By on August 22, 2018

2018 Cadillac ATS-V front quarter

2018 Cadillac ATS-V

3.6-liter twin-turbocharged V6 (464 horsepower @ 5,850 rpm; 445 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm)

Six-speed manual, rear-wheel drive

16 city / 23 highway / 19 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

Observed mileage, mpg: 19.6

14.4 city, 10.4 highway, 12.6 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $64,790 (U.S) / $68,545 (Canada)

As Tested: $78,185 (U.S.) / $86,445 (Canada)

Prices include $995 destination charge in the United States and $2,100 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Let’s not go too deep into history here. Until a decade and a half ago, Cadillac’s efforts at competing with European sports sedans have been lackluster at best, and positively shameful at worst. But in 2004, the wreath division of General Motors discovered the alphabet’s 22nd letter, and everything changed.

Those first CTS-V models harnessed Corvette power wrapped in a sinister Art and Science sedan body, immediately making enthusiasts take notice. Now the V is available in a more compact package. Though it doesn’t have majestic V8 goodness, the 2018 Cadillac ATS-V Coupe makes for a properly American alternative to the Teutonic stalwarts.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V profile

When the ATS-V arrived, I was thrilled to see a trio of pedals and the excellent Tremec six-speed manual transmission, rather than the typical eight-speed automatic. I’m sure the auto is fine, but a proper sports sedan still needs a manual. I’m looking at you, Audi.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V front

One little thing I struggled with in the pedal box – the dead pedal seems a bit too close to the clutch. I found myself catching the edge of my shoe on the dead pedal, leading to occasional lurching from a stop as I released the pedal awkwardly. It’s likely not an issue if your shoe size has fewer than four letter E’s, or you can be a bit more precise in placing your left foot on the left pedal than I am. I’m sure that with practice, I’d be fine – after all, nearly every car I drive anymore has but two pedals. My left foot needs more training.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V front

When you do get the clutch drop right, look out. Traction control and the electronic limited-slip differential still allow a bit of wiggle and squirm from the rear wheels – and the no-lift shift system allows full-throttle upshifts with a bang. As that left foot isn’t practiced with dragstrip launches – and I don’t have a plethora of deserted roads on which to test – I couldn’t get repeatable test figures. Car and Driver, however, was able to test 0-60 in 4.2 seconds, with the quarter mile coming in 12.5 seconds at 117 mph.

[Get new and used Cadillac ATS-V pricing here!]

I live in Ohio, where the police are more aggressive than most in speed enforcement – especially when driving something with Michigan plates. I don’t feel like going to jail for TTAC readers, sorry. But I can attest that this drivetrain combo is magic, and those numbers seem right.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V interior

My only real issue with the 464 hp twin-turbo V6 is the soundtrack – it’s not particularly melodious. The aftermarket has picked up the slack as always – I’d be certain to add something with a deeper tone were I to invest my imaginary money in the turbo Cadillac.

I’m seriously impressed with the ATS-V’s handling – especially considering the heft. It weighs 3,809 pounds – but that size isn’t as noticeable when hustling through the backroads. The electrically-boosted power steering is direct, with incredible feel one would expect from an old-school hydraulic rack. When I got a little stupid with the right foot coming through a second-gear roundabout in light rain, allowing the rear to step out, a flick of opposite lock caught the slide before traction control intervened.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V center stack

The ride is definitely sports-car firm. The wide Michelin Pilot Super Sports have minimal sidewall deflection, allowing bumps and potholes to transmit their terror through the cabin with a muted thump. The magnetic ride control suspension does a nice job of minimizing the impact to the passengers, but you can feel the bumps through the steering.

