By on January 22, 2018

Our roads are a mess. It doesn’t seem to matter where in America (or Canada) one travels, there stands a very good chance that one will find crumbling infrastructure. In fact, the United States ranks eighth in the world in national infrastructure quality, behind Germany and the U.K., but above France and Canada, according to one recent study. Some days, it sure seems worse than that.

Which leads us to today’s question: what’s the worst road in your neck of the woods?

We don’t mean the most dangerous roads. Those are terrible, too, but often earn their badge through some combination of poor design and bad traffic patterns. No, what we mean in this post are the roads most likely to shoot a strut right through the hood of your car.

Back in June, Business Insider ranked a few states in terms of their appalling road conditions. New York was ranked eighth, laying claim to 114,365 miles of public road, 28 percent of them rated as being in poor condition. Heavy traffic (both in terms of weight and volume) combined with winter conditions that promote tarmac-warping freeze/thaw cycles all conspire to scupper the pavement in New York.

As a percentage, the same study reported that Washington, D.C. has the country’s worst roads, with a shocking 95 percent of the district’s 1,507 miles of public roads being classified as “poor.” As a function of basic math, small states which have a relatively low total mileage of public roads fared poorly in terms of a percentage.

Leading the way in terms of total miles of cratered pavement is California, no surprise for anyone who’s plied roads in the Golden State. About half of the state’s roads, which total nearly 200,000 miles worth, are said to be in poor condition, according to that same report.

What’s the worst road near your home? We’re sure there’s plenty of them.

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78 Comments on “QOTD: Potholes, Dips, and Craters – Oh my!...”


  • avatar
    idesigner

    Looks like the Mercier Bridge, but Montreal roads in general are in terrible shape. At one time you could see thru the rebar and see the rushing water, Yikes!

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      The Mercier Bridge is the one that is really two bridges side-by-side, right? (Like a lot of major freeway bridges.) Don’t know if it is still the case, but in the 1990s the left-most lane on each side was reversible- that is not something a lot of drivers expect when the rest of the oncoming traffic lanes are on a physically separate structure.

      In spite of all the lights and signage, there were occasionally there some ugly head-on collisions with buses! It just goes to show that 5% of all drivers are worse than 95% of the rest of the drivers on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        idesigner

        Yup that’s the one. One side is operated by the Province and the other is the Federal Gov.
        It’s looking a lot better, last year was when they finished replacing the final decks on the bridge.
        Not sure what there waiting for to change the railings.
        If the railings are an indication of what’s beneath the decking, its really bad.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Interstate 75 through Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. I used to think I-70 through St. Louis was the worst road ever designed, but I-75 here is a terrible excuse for a “freeway”, also through Dayton as well. It beats I-70 by a mile!

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @Zackman ..Agreed, I drove I-75 to Florida in late 2013 . At the time we were driving in the 2008 Mustang convertible . I guess it was a good thing that I had just spent some big bucks, replacing the integrated control arms/ ball joints.. Going through Cincinnati, stopping, or slowing, certainly wasn’t an option. I checked my wife’s seat belt , placed my hands at the 10 and 2 position and drove with the flow.

      For the most part American roads are in better shape than ours. That stretch of I-75 you refer to, made us feel right at home.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Here in the GTA It seems the only infrastructure our government is willing to build comes with a “toll bill”. Fair enough, I can live with that . You want convenience ? Pay for it.

    What does pi$$ me off, is the Brock Road to the 9th line West Bound stretch of the oh so expensive 407 . They have no problem building state of the art cameras, and transponder readers . The Ontario Government does seem to have an issue doing a proper fix to the pot holes.. Or better yet, maybe for the small fortune we all get billed for , we could possibly repave ?

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    There’s a stretch of road here that is just terrible – two-lanes, tucked in very close together and with heavy traffic. It makes pot hole dodging very difficult.

    Last year I went down this road after the March thaw. A few potholes later and my windshield cracked. Oh the wonders of the hard MINI suspension.

    They refinished the road last year but, given the poor grading, I fully expect it to be back to WARZONE level in the no-so-distant future.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Are we only counting paved roads? Every gravel road is junk for a week or two after it rains or the snow melts. The local paper runs a column of old-time excerpts, and 80-100 years ago there was an endless stream of complaints about how horrible the roads were.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    This is the big problem with all the very low profile tires these days. No rubber ‘tween the rim and the rubble.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Easy fix. Base CUV with smallest rims greatest sidewall or pickup truck minus one of the ridiculous option packages that give you 22 in rims.

