By on February 2, 2018

The day is upon us. The Big Game. And I’m not talking about my daughter’s basketball game from which I’ll be rushing home.

It’s the Super Bowl of big games — also known as The Super Bowl. The one time per year when marketers shake off the rust and bring out the big guns for 30 seconds of expensive glory.

This year, perhaps slowed by a football matchup between two Northeastern teams, there have been few commercials revealed — at least so far — in the lead-up to the game. As I’ve done in years past, I’ll be live(ish) blogging all of the automotive commercials throughout the game, but below I’ll share, in alphabetical order, the ones that have already made their way to Youtube.

Hyundai

Hyundai has released a pair of teasers. If you recall, last year the company filmed a commercial during Super Bowl LI where it brought three deployed service members to the game, virtually. This year, according to Adweek, the automaker is focused on bringing attention to the Hyundai Hope on Wheels foundation, which raises funds to fight pediatric cancer.

Hyundai has also enlisted the second-worst youth soccer referee in the world to rush kids off the field, just so he can get in his Hyundai Kona and head towards a big screen. Problem is, at least in these parts, ain’t no outdoor soccer being played this time of the year.

Kia

Matt Posky scooped me on this one yesterday. The automaker’s ad features famous rock star and scarf enthusiast Steven Tyler driving a Stinger backwards on a race track, as famous race car driver and lambchop sideburn enthusiast Emerson Fittipaldi looks on.

Lexus

I’m not a comic book person, but I infer that Marvel Studios’ Black Panther is indeed a movie based on a comic book. Lexus has a tie-in with the new LC and LS flagships — though the models shown have more autonomous features than are truly ready for public consumption.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz blends the glitchy trivia game HQ with an old-school local radio promotion in Last Fan Standing, where literally the last person still touching the Mercedes-AMG C43 Coupe on their cell phone will win it. And they’ll win cash to cover taxes, too, which nixes my plan to sell the C43 to fund a 190E 2.3-16 Cosworth purchase.

Weathertech

Floormats aren’t cars, I know. But what other auto accessory company has the funding to put up a Super Bowl commercial, let alone singlehandedly keep automotive print magazines alive?

This one will once again generate discussion about the All-American theme.

That’s all I have for now. Come back to TTAC on Sunday night to watch for surprises!

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30 Comments on “Super Bowl LII Pre-Game Commercial Round-up...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    We used to call those “Mutton Chop” sideburns back in the ‘70s.

    • 0 avatar
      Rick T.

      Your comment reminds me of the British saying about inappropriately dressed older woment as mutton dressed as lamb.

      PS – with the two East Coast teams this year, can’t really work up an enthusiasm for the game.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    None of the commercials are funny, clever, or even half-witted anymore, and that doesn’t just mean automakers. Superbowl used to be about the commercials you could only get away with running once a year, but between the predictability and lack of humor now coupled with all this taking a knee crap, I’m not tuning in to anything NFL.

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      The incessant replay reviews started turning me off a few years ago. Protesting is fine but I don’t care for the underlying victimology and anti-police sentiment it promotes.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Dart right in the bullseye, both of you. Ive been a lifelong NY Giants fan, but the whole point of football is that its supposed to be an escape from the politicizing of literally EVERYTHING these days. Really leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Football (and the rest of pro sports) has been politicized for a LONG time now. Do you think that stuff like having soldiers sing the National Anthem, or having fighter jets flying over the stadium right before kickoff, aren’t political statements? Of course they are. Patriotism is a political statement in and of itself, wouldn’t you say?

        It doesn’t end there, though. What about punishing players for using certain kinds of mind-altering substances (weed, for example), but not for using others (alcohol or tobacco)? Employers are certainly able to punish or fire employees for smoking weed off the job, but most cases, that’s a business decision; not a legal requirement. Last I checked, the whole “legalize it/don’t legalize it” debate has been going on since the ’60s, so I’d say the league is making a political statement here as well.

        Hell, the entire existence of pro sports leagues hangs on politics – technically, they’re trusts, and there are laws against that kind of thing (this is how Roger Clemens got trotted in front of a Congressional committee to testify about steriods).

        Not that I’m disagreeing with any of this kind of stuff, mind you – I’m perfectly fine with patriotism and telling players they have to behave if they want to keep their jobs.

        I’d say that you agreed with the politics they were putting on display, and don’t agree with the politics you’re seeing when people don’t stand up for the national anthem. And that’s cool. You’re entitled to believe what you want. Just don’t tell me that the pro football was somehow a refuge from politics; it wasn’t, and never has been.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Keep the teams in the locker room during the anthem. Problem solved.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Well, that, or just put up with your fellow Americans expressing themselves politically at the workplace, which is what the folks who are taking a knee are doing.

            Or just decide to ignore that entertainers and celebrities may have political opinions you don’t agree with, and just be entertained. That’s how I do it. If I got my undies in a “I’m boycotting you” twist over every singer, actor, or athlete I disagree with politically, I’d probably have to go live in a monastery. What’s the point? Just chalk it up to Americans being Americans, and choose to be entertained.

            Unfortunately, there are some people who demand that their entertainment has to march in lockstep with their political ideologies. And that’s true of too many people from all ends of the political spectrum. A big steaming cup of chill the f**k out would be a good thing right about now, if you ask me.

