By on June 25, 2018

Never mind the bollocks coming from professionally cynical actors-turned-rappers: This is America. At least it is for much of this country’s working middle class. The F-150 is designed in America, tooled-up in America, and made in America. By an American company. For a customer base that is overwhelmingly American. It’s also a solid candidate for the title of World’s Best Passenger Vehicle.

Don’t believe me? I don’t blame you. The media has long vilified the full-sized pickup as an avatar of this country’s long-discredited and frankly unwanted silent majority. Never mind the fact that today’s pickups have long surpassed traditional automobiles in many of the qualities that real customers want and will pay for. Nor should you look too closely behind the curtain that covers the deficiencies of unibody SUVs when compared to full-sized trucks. My colleagues in the car business, many of whom are notable for their childlessness, sedentary lifestyles, and complete lack of a classical education, love to screech about BANNING these HICK-MOBILES from the VIBRANT STREETS OF AMERICA. Some of their points have merit: I’m far from thrilled with the ride height of today’s half-tons from both an active safety and a visibility standpoint. Most of their complaints, however, are so much sound and impotent fury signifying nothing more than the fact they can’t afford to drop $60k on a cowboy Cadillac of their own.

The 2018 F-150 is already in showrooms and media fleets, but if you know me then you know I prefer the spin-free zone of the rental counter to the walled garden of a press trip drive. Furthermore, there are thousands of trucks just like this available through secondary sources for prices in the $24,000-28,000 range. What do you get for that money? Let’s find out.


As I write this, I am approximately eight hundred miles into a 1,450-mile trip from Ohio to South Carolina via a couple of racetracks and side projects. My initial plan was to take my Silverado Max Tow on this journey, as I did last year. Once I did all the math, however, it made more sense to rent this F-150 and use it than it did to put that kind of mileage on the Chevy. Using a 6.2-liter, six-foot-bed, fully-loaded 4×4 truck to drag three people and four bicycles around the country feels like overkill.

[Get new and used Ford F-150 pricing here!]

Which leads to the question: How is this any different? I’m glad you asked. This F-150, which could be picked up as a new 2018 model for maybe $33k if you stacked your incentives right, is much cheaper to buy and run than my Silverado. Let us count the ways: It rolls on dirt-cheap 245/70R17 tires instead of the Chevy’s twenty-twos. It doesn’t have a front axle, which allows the 5.0 V8 to return about 21.5 mpg on regular gasoline and a remarkable 17 mpg on E85. It’s substantially simpler both inside and out, so there’s less to wrong and fewer repair costs involved if something does go wrong. In short, if my Silverado is the direct successor to the Kingswood wagons of the Seventies, this is more like a middling-spec Ford Galaxie sedan from the same years. Which is appropriate, because it performs pretty much the same role in many American families as those anonymous full-sized sedans did back then.

As a former Ford salesman from the Nineties, I still remember when the XLT trim was vaguely aspirational for F-150s. The approximate spec hasn’t changed — hard-wearing cloth seats, power windows/locks, tilt/cruise, an okay stereo, a generous but not flashy helping of chrome trim — but in the meantime there’s been a space race to pimp out the full-sized pickup, so the first impression a modern buyer gets from an XLT is “work truck.”

One of the B&B said earlier this week that XLT was roughly equivalent to Chevy LTZ; that’s a laugh. This is somewhere between 1LT and 2LT in terms of equipment, with seating areas that wouldn’t be out of place on a Chevy LS.

The dashboard and center stack are poverty-spec, with deliberately chintzy dials and an HVAC control system that feels designed to make the customer regret not buying a model with automatic climate control. It’s obviously the same electronics and capabilities behind the panel — and how can it be any cheaper to have an “manual” fan control with LEDs that light up around the knob to show what position you’ve chosen? Someone like our own Bozi Tatarevic could probably install a Lariat-style dual-zone setup in an hour or two. It doesn’t help that the HVAC system in general feels less able to precisely control the temperature than the equivalent GM equipment. On full blast, however, the F-150 was able to handle the 97-degree South Carolina heat without much difficulty.

The seats are probably the one area where this modern XLT doesn’t measure up to its Nineties predecessor. The fabric looks like it was overrun production from the 1997 Windstar GL, the manual seat adjustment is far from precise, and general comfort is more in the range of “acceptable” than “comfortable.” The flip-fold center middle seat has to be the worst in the business, offering a remarkably small amount of storage and requiring all manner of contortion to access the cubby on the center tunnel. On the positive side, it showed very little wear and tear from 27,000-plus miles of rental use. Ford knows how to do this better — just look at any mid-level Fusion for proof. It just doesn’t have any interest in selling you this over a Lariat, King Ranch, Limited, or Platinum.

There’s a bit of obvious skimping in the powertrain, as well. Not in the 5.0-liter engine, which loves to rev and sounds appropriately butch even through the soda-straw exhaust. Having driven both EcoBoost variants before this normally-aspirated V8, I would move heaven and earth to make sure than my own F-150 had the 5.0 under the hood. I’m less impressed with the six-speed transmission, which has a few bad habits. It’s reluctant to shift under power and slow to engage the clutches once it gets around to making the decision. Around town, it steadfastly refuses to shift up or unlock the torque converter when you come off the throttle. Instead, it drops to fourth gear in a hurry (for once) and engine-brakes your face into the airbag cover.

Pressing the button at the end of the poverty-spec hard-plastic column shifter engages tow/haul mode (if pressed once) and a “sport” mode (if pressed twice). I can’t speak to this truck’s towing ability — as with most rental half-tons, it was deliberately lacking a hitch — but the sport mode is risible at best and should be named “Fifth Gear On The Freeway Mode,” as the only observable difference when it’s engaged is that sixth gear is locked out, even above 80 mph.

I hate to say it, because I appreciate and respect the work Ford has put into developing first-rate overhead-cam engines, but the old-style 6.2 in my Silverado whips it coming and going. The best thing I can say is that current Titan and Tundra owners will be very impressed, while 5.7-liter Ram owners will probably come to accept the way the Ford prefers revving to twisting.

In matters of chassis and dynamics, however, the F-150 is the undisputed class of the field. This platform feels a little overwhelmed when it’s asked to underpin a jacked-up 4×4, but as a 2WD short-bed crewcab on 17-inch wheels it’s an authentic joy, effortlessly handling the mountain curves on I-77 at 90 mph and returning steering feedback that wouldn’t disgrace an E-Class. While the aluminum Ford might not weigh any less than a steel Chevy, the distribution of the weight is superior. This is the Lotus Evora of full-sized pickups, and the lack of a front axle just adds to the joy of driving. Shame that the aluminum panels are so dent-sensitive. As with a Lotus, you do pay a price for the athleticism.