      That seems to be the answer for many Americans.

      • 0 avatar
        redliner

        Reasonable sized wheels are underappreciated. I find that 17-18 inch wheels are the sweet spot for durability, handling, low cost of replacement and ride comfort. I ride on lightweight aluminum 17″ for the car, 18″ on the truck. It may not look special, but it’s mighty functional.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I’m a 14″-16″ man myself, and certainly can appreciate some good old steelies. My departed ES300 had 205/65R15 all seasons on the factory alloys, for the winter I picked up some junkyard camry steelies rolled up on 205/70R15 firestone winterforce snow tires. Normally I’d go narrower than summer for snow, but there was a sale on that size, $58 a tire. Due to Wal-Mart’s screw up I ended up getting them totally for free. Now THAT was a cushy bomb-proof ride. Handling-shmandling. As long as I can dodge a pothole that’s all the handling I need for my daily purposes.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            Am I the only one who giggled from reading that?

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Haha I caught that as I wrote it, but left it be. When it comes to vehicle wheel size, I’m no size queen, relatively speaking! :p

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I went with 10 ply tires on my F150 because the stock tires had way too much flex and flat resistance. My truck came with 18’s which allows for decent sidewall.
            The nice thing about owning a truck is having a suspension that will hold up better to crappy roads. My ex’s Sienna, the last time it had an alignment check was still within specs but just barely. My truck was still perfect last time it was checked and it gets used off-road.

            “I’m a 14″-16″ man myself”

            That reminds me of the joke about going in a tight end and coming out a wide receiver ;)

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    The roads here in Eastern Kentucky suck, but this year is no different than previous years. What is different is the amount of co-workers complaining about damaged tires/wheels in the last few years. While they may look/handle better, these short sidewall tires/wheels are not a good combination for winter driving.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Where are all the commenters bashing the pick up drivers with their empty beds? This topic may be one of the reasons for the demand of trucks. Our roads suck, and near as I can tell they are not going to improve.

    Who has time to deal with damaged tires and wheels, dodging pot holes and craters that can swallow small cars? Enter the 1/2 truck and in most cases you are good to go. Very few are offered with low profile tires and most have plenty of sidewall to absorb the shock even the worst potholes our infrastructure has to offer.

    Granted I drive a Suburban, not a pick up, but I like the fact that I have a serious set of treads on it with lots of side wall that makes crater like potholes less of a potential inconvenience.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yup. I was happy that my wife’s Terrain was one of the ones with 17 in rims and not optional 18 or 19 in rims. I’m happy to have 17 in rims and 65 aspect ratio tires on my Highlander.

      • 0 avatar
        EMedPA

        Exactly. Both my Escape and my wife’s T&C are proudly shod with steelies and snow tires. If one of us (or my 17 y/o daughter) hits a pothole, it’s unlikely to break anything.

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      I don’t know that a jacked-up diesel Bro-Dozer with a coal-rolling switch, is the answer to potholes. A vehicle of simply more-rugged construction, is.

      Here in my small Montana city…potholes abound, as we’re in a valley that has surprisingly-temperate weather. Which means, unlike the mountains, there’s a lot of freeze/thaw cycles.

      They also don’t use MUCH salt. We rail against the Eastern cities that pave the streets with rock salt…but not-using it has its own issues. This winter came fast and furious, but now it’s easing off to more-normal temperatures.

      Which gives us about four inches of snow/ice crust on side streets…that’s breaking up in big, thick chunks. There’s wheel ruts on many of them, and deep enough that the crust in the center can scrape against the car underside.

      Yes, a bro-dozer will do better than a SMART For2. But it’ll jar your teeth loose, anyway.

      The best answer, in theory, was the long-departed Jeep Cherokee…with the beam front axle, even in 2wd versions. The coil springs made it civilized; but the beam front track gave it more freedom from the dangers that befall MacPherson Strut FWD units.

      Since those are gone…those, and the Ultimate Urban Apocalypse Vehicle, the old AMGeneral mail truck (also with a beam front axle) the best bet might be some flavor of Wrangler. Or other vehicle, any brand, with a solid or heavily beefed-up front end.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “Which gives us about four inches of snow/ice crust on side streets…that’s breaking up in big, thick chunks.”

        Oh! I know exactly what you mean! Living in a warmer climate, I do miss four real seasons, but I don’t miss this particular aspect of winter driving.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        For the record JustPassinThru I have never advocated the jacked up diesel douching bro-dozer. I am not a fan.