I really want to get the ATS-V on track. The massive 14.5-inch front brake rotors are clamped by six-piston Brembo calipers, which I’m certain would stand up to repeated track use. The brakes were firm and confidence-inspiring on the street, with no real noise coming through to the cabin.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V infotainment

My wife was not especially impressed by the interior. Some of the materials are indeed cheap feeling, and the controls below the touch screen for the heating, cooling, and audio volume lack tactile feedback. It was a challenge to know if the buttons were responding to input without taking eyes off of the road. Further, the volume needs to be controlled by a knob, not a chrome touchpad thingy.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V front seat

I’ve heard complaints about Cadillac’s CUE infotainment system. In this ATS-V, however, I didn’t see any issues – beyond the volume control. Pressing buttons on the screen triggers a bit of feedback – as if the entire screen is moving inward with the button push. It’s pleasing, and you immediately know that you made the system do something. Scrolling through menus is intuitive, with quick responses.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V seat detail

When you order your ATS-V, you must spring for the Recaro sport seat package. At $2,300, it’s not cheap, but these are some of the best chairs I’ve ever experienced in any car. Adjustable bolsters on both lower and upper cushions, as well as meaningfully-adjustable lumbar support means I quickly found a perfect seating position. Further, my youngest, when she was able to ride up front, found the seat so comfortable that she fell asleep within five minutes.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V rear seat

Once they got back there, the kids were happy with the rear seats. However, the typical two-door coupe struggles mean getting in and out can be a slow process. The seat belts for the front seat, especially, can hinder egress, and the slow power seat slider – thankfully accessible from the rear  – can be a challenge for a nine-year-old who really needs to pee NOW.

Barely 10 minutes into my drive, I was struck by an odd revelation – this ATS-V is a modern-day Mercury Cougar. No, not the flabby ‘70s personal luxury coupe fitted with curb feelers and opera windows – the original Cougar from 1967, based on the Mustang. Bear with me here – that first Cougar was a plush, lux version of a pony car. Beneath the bones of this ATS-V lies – you guessed it – GM’s Alpha platform, which similarly underpins Chevrolet’s pony car, the Camaro. They’re built in the same Lansing factory.

It has a similar pony-car character behind the wheel, too – completely out of character if all you recall of Cadillac is a bustleback Seville or the like. Steering is beautifully weighted and direct. Power is plentiful. Handling is excellent for such a heavy, wide car. It makes loud noises and can turn the finest rubber into smoke with an impolite poke of the foot.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V rear quarter

Yet, the 2018 Cadillac ATS-V can be a civilized commuter car when needed. A golf bag does fit sideways in the trunk. The styling, while somewhat showy especially with the carbon-fiber bits on my test car, looks right at home at the conservative country club.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V V badge

But those massive brakes, the happy engine, and the stellar handling mean the ATS-V will make an incredible track-day toy. While I’ve spent plenty of time with my TaylorMade driver, I’d rather drive something a bit louder – and burn down a few sets of Pilot Super Sports.

2018 Cadillac ATS-V logo

[Images: © 2018 Chris Tonn/TTAC]

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71 Comments on “2018 Cadillac ATS-V Review – From Golf Bags To Helmet Bags...”


  • avatar
    RedRocket

    It really is an awesome machine – as it should be for the price. Not sure what exactly interior bits are “cheap” – we are not talking Hyundai quality here. Get one while you can.

    Now eagerly awaiting the usual ill-informed anti-GM/Cadillac comments.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      I guess you’ll just call me ‘ill-informed,” but in my experience Hyundai (and Kia) of late does a superior job with stitching and fastening the interior bits together than Caddy manages… and yes, I’ve looked closely at all three.

      I agree the ATS-V is an awesome machine, but apart from those performance bits nothing else rises to the level one should reasonably expect from a vehicle wearing the badge of a purported luxury automaker.

      • 0 avatar
        gasser

        My neighbor traded his Cadillac sedan (??size above the CTS) for a G90. He finds the ride and interior to be a cut above the Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Genesis has interior quality 3 cuts above Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors –

          Atrocious leather fit/finish is a Cadillac/GM hallmark that even many fanboys on GM Inside News acknowledge –

          Check out post #141, post #151 and the following ones with pictures of horrendous leather seats stitching/assembly in a new CTS *AND* compare to the MB E Class someone posted in post #163:

          http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f15/de-nysschen-cadillac-will-develop-entry-level-sedan-192753/index10.html

        • 0 avatar
          Peter Gazis

          gasser

          Your neibor should have took a look at the Lincoln Continental. It’s like a more durable version of the G90 that costs $20K less.