Road noise is extremely low for a full-sized truck, and the “head toss” behavior that sullies much of the competition doesn’t make much of an appearance here. Compared to the Silverado, the F-150 has less space up front and a little more in back. It’s also missing the extra glovebox on the passenger side: blame the compromises of XLT trim for that. The same’s true for the rear window, which lacks any kind of sliding mechanism.

As a $30,000-ish proposition, either new or slightly used, this Ford amounts to the bargain of the century. For the price of an Accord or Camry, you get twice the power and twice the capability. It will last a long time and there will be a willing buyer lined up when you’re done with it. If there’s anything to regret about the F-150, it’s the fact that the resale market tends to punish people who choose a reasonable specification and the simpler two-wheel-drive powertrain. Shame, because this, not the Lincoln-ish Platinum or the absurd Raptor, is the best way to buy your all-American pickup truck.

Do I regret buying my Silverado? Not as a 6.2, 12,500-pound-tow-rating tugboat. But if I wanted a little bit less truck for a lot less money, I’d choose this one without hesitation. This is America. It’s pretty good. Give it a shot and see for yourself.

[Image: Jack Baruth/TTAC]

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150 Comments on “Rental Review: 2017 Ford F-150 XLT 4×2 SuperCrew 5.0...”


  • avatar
    "scarey"

    Why didn’t you rent a Ford Super-Duty King Ranch Platinum with the standard 1.0 L 3-cylinder 15-speed automatic and the automatic Stop/Start system ? Oh, wait ! That won’t be out until mid 2020.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    So, does this V8 require one or more SSTs to dig out the spark plugs that were broken when you attempted to change them?

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      It’s a Coyote rather than a modular (“Triton”), so I don’t think these have that problem. I was searching for a tool on Amazon recently, and the Triton spark plug repair kit came up in the related tools category. Made by Time-Sert, it’s $433.83. Gulp.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      I didn’t realize that there were problems with the plugs on these engines. Went to YouTube and watched Ron Williams do the repair on a 2-valve Triton. Wow. Ford did not have a “Better Idea” on this one. There must have been one of those “valid engineering decisions” made to utilize only 4 1/2 threads in aluminum to hold in the plugs against cylinder compression at varying pulse cycle frequencies.

      • 0 avatar
        greaseyknight

        I’ve done the repair on two cylinders on a 2V to install the inserts, and once you get that hang of it, with the right kit, its not that bad for a DIY’er with some knowledge and tools.

        Still sucks, but its not a scary as it sounds.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    “Never Mind The Bollocks”…a glimmer of hope during the dark ages of disco.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      There was actually a lot of great disco; it just wasn’t what they were playing on the radio. Disco and post-disco from the late 70s/early 80s are about all I listen to these days.

      I think much of the anger with disco was that it was without pretense. It didn’t take itself seriously, which was the point. People living in inner city slums didn’t need to be brought down even further by gloomy self-serving prog rock or punk. They rightfully wanted to dance.

      I think disco also made a lot of its haters feel self conscious. It was sexy dance music. From what I saw the average disco hater was unsexy and not good at dancing. I think it was a bit of jealousy. People grooving to disco were not thinking about whatever music its detractors were brooding to.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    For a rental fleet, maybe this trim makes sense, but I understand why the majority of individual buyers pick a Lariat or higher. It really is a luxury vehicle at that level and for someone putting a lot of miles on, those creature comforts are important.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      FWIW the XLT is indeed the most common trim. I’m certainly eyeballing this gen of F150, the aluminum body solves the biggest issue the prior ‘10-‘14 body had which was poor rust proofing. In my case I’m actually cross-comparing a lightly used F150 XLT and a Frontier, as odd as that may sound. I prefer the smaller size and more usable bed height of the frontier but the F150 would definitely be a more practical family hauler when needed. The F150 might actually get better real world mpg which is crazy to think.

      • 0 avatar
        cimarron typeR

        I’d give it a whirl. Both of my bros-in-laws own F150s in poverty spec w/ Sport package. The black cloth interior looks much better then the one pictured above. I have to say in Crew cab variants w/ short bed, they ride and handle remarkably well.They have the base ecoboosts, which are punchy,I’ve never driven the 5.0. The long wheelbase of full size trucks make for an Avalon like highway ride.

        I’ve always felt trucks are better in the poverty spec like JB chose vs fully loaded.Having sampled a buddies fully loaded GMC Duramax ,it didn’t feel that his 60k sticker was spent well(except for the powertrain).

        The F150 is basically the Camry of my area-probably because they’re built here in KC.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        XLT trim is in fact the most popular trim, but finding a base XLT with no options/equipment packages (as this appears to be) is a rarity. Plus there is the SXT (which is basically an XL with popular options like 8″ screen, bucket seats, etc) for basically the same price.

        That said Ford does abuse it sales position and reputation in the pickup market. It is much easier to get more content for less (or equal) money in most of the F-150’s competitors. Don’t even get F150 fanboys started on how you need to buy a loaded Lariat as an entry point just to get the LEDs.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      So the XLT is too down-market? LOL!!

  • avatar
    Menar Fromarz

    While I admire some aspects of these trucks, notably how civilized they have become, they are getting a bit big, and a bit tall for my taste. And FWIW, I drive a ’06 F350 Jumbotron. However, someone in Ford purchasing has a brother or relative in the “f’n awful grey cloth seat material industry”, or something to that effect, as for as long as I can remember, including Jumbotron’s seats, that cloth seating material makes me hurl. Don’t really know why, it just does. Like Ford paint colours in the ’60s thru the ’00’s, there is just something I cant quite put my finger on…
    From a member of the “cheap and cheerful” XL poverty spec/work truck fan club.

  • avatar
    St.George

    Nice review Jack, it’s great to see a review of a ‘normal’ spec truck, the sort that has enough doodads to make day to day life a little easier, but without the ‘bling’ that drives the price up to the stratosphere.

    I will certainly be in the market for one of these when the time comes. I used to drive the most basic vehicles ever (think Mk2 VW Polo’s, Vauxhall Cavaliers etc) so even a ‘prosaic’ truck like this has many wondrous features!

    It would be nice to see Apple Carplay/Android Auto though, that tiny screen is quite a disappointment. Did that small screen prove annoying? And what’s the sound quality like?

    Many thanks!

    • 0 avatar
      Prado

      Ford still does many ‘a la carte’ Options, in addition to packages. The bigger screen with sync3 is one of those options. You can actually spec up a very nicely equipped XLT, unlike this stripper XLT that Jack reviewed

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Well Jack Ford has obviously done a sh!tload of work on this Coyote powered pickup. As a matter of fact I had one for six and a half months.