        I am a big fan of the half ton gas CC 4×4. I am thinking from a price point, I could get an 5 Series, A4/A6 or a CC pickup with the same trimmings as the afore mentioned. Based on the crappy roads around here, I will gladly drive the pick up.

        • 0 avatar
          EMedPA

          @justpassinthrough: I wouldn’t recommend a 3/4 ton diesel to anyone, either. But in an area with consistently bad roads due to weather, a CUV with higher profile tires is not a bad choice. And a 4wd XJ Cherokee is the ultimate winter beater.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            A bloody shame that vehicle, and the people who designed it, didn’t survive the three major upheavals that AMC/Chrysler/Daimler/Cerberus/Fiat went through. The XJ proved, conclusively, that a beam front axle did not by itself destroy road manners; and DID offer tremendous advantages in a utility vehicle.

            As in or modern roads…maintained by governments like that of Chicago.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Sedan/CUV IFS seems to range in durability quite a bit as well, and varies by design and vehicle weight, etc. My ’96 ES300 (209k miles) with original everything was still very good and tight as far as bushings and balljoints and tie rod ends go, just a set of rear swaybar bushings and it was good t ogo. My ’03 Pilot with 178k miles has gotten a lower control arm to fix a critically worn lower balljoint, swaybar links all around, and I suspect somewhat worn tie rod ends causing some steering slop. The pilot is a girthy 4500lb, the Lexus closer to 3500lbs. The Honda also rides like crap over larger imperfections, even rolling on fat 70 series rubber. Toyotas generally seem to excel at having soft rides and durable suspensions, at a cost of handling sharpness/response.

        I miss my old Ranger’s twin-I-beam right now. Not the smoothest ride, but just a crude and stupidly sturdy setup. My 4Runner excels in these conditions, but warm/slushy/salty just makes me cringe about encouraging rust. I’ll sacrifice the $500 Pilot.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I’m not defending “brodozers” but a large tire is a definite advantage when talking about potholes and cracks in the road.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      87 Morgan, 1/2 ton pickup trucks and BOF SUVs like the Surburban based on 1/2 ton pickup trucks were the preferred solution to potholes on gravel roads where I grew up in Kansas. Rugged enough to survive rough roads if you occasionally fail to dodge a pothole. They also tended to hold their value much better than cars from the same domestic manufacturers. When parts or even the engine and transmission wore out, people would replace/rebuild the worn parts and put the pickup truck back on the road. My dad has a relatively nice looking pickup truck he can drive to church and a really beat up pickup truck used to haul rock and trash.

  • avatar
    rcx141

    Outside of the Chicago Loop a lot of the surface streets are in shocking condition. Yesterday I hit what turned out to be a collapsed manhole cover, damn near though the car was going to turn over. The really hilarious thing is you will be driving at literally 2mph down a street that has completely failed, and is more like a farm track – and it will have speed bumps!

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I-70 from Richmond,IN, to Indianapolis. Large pothole-sized chunks at the outer edge of most expansion joints and the expansion joints at bridge aprons are 6″-wide chasms with no fill. Bone jarring to say the least.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I-70 from Denver to the Kansas line used to be awful, but that was fixed a couple of years ago. I-70 from downtown Denver to the eastern suburbs is not great (it’s an old road set to be replaced soon), but it’s certainly livable.

    Otherwise, you get the usual potholes from time to time, but roads around the Denver area aren’t that bad from a maintenance standpoint, surprisingly enough. The main problem here is traffic – we have a highway system designed for a city of maybe a million and a half people trying to cope with the current population, which is around three million, and rising quickly. You could put a squadron of men on Mars for what it’d cost to build a truly effective system.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Spend some time in Elbert county….worst roads in the state.

      • 0 avatar
        TOTitan

        Im building a new home on 10 acres off 86 between Elizabeth and Kiowa so I know Elberts roads pretty well. Elbert road is the worst paved road but its lightly traveled so its easy enough to move around to avoid the bad places. 86 is fine and Kiowa Bennett is better than Elbert and has even less traffic. The unpaved roads are what youd expect but since Ive spent half my life in AK I probably have more experience than most on bad roads.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          The stretch of Singing Hills after Delbert Rd 3 way stop is pretty bad. Mostly due to the fact this is one of most traveled roads in the county as folks head into town for work.

