By on May 8, 2018

2019 Ram 1500

Sixteen thousand, five hundred miles. In ten months. It would be fair to say that I’m getting a lot of use out of my Silverado “Max Tow”. What that number doesn’t make plain, however, is how much effort I put into not driving the truck. Unless the hitch is in use or there is some kind of load in the bed, I don’t take it out of the driveway.

This is not sitting well with my wife, the infamous Danger Girl. She point outs that we should be able to get a quarter-million miles on the truck and it makes very little sense to use something that is plainly more expensive to run, such as my ZX-14R, rather than the Silverado. All I can say in response is that I feel guilty using a three-ton-plus vehicle for the drive to work or dinner. It’s a mild form of mental illness, I suppose.

Not everybody is crazy like me. Which brings me to today’s “Ask Jack” questioner, who is in a rather unique position to go truckin’ like the Doo-dah man.


Bobby writes,

What’s worse than a rich kid asking you what car to get? It’s probably when somebody is getting a free car lol. Or in my case, a free truck lol. I’m being sent to Texas for a work assignment that would last maybe two years, possibly three. Living in the city I never had a truck and didn’t see the need. Basically, I can have a three-year lease paid by the company for a truck. The new Ram looks pretty good, but I remember you bought the Chevy. What should I do?

This was a remarkably terse email, so I’m going to make a couple of assumptions. I’m going to assume that the would-be company truck in question is a half-ton full-sizer, most likely a crew cab. So we can leave stuff like the Ridgeline and the Dodge Power Wagon out of this. I’m also going to assume that Bobby isn’t able to get something like a Tahoe RST or a Range Rover instead of the truck.

Given what an outsized presence half-tons have on both the American road and the American economy, it’s kind of odd to think that there are relatively few entries in the marketplace. They are:

* Ford F-150
* Silverado/Sierra
* RAM
* Toyota Tundra
* Nissan Titan

Did I forget any? Who cares if I did, because these are the only trucks that matter.

Right off the bat, I think we can forget about the Nissan Titan. It looks weird and I can’t see what it offers that the other trucks don’t. Sure, there’s that mid-size diesel, but… nah.

Normally the Tundra would be the next to go, but it happens to have a bit of an inside line here because it’s actually built in Texas. You never know. It might come in handy if Bobby has to deal with people who earn some or all of their living from the Toyota presence here.

My experience with the Silverado has been outstanding but there’s no point in leasing the old model and the new one isn’t available yet.

So I think this is a three-way fight between the local-favorite Tundra, the default-choice F-150, and the new Ram. Given that this is a company-paid lease and not a long-term personal purchase, I would find it very hard to say no to the Ram. It looks good, it will ride better than the others, and it has some utterly gobsmacking infotainment options. Last but not least, it might be cheaper to lease than the others thanks to incentives. So in Bobby’s shoes, I’d order myself a crew-cab Ram with every option in the book, and I’d make sure I’m in Amarillo by morning.

That’s a country song, in case you don’t know as much about country as I do. I know a lot about country music now. I’m a truck owner, you see.

[Image: © 2018 Matthew Guy/TTAC]

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83 Comments on “Ask Jack: A Truck Without Consequences?...”


  • avatar
    thegamper

    Thank you for leaving the truck in the driveway whenever possible.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      “I feel guilty using a three-ton-plus vehicle for the drive to work or dinner. It’s a mild form of mental illness, I suppose.”

      More likely it’s the result of being raised by people who experienced some privation in their lives and learned to abhor waste. My mom grew up in the depression and never threw out anything that could be reused somehow. As long as you don’t take it to extremes, like making yourself miserable by denying yourself real pleasure, it’s a fine mindset to maintain.

  • avatar

    maybe at this job they will teach bobby not to end his sentences with lol.

  • avatar
    ajla

    The lack of love for the F-150 5.0L on TTAC is distressing.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I’ll love it despite never having met it.

      I have driven a higher mileage 2010 with the old 5.4L and enjoy the smoothness, linear power delivery, and soundtrack of that engine. If the 5.0 combines those characteristics with the recorded ~6 second run to 60, it sounds plenty lovable to me.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        FWIW looking at Ford’s press releases they feel that THE VOLUME MODEL will be F150 Crew Cab 2.7 EcoBoost 4×4 XLT… (Which means they’re likely dang easy to find sitting around the dealers lot.)