      • 0 avatar

        Hyundai and Kia do a better job with their interiors than any of the domestic car makers. Detroit has never learned how to produce a true quality interior, and probably won’t for a long time. That said their are now some excellent engineered US cars available.

    • 0 avatar
      Dawnrazor

      The interior is very nice overall, and probably one of GM’s better efforts, but look a little closer and you’ll see it just doesn’t quite meet the standards of its competition, particularly Mercedes and Audi. The fit and finish, materials quality (including leather), ergonomics, and styling (admittedly somewhat subjective) just aren’t quite as “premium” feeling as they are in an S4 or C63. (Especially the S4, which strikes a perfect balance between form and function and honestly may be one of the best interiors I’ve ever seen on any vehicle at any price.)

      Oh, and don’t knock Hyundai until you’ve tried one. Their styling can get a little overwrought and may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but they are screwed together solidly, made of durable (though not “luxurious” materials), and don’t squeak or rattle as the miles start to pile up.

      All that being said, this is still one hell of a fantastic car, and I agree people should act fast because it probably won’t be around for long. It will not be a brisk seller, and the short attention-span brass at GM will probably kill it because it won’t really move the needle significantly for Cadillac (I don’t think the “halo effect” marketing strategy works as well as it once did.)

      • 0 avatar

        Any industry that can produce the ATS-V, Hellcat, Corvette, Tesla 3, mustang, and F-150 can’t be all that bad. Those are some fine vehicles. However, they all share Detroit remaining Achilles heal and that is interior materials. It has been a problem for Detroit for nearly 40 years. The problem is that those running the big three just don’t see the problem. It is almost as if they have a mental block in this area. I sat in a GM truck at a local dealer about a month ago and was surprised how cheap some of the interior materials were. The only thing that looked slick was the navigation screen. The materials in a Nissan Versa were far superior to what I saw in this $40,000 GM truck. I doubt things will change since the big three seem oblivious to interior craftsmanship.

        The Tesla 3 and Corvette seem to have the best US interiors.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          You’re judging an entire industry’s interiors by the Silverado? Seriously? But $40K doesn’t get you a fancy Silverado if it’s 4wd and a crew cab. Maybe the $70K interior isn’t much better, since it’s still a truck?

          But I’ll admit “soft touch” interiors have never been a good fetish for me. The panels just have to hide the wires, brackets and junk, look OK, then after that they’re a blur to me, don’t care to stare and fondle.

          So maybe I’m part of the problem? I guess it’d be nice to “have it” all, but what would YOU sacrifice for “a quality” interior?

          What if the Versa had the nicest interior in the world?

    • 0 avatar
      ttiguy

      I have one of these (coupe, 6mt, Recaro, etc) in arrest me Red and I love the thing. I do admit that the griping about the “gages” is sorta valid, but they are way better in person than pics. Other than that, it has performance which rivals 99% of what’s available anywhere but is easily livable as four seasons day to day commuting car also.

      Note to OP: my wife jokingly refers to my car as the “red rocket”.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Based on my experiences Cadillac could learn a few things about interior quality from Hyundai.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Red Rocket

      Some of us have to deal with midwestern winters. Over the long run Hyundai/Kia products don’t hold up.

      • 0 avatar
        boozysmurf

        @peter Gazis – I dunno. I don’t think your midwestern winters are appreciably worse than my Canadian/Eastern Ontario winters. And my almost-ten-year-old (bought it April 2009) Genesis Coupe which still gets driven in the winter is showing effectively no rust (the usual underside stuff, nothing in the body). There are at least 9 5-10 year old Hyundai’s (ignoring my friends in the Genesis community who tend to store their coupes) in my particular group of friends, and none of them are showing any rust.