    Handling??? WTF drugs do you take? The a $$end is skitish on anything not perfectly manicured.

    The engine is like driving a GM V6. You need revs to get any satisfaction and your FE is from some fantasy. I got 15mpg or less average.

    The interior makes the Chinese imported pickups we get appear prestigious.

    Rubbermaid knocked uo the interior in Laos or something.

    Its a lot of vehicle, but it was disappointing. The Hemi Rams I’ve had were better daily drivers.

    How much did Ford pay you????

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      You’re the only person I’ve *ever* heard suggesting the Coyote 5.0 was unimpressive, even in a truck, so I … think maybe it’s a personal issue?

      (You’re driving a 2017 F-150, but it’s not the *same* F-150, is it?

      Remember, on FE, that Jack’s talking about pure highway mileage, and this is a RWD truck.

      Combined, that makes 21mpg perfectly plausible, sine real-world Fuelly reports suggest 16-17mpg in mixed driving.

      Do they even import a 4×2 F-150 to Australia? Doesn’t seem like the market’s there compared to 4x4s, from a quick search. And the extra driveline stuff matters for economy.

      And on handling, is yours the same wheelbase and configuration? A longbed standard cab, e.g., would be expected to be more skittish than Jack’s shortbed crew cab, because of the weight distribution.

      I can’t speak for a modern F-150, but I will note my ’07 F-250 is not skittish at all, even empty, with its 5.4L and 4.10 rear end, even when I push it a little*.

      * Which I don’t do much, because it’s a 7,500# monstrosity and rewards moderation.)

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        (And I’m no Ford fanboy; having to replace the 5.4 in my truck at 130kmi made sure of that.

        Its eventually replacement has even odd of being a Chevy or even a Ram instead of a Ford, depending on who offers what at the time.)

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Sigivald,
        The engine is okay, but I don’t consider it much of an engine to move weight.

        A friend of mine is restoring a 67 Mustang and when considering engines he even said no Coyote for the very reasons I’m not a big fan. The 3.5 EcoThirst Epedition I had was a better engine.

    • 0 avatar
      "scarey"

      Who is this “Jack Ford” that you refer to ?
      Note to Our Man in Hamburg- punctuation !

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      What are you talking about Al?

      The interior of the F150 is good. At an XL or XLT level it isn’t great, but its certainly passable. It drives well and it is comfortable.

      I’m making a decision on a half ton truck soon, and I test drove all three half tons in the last week. The F150 is a fantastic product.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Nice to see an old name pop up! Didn’t peg you for a truck person Adam, what lead you down that path?

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I am usually moderating comments now and haven’t been commenting as much because of work. I need to comment more. Heck with work!!!!

          I want a truck because I really like trucks. I wouldn’t use a truck for truck things everyday, but I would quite a bit. Originally, I was going to wait for the Ranger or buy a Colorado. However, there is no value there. The Colorado is as much as a Silverado in some cases and the Ranger won’t have discounts. I’m trying to make a decision, but it will probably be the F150. It has a really good combination of price and options in a lease. The 2.7TT is a much better engine than what you get with lease specials from RAM and GM. An F150 with the 2.7TT and Sync3 isn’t much more than a Ram Express with the UConnect5 and Pentastar.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Adam,
        You constantly defend Ford for the crap interiors I have pointed out.

        US Ford and GM need to improve their interiors. Material choice seems Chinese cheap or worse. You Trump can’t figure out why the US can’t be more sucessful exporting vehicles, this is one simple change to make vehicles more attractive.

        The F150 I had worked, but in all honesty my BT50 interior is superior as the vehicle dynamics.

        The Ford might be quicker, but 70mph is 70mph, The F150 also didn’t offer any advantage over a Hilux.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    If not for me being a mild enviro-weenie AND wanting a track capable second car, I could do an RCSB 5.0 4×2. With the 10AT and whatever constitutes a decent 32″ diameter tire, this thing could almost be fun in the twisties. But I would want something like a 330e and an old DOHC VTEC Civic for my garage… this has absolutely no place in it lol.

    When I saw the center console, I retched. That photo after the passage debunking XLT = LTZ was a good sequence.

    Maybe Ford needs to bring back the Lightning.

  • avatar
    vvk

    The full size pickup is the best selling vehicle on the planet.

    I am perplexed by this, since I see families loading groceries into the rear seats of large pickups in supermarket parking lots. It is my impression that the bed of a full size pickup is unusable. First, it is too big to put anything in it because the stuff will end up so far away that it is unreachable and one would need to climb onto the bed to reach the shopping bags, etc. Climbing up into the bed seems like an almost impossible feat of acrobatics, since the bed is simply way too high for a normal height human to step onto. I can see how old style low to the ground pickups may be useful to have for house projects, etc. But it seems that the full size pickup is completely unusuable because it is too high to first lift heavy items into the bed and to later get these items out of the bed. Another thing that seems weird for a best selling vehicle is that they are impossible to climb into for both old people and little kids. So I don’t understand why people buy them, other than because they want to be protected in a crash and to be able to intimidate drivers of smaller vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      vvk,
      Research why.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Well, running boards are available on every truck. Also keep in mind those sales figures include HD trucks and do nit discriminate between fleet and consumer sales.

        • 0 avatar
          vvk

          >Well, running boards are available on every truck.

          I think if either my mother or my mother-in-law tried to use them, they would end up in the hospital.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @vvk – Sorry about your mother/MIL, seriously. The backseat of any pickup is considered part of the cargo area. And it one step back. Groceries especially you want to keep room temp anyway.

            You don’t drop small things in the bed, (especially when with the back seat available), that you’ll be reaching for eventually or immediately, without running boards, if you’re vertically challenged like me.

            You only set things in the bed that are big enough to reach/retrieve, or have handles not unlike grocery bags do.

            Sure there’s inconveniences driving a fullsize pickup vs say a RAV4, for the daily routine, but ask owners if they’re not easily outweighed by the advantages over any other type of vehicle.

            Believe me once you own one you wonder why it took you so long, especially if you already enjoy the great outdoors, projects, tasks, chores and or helping others accomplish theirs.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “First, it is too big to put anything in it because the stuff will end up so far away that it is unreachable and one would need to climb onto the bed to reach the shopping bags, etc.”

      Load management equipment solves that.

      People using them as grocery getters either put groceries in the backseat, or *have a solution in the bed*, be it dividers, a net, or a variety of other options, available from dealers or the aftermarket.

      Equally, I see both older [if not ancient] people and children getting in and out of trucks all the time. Handles and running boards or steps – they all have the former and in practice almost all have the latter; running boards are a $250 option on the F-150 XL, after all.

      My mom has used them and didn’t die, so I got that goin’ for me.