        Personally I’d love a 5.0 model and slap and exhaust on it that makes it sound just like a Mustang GT while leaving it otherwise pretty stock.

        Why? For the grins of it.

        • 0 avatar
          srh

          In my area of the country the 5.0L is tough to find. That was my preference, but I had other stronger preferences so ended up with the 3.5L instead. In the end I figured “WTH, at least maybe I’ll get better mileage with the 3.5”.

          I don’t know what highway mileage the 5.0 gets, but my 3.5 is lucky to see 20 on the highway. Sure it sounds fine, but that’s probably because of the artificial revs pumped through the stereo. My 4-banger BMW sounds great inside but sounds like a dying squirrel from the outside.

        • 0 avatar
          whynot

          The two ecoboost engines (2.7 and 3.5) make up the bulk of the F150’s volume (by a lot). The 3.5 is necessary for getting max towing out of the vehicle. They both are fantastic engines though, other than their sound.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I had the 3.5 Egobust in a rental 2016 Expedition EL 4×4, and I would prefer a V8 over a V6, even over a doubly-blown V6.

            Ideally, I would like to see a 350 cubic inch/5.7L V8 with twin turbos, or a supercharger. Something that cranks out over 400hp with oodles and oodles of torque, and is still understressed.

            And GM sees it my way as well. They publicized GM will be making ‘m.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            The latest-gen of F-150 engines have moved to dual injection, haven’t they? I applaud that.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        OTOH, I’ve had to *replace* a 5.4 in a SuperDuty, and frankly I’d be happy to have the 3.5EB to replace it even my my SuperDuty, let alone in an F150.

        I can’t grasp why people are so enamored of the 5.0 – probably because I’ve never once cared “what my vehicle sounds like”, especially to passers-by.

        (And most people that do care seem to want “as loud or stupid as possible” and I want to murder them every time they drive by being loud and stupid.

        Anyone reading this that is NOT that person, well, you’re NOT that person.

        If you are, well, maybe reconsider that.)

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      A regular cab short bed 5.0 is basically an S197 Ranchero. Only about 4100lbs. I imagine they’d be a riot if you can live with the bench.

    • 0 avatar
      HattHa

      ’16 F-150 5.0 driver here…great engine, quick to rev and sounds good…flooring the thing always makes me smile…chose the 5.0 over EB b/c I plan on owning it for a decade or two and am convinced that a bigger engine running at lower capacity is a better LT play than a smaller engine at higher capacity (eg: turbocharged)…I could care less if an EB is faster as this thing is hella fast to begin with

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I’m guessing Bobby will be happy with any of the above. His criteria are not exactly restrictive.

    He should probably just go test drive XLT-ish trims of each from his local dealer and pick the one that seems right. Focus on the things that will matter for his ownership experience, such as which colors are available and which dealer has better coffee during scheduled oil changes. Obsessing over SAE tow ratings or the long term durability of a turbo vs. NA V8 isn’t necessary.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Just spent four days in Texas (Houston metro), driving around more than usual. Pretty much every man drives a truck, overwhelmingly half-tons with a few big guys and midsizers scattered in. I didn’t see all that many Tundras. Just an endless procession of F-150, Silvy, and Ram, decorated with an awful lot of “Lone Star” and “Texas Edition” badging.

    Even my FIL, who hosted us, who is a sports car guy in his heart of hearts, and who hauls something maybe once a year, has an older F-150, at least partly to fit in.

    • 0 avatar

      I was most comfortable and fitting in with my red front-drive Murano around the San Antonio area.

      NOT

      [But seriously the Murano’s really not bad for what it is.]

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        LOL, Nissan crossovers. My rental was a FWD Pathfinder, which actually worked quite well for its intended purpose of carting wife + babies + grandparents around, and was less awful than expected. Silver, so no one noticed it.

        • 0 avatar

          A biiiig Altima wagon you had there.

