By on January 11, 2018

With the Focus RS out of production and the Fiesta ST heading off into the sunset, Ford’s attainable performance stable was starting to look a little bare. Maybe it still is, depending on your reaction to the vehicle pictured above.

Regardless of how you feel, it’s happening. For 2019, the Blue Oval is slapping its performance badge onto the midsize Edge crossover, cranking up the power, swapping the transmission, and sending the model to the plastic surgeon for a facelift. It’s 2018, and this is apparently what we want.

As the Edge was already due for a 2019 design refresh, this ST is your first glimpse of the new look —though it’s bound to be the most aggressive of the model range. More in keeping with models like the Fusion and Police Interceptor, the Edge’s reshaped grille beckons with black honeycomb mesh. No longer do the headlights (now LED) touch it. A larger lower bumper opening and angrier side vents boost the vehicle’s menace.

Amidships, though, it’s still the same old Edge. The side skirts appear unchanged from the previously range-topping Sport model, and the 21-inch wheels can now be had with a jet black finish. Out back, the rear bumper undergoes its own performance-minded makeover.

2019 Ford Edge ST, Image: Ford

Thankfully, the ST-ification of Edge isn’t merely an exercise in appearance. There’s extra power under the hood, with the 2.7-liter EcoBoost V6 — the hottest of the Edge powerplants — now making 335 horsepower and 380 lb-ft of torque. That’s up 20 hp and 30 lb-ft from the 2018 Edge Sport. Transmitting that power to all four corners is an eight-speed automatic, replacing the old six-speed unit.

Naturally, Ford went to work on the Edge’s legs, sportifying the Sport’s suspension for improved handling. One normally doesn’t think “Edge” when envisioning a powerful vehicle churning up the track, but that’s exactly where Dearborn wants buyers’ minds to roam.

“Edge ST puts a new animal on the road – a performance SUV with a track mentality,” said Hau Thai-Tang, Ford’s executive vice president of product development and purchasing, in a statement. An accompanying video shows stunt driver Ben Collins whipping the model around a rooftop course, though there’s no actual track in sight. Where does the Edge ST’s limits lie? That’s for you to discover.

Ford claims the model’s new Sport mode adjusts everything from throttle response to exhaust note, with the eight-speed holding gears almost until redline. There’s a performance brake package available if stopping is as important to you as going.

2019-Ford-Edge-ST-interior, Image: Ford

Inside, ST cues abound, as does new technology. Post-collision braking makes its debut on the 2019 Edge family (the vehicle applies moderate braking effort after detecting a collision), as does evasive steering assist. Guided by radar and cameras, the system works at low and high speeds to aid a driver’s collision-avoiding steering wheel inputs. Ford’s adaptive cruise control grows smarter for 2019, adopting a stop stop-and-go capability and lane centering. (Ford’s existing lane-holding system is a popular gripe here at TTAC.)

Of course, these driver-assist features aren’t relegated solely to the Edge ST, nor is the eight-speed. Ford’s on a fuel economy kick for 2019, and the 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder becomes standard kit for non-2.7 models. The engine gains 5 horsepower, bringing output to 250 hp and 275 lb-ft of torque (when fueled with high-test).

The 2019 Edge ST and its lesser siblings arrive at dealers this summer.

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

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80 Comments on “2019 Ford Edge ST: The Unlikely Athlete...”


  • avatar
    IBx1

    What a hot mess. Too many lines and twists that don’t line up properly with anything else, and of course it’s automatic-only. Hard pass.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged Miata Man

      It boggles my mind why Ford insists on styling that shines a glaring spotlight on misaligned panel fits.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        The Edge (and Taurus) always had horribly aligned panels. Even the new Lincoln Squidward, or whatever it’s called, has mis-aligned taillights in the press photos:

        https://www.netcarshow.com/lincoln/2019-nautilus/1600×1200/wallpaper_30.htm

        What I want to know is why Ford went so cheap on this reskin and did not fit the Edge Sanitary Towel (ST) with the CCD suspension? Everyone complains about the ride from the laughably large 21″ wheels, that would have been an easy way to solve that and, with “sport” mode (shouldn’t it be Sanitary Towel mode?) you could adjust the suspension to give you better handling.

        This is a typical half-assed refresh from Ford. And the interior is still horrendously cheap.

  • avatar
    Thinkin...