      (Height *is* higher than would be ideal for General Everyone Usage, but I think the Old Folks are buying low-riding SUVs more than pickups.

      I regularly load over half a ton of gear into the bed of mine for camping purposes [under a canopy, no less], and the liftover isn’t a big issue with the gate down; I’m not A Burly Man but I don’t find myself wishing it was lower.

      I wouldn’t *mind* it, but it’s not a pain point.)

    • 0 avatar
      don1967

      vvk,

      If you see cars as nothing more than transportation pods then yes, trucks are a waste of steel and gasoline 99% of the time. Just rent one when you need it.

      For millions of truck addicts, however, it’s more about independence and self-reliance. Being the guy who brings the stack of drywall home himself, helps his kids when they move, and brings his buddies and their clubs to the golf course in one vehicle. It’s a lifestyle thing, not a transportation thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Zipster

        It’s not really a life style thing, it’s an image thing. If practicality was the motive, than the bed height would be what it was for many years, about at foot lower. The nose would be dipped to be aerodynamic instead of blunt and fuel consumption would be about 20% less. But practical trucks are not the goal when you are trying to show the world that you are a person to be reckoned with.

        • 0 avatar
          "scarey"

          Here in Flyover Country, most people couldn’t care less about the prestige or image of their vehicles.
          Some of our vehicles are admittedly ugly. And IRL, practicality means hauling a cord of wood or a load of lumber, concrete blocks or camping gear. If it is not a gas hog, that is a bonus.

        • 0 avatar
          don1967

          Zipster, we agree that practicality is not the main reason people buy trucks.

          I said it’s more about independence and self-reliance… traits which have little to do with practicality. (Like my buddy who spent three weeks fabricating a homemade garage door opener just to see if he could. Not surprisingly he is also a truck owner.)

          Not every truck owner is a poseur. Some of them simply have an independent streak and enjoy working with tools.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        By that logic, minivans should be the best selling vehicles.

        It’s a fashion thing.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          The whole “nobody really needs a truck” has been beaten enough times. The horse is dead, give up. People want them, so they buy them. That’s it. Buy/drive what you want, and don’t dictate to other people how they should live their lives. It’s kind of pathetic and proves exactly the point Jack made in the second paragraph “they can’t afford to drop $60k on a cowboy Cadillac of their own.”

          • 0 avatar
            RSF

            Mandalorian- Yep, well said. Drive what you want or like. I couldn’t care less if you want to drive your Prius. I’ll continue buying F150’s as I have for the last 20 years.

          • 0 avatar
            vvk

            > The whole “nobody really needs a truck” has been beaten enough times.

            I asked about full size pickups being unusable to the average consumer. So far, none of you high horse pickup owners have answered my assertions. The ones that answered all agreed the full size pickup is a foot too tall. There was a time when I was considering buying a small Toyota pickup, one low to the ground. A work horse that would be useful around the house. I would actually prefer a Kei truck, if I could buy one with left hand drive. Small, incredibly useful, economical. A full size pickup? Lunacy! Like I said, it is so tall that it is unusable.

            As far as I can tell, the only reason is fear of death or injury in a crash, so pickup owners want the tallest, heaviest, most dangerous vehicle around.

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            You know, the idea that one must have no reason other than envy is sort of played out at this point too. It’s really not that big of an achievement to afford a late model(ish) pickup, especially if they’re as cheap to run and have the longevity the B&B swears they do.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    They misnamed the trim, should have called it the 2017 Ford LTD F-150. It’s our time’s full size family vehicle.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I seem to remember at the launch of the Dodge Dakota, someone remarking that the pickup truck is the most versatile vehicle you will ever own. I really can’t argue against that. It’s like clay that you shape into the vehicle of your needs.

    Maybe Ford needs to work on some of it’s packages with this truck, but I have a feeling it’s number one in the US for a reason.

  • avatar
    Dilrod

    Thanks for doing this review; I’ve been considering this exact truck for my next vehicle.

  • avatar
    AK

    The XL with the STX package seems like by far the best deal in the F150 lineup.

    As a bonus, it’s the best looking of the bunch too.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Sounds like yet another vehicle that would be a lot better with a shift-it-yourself transmission.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I owned a ’95 F-150 XLT SuperCab for 17 years, and I would agree on the seat material. Mine was Opal Gray, a kind of velour-type cloth with little random purple and green accent fibers woven in, and the stuff wore like iron, so that even when I traded it in after 214,000 miles, it still looked like new. My 2013 Tacoma has the same type of woven cloth that they use in this 2017 F-150. I’m sure it’s wear well, but it’s not as soft, and dog hair weaves itself into the fabric, and is a pain to get out.

    “As a former Ford salesman from the Nineties, I still remember when the XLT trim was vaguely aspirational for F-150s.”

    Yep. Back when I bought my ’95, it was the “Special” (basically the old Custom), then XL, XLT, and finally Eddie Bauer. My XLT had the power driver’s seat (with the 40/20/40 seat with the fold-down center), and the Alcoa alloys, so it was fairly loaded for an XLT. I thought the 5.0 was pretty quick, but in a drag race, the 4.0 V6 in my Tacoma would absolutely smoke the Windsor in the F-150.

    If I was buying one of these, I’d go for a 2018, only because I prefer the new front end to the frowny face front end of the 2015-2017 models.

  • avatar
    a5ehren

    That center console is embarrassing for what the sticker is on this thing, not that anyone actually ever paid that.

  • avatar
    gtem

    My one qualm is with the supercrews rear seats. I wish they sacrificed a few inches of the enormous legroom to put a few more degrees of recline to the rear row, or maybe make it adjustable like the ‘07-‘13 tundra crewmax.

    Excellent review Jack, like others have mentioned it’s great to see an XLT reviewed. Around here lightly used XLT 4wds in either supercab or super crew can be found in the mid $20k range with low miles, a highly tempting option. I’ve test driven a 2013 3.5L ecoboost and found the throttle response to be a bit off, I wonder what the new 2.7 is like.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    so you buy a GM pickup bc it is the most versatile thing with 4 wheels , and you decide it does not make sense to drive it for this trip so you rent a F150, Seems like maybe the GM pickup is not the do all machine you thought it was.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Versatile” necessarily compromises things that make the most-versatile vehicle lose to *specialized* vehicles in some contexts.

      Like this one.

      “Barely any cargo on a long highway trip” is the thing his super-versatile 4×4 towing rig is horribly ill-suited for, because it eats fuel economy while not using any of the rig’s particular *capabilities*.

      (I mean, Jack never suggested the GM was not capable of doing the job he wanted here, did he? Just that it would *burn a lot more fuel* doing it *no better*.)