          The one I was in was oddly optioned, with heated seats and navigation over cloth, as I recall. And that red paint that costs extra.

          “Do you want a Murano, or this Journey,” she asked me. [e-z]

          But the ride was compliant, and the CVT matched okay to the 3.5. The interior had a mother of pearl wood trim that was awful, but overall the package was much improved over the prior generation. The old one was bouncy and harsh, with an even cheaper interior.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I was more pleased than expected with the ride. Not sporting at all, but nicely controlled. It’s better in that respect than the Altima it’s based on. CVT is always okay when mated to a V6, and fuel economy was very good for this class.

            I don’t think Nissan is calling them “Zero Gravity” anymore, but my pretty loaded SL had the uplevel seats and they were exceedingly comfortable. Honestly some of the best seats I’ve had in a recent mass-market car.

            Packaging is quite good too. My 5’3″ wife was comfortable in the third row (necessary as the third row only has one top tether for a car seat), and the second row is limo-like.

            Honestly it’s a more refined drive than a lot of other entries in the class. The only real drawback is design: it’s boring and ugly inside and out.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Ditto for my area in Denver, dal. The four-door pickup is the new status symbol around here.

      It’s gotten to the point where if you go into an American-brand dealer in my area, and tell them you’re not there to check out a truck, they look at you funny.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “The four-door pickup is the new status symbol”

        More than a status symbol because it is super-functional as well.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Really? I just don’t get the functionality unless you need to haul stuff that you don’t care about getting wet or stolen. A van is functional. Trucks are just silly. The codpieces of the 21st century.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            Saw a guy hauling a mattress and box spring when a storm with torrential rain and hail hit. He should have changed course to the dump. Vans haul stuff, pickups … strut?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            krhodes1, the functionality comes into play when it is used as a people hauler like in the four-door pickup versions, or a load hauler when the large open trunk is used, and pickups are usually taller than much of the traffic around them offering better visibility to the driver.

            Many people who can only afford ONE vehicle, like illegal aliens, or migrants, or guest laborers, will opt for the four door pickup truck to be their multi-purpose vehicles.

            Pickup truck sales really took off when the OEMs quit making the four door sedans like the Crown Vic, Mercury Marquis, Lincoln TownCar, et al.

            05lgt, many pickup truck owners also install camper shells on their truck beds.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            A little unnecessary prejudicial language in their, HDC, even supposing it might be true. You are right about one point though; with large–truly large–sedans now off the market, the four-door pickup truck had to take its place. It is, today, the ultimate status symbol for Americans that is used far more as a car than as a truck. I’m quite sure someone here can find the chart that shows how new trucks are used by their first owners but IIRC, roughly 50% never see a load in the bed or a trailer on the bumper until their second owner while another 20% only see an occasional load or trailer, used for recreational hauling/towing, not real work.

            It’s the second or later owners who finally put them to work.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Pickups have the best versatility, compared to vans which have a very narrow set of “advantages”.

            If your needs/uses/tasks change on a daily basis, ideally you would have a van and pickup at your disposal, maybe a flatbed too, but how can you beat a pickup as your solo vehicle?

            Never mind vans aren’t really good at eliminating your need for an additional sedan, SUV, family hauler, off roader, 5th wheel toter, luxury and or muscle car, etc, etc.

            I’ve hauled high-end loads across several states, through heavy rains, snow storms, and they’ve always arrived bone dry despite an “open bed”. Yep know how to use tarps effectively. “Rocket Science” yeah I know.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Vulpine – it wouldn’t be “HDC” without “prejudicial” language in there somewhere!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Vulpine, no prejudice on my part. Just an accurate reflection of what is real life in MY part of the US. New Mexico, The Land of Enchantment for illegal immigration, undocumented aliens, and a sanctuary state to boot!

            Both my 1988 ExtCab Silverado and my 2006 SuperCab F150 were sold to illegal aliens, one who was actually serving in the US Air Force, and who have both since departed NM for Blue states.

            I am amazed at how many refugees from high-tax states flee to NM, AZ, and TX to get away from the legal high taxation, but are willing to put up with all the illegality of harboring criminals in a sanctuary state.

            Something two-faced about that.

