By on June 19, 2018

Volvo doesn’t want anyone to forget it’s revealing its first U.S.-built model on Wednesday, so it furnished us with a few more teasers to whet the collective appetite. It isn’t the car’s looks that have us excited, however — we already know the S60 will resembled a scaled-down S90 in both form and function.

What has our shorts in a pleasant knot is the fact that Volvo hasn’t replaced the model with another crossover. The new model replaces the second-generation sedan launched in 2010 (and sold in ever-decreasing numbers since 2012) and the automaker seems intent on offering everything customers have come to expect, and then some. There’s even a Polestar Engineered edition of the T8 model that offers 415 horsepower and 494 lb-ft of torque, plus enthusiast-oriented tweaks to the braking and suspension.

Frankly, it’s all shaping up rather nicely. 

The model will become the first product to emerge from Volvo’s new South Carolina plant later this year. The automaker estimates domestic production of the S60 to average roughly 60,000 units annually.

There shouldn’t be too many surprises. Volvo already has the XC60 on the market and the V60 goes on sale in early 2019. Both of those have garnered quite a bit of praise and, other than a unique grille and mild styling differences, the S60 shouldn’t represent a drastic change in overall form. We’ll know more on Wednesday morning, when the official unveiling goes down in Gothenburg, Sweden.

[Images: Volvo Cars]

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9 Comments on “Volvo Doesn’t Want You to Forget About the S60 Reveal on Wednesday...”


  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    Now if they could only bring back SAAB and build some in the USA. That would make my “GM SAAB” license plate even more cool!

    • 0 avatar

      That’s the difference between companies GM used to own and Companies Ford used to own. Ford didn’t do too many favors for Volvo, but at least they didn’t kill them.

      • 0 avatar
        hifi

        Ford didn’t do Volvo any favors? They only saved Volvo from extinction, and upped the level of every car in their lineup by offering R&D resources and decent platforms. Let’s be honest, the 240 and 700 series were legendary, but they were crude. The original S60 was revolutionary. One of my favorite cars was a 2005 S40, which replaced the truly awful Mitsubishi platformed S40. The original XC90 wasn’t too shabby either.

        • 0 avatar

          Pretty sure I said “many” not “any”. All things considered if you take that Ford bought Volvo for $6.5B and then sold it for $1.8B I’d find it hard to say that shows they strengthened the company too much. Certainly if you compare Volvo under Ford compared to Volvo under Geely you’d be hard pressed to say Ford was a better parent. I love Ford as a product and a company, but I can’t get too excited of their handling of their Premier Automotive Group.

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    >Volvo Doesn’t Want You to Forget About the S60 Reveal on Wednesday…

    Too late. Already forgotten.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Yeah my two Volvo 850 experiences scared me away from the brand.

    I know, I know – 20 years is a long time – but experiences like I had are hard to forget.

    • 0 avatar
      pdl2dmtl

      He, he….I know. I owned one 850 SE wagon upon wife’s insistence.
      Eventually I got rid of it and now she drives a Highlander and we’ll never going to look back.
      I am forever going to call that car “Volvo – what was I thinking?”
      Cheers.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Conflicted on this one…on the one hand, loving that folks in my former home-state of South Carolina have the opportunity to find work by assembling them. However, not thrilled at the Chinese ownership. Either way, not within my price range to purchase, so that conundrum isn’t one I’ll have to face any time soon.

    • 0 avatar
      Garrett

      China is propping up our federal government through debt purchases.

      Frankly, if they are going to be investing in the US, it’s better that they actually build factories that employ people than helping to make it cheaper for the government to engage in deficit spending.


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