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Would it really burn enough more fuel to make up for the cost of renting another truck? It’s not like 21mpg is anything to get excited about. What would his get under the same use? 18? It’s a rare rental for me that is under $100/day by the time taxes and fees are included in the rental rate. That’s a decent amount of gas.

        Of course, renting this is an excellent excuse for TTAC to both pay for the rental (presumably, or he at least gets to write it off if not) and pay Jack to write the review, of course. Win-win.

        In general I don’t get the concept of renting a vehicle to “save miles” on your otherwise entirely competent vehicle you are already paying for. If your car is decrepit or not enough seats or cargo capacity or whatever, OK, but renting something that is just about the same seems like a waste of money to me.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I agree with you in not getting the concept of renting a vehicle to save miles on a similar vehicle that you own. The only case that really makes sense to me is if you are considering buying a new one of the model you are renting. That way you can really get a feel for it that you couldn’t on the dealership’s short test route.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          I paid $513 and drove it 1,817 miles over nine days.

          Not to crush anybody’s dreams about what TTAC does or doesn’t pay me, but I wasn’t enough to cover the truck. I made the decision to rent based on the economics of what I think it costs me to run the Silverado per mile. That, and the fact that trucks get considerably worse at towing reliably as they age. It makes sense to use something else for long trips where there is no payload and no tow involved.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          If you can get 18 mpg out of a 6.2L 4×4 truck, you’re absolutely amazing. I bet you could get 50 mpg out of a Focus.

    • 0 avatar
      Prado

      Context. I’m guessing the F150 rental was essentially free if you get paid to write about it, as well as deduct the rental and gas as a business expense. On top of that, JB previously indicated the desire to purchase another truck similar to this. … so this may have been an extended test drive for that purpose as welll.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    FORD BUILDING THE F150 (BEST SELLING VEHICLE IN WORLD) IN UNITED STATES WITH 85% AMERICAN COMPANY-SOURCED PARTS!

    BRAVO, FORD!

    RAM MOVING *ALL* RAM PRPDUCTION TO U.S. AND ALREADY USING 72% AMERICAN COMPANY-SOURCED PARTS!

    BRAVO, RAM!

    GM (GUANGZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS) BUILDING THIS POS, THE SILVERADO IN MEXICO, WITH A MERE 55% AMERICAN COMPANY-SOURCED PARTS, *AND* EXPORTING CHINESE COMMIE ASSEMBLED VEHICLES (BUICKS, CADILLACS, CHEVROLETS) MADE OF 90%+ CHINESE COMMIE-SOURCED PARTS TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA!

    BOYCOTT GM (GUANGZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS) !!!

  • avatar
    86er

    I would give anything for 2wd trucks to be available in Canada.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “If there’s anything to regret about the F-150, it’s the fact that the resale market tends to punish people who choose a reasonable specification and the simpler two-wheel-drive powertrain.”

    This may be a regional thing. Most of what’s traded down south and out west is 4×2 so no biggie, but in other regions 4×2 is the kiss of death.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      For sure nobody in Maine has any interest at all in a 2WD pickup, and having had the “pleasure” in my youth neither would I. A GMC “Camper Special” diesel with the spare tire hung off the nose just to make that tail end have even LESS grip.

      I sure hope that one Canadian longing for a 2WD pickup lives in Vancouver.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “…in other regions 4×2 is the kiss of death.”

      Raising hand for Colorado…good luck finding a RWD-only model of anything around here unless it’s a muscle car or ‘Vette.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      4×4 is the dominate version in the PNW I just did a 50 mile radius on cars.com using my suburban Seattle zip code. Of the 2508 used listings for Crew Cabs, 2310 were listed as 4wd/AWD, 4 listed as FWD, 171 RWD and 23 Unknown. For Extended cabs it was 487 total with only 128 being listed as some form of 2wd. Regular cabs of the 251 listed there were 127 with some form of 2wd.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Even in the South, 4×4 is becoming more and more common, probably at least half of all newish truck have it. You really have to go WAY south to places like Miami and New Orleans to find majority 2WD anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      wyndage

      I’m in the southeast (Appalachia region). I just sold a 2015 F150 5.0 XLT 4×2 and it took some doing, despite the truck being optioned to the hilt. You couldn’t buy a nicer XLT.

      I definitely took a hit on resale due to the lack of 4×4. My truck just wasn’t desirable to very many buyers.

      Despite that, do you know how many times I needed or wished I’d had 4×4 in the 3 years I owned it? Zero.

  • avatar
    dartman

    “Once I did all the math, however, it made more sense to rent this F-150 and use it than it did to put that kind of mileage on the Chevy.”….

    hmmm…did all that math include expensing the rental and all associated costs as a “business expense” to be reimbursed by your employer as a clever way to pay for part of your vacation? Your inner salesman’s Id is showing; this is expense report pencil whipping as an art form!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Right, because the first thing that people who cheat on their expense reports do is publish the story of said cheating on the Internet.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      There are at least two ways I could have deducted this as a business expense — I took it to VIR for an R&T feature, and I wrote this piece.

      However, I was audited last year and it was made absolutely plain to me that the IRS considers autowriting income to be magical manna from the sky which admits of no expensing whatsoever. I’m serious about this. My auditor tried to deny the cost of the plane trip I took to write my Malaysia article in 2013. “How the fuck am I gonna get to Malaysia otherwise?” I asked. “Paddle?”

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Serious question: Why isn’t Road & Track covering your travel expenses (i.e. trip to Malaysia)?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          WORSE YET, assuming Are&T does not cover cost of such flights, whoever told you that “[I]t was made absolutely plain to me that the IRS considers autowriting income to be magical manna from the sky which admits of no expensing whatsoever…” is a massive, dumb a$$.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’m a diehard car guy, and I have absolutely no use for a truck, but I’ve always had a soft spot for the F150. In red. No super cab.

  • avatar
    bobmaxed

    I guess I’m on the wrong site this must Be TTAT but I was looking for TTAC.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      go here for a site dedicated to anything anti-truck: jalopnik.com

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Yeah, because trucks have such a tiny piece of the automotive landscape, any article concerning them is fluff. I know I’d much rather read an article on a Nissan Sentra rental review.

      “The CVT droaned, it got good mileage, its not that bad if you just need an a-to-b car”. Be still my beating heart! So much better than reading about something people actually buy and enjoy.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well F150 XLT is today’s Galaxie 500, the Lariat today’s LTD, ect.

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    Nice review, Jack. After driving a full-size truck, I do understand why they are so popular. If I’m keeping a vehicle for the average 10 years, it’s a solid choice, fuel economy aside.