  • avatar

    Well, I was drunk the day my Mom got outta prison.
    And I went to pick her up in the rain.
    But, before I could get to the station in my pickup truck
    She got runned over by a damned old train.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      To cite another of that singer’s songs…

      “If that ain’t country, I’ll kiss your @$$!”

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I saw Coe live at the 8 Second Saloon last summer. Dude’s getting really old but apparently they still have to go hunt him down in a seedy strip club on the West side half an hour before his set. He’s pretty decrepit but still belted out some classics after warming up for a bit with some annoying woman singing over him for the first 4-5 songs.

    • 0 avatar
      Rick T.

      Steve Goodman was such a talent. Gone too soon and sorely missed. Wrote the perfect country and western song, the greatest train song as well as the best baseball song.

  • avatar
    relton

    Somehow I never feel guilty about driving around in my close-to-3 ton Bentley.

    Maybe it’s because the streets of Ann Arbor are filled with Teslas and Priuses, who are busy offsetting the Bentley’s excess.

  • avatar
    mikey

    If it was me paying the lease, I’d pick the Silverado.( retiree discount and all.) If someone else was picking up the tab, I prefer the looks of the F 150.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    A friend has an F-150 crew optioned out to the hilt. These new trucks amaze me at how comfortable and smooth-riding they are. When I replace my 2000 Lexus in a couple years, I can’t believe I am thinking to get a truck.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Within this context a Ram in whatever trim can get you a nice-ish leather interior and a Hemi sounds like the way to go. If you want an affordable factory bro-dozer look, Ram’s got the Rebel and Toyota has the Pro-4X for (relatively) attainable money,.

  • avatar
    86er

    These make you wanna sing “I ain’t rich, but lord I’m free”.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    My simple answer for the OP is to buy what you like and don’t worry about the specs. Unless you know you’re going to be hauling or towing unusual loads then don’t even worry about capacities. Besides, considering your obvious lack of experience with towing or even in driving something so large, what you choose is unlikely to be all that critical to the job; if it were, the company would have placed certain demands on your decision making.

    But I’m more like Jack, here. Why drive something so friggin’ large if you don’t need to? A modern mid-sized truck offers almost the same capabilities as those half-ton class trucks and are slightly smaller and easier to maneuver. I’d prefer something even smaller but unless the OEMs come out with something notably smaller within the next year or so, I expect I’ll be going with the Ranger (Ford seems to be the only company that understands what an “extended cab” is meant to do.) Meanwhile, I’ll keep driving my 21-year-old Ranger as despite the fact that it’s slightly underpowered (112 horses) it’s a heck of a lot of fun to drive and gives me decent economy for its age. (And its agility because of its much smaller size is enviable.)

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’ll be the outlier and go with the Toyota. Why? It’s made in Texas, yo.

  • avatar
    brettc

    If I wasn’t paying for it, I’d probably get the RAM as well. They have a unique look to them and you can get a diesel option for more manliness-ness points.

    Don’t forget that if you want to live in Texas, you’ve gotta have a fiddle and a band to go along with your truck.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    Not too often you read an article with a Grateful Dead reference AND a George Strait reference, and they’re both apropos. Well played.

    A lease someone else is paying for? Ram.
    Buying it yourself? F-150 or Silverado.

    I’m surprised more people aren’t putting 5.7 Hemis from Rams in old Mopars. My buddy’s 2005 Ram is falling apart and rusting to the ground, but that engine still runs like new and sounds like Freedom.

  • avatar

    btw lol i rec the RAM bc you don’t really need a truck 4 ur work it sounds like so u might as well be comfortable lol

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You are suspiciously good at that.

      • 0 avatar

        i am the chameleon

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I think Corey’s been trying to message me about a Mazda 3 I’m middling.

          I actually had some methhead on facebook try to convince me with a fake check and a bizarre SOB story as well. Between that and the sticklers upset over a few small hail dings and some carpet wear on a $4000 economy car with 156k miles and the paranoid folks, it’s been a fun ride.