          Fortunately I don’t have to head out that way too much.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      I’ll jump in here and mention I-70 over Vail pass, particularly east bound.. I drive it all the time. It gets lots of maintenance and resurfacing every few years, but a resurface job goes to hell within two years. I think it is the fact that semis strictly (and justifiably) must chain up, and that means that heavy semis clawing and slipping through ice and snow up and down the steep grades there, and 8 months a year of freeze thaw cycles just chews up the asphalt. That portion of I-70 is pretty much all thump, roar, crash, and bounce all the time.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I 40 through Arizona is terrible, especially once you get past Flagstaff. Of course they’ve got a Governor with the attitude of: “Paved Roads – another example of needless government expense.”

  • avatar
    Dan

    Living in Maryland with plenty of maintenance money and no winters to speak of, the roads are at least intact and generally pretty good.

    They’re also loaded so far past design capacity that you’ll spend most of your time at rutted gravel speeds anyway.

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    I can honestly say that there are no bad roads within hundreds of miles of where I live – with the exception of active construction.

    The worst roads I have driven on in the US had to be in and around Detroit, which made me appreciate my American rental car’s plush suspension. It was a real eye opener for me. It was the first time I understood why someone might want a soft riding car.

    Second would have to be New York City.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    The roads here aren’t terrible. People locally think they are but that’s only because they haven’t driven to the NE. However every time you drive over a bridge is a craps roll. Most of our bridges are over canals and they weren’t built to handle the population growth. (Idaho)

  • avatar
    3CatGo

    I live outside Harrisburg, PA, so I know bad roads. Although I’ll say PA’s highways get a bad rap that I think is a bit outdated, especially compared to Virginia, where I travel a lot.

    I also cannot see the US ranked ahead of France. I did a 1,400 mile route through France last year, covering Paris-Bordeaux-Toulouse-Paris, so pretty decent coverage, and the roads were amazing everyone, on and off highway. However, when we went to the Montreal GP back in 2015 I was appalled at how crappy Montreal’s roads were, I feared for our car every mile we drove. Beautiful city, terrible, terrible roads.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    I’m in Syracuse, NY., the road salt capital of the Earth. City streets are easier navigated with pack burros than cars, you want to stay near the rim of the potholes without falling in. Interstate 81 lies in wait for unsuspecting drivers to sacrifice a tie-rod or strut on the Altar of Sodium Chloride.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      I wonder if salt and magnesium chloride do in fact degrade asphalt. I suspect it , even if I cannot come up with an explanation.
      I also wonder if repeated scrapings by snow plows also damage road surface. I read somewhere that airports plow their runways with nylon edged blades to avoid runway damage.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        The plows can damage road surfaces; but mostly at irregularities. When I worked with a small-town DPW in NYS…the Oshkosh plow truck would peel manholes regularly. Not the lids…JUST the lids..but the cast boss they’d sit on. Break the tile that the casting was set on. A gaping four-foot-wide hole in the street where there had been no problem before.

        If it poked up, it could get lifted.

        Salt and magnesium chloride do not damage asphalt – in themselves. What they DO do is multiply the freeze-thaw cycle. Even with the temperature below freezing…the salt truck goes by; throws its load; the ice melts into brine.

        Which melts more ice, diluting the brine. Until the mix on the street is so watered down and diluted, it again freezes…busting open cracks in the pavement.

        And in two hours or so, repeat. THAT, in my observation, is where most of the winter damage to roads comes from.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I’ve never seen a plow pick up a manhole cover. My dad never mentioned it when he would contract hauling snow for the town.

          My town’s roads get light clearing done with tandem axle sand trucks with belly plows and nose plows for more open boulevards. After heavy snow or when it all gets packed down graders scrape right down to asphalt. 4×4 backhoes or front end loaders follow the graders and tidy up driveways.

          Loading snow into trucks is done by a large front end loader with a snow blower attachment or front end loaders.

          The trend to warmer winters play havoc on the roads. Freeze/thaw cycles break up asphalt and pop up pot-hole patches. Roads tend to stay in great shape if it hits -10C or colder and stays there.

          We call it “Spring breakup” when the frost comes out of the ground all of the secondary roads get hit with load restrictions to reduce pounding them out. Logging gets shut down until everything dries out.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    If there are areas with worse roads than Metro Detroit, America is in truly pitiful shape.

    Here in the Motor City, unless it was redone in the last five years, odds are the worse road is the one you are one.

    Mound Road was horrible. After the post-deep-freeze thaw, it is worse.