        I think maintenance (and lack there-of) has a lot to do with it. I boggle on a regular basis at 5-6 year old cars of all manufacturers with surface rust starting that is in large part due to a car that has obviously been washed once every two years, whether it needs it or not. People just don’t care that much about their cars (enthusiasts excepted).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Oh, no…a positive Caddy review!

    (I saw one of these a few weeks back in arrest-me red, and Lord, did I want it.)

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Agreed.

      I feel ashamed admitting around here that I’ve liked the ATS since it debuted. I like the angles, I like that it has a manual, I like that it is focused on handling and counterintuitive for the brand. And now this. This perennial slow-seller that is often Exhibit A in what’s wrong with Cadillac has a bonkers 460hp version with stick shift and Recaros.

      They’ll sell 5 of them. It’s ridiculous but it’s wonderful to see.

      Commenters gripe about GM and perhaps for good reason on some things, but is Lexus, Acura, Infiniti, Lincoln, Audi, Mercedes doing anything this interesting and irrational? Would anyone else produce an SS?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        On Mercedes and Lexus, I’d say yes. At least for now.

        Mercedes offers 6(!) convertibles, 4 2-door models, a wagon, a plug-in large CUV, a V8 AMG-branded CUV, two power levels of a V8 powered compact car across 3 bodystyles, the G-class, and a V12.

        Lexus offers a naturally-aspirated V8 that spins over 7K, a hybrid V6 system, and two dedicated off-road SUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Anyone who cares about everyone dependent on GM (employees, customers, shareholders) can’t celebrate such irrational decisions without hesitation. GM already has the Camaro; this car, as good as it may be, is a waste of capital and effort.

        • 0 avatar
          johnls39

          You can say the same thing for the Camaro also which the car itself has ZL1 & ZL1 1LE.

          There are several choices for cars for everyone nowadays. It is not a waste of capital and effort. I rather Cadillac try than not to at all. I’m glad Cadillac develop this car. Although I may not have any inspiration of owning it, I’m glad it is around rather I choose to get one or not.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I like the ATS too, 30-mile. It’s definitely flawed, but it’s entertaining. Might be worth looking at a CPO one when it’s time to chuck in the Jetta.

  • avatar
    Jean-Pierre Sarti

    I’ll say this, the ATS-V coupe is way better looking to my eyes than the CTS-V coupe. Unless you are an ass man in which case the CTS-V coupe is the car for you…

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    Given the significant discounts available, it really is a bargain.I test drove an uber rare (in the Midwest at least) ATS turbo manual, and it was a better handling car than my 6spd g37S sedan. Less weight on the nose and equal steering.
    CUE didn’t bother me, most testers have the car for a few days, and an owner has more time to work past any minor ergonomic issues.
    I’ll go and be the first to repeat what others have said, an LS engine would’ve made the difference between chopping block and building block for Cadillac

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Not gonna lie… Don’t care about the dash, CUE, whatever…

    I want one. In silver, please.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Yeah, this is one of those that really, really, really makes me wish that I could afford new.

    And there’s the added inducement that I’m not driving a Mercedes-Benz/BMW/Audi like the rest of the sheep.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I just wish the Camaro had this roofline.

  • avatar
    redapple

    $80 grand.
    Eighty thousand dollars.

    No thank you. More power to you if you like. But for less than half the price I ll drive my 300S.

    DRIVE THEM V 8 S WHILE YOU CAN STILL GET THEM!!! You ve been told.

    • 0 avatar

      That was it. I drove an ATS-V and it was love. In the past is an m sport e46, so I get it. At the end of the day is it this car or a c43 ? If the ATS was 40-50k and you could find one at a dealer, OK. 80k ? Nope. You can get AWD, a MB badge, and a real interior, and never have to mess with CUE.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I just don’t understand this car when you can get this…/ “Corvette From $55,495”

    That backseat is not worth $25K

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Easier to get in and out of? Don’t like hatchbacks? Better seating position? More interior room?