    • 0 avatar
      Menar Fromarz

      I think you forgot to finish your sentence with “,yo” to fit into the whole vibe of this thread, even in jest.
      But if you didn’t, I’m ok with that.
      NOBODY with an intelligence above an IQ of 20 uses “yo”.
      I grew up in the ’70’s/’80’s and its funny to hear old Cheech and Chong nowadays and think ” Gee, relative to folks today, they actually sounded somewhat intelligent”

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    Raptor!

  • avatar
    Carzzi

    If it floats, flies, or trucks — rent, don’t buy.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Every time I think I want a truck ( and I’m simple, a used 2wd supercab something) I think of how many trucks I can rent for the cost.

      Although Dodge is offering a low mileage lease on the old Ram for 189/mo for 24 months with 2800 down in my area. It piqued my interest, but again, I “need” a truck so little but I’d like to have one for convenience ( mulch when I want, kids bikes to the park when I want,etc.) But just can’t justify it.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Jack, If you are now a Country trucker do you have the shoes and hat to go with that?

  • avatar
    walleyeman57

    “…You can set my truck on fire and roll it down a hill
    And I still wouldn’t trade it for a Coupe de Ville
    I’ve got an eight-foot bed that never has to be made
    You know if it weren’t for trucks we wouldn’t have tailgates
    I met all my wives in traffic jams
    There’s just something women like about a pickup man
    Most Friday nights I can be found
    In the bed of my truck on an old chaisse lounge
    Backed into my spot at the drive-in show
    You know a cargo light gives off a romantic glow
    I never have to wait in line at the popcorn stand
    Cuz there’s something women like about a pickup man”
    Joe Diffee “Pickup Man”

  • avatar
    NeilM

    I have the use of my neighbor’s Ford pickup whenever, as was the case today, I need to take a set of wheels and new track tires to be mated to one another. That’s pretty much the ideal truck — no, not a Ford, I mean a truck I don’t have to own. Now that’s ideal.

    What a freaking miserable driving experience, and holy sh!t, are they ever expensive!

    Obviously I understand a truck if that’s what’s actually needed on a daily basis, carting lumber, towing a horse trailer, whatever. But otherwise, puhlease.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      In my family, having one vehicle with an open bed is almost mandatory; it’s just too convenient when you want to carry things that just aren’t suitable for carrying inside the cabin. BUT… what we don’t need is a giant, twenty-three-foot Road Whale™ that can’t even get out of its own way, even if it had 1000 horses under the hood. Their lack of agility and excessive width make them a hazard on the road and newer models are simply top-heavy to the point of making them the single most dangerous vehicle on the roads in a single-vehicle crash. Today’s mid-sized trucks are little better, especially when they’re in full crew-cab guise. The problem is, there’s nothing truly smaller in today’s market and if you watch the roads you’ll see a surprising number of notably older, seemingly ‘compact’ trucks, when compared to modern full-sized models, though in their day they were called mid-sized.

      I currently drive a 21 year old Ranger. It lacks the extended cab and legroom that I and my wife need but it certainly lacks the excessive length and height (and width) of the full-sized trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “…BUT… what we don’t need is a giant, twenty-three-foot Road Whale™ that can’t even get out of its own way, even if it had 1000 horses under the hood…”

        Speak for yourself, but F-150 crew cabs start under 20 ft to just over 20 ft and can sprint to 60 mph in around 6 seconds, but I don’t know what you consider “fast” in you’r Hot Rod 4cyl Ranger.

        “…Their lack of agility and excessive width make them a hazard on the road and newer models are simply top-heavy to the point of making them the single most dangerous vehicle on the roads in a single-vehicle crash…”

        Maybe you’re expecting a tossable Autocrosser, with available 4Lo, good ground clearance in mud-n-snow knobbies?
        But the added width vs your Ranger is about 6 inches on each side, which makes me wonder how good you’re at piloting that mammoth midsize beast into a parking space without spotters.

        Hey some seniors are like that.

        “…Today’s mid-sized trucks are little better, especially when they’re in full crew-cab guise…”

        If you think midsize crew cabs are also too big, and too much for you to handle or live with, well what more can I say? What more can anyone say?