    I will say that you don’t see this particular spec truck out on new car lots, just the rental counter and wherever sells them afterward. Most dealer XLT’s at least come with the upgraded radio and other niceties. These are basically XL’s. The 302a Sport pack seems like a very popular equipment group in my area.

    I will say, I’ve never been a fan of the steering on these F150’s. They have that weird dead spot in the middle that’s slightly upsetting on a new vehicle. Given my money, I’d take a Ram Big Horn, but can’t fault anyone who spends their hard-earned money of one of these.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      > After driving a full-size truck, I do understand why they are so popular.

      Please do share.

      After friving an F-150, I sure do not understand. Drives terrible, no feel, numb steering, weird brakes, impossible to climb into, dangerous to jump out of, impossible to park, does not fit into garage, bed is so high, it is impossible to reach into. I also was not able to use anything other than the heater because the stereo/computer interface is incomprehensible. Maybe the (brand new) rental I had was broken.

      I wonder if the difference is in how tall you are? I had to rent a Dodge Caravan a few weeks ago to take my family to an event. I felt it was way too high and way more difficult to get into than my old Traverse. The floor was so high, my MIL almost fell climbing out of it. Good thing there were a couple of bystanders who caught her. The floor of the Dodge Caravan was above my knee, which is CRAZY high. To give you a visual reference of what I am thinking when it comes to pickups:

      https://youtu.be/GKGsTJNBFz4

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Here’s a wild suggestion, how about you not buy one, not even drive one?

        Just let it be a mystery why they’re so popular with the mainstream, even 1st time pickup buyers.

        If you’re disappointed by fullsize trucks, prepare to be severely underwhelmed by smaller pickups.

  • avatar
    don1967

    I’m a convert to the world of personal trucks, but only because I was able to pay cash for a pampered used F150 from a trusted relative. The sheer utility of this rig, paired with zero monthly payments, makes it easy to overlook the rock-hard interior plastics, peeling paint, rusty frame and horrendous fuel economy.

    Wandering the local Ford dealer’s lot on a Sunday afternoon, however, the number of $70,000 (Cdn) windows stickers is mind-boggling. For the average person borrowing the money, this makes about as much financial sense as a drug habit.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I’m in the same boat with my little old Ranger. $2000 cash, dead reliable, nice and usable (low) 7 foot bed, I’m not afraid of denting or scratching it. But it’s not exactly relaxing to drive home in after a day of work, and not something I’d use to take a long trip in. It does get about 25mpg which is very nice indeed. I consider it my gateway into truck ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Buying a well cared for truck from a close and trusted relative. I wanted to do this, but my dad decided he needed it. Lol, okay so I told him about it and showed it to him, and he loves it.

      $16k for a 2013 XLT 4×4 SuperCrew one owner truck with 104k, tool box in the bed, aftermarket wheels/tires that are like new, I think its a deal. Best of all, he likes it and that’s all that counts. I was willing to buy it later this summer or fall, but he was ready to sell it now, so best that my dad got it.

      Now, time to clean up and sell his 1999 F-250 with *only* 340k miles on it.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    “The media has long vilified the full-sized pickup as an avatar of this country’s long-discredited and frankly unwanted silent majority.”

    Really? I think the media hasn’t done near enough to vilify trucks. In fact, most coverage I think probably glorifies the pickup truck as being “American, wholesome, etc” Also, not really sure there is a silent majority or that you could remotely equate such a group as belonging specifically (or mostly) to the Pickup truck. The voting block of which you speak is truly an amalgamation of several groups that couldn’t be more diametrically opposed in some cases.

    “Most of their complaints, however, are so much sound and impotent fury signifying nothing more than the fact they can’t afford to drop $60k on a cowboy Cadillac of their own.”

    For the life of me, I really cannot understand why anyone would assume that those who don’t own pickups simply cannot afford them. Is this a way that people who buy pickups deal with the vitriol and despise that non truck owners feel for them? A sort of reverse psychology? I can just hear that soundtrack playing in someone’s head. “Im not a prole, I bought this super expensive pickup, its awesome, I could even tow my whole house with it. See what I did there. One simply has nothing to do with the other.

    None of this is meant to be offensive to anyone. So many pickups on the road, it is truly a collection from every demographic. That doesn’t make them any less a menace to our society “in general”. It is important when writing persuasively to use the ad hominem though. Because how could any sane, reasonable, red-blooded American not like a truck. Somehow, this whole article sort of comes off like a tweet railing against “fake news”. Anyone suggesting that trucks aren’t amazing is some sort of propagandist trying to libel/slander the goodness of trucks and America itself.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      I can understand how people like trucks – some actually use them often as intended. The vast majority of purchases are really fashion statements- and there’s nothing wrong with that (excluding perhaps any global warming concerns). Many decisions are not “rational”, but make us happy. I don’t think its necessary to wax poetic about independence, the American way or whatever. If you made a decision that satisfies you, congratulations!

      For me personally, I would honestly have to be paid to take a pickup and incur all the additional costs and aggravation of driving a big, lumbering, gas guzzling vehicle versus a fun compact. Your mileage may vary….

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        “The vast majority of purchases are really fashion statements”

        So, you flag down and stop every pickup you see to ask them if they ever tow, go off-road or haul anything in it? You got more nerve than I do.

        I’m willing to bet that if it was the Toyota Tundra that sold as well as the F-150 and vice versa, suddenly truck owners wouldn’t be so bad.

      • 0 avatar
        don1967

        “The vast majority of purchases are really fashion statements- and there’s nothing wrong with that (excluding perhaps any global warming concerns)”

        You mean Prius purchases? I though we were talking about trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I’m speaking solely of the automotive media here, most of whom don’t make 60k in a year and most of whom expect to be lionized for driving used pieces of crap.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    I don’t see the point of reviewing a product which really does not extend to the 2018 version – comments on the transmission particularly when you are reviewing an antique when the 2018 is a 10 speed and is drawing rave reviews. The 3.5 ecoboost is hardly a skimped item either. You may be biased toward v-8’s, but that does not make the 3.5 a worthless option.

    XLT used to be top of the line in Ford trucks many moons ago. Then people kept buying more and more expensive ones and now the XLT is essentially an upgraded base model.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The XLT is the base retail model. Dealers do not have to stock the XL if they don’t want to and many don’t or only stock one or two.

      As far as reviewing last year’s model much of it does translate and many here would prefer to buy that slightly used model rather than new.

    • 0 avatar
      gmichaelj

      You can still get an F-150 XL and XLT with 6-speed transmission

      https://shop.ford.com/build/f150/?gnav=vhpnav#/select/

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      You should look at the stats for this site. Tens of thousands of people reading reviews of old cars. For a long time, my review of the Chevrolet Captiva was out-drawing new-car reviews. We have a long tail for this sort of stuff.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Is there any $35,000 vehicle with a cheaper interior? Is there any interior part that isn’t done better by Hyundai in a $10,000 Accent?