    I-75 south of exit 67, bad. I-696 east of I-75, bad.

    Years ago, during one of his visits, my brother remarked how 11 Mile Road was cratered as if A-10s had been doing practice runs. It was repaved several years ago, and is one of the few bright spots.

    As some one noted, our potholes (and many dirt roads–one would be surprised) probably drive a lot of Pick-Up sales in metro Detroit.

  • avatar
    JW9000

    Virtually every street in Baltimore, though I’ve heard that Cleveland is worse.

    I’ve already trashed one set of sway bars on my car, thanks to the 3rd world levels of street maintenance.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      These are the costs proles seem to forget. Esp when they clap at how their munis and state gov’ts screw them, for the chillens’.

      The irony is indeed thick when these conditions are not the exception but the norm and their response is: 22in wheel all the things!

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The Eldorado lost a wheelcover just *thinking* about the potholes.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      My Uncle had a 77 LeSabre coupe that he had pulled out of his father-in-laws barn as a beater daily driver to his factory job (this was in the early 1990s). Did GM use poor quality steel in the wheels in those years? He could never keep the factory hubcaps on AND he had slow leaks at all four corners because the factory wheels were subtly deformed at the rim causing leaks.

      He eventually swapped for new black steelies and baby moons with no trim rings. The local criminal element thought he was an undercover cop.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeremiah Mckenna

      I think I found it.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I think the methodology here is suspect. I lived and drove in the District for six years, and while the roads there had issues I couldn’t imagine classifying 95% of them as “poor.”

    Next-door neighbor city Baltimore is far worse, tied with Detroit as the place I’ve driven that has the worst roads. In both Baltimore and Detroit the problem goes beyond potholes to chunks of pavement that have gone entirely missing, with potentially catastrophic results for drivers (or pedestrians!) who aren’t paying close attention. NYC gets an honorable mention for bad roads too.

    Here in the PNW, things are usually pretty good. We get a lot of minor holes in the winter and small dips/bumps over time thanks to soggy ground that gives way, but without the freeze/thaw cycles you see in colder places it takes a long time for roads to fail catastrophically.

  • avatar
    Jeremiah Mckenna

    All of New Orleans, LA roads are littered with pot holes and rising and falling rod sections. But then again, some people think that New Orleans is one big pot hole.

    One of the main reasons the roads here are so bad is because of the soil and the fact that the land area around here is literally sinking all the time. there are roads around here that have so many holes and uneven pavement that you almost need a truck with a higher ground clearance to be able to drive down them. Not only that, buy you can’t drive faster than 5 miles an hour and it takes a long time to swerve back and forth avoiding as many large holes as possible, while driving over smaller ones.

    The soil is one major factor, but another major factor is funding. The local government around here is so corrupt that the money is collected in taxes, but spent in other places, or simply disappears. When you go to a town meeting, you can ask a question, but that question must be submitted prior to the meeting. If you ask a different question when it is your turn, then your mic is turned off and you are escorted out of the building by the police. When you question their authority, they throw you in cuffs, like they did the teacher a few days ago for questioning why the superintendent was receiving a huge raise while the teachers did not, nor are the schools performing at an adequate rate.

  • avatar
    gtem

    I could cheat and refer to the corner of Siberia I’m from, and the roads of Biysk where they repair potholes with stacked bricks, where the spring thaw turns streets into 2 foot deep rivers, and rural roads are moonscapes that savvy motorists turn the dirt shoulder into a usable lane and ignore the pavement.

    youtu.be/RhXHc9EV7xU

    Within the US and local to my part of the Midwest, I70 and I69 get pretty chewed up by the winter and heavy truck traffic. Heading east, I-86 east of Erie (lake effect epicenter) gets horrible after the winter. I’ve driven through in the spring when they simply put up signs “rough road next 11 miles” and then over that stretch see 5-6 cars with blown out tires. Generally late model sedans/CUVs with low profile rubber.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Gtem laughs at North American winter.

      “That all you got? You didn’t even flood the road!”