        “…The problem is, there’s nothing truly smaller in today’s market…

        You’re an outlier, and automakers can’t be expected (or forced) to bow to occasional niche buyers

        “…and if you watch the roads you’ll see a surprising number of notably older, seemingly ‘compact’ trucks, when compared to…”

        They’re not much smaller, mini-truck regular cabs to… well they don’t make new midsize regular-cabs anymore, but the old ones had thinner doors and slim bodies in 2wd guise.

        And it doesn’t mean owners of vintage mini-trucks don’t wish for something a little bigger, more roomy, especially regular cabs.

        But if you were to compare “classic” extra cab, mini-trucks with 4wd, (which came with wider tracks and fender flairs vs base 2wds), against Today’s “midsize” replacements, the difference would be negligible.

        But you won’t do that (just only “base” stripper mini-trucks vs full-boat, full feature current midsizers), you need something to complain about here and down at the retirement center, Boca Del Vista

    • 0 avatar
      riggodeezil

      “What a freaking miserable driving experience”.

      Yeah, that’s the thing. I keep hearing how nice and comfortable these modern pickups ride. Yet every one that I’ve test driven is much closer to “freaking miserable” than it is to “nice and comfortable”. But, hell, it’s a pickup not a sedan. Given that, I can’t believe how many folks use these things as their main (and maybe only) vehicle to do commutes, school drop-offs, grocery runs, etc. Seems like a big chunk of the white collar world have been brainwashed into thinking they “need” a half ton 4×4 crew cab V8 “just in case” the zombie apocalypse hits. Yet ‘til that happens, the behemoth is relegated to making 5 mile Slurpee runs and taking up all the space in the garage. I get it— it’s a “lifestyle vehicle” or whatever— but, damn, talk about a complete misapplication of damn fine machinery. It’s just mass, inexplicable inefficiency The fact that pickups are now being used as the “family car” and that a regular old joe that might need one for actual work couldn’t get it without selling off his kidneys says a lot about how screwed up things are these days. So, ayy Bobby: Unless you’re hauling manure, towing a house, or driving through a mud-bog pretty near every day, why don’t you show them Texicans what fer and just get yourself a nice, smooth-riding, easy to maneuver 30+ mpg sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I have to think that the people who say new trucks are smooth riding have never actually driven anything better than a clapped out Corolla. Because while they are certainly better than trucks of 2-3 decades ago, they still bounce, jounce, and shiver their way down the road. But people around here think Panthers are good to drive too, so what the heck do I know?

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Yeah they have a smooth ride “relatively speaking”, but tire-pressure means everything. I agree it’s a bit unnerving putting a rear tire in a bad pothole giving you the sensation you’re about to go sideways and die, just for a split second, but you get used to it, and it’s even not dangerous.

          The real beauty of pickups is elsewhere. You have to put up with assorted things with every type of car.

          Still you’re not gonna damage a wheel from a pothole, and I’ve cracked all four alloy wheels in one shot, driving a friend’s Accord with 40-series tires, just from a 1 inch lip (across the lane) on the badly worn freeway surface, after a wild storm.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            +1 DenverMike, tires choice and inflation make a huge choice. Per krhodes1’s comment, it’s tough to quantify how much of my impression is absolute and how much is relative to my expectation, but I have a fair amount of seat time in a borrowed ’04 Colorado (I5, 4WD, extended cab, Z71 package). I find it shockingly nice to drive. What absolutely transformed it was a switch from the OEM on/off-road tires to the most pavement-friendly Coopers available in the same size. Wow, do modern 75-series radials ride nicely. One wonders how well current sedans could drive if the stylists and marketeers actually let the engineers choose an optimal wheel/brake/tire set-up for a given model.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            That’s a good point. Many people run the fully loaded tire pressure even with an empty bed. That would make for a jittery ride.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      “What a freaking miserable driving experience.”

      In car terms, yeah. Three tons of wallowing body on frame makes a Corolla feel like a go-kart.

      Three tons of wallowing body on frame also makes absurdly low speed limits seem less absurd and your fellow drivers who fail to keep up with them seem less in need of shooting. It makes speed bumps and potholes irrelevant. It makes room to stretch your knees and elbows out along the way.