    Realistically, this is a vehicle costing $10,000 more than an Accord and will cost $1,000 more in gas per year. “This is America” alright, but not in a good way.

    (And is it possible to get through a TTAC post without multiple typos? I thought Jack at least had some pride in his writing. My wife probably spends more time proofreading her kindergarten report cards which have an average readership of less than 2.)

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      The issue is the WordPress interface, which will simply eat words as it parses 1,500-word articles through multiple plugins. The only way to make it perfect is to read the whole thing after each edit cycle and then fix the missing words which have been introduced by THAT edit.

      Shouldn’t that be “fewer than 2”?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Take your hand and cover up the blue oval. Is that better?

      And please show me a new Accent that the MSRP is $10k. Not even the perpetually cheapest new car Nissan Versa starts that low any more.

      And, wait until the odometer on each vehicle reads 100k, and tell me how much better the Hyundai still is. Its ready for the BHPH lot that can’t afford 200k mile Accords at the auction, while the F-150 looks (and is) ready for the next 100k and is still worth (and is easily sellable for) a pretty good chunk of its as-new MSRP..

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Sorry for your disappointment, or if you were mislead, but the interior for construction, tree service, etc, crews is no different than for the luxo Limited/Platinums, even if molded in different colors.

      So they have to take a hit from a metal organizer or lunch box, maybe 20 ft sticks of trim or PVC placed through the rear slider in a pinch, when you slam the brakes or bouncing down a dirt road without shattering, or even gouging.

      If the feel of look of the plastics is what you’re looking for in a “truck” truck, I don’t know what to tell ya.

  • avatar
    maui_zaui

    Nicely written! I had to make a comment more so on the writing than the actual truck itself. I appreciated how you somehow managed to weave in references to Donald Glover, elitist “journalist” ideology, and a tiny hint of patriotism? If you get caught doing the latter too often you may even be demonized as a nationalist. Anyhow, thanks for reviewing the XLT trim. Recent backyard projects involving multiple trips to my local Home Depot have made me consider a full sized truck. It’s always fun to take the whole family with 2 rear facing child seats while figuring out how to haul intact 4×8 sheet goods on a whim. This despite rationality reminding me that a Grand Caravan could probably accommodate all my “needs” at a much lower cost, but the wife refuses to participate or even entertain that idea.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Correction: It’s F150….Ford took out the “-” in the name.

    Interior is cheap, even on the higher end models which is disappointing. My coworker had a `16 that ended up leaving him stranded twice due to some electrical issues and had a complete loss of the wipers once during a rainstorm. (wiper motor failed). He never complained about the 5.0 and 6 speed though; they seemed perfectly fine to me. I haven’t driven a 10 speed model yet.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      “It’s F150….Ford took out the “-” in the name.”

      I’m sure someone at Ford found the old story about the New York Times saving $42 / year by removing the period after the name on the front page.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      Ford still refers to it as the F-150 with the “-“:

      https://www.ford.com/trucks/f150/

      They even stamped in the “-” on the tailgate in the 2018 models.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’m not sure where you read that, but the hyphen hasn’t diseappeared. Besides, taking the hyphen out might cause it to be confused for a Ferrari. (F430).

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    R.I.P. Richard “Old Man” Harrison. He loved cars, especially Chrysler Imperials.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Refining the full-size pickup to include real amenities and road manners while giving it 4 doors and a huge backseat was genius. “World’s Best Passenger Vehicle”. Isn’t that the truth, particularly the last two words. Panther fans, here’s your BOF, RWD, V8 sedan for 2018.

    These things are still expensive though, they’re no Camcord replacement for the masses. The largest Ford dealer in our metro area has 150 F-150s in stock, only 5 in V8 Super Crew variant, and only in XL trims that somehow crest $45K MSRP (they’re all 4WD). Listed discounts bring that to $38K. XLTs sitting on the lot are optioned to $50K MSRP minimum. Not sure how the “working middle class” is absorbing the costs if these trucks are not being used to generate household income.

    The cheapo interior is a valid complaint; nothing in there looks or feels any nicer than a second-tier subcompact commuter car. It’s bad. But you’re really buying the powertrain and capability. A C&D review of this truck provided acceleration stats that met or exceeded the new Accord 2.0T. It’ll embarrass a GTI in a straight line and emergency braking distances look solid as well. It’s huge but weighs the same as my 4Runner. Impressive.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      My bro’s mountain biking buddy brought over his new ‘17 F150 over recently just to show it off and put it through its paces. Supercrew 4wd 5.0 XL in refrigerator white and steel wheels optioned with the rear locker. Awesome capability and utility, and passable MPG (he’s been averaging 19mpg with his driving). For an outdoors-centric person a low end F150 makes a lot of sense, you sure get a lot for your money.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The working middle class would likely lease a vehicle in this price range.

      But $45K for an XL? Pre rebates? That’s actually the 45K XL including the “STX” (package), Super Crew 4X4 with the V8, SYNC3, 8″ touch screen, Apple Play, trailer backing assist, locking diff, 20″ wheels, fixed running-boards, fog lights, and a few others that embarrass the (at $1,000 more) base XLT 4X4 Crew, definitely in appearance.

      The XLT looks positively cheesy in comparison.

      What’s also great about the STX is color-keyed bumpers and grill surround, black “matte” grill, mirrors and door handles. Plus available carpet “delete” (which I’d actually pay more for).

      The first thing I did to mine was peel the “STX” from the bed sides.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      As a Panther Fan/Owner for over 20 years a F-150 as a daily driver does cross my mind from time to time. The problem is I just can’t justify having that many pickups. For the daily driver I’d want the Super Crew 5.5′ bed because I have have to parallel park and from experience I don’t like the clam shell doors in daily use. The problem is that I already have an F250 crew cab with 8′ bed and while it only sees 5-6,000 miles per year probably half of those are doing things that the F-150 couldn’t really replace. So I keep going back to having a sedan or maybe a CUV for a daily driver.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I had a 2018 F-150 XLT SuperCrew rental a couple of months ago. It only had the base 3.3-liter V6, but was equipped much better than this one. It had chrome door handles, the mid-spec instrument cluster (full-color LCD, but still a smaller screen), the large SYNC3 system with full map-based navigation, a power driver’s seat, power-adjustable pedals, and a factory bed-liner.

    Me, I don’t like poverty-spec anything, but nor do I want to drop $60K on a King Ranch, Platinum, or Limited. If you know what you’re doing, you can get a Lariat SuperCrew with RWD and leather seats for under $40K. That’s what I’d do. Skip the pricey options like LED lights and blind-spot monitoring.