    And just like that, ST became meaningless. First they came for //M, then for AMG… What’s next, the new Subaru Ascent STI? It has 19 cup holders and is a thoroughbred rally car, because STI. Nothing against a fast Edge, but if “ST” had any brand equity, it meant “scrappy, fast, and reasonably cheap.” And ST has always meant manual transmission, right? Now it’s a high-spec trim line on an expensive midsize suv?

    Of course, they’ll sell boatloads of them. Middle management will love it.

    • 0 avatar
      mzr

      Word. Ford’s habit of diluting performance monikers continues, as ST joins SVT in its shallow grave.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        What SVT vehicle was not worthy of its name?

        Lightning, Cobra, Contour, Focus, Raptor?

        The Contour and Focus are the obvious candidates, but they were good vehicles. Well, maybe not to own, but they drove great.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeremiah Mckenna

          There was also the Merker XR4 Ti
          Let’s not forget about the Thunderbird Turbo coupe, the Mustang SVO, and the Mercury Cougar XR7

        • 0 avatar
          mzr

          Yes, they had a good string of hits and then let it die on the vine. It was a group within Ford, and they were to produce performance vehicles. They also started slapping SVT on anything it would stick to in their parts catalog.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          1999 Cobra really wasn’t worth the badge. The 99 Mustang GT was nearly as fast. If you recall (no pun intended) Ford had a recall on them since they weren’t making the advertised power and IIRC were getting sued by owners.

          As the story goes John Coletti after doing some development work on the Cobra with his team walked out of a store and tossed a can of dog food into the car and told his team that is what he thought of the NA Cobra. It was a dog and was one of the reasons for the 03/04 supercharged Cobra.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Seems to fit the mold to me? I never considered the ST line particularly “hardcore” like the Fescue RS or GT350 Mustangs and it seems fairly faithful to the moniker with an upgrade engine and suspension.

        The only real departures seems to be the lack or Recaros and no manual transmission but I suspect niether would be particularly welcome in the Edge ST and then I think if one were to be included it would be the Recaros.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Not with almost 400 lb-ft of torque and Motor Trend figure-8 times within a few tenths of an X4/X5.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    Dumb. Who the hell green lighted this?

  • avatar
    hirostates12

    “Edge ST puts a new animal on the road”

    And that animal is the devil spawn of the sexual union of a manatee and a feral hog.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    So what you’re saying is that, like the Nautilus (formerly MKX), the N/A Duratec V6 is out of the lineup for 2019?

  • avatar
    brettc

    21″ wheels? That’s insane. I wonder how many of these will be traded in when it’s time for tire replacement.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      The current 21″ Edge Sport wheels are $1,141.43 a piece. They also make the Edge ride like crap. The 18″ wheels of the MKX/Nautilus paired with the 2.7TT are cheaper and better.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        That’s why you can buy the “Linglong Singsong radial happy best go!” Nothing like seeing these newer cars with large wheels, especially high-end stuff, with garbage Chinese tires on them.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I love Chinese tire names.

          They are all basically Comfort Road Wizard Dragon XT1123

          • 0 avatar
            JaredN

            HAHAHAHA you’re so right. I love seeing what our service department at work conjures up for people who just want the cheapest new tire possible

          • 0 avatar
            civicjohn

            ROFL, +1.

            Now if you could have worked in “HanKOOK” (emphasis added), you’d be up for post of the month.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I rolled my eyes when one of my fellow principals replaced the original tires on her Pilot with Linglong tires.

          “YOU MAKE $80,000 a year you cheap BA$TARD! Buy a real tire!”

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            I see a bunch of wannabee “ballers” rolling around in fairly new Audis, Benzs, etc.

            You can always tell when they’re wannabees when their AMG rolls up in brand new Chinese tires.

            Or better yet, three different brands on four corners.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          Is the soccer mom who buys this beast at next year’s Ford Holiday Sale going to remember to put some of her $9,000 rebate into swapping those fancy summer tires out for proper winter rubber? I sure hope so because I can see this thing being an absolute nightmare in the Midwest and on the East Coast in the winter with inexperienced drivers behind the wheel.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeremiah Mckenna

        Where are you getting your tires from? Hankook makes some for only $212/tire, Michelin for only $275 and Continental for only $226. There are a ton of 21″ tires in that price range.