      I instructed a guy at HPDE that had one and was very impressed. I briefly looked at these before getting my Stingray. Weight was the main turn off at 3,800 compared to the ‘Vette at 3,300.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      I’m more curious if the interior improvements and supposed prestige of the Cadillac badge are worth anything close to their $35-$40k premium over a Camaro SS with similar power on the same platform. Based on the comments in the review I would lean toward no.

      That’s to say nothing of the significant upgrade IMO from the V6TT to the LT1.

    • 0 avatar
      readallover

      Backseat? What Backseat, it is a luggage shelf. One of the main reasons the sedan did not sell.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Meh. FWIW, 60 is just around the corner. While generally IDGAF about what people think about what I drive, this car presses a bunch of my buttons.

      Besides, whether or not people see me this way, I know I wouldn’t want to be one of those old-heads trying to look cool at the local Cars and Coffee…

    • 0 avatar
      johnls39

      It does not have anything to do with the back seat. The Corvette is a standard sports car while the ATS-V is a luxury sports car separate from the bread-n-butter ATS. Totally apples to oranges.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    The only problem with Cadillac is that as usual they are late to the game where the real action is at. BMW and MB make M and AMG versions of their SUV/CUV models that are in a growing segment of the market and provide some image for the more pedestrian versions, but Cadillac put all their sporty efforts into coupes and sedans that the market is running away from. This seems to be a nice effort, but unfortunately a large portion of those that still want a car will likely shop the Germans and not even consider a Caddy. How hard would it be to make a V version of the XT5 or Escalade, but given how GM scheduling seems to work we probably won’t seen them until 2025.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Ill take any CTS or ATS in V guise before the stodgy and geriatric Cadillacs of yore. How these haven’t taken off in popularity, Ill never know…especially considering how successful the Mopar LX has been in appealing to fans of real deal rwd performance. Could be the whole ‘Caddys are for the elderly’ stigma that they just cant shake off, I dunno.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      LX cars appeal to people who value straight line speed and space. Alpha cars appeal to people who like handling. Most people don’t have the opportunities to enjoy handling, but anywhere there’s a stoplight or straight length of road = enjoy straight line speed. Plus the LX cars are way more livable and better values IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      You can buy a Charger with a Hemi for around $30k.

      The cheapest (and only) way to get a V8 in a Cadillac sedan is to spend $100k on a CTS-V.

      Cylinder count still matters to this buying demographic. So does back seat space. In both cases the Mopars are way ahead of the GMs.

    • 0 avatar
      johnls39

      For ATS-V, for being a slow seller is true but not for the CTS-V. The CTS-V sells faster than the ATS-V and generally sells out (stays on dealer lots less than 30 days or less). For as Mopar, I have nothing against them, but they are not on the same level like Cadillac or any luxury automaker for that matter.

      The V series are low volume models cap at a certain number. This entry is crowded and not enough enthusiasts to make them volume sellers.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I really like it. But…those stupid chrome buttons. Give us knobs Cadillac. KNOBS!!! And the interior’s pretty meh for that price point. Wow, I can choose black OR gray?! I may be in the market for a fun car in a couple years, I expect a used ATS-V will be a bargain.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    The back seat is useless.

    The interior trim, useabable interior space, diminutive trunk, gauges and build quality is WAY LESS THAN INFINITI level good (and nowhere near as good as Audi).

    It’s chock full of Chicom parts.

    This car was the catalyst for my latest and spot-on (predictive value and analysis) crusade against the complete, incompetent, clueless execs at a taxpayer bailed-out Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GGM).

    The fact they are trying to dress up this compact-size (but with a backseat that’s not useable for people taller than Mark, or 4’2″) bucket of Harbor Freight bolts by stuffing the ubiquitous 3.6 liter GGM engine in it – but with twin turbochargers (bad idea; terrible noises and many disadvantages versus the 6.2) – is indicative and confirming of the complete, utter, idiocy that is the Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GGM) Clown Show & Circus (Oh, Mary Barra, Dan Ammann, Mark Reuss and Dan Carlisle are a REAL A TEAM).