    Now, the question is, for someone who isn’t going to tow or carry a giant payload…does it make sense to forget about the 5.0 and go for the 2.7-liter EcoBoost, which seems to be the best for daily driving on paper?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      The 2.7TT is a rocket ship. If you can live without the V8 sound, the 2.7TT is better as a daily driver.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        FYI the 5.0 V8 is now 10 speed only, 2017 was the last year for the V8 6 speed auto combo. Edmunds tested a 2.7TT & 10 speed against a 5.0 and 6 speed and the mileage was remarkably close. I’m guessing the 10 speed will make it more so (real world, not the EPAs test.)

        V8 for the sound, 2.7 because I’ve heard grown men giggle when the floored the accelerator in that twin turbo mil.

        • 0 avatar
          Carrera

          I’ve rented a 2018 XLT with the 2.7V6 and I was very impressed. The quiet woosh of the turbine is addictive. The ten speed transmission was flawless and seemed wired to my brain. Not a big fan of the start/stop but that’s easily defeatable with a button on the dash. The standard lcd screen is a sad joke. It looks tiny. The truck only had 1100 miles on it but drove like a dream. If I didn’t have to commute 100 miles per day, the 2018 F150 would be in my driveway.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            With the V8, it’s easy to forget you’re in a 1/2 ton truck, not a muscle car. Trust me you won’t regret it. In case you care, the V8 just feels right.

            I’ll gladly take a loss in power/torque, loss in towing. The V8 will probably get you more in “resale” though, at least to the private party.

    • 0 avatar
      RSF

      If you care about resale value go for the 5.0 or 3.5 Ecoboost. The 2.7’s take a hit.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    I am a car-guy. I don’t hate trucks, but wonder why a lot of people buy them, also wonder why the design needs to be so cartoonish. Yesterday, spent 600km in the back seat of a friend’s 2016 Ford F-150 Lariat (or whatever the fancy one is called). I want a truck. On the highway, that Ford is quieter than my Lexus, and soaks up the potholes far better.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Lightspeed how was comfort for a long haul in the back seat? Did you miss being able to recline the seat more? Inquiring minds want to know.

      • 0 avatar
        Lightspeed

        I’m 5’7″ so not real tall, the passenger in front of me was 6′ but I had plenty of knee-room. I found the seat reclined enough, more importantly, was well padded and proper shape. The leather on the seats was good quality and well-stitched, no wrinkles. This is not a cheap truck, likely CAD$60,000, so comparing to a Lexus GS is strangely not out of the question. I give Ford props for the comfort and quiet of this thing. Trucks have come a loooong way since I was pounding base-model trucks around the oil field 35 years ago. I definitely see why they are so popular. Basically, if you can afford a nice truck, why the heck wouldn’t you get one?

    • 0 avatar
      PM300

      Lightspeed, my thoughts exactly and I’m contemplating making the switch myself. I have a 2016 300S, which is already a smooth and quiet car, and my Dad’s 2016 F-150 XLT Supercrew is dead silent at interstate speeds and rides great. 19.1mpg with the 2.7 and 4×4 over 45k miles of heavily biased city driving also. I’m lucky to average 20mpg in the city with my 300S.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Great review for us commoners, Jack.

    My extended circle of associates must have heard I’m on a 4×10 summer schedule with Fridays off, because this weekend I was involved in 3 auto sales as their wingman/negotiator/guardian angel. One was a Rogue SV, the next a Toyota 4Runner Limited, the last (Saturday afternoon) an F-150 XLT SuperCrew. My friend has simple tastes (personally I’d want a King Ranch); he wanted a sunroof, heated seats, Blind Spot, nav, 5.0 and the trailer package in the RWD configuration. We nailed one at $33k plus TTL. That was a hell of a lot of vehicle for that money. Drives beautifully as well.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Maybe it’s time I try one of these pickups. Are they really that versatile? They don’t get all loose in rain or snow with an empty bed?

    I have always guessed that suvs made more sense. Theyre these trucks but with covered back ends, so your gear or luggage or home depot stuff fits but isn’t exposed to the weather. Back seats are for people?

    I actually really wish they’d make F150 suv or Silverado suv. I know you could argue an expedition or Tahoe, but they’re clearly dumbed down. I mean a full size off-road capable suv… The F150 with a cap kinda thing. Love the Tahoe but it seems like a Silverado will do far better in the rough stuff. It’s pretty clear the expedition is a family car.

    Weren’t the old big bronco and k10 blazer basically this? And why are they not made anymore?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      With an 8′ bed and regular cab, yes, but you can get around OK in snow with a 2wd crew cab, short bed.

      But it’s gotta hurt your pride sliding into the ditch, despite 4wd, traction/stability control and whatnot, and the cop that shows up is in a Crown Vic!

  • avatar
    crtfour

    A question for those that rent a vehicle to avoid putting miles on another similar vehicle, why would you do this especially with a truck? It’s not like it’s a collector’s item or anything. I’m the opposite and seem to enjoy my vehicles most during road trips. It’s almost like you saving the vehicle for the next person.

    Same as commuting in a crappy vehicle just to “save” the nice car. Life’s too short not to just enjoy it.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “Love the Tahoe but it seems like a Silverado will do far better in the rough stuff”

    But would it? Looking at the equipment lists and dimensions I don’t see why a Tahoe Z71 would be materially worse off-road than a Silverado Z71. There may be some nuance between the two, but if you’re doing hardcore off pavement stuff your better GM option is the ZR2 anyway.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I wouldn’t want to get a new (or newish) truck and have it sit outside forever, but from wall to door my garage is 225 inches long so AFAIK that excludes any full-size truck with a backseat from consideration.

    I like the tidier dimensions of the mid-size trucks, but the engines offered in that segment just don’t do anything for me.

  • avatar
    08Suzuki

    “Never mind the bollocks coming from professionally cynical actors-turned-rappers: This is America.”

    Ah, The Trump About Cars.

  • avatar

    I have a 2018 F-150 3.5tt with the 10-speed and some fancy options, and that truck just SHREDS the rear tires. Total burnout machine. My kids love it (roomy, real outlets in the back and climate control for them) and my wife keeps finding excuses to drive it.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I like GM’s 6.2 V8, but unless you go for higher trim levels, it’s not available. I take the Coyote with new 10 speed over the 5.3 GM V8 and its not so good 8 speed automatic. Until they make the 6.2 and 10 speed automatic available in lower trims and make it in USA, forget the GM trucks. F150 with V8 and 10 speed all day.

  • avatar
    CombiCoupe99

    After all these years, I STILL don’t get the four door luxo-truck with the mini-bed.

    I guess its OK to be like that – I just don’t relate.


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