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        It is truly a destructive testing environment for cars. A few good hits on their potholes will blow out a fresh shock on a Toyota sedan (more or less the standard by which durability of non-4×4 passenger autos are judged). Although my cousin swore by his W210 E-class with 500k km under its belt. He sold that and moved back to a slew of used up Toyotas that he keeps running (Corolla fielder with 800k km, XV30 Camry). Russian stuff rides well but is actually not terribly durable, not in terms of ball joints and bushings anyways. But they are dirt cheap and easy to replace. Said cousin’s friend who’s a cabbie simply buys a full kit of balljoints and bushings to rebuild the front end on his RWD Fiat-based Lada 2107 every spring for about 5k rubles (less than $100 USD) every spring. For longer cross country fares he also runs an XV30 Camry (left hand drive, Euro-market). 1 inch Coil spring lift kits are commonly installed on Japanese imports, along with steel skid plates.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeremiah Mckenna

        Maybe that’s why more people are trying to get in here than there???

  • avatar
    George B

    The statement regarding crumbling infrastructure isn’t true. “Our roads are a mess. It doesn’t seem to matter where in America (or Canada) one travels, there stands a very good chance that one will find crumbling infrastructure.” Weather damage happens, but deferred maintenance is a choice. When I drove I-20 east from Dallas, the pavement transitioned from mostly ok in rural areas and suburbs to noticeably rougher in the central cities.

  • avatar
    Zipster

    I43 in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin has a nearly 20 mile section of washboard conditions which are probably related to expansion joint issues. No one slows down, but many regular users will be shocked and dismayed when they have to have major front end work performed.

  • avatar
    TW5

    US 380 is one of the worst roads in the DFW Metroplex. The quality of the road surface is actually quite good, but the population in the north DFW exurbs has exploded, and US 380 needs probably a billion dollars in upgrades to build overpasses and light the road for night time safety.

    Definitely one of the worst roads in the federal portfolio, though not for potholes.

  • avatar
    James2

    Honolulu, Hawaii, where the mere *thought* of rain causes roads to break out in pothole acne. Where the H-DOT somehow fails to spend hundreds of millions in federal funds and, instead of sucking it up and truly paving the freeways, they inject some sort of black glue* in the cracks of the roads.

    To be fair, the current idiot mayor is spending lots to address the backlog left behind by past idiot mayors, but addressing decades of neglect will probably take decades to fix.

    *Which gives my parents’ Lexus a case of the fits as the lane-correction mechanism can’t decide where the ‘lane’ is.

  • avatar
    Yesac13

    It amazes me to say this…

    Midcoast Maine where I live at… now has very good roads. Very, very good. I’m sure there are bad roads there and there but mostly not in my area.

    But they were VERY BAD 5 years ago or so. Then they were all repaved. Not only that… the drainage was actually fixed before repaving occured.

    The sad thing is… if you let roads go so bad, it actually costs more to fix them vs fixing them earlier. Why? Gotta dig all of the way down. I saw this a few times… the towns who did this ended up spending money on drainage so the new repairs would actually last.

    Fix drainage first then repave. Dig down as deep as possible if really bad shape so the repairs/repave lasts.

    Towns in my area are proactive with potholes.. always fill them in or cordoned off. I think it is because too many have had repairs done to their car’s suspension or tires so even lazy Maine bureaucrats are in a hurry to fix potholes.

    Maine is NOT a wealthy state. It’s among the poorer ones. So there is no excuses for shitty roads in wealthier states.

    I’m sure my roads will be bad again in say, 2025. Frost heaves are hell on roads. Time will tell. I hope not… the drainage is certainly vastly better now…

  • avatar
    rpn453

    In a couple months, it will be “all of them”. Hopefully they’ll have them patched up by next fall.

    Right now they’re fine if you have a reasonable amount of tire sidewall.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Where’s that classic Citroen suspension? If only tojo could do it cheap & reliable.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Just about any non-arterial street in downtown Seattle, Belltown, South Lake Union, and Queen Anne is a complete $h1t show.

    It’s a crater field of ruts, bumps, and metal plates from the endless construction. Heavy equipment and trucks have buckled the pavement, the city has no motivation to repave while massive construction is going on, and some of these streets truly resemble the roadways of Managua or Granada, Nicaragua.

    Roads are also covered in construction barriers and portable no-parking signs that investigation after investigation shows that construction companies are abusing to secure free parking for themselves. In many places outside of arterials, they are barely 2 lanes wide.

    I hate driving down there.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Eh. After dating a Baltimore girl for a while and doing the attendant driving in that city, I can’t get exercised about anything I’ve seen anywhere in Seattle, South Lake Union chaos included.

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  • ajla: “With 72+ month financing” What if there is no more 72+ month financing?
  • lstanley: Nice Audi. It’s a Genesis. Oh. Looks like an Audi. No, it’s a Genesis. Ok, I guess.

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