    Given how GGM managed to epicly blow every aspect of this POS, one is WAY better off buying a C7 Vette, for $24,000 LESS, which is probably the best vehicle GGM has made in the last 40 years, and one of the 2 or 3 vehicles in GGM’s lineup that isn’t a total POS depreciation and reliability monster.

    HELLO, JOHAN, UWE & MELODY CT-LEE!!! HOPE YOU’RE ALL DOING GREAT, GENIUSES!

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Here is a pity post for this re-heated 6 year old hyperbole. Hopefully you do better next time, though history suggests that will be unlikely.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        We agree on so much, from the LX platform virtues to Hyundai’s improving fortunes, and many things in-between, yet you seem to hang on my every word and sentiment.

        That’s okay, though.

        In fact, it’s a good thing.

        I actually interpret it (correctly) as your affinity and begrudging respect for my passion, persistence, dramatic flair (a positive trait in the otherwise too-often dull world of automotive manufacturing commentary), and most important of all, seeming clairvoyance in predicting both successes and failures in terms of vehicles and automotive executives.

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      Speaking as a guy who literally just traded an ATS coupe for an Infiniti Q60, you are dead fucking wrong.

      The ATS was a significantly better car, and also significantly cheaper. The Infiniti services don’t work. The gauge cluster is bullshit that doesnt have half the info of the ATS. Wifi costs $50 a month for a shit tier hotspot instead of $20 for unlimited AT&T. The seatbelt strangles me every time i get in. I literally can’t get out of the vehicle without moving the steering wheel and seat. The nav map sucks ass and there’s no android auto. The list goes on, and on.

      Meanwhile, the caddy was fucking perfect. Everything worked exactly how i expected it to. The wifi was great and it had a normal power outlet so i could get on my laptop and work on the road.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I can’t help feel that this would make a great Pontiac.

  • avatar
    jmiller417

    As a 2.0t owner, I think the gripes about the interior are a little overdone, aside from the gauges. The pieces all feel a cut above mass market. And I know I can’t be counted as a totally unbiased opinion, but the interior felt more solid and about as roomy as the XE and Giulia I sat in at the car show. The styling inside is perhaps dated, but it’s at the end of its life cycle.

    • 0 avatar
      RedRocket

      Shhh, you’ll upset the chimps and they’ll start flinging bananas and poo.

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      Honestly, even the gauges aren’t that bad.

      They seem bad from a distance, but they have a lot more functionality than one mighr expect since the lcd display actually has 3 parts, so you can see three different pieces of info at once. Most guages might have bigger displays but it only shows a single screen at time.

      On my ATS it was really nice being able to set one screen to the current speed limit, one to my actual speed and still see what’s playing on the radio in the middle.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Garbage scrap gauges, interior trim, build quality – a real POS.

        Being stuck inside that Federal Hazard Waste Dump of an interior is similar to being stuck in a Chinese melamine factory.

  • avatar
    nsk

    For those of you looking for a track-oriented review, here it is: http://blog.axisofoversteer.com/2015/08/we-beat-on-it-as-hard-as-we-could-2016.html

    This car depreciates laughably hard.

    I think it’s cool and on paper compares well to M3 and C63, but in the real world I’d rather live with one of the Germans.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      All cars/trucks/minivans/CUVs/SUVs depreciate.

      Most Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GGM) vehicles DEPRECIATE LIKE LEAD ANVILS FALLING OFF THE CLIFF IN THE ROADRUNNER CARTOON (it doesn’t help that begin to spontaneously deteriorate at approx odometer mile 7,000).

  • avatar
    stuki

    Not specific to this Caddy, but rather a problem common to all the hopped up, compact stockbroker haulers: The only way to achieve the dynamic goals they are after, is to stiffen the suspension to the point where you may as well drive a track car set up for slicks.

    Mazda and Porsche had the right idea with the RX8 and the original Panamera (and 928). Aston with the Rapide, as well: Get the darned COG, and hip point, down, and the wheels out from the COG, to where the suspension can suspend without the car rolling too bad.

    It’s a problem that is much more obvious in attempts at M/AMG versions of CUVs. But with the grip available from tires these days, it’s gotten annoying even on more moderate hip point sedans. Particularly shorter/narrower ones.