      I love driving a taut car on a fast road as much as anyone else here but for public roads as they actually exist the modern half ton is the least miserable thing that they’ve come up with yet.

      • 0 avatar
        riggodeezil

        “…for public roads as they actually exist…”

        Yeah, good point. Of course, I’d much rather see the infrastructure get fixed rather than have everybody driving around in Abrams tanks in order to deal with its crumbling. Right…I’ll keep on dreaming. Like others have said, most folks got their pickup for want rather than need and they probably would have made that choice even if 99% of their driving was done on smooth-as-glass tarmac. Nothing wrong with that, of course. Freedom of choice and all. It’s just an sight odd IMO— all the $50k 4×4 pick up trucks idling in the school drop off line or cruising around the mall looking for a parking spot (or 2) to fit in.

  • avatar
    cliff731

    Folks who reside in the other 49 States of the Union who haven’t ever set foot in Texas (The Great Republic of Texas!) need to know one thing… pickup trucks “rule” in Texas.

    You ain’t nobody in Texas unless you’re driving a pickup truck… and to paraphrase here, “When in Texas, do like Texans do”!!!

    I’ll add for Bobby that it doesn’t matter what flavor pickup truck he might decide to “own” once he’s in Texas… Ram, Ford, Chevy, GMC, Toyota, etc.

    Just as long as it’s a P-I-C-K-U-P T-R-U-C-K!!!

    • 0 avatar
      riggodeezil

      But definitely not something like a Ridgeline right? Can’t see that cutting it in Texas…even though it is a damn fine truck-like vehicle for Stanley the Suburbanite.

      What about the stereotypical big ol’ Cadillac with bull horns coming out of the grill? Anybody still got those? What’s the modern day equivalent?

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Sounds like Danger Girl might just want you to survive a while longer.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Drive them all and buy what you like.

    If you need real off-road capability, get one with 4WD. Some of the Rams have a weak on-demand AWD system instead.

  • avatar
    cliff731

    Riggodeezil… Honda Ridgeline won’t cut the mustard down in TEXAS… that one is for them “girlie boys”.

    I’ve never seen a Caddy down there either with those huge steer horns mounted on it. That’s just in the movies and TV shows… :-)

    Just get a real pickup truck. Don’t even have to be 4-wheel drive. As long as it’s a R-E-A-L pickup that’s “body on frame” at least rear wheel drive… V-8 under the hood is even better… and that bed on the back needs to be separate from the cab. No cheating here… ya hear?

    Trust me folks… I’ve been there and I’ve seen it! First hand as they say. Proper Texans don’t drive cars in Texas!!!

  • avatar
    Igloo

    Needs verses wants; the two seldom cross.

    As for status symbols where I currently reside, its which model Fisher V-plow you have.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Saw a guy hauling a mattress and box spring when a storm with torrential rain and hail hit. He should have changed course to the dump. Vans haul stuff, pickups … strut?

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      To be fair, how would have that mattress even fit inside of a van (unless it was a twin size bed)?

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        Once, when i was younger and poorer, I owned a 1998 Ford Econoline conversion van. I actually chose it, because I am a weirdo. Anyway, that thing would happily swallow a queen size mattress between the wheel wells if you took the seats out. It was also spacious, comfortable, reliable, and incredibly useful. I now own an F150, which in addition to being less spacious, comfortable, and useful than that van is also rediculously expensive for what it is. But I love it, because, as stipulated, I am a weirdo.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    If the company is picking up (no pun intended) the tab on a new pickup, order the most loaded variant that he can get his hands on. It does not say who is paying the fuel bill or associated expenses. I assume that the company will cover that so it really doesn’t matter the kind of mpg.
    If he has to cover fuel expenses or if he is uncomfortable driving a full sized truck then he can get a Colorado/Canyon or Tacoma. The Canyon can be had in Denali trim for the same price as a mid-spec full sized truck. If the only option is a full sized truck, get a short box i.e. 5.5 box if he doesn’t need to haul anything or as stated, isn’t comfortable with the size.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    Is this some parallel universe? I come here and read a buy-it recommendation from Baruth that specifies the convenience of the “infotainment” for a truck? I thought it was Jalopnik that sold their soul.

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