          • 0 avatar
            ClutchCarGo

            At this point it’s naïve to think that hiding away the players would solve the problem. Those who are offended by rich black athletes protesting police behavior will not be satisfied by anything less than making “that son of a b1tch” stand for the anthem where everyone can see him. Those who are offended by rich black athletes denied their freedom of speech will not be satisfied by anything less than full TV coverage of their protests. And so the nation spins, faster and faster, the center cannot hold.

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            I’m not pleased with the product, so I don’t watch as much, protests alone won’t keep me from watching. I don’t always agree with Eddie Vedder, but I travel quite a distance to attend Pearl Jam shows.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Meh, it may or not be a racial thing with people. There are just folks who don’t agree with the tone or content of the protests, and that’s OK. This is America, and they’re allowed to disagree. But they can’t tell me with a straight face that they’re upset about “politicizing” sports, because sports leagues have been politicized from the word go.

            What they’re really upset about is being confronted with a political opinion that doesn’t sit well with them, for whatever reason, and I’d imagine racism is one of those reasons for some people whose undies are in bunch. But certainly that’s not the case for all of them.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Anybody remember the Rodney Dangerfield vehicle “BACK TO SCHOOL”?

            Robert Downey Jr. is seriously underappreciated in his role as the “best friend”. His characters protests of the colleges football program as “a metaphor for nuclear war” is what these anthem protests remind me of.

            It’s a free country folks – can’t make adults do much of anything.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I try to put myself in the shoes of the people protesting whenever I see one. In that context, if I were an African-American, given how I know those folks were treated where I grew up by the police, I’d think that protesting police misconduct is far from trivial, even if protesting at a football game might not be the best way to get their point across.

            I then tried to put myself in the shoes of a tiki-torcher and came up with no earthly reason for them to be hacked about the stuff they’re hacked about. Then I vomited.

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            “To believers no proof is necessary, to non-believers no proof is possible” or something like that.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Pretty much, which is why I always try to figure out if there’s something to believe. In the case of police brutality towards black people, there’s plenty.

    • 0 avatar
      IBx1

      To add to my original statement, not only do I not care about entertainer’s political beliefs, I don’t *want* to know what they stand for. They can do whatever they want in their spare time, but on stage or on field I just want to see entertainment. If I were staging political protests in my workplace during work hours I’d be thrown out because it would be a smart move by my boss to do so.

      This works reverse for me the way it does for most people: most people say they don’t like someone’s politics but they still like their music/movies/whatever. Example for me is I don’t care for Taylor Swift’s music, but she has my utmost respect for deflecting political questions and not alienating her audience. Any time you take a political stance as an entertainer, you permanently alienate half of your audience. Issues come and go and your stance won’t matter just a few short months later, but disrupting your team dynamics and losing people who had your back lasts forever.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I see where you’re coming from, but whether you want to know or not know an entertainer’s stand on things, he or she still has the right to tell you nonetheless.

        It’s America. You can do what you want from there.

        In the case of the NFL, though, do you really think that if the players were kneeling to “honor fallen military heroes and our first responders,” or something like that, the “I quit the NFL over all this kneeling” crowd would still be offended? Somehow, I don’t think so. I think it boils down to disagreement over the protest’s message.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          “but whether you want to know or not know an entertainer’s stand on things, he or she still has the right to tell you nonetheless.”

          And a right to free speech doesn’t mean anybody has to listen. If there is truly a significant portion of the populace that is offended by the protests and refuses to watch the NFL, then they have decided “not to listen.”

          • 0 avatar
            Middle-Aged Miata Man

            “And a right to free speech doesn’t mean anybody has to listen.”

            IMHO, that is a very important point that needs to be emphasized much more often in this and every other 1st Amendment debate.

            Unfortunately, the Internet has not only provided an open forum for those spouting hysterical views, it has also fueled the mindset that such views are entitled to an audience.

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            The right to free speech doesn’t mean you’re free from the consequences of your speech.

            These athletes are protesting while on the job, representing their employer. If I did that, I’d rightfully lose my job the same day.

            Protest all you want, but do it on your own time and don’t drag your employer into it.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    Americans have become such good brainwashed consumers that we have an entire cottage industry devoted to analyzing super bowl commercials.

    Dilly dilly!

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    If your home town NFL team has been too crappy to make it to the Super Bowl, it may have been a public health service. Interesting news if you’re sick of self-satisfied Patriots fans:

    https://www.npr.org/2018/02/01/582513493/your-team-made-it-to-the-super-bowl-now-maybe-its-time-for-flu-shot

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Hyundai superheroes – WTF?
    Hyundai fat chick – WTF?
    Hyundai Kona kids soccer – total miss. Now I know that soccer has red cards but no idea what commercial was about
    Kia Stinger – right on money
    Lexus LS – not bad
    MB – at least we know, it was about MB
    WeatherTech – only missing – Make America Great again

  • avatar
    ajla

    I don’t mind the Super Bowl.

    I get to make KC *and* Memphis style ribs plus white queso kettle chip nachos.

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    ” I CANT STAND THE NFL AND ALL THAT IT STANDS FOR!” “OH DID YOU SEE THAT COMMERCIAL DURING THE SUPER BOWL!” Die, in a fire, soon. THX.

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