher end, the new 10 speed Expedition with the latest iteration of the Ecoboost is damn impressive in terms of performance and interior comfort/design, although I’ll always be leery of putting a ton of tongue weight on an independent rear suspension for serious towing.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    Oddly enough, the sales of Honduh and Toyoduh cars are not as positive as one is being led to believe here. I believe all YTD sales of these branded cars are now trending negative. The reality may be that both companies are looking at the world through rose colored glasses – sadly the CUV/SUV infection continues with only the hope that $5 per gallon gasoline will cure the disease.

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