    Moral of the story: Build compact performance cars on enlarged sports car chassis. Not hopped up compact sedan ones. Nor, for f’s sake, CUV ones…

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    … and in this instance, “helmet bag” has to be a synonym for condom.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I found out yesterday that my SS is totaled. If this had the LT1 instead of a V6, it would probably be my next car. Now I have to try and negotiate a CTS-V down to a reasonable price.

  • avatar

    It seems to me Cadillac and Tesla represent the pinnacle of American auto design and engineering. Even when they miss the mark their vehicles are still interesting. The problem with Cadillac is their vehicles are over priced and some of the interior materials in their sedans look a bit cheap. Still, Cadillac has left Lincoln in its rear view mirror years ago.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    Or buy one used, as I did. My black-on-tan 2007 was CDN$15,000 three years ago. It’s 50 lbs. heavier than the above ATS-V but that could easily be attributed to the 6.0L under the hood and two extra doors and actual rear leg room – at a fraction of the price. Got a decent set of tools? You can work on this thing like it was a truck. That said, as much as I enjoy it I’d happily trade it for a Vagon with a manual…

  • avatar

    I have a really hard time with the interior on this thing. It’s just not up to par with anything else in the price range. You’re paying more money for worse build quality and less badge prestige. And that doesn’t make sense.

    This goes beyond the cost of an S5, and even exceeds the ask for an RS5 by $8,000.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Exactly.

      I’m not agreeing with you out of confirmation bias, but it’s objectively true to those of us with eyesight and with normal sensory perception (i.e. Touch) that this ATS…any ATS…literally has the level of build quality, interior materials quality, switchgear quality, overall design, that’s LITERALLY on a level that’s no better than a Golf GTI, a $24,000 car (and in some cases, worse).

      I have posted the picture comparison of the ATS’s (and XT5 and XTS and CT5’s) dash and gauge cluster and center stack with vehicles such as the GTI, Mustang, Genesis G60, Infiniti of all manner, etc., and even the Hyundai Elantra GT -‘and the ATS, whether in more base trim, or even in V-trim with Recaros and stuffed with a twin turbo V6 (a ubiquitous GM 3.6 liter at that) ringing the MSRP Monroney bell at near $80,000 – asinine) just absolutely SUCKS. It’s so inexcusable that this Cadillac at this price point is so fantastically horrid.

      The two things the ATS has going for it are a solid, well-engineered chassis and a very good steering unit that could fool people into thinking it’s a great hydraulic system.

      Those are the only two good things about this vehicle in any of its trim variations.

      But, that’s GM. And they’ve killed Cadillac. If one didn’t know better, one could be forgiven for thinking it was premeditated, or at least depraved heart murder.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    And we’ve been pointing out the circa-1990s Pontiac Bonneville style gauge cluster in the all Cadillac but the Escalade, CT6, or upgraded one in the CTS for 5 years,and GM in tone deaf.

    There are peeps in the Cadillac forums who’ve actually hacked the base gauge cluster panel and upgraded it on their own with the upgraded unit and posted their tales of woe or success to try and help others with their projects; that’s how bad it is.

    It would literally cost Cadillac less than $400 (maybe $250) just to make the upgraded gauge cluster standard minute ATS, base XTS, and base XT5, but they are tone deaf.

    I won’t even get into the fraying and wear-prone pleather, cheap door panels, cheap hood prop rod, or myriad of other really awful/cheap components.

  • avatar
    chrishs2000

    Look at the close up pics of the entertainment unit screen/HVAC controls. Then look at the trim and the surround carefully. It’s not pretty. I count at least 8 noticeable misalignment, improper fit, stitching, quality and other trim issues. On an $80k Cadillac. Really, really sad. It must take a serious masochist to buy this over an RS5 or M4. The last Cruze I was in looked better put together. GM needs to bring its “divisions” back, because this thing looks like it has all the fit and finish of a Pontiac Grand Prix.


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