        If you are talking about the alloy WHEEL, then yes, OEM wheels are going to be pricey. But then again, wheels are not inexpensive. I just put a set of wheels on a car and they were $3,000 each.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        The Noble 2 S2 (?) is the same as used on my Envision Premium. A good tire above 50°F for a all season UHP.

      • 0 avatar
        EMedPA

        Amen, Adam. I keep waiting for the plague of Conestoga Wagon wheel to go away.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Good gravy! I pitched a blue fit when my 2009 Pontiac came with 17″ wheels standard. In relative terms, 17″ tires and wheels are cheap.

      When will the wheel size inflation end?

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      I wonder how many of these “budget” sports vehicles get traded for a whole bunch of expensive reasons – how much are new discs and pads for the high performance brake package? How much does it cost to replace adjustable dampers? How much for new performance rubber after they wear out in 5,000 to 15,000 miles? How much for a new super low chin spoiler that constantly gets cracked with curb contact while parking, etc.? These “consumable” items are extremely costly relative to the new price of the vehicle, which probably surprises a whole lot of buyers who just wanted to look sporty during their 84 easy monthly payments.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        I wouldn’t expect the discs and pads on this vehicle to be much more expensive than anything else Ford makes. They’ll just grab rotors from the Conti or something. They parts bin all these vehicles, which is fine.

        Now the chin spoiler, wheels, and tires are going to be expensive to replace. If anyone is buying this car on payments, I would tell them to shell out the $500 or whatever for the tire and wheel coverage. I usually hate that stuff, but if you hit a pothole, blow out a tire, and crack a rim, that’s going to be at least $1500.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Yeah, it’s perplexing they stick this with that much unslightly ground clearance, but also rubber band tires and massive expensive rims that negate much of the benefit of ground clearance.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        If this is the performance version (haha) of a CUV then why is the ride height still so high? This thing needs a drop. But then you can’t stuff the silly 21″s wheels under it. Thanks to rapper videos on YouTube apparently everyone need to rollin’ with 20″ or bigger rimz.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeremiah Mckenna

      Why would you trade in your car when the tires are only $230 each?

      • 0 avatar
        ktm

        Because these are the same people that will be carrying a 7 year note after rolling the balance of their last 20 vehicles into its purchase, making a monthly payment they can barely afford.

        A $230 tire is JUST for the tire. Mounting, balancing, tax, disposal fee, etc. and you are going to be closer to $275 a tire. Multiply by 4 and that’s an $1100 nut.

    • 0 avatar
      focus-ed

      Hopefully (for some of the more ignorant original ST owners and used vehicle buyers), the “performance”/bling brake calipers will clear smaller rims. It’s not too bad if the OEM tires made it to intended replacement interval (if still pricey), but at 21” most of them will be cut on potholes or curbed in half the time. Pity the fools.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I mean, I get it from the business standpoint. “It’s what the people want”. Why have a small, tossable, trackable car when you can have a large crossover with the same badge that is none of those things? This is the same idea as an X5 M, just with Ford badges and pricing. Probably.

    The performance brake kit should be standard. Our Sienna SE with nearly 300hp can go really well. But don’t try to slow it quickly from speed or you’ll hear nothing but protest from the braking system. These are large, heavy and powerful vehicles, they should have the brakes up to the task, even if there’s only faux sporting pretensions. I remember driving a rental Avalon spiritedly around 2011 and finding out the brakes weren’t quite up to the powerplants ability to generate go.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeremiah Mckenna

      Have you driven an X5 M after driving an X5? There is a huge difference in performance, handling and of course braking.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        Not my point. My point is that if BMW can sell X5 M version, Ford can sell this thing at a lower price point to those shopping domestic. FCA moves Cherokee SRT-8, why can’t Ford sell these. I do agree its a drag on the ST name.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Well, considering the industry-wide shift to SUV/CUVs in the USDM, this vehicle makes sense.

    Maybe not for me specifically, but in the larger scope, it does.

  • avatar
    AK

    Yuck.

    STs were kinda cool.

    That’s gone now.

  • avatar
    Jeremiah Mckenna

    It’s the Edge with edge, the edgy Edge. Who maned this thing in the first place?

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Gotta admit, if I haven’t bought a car by then (been looking for the “perfect” car for 2-3 years now :-), I’ll take a look.

    I’m looking for a good, sporty/shiftable automatic, 300+ hp, AWD, room for 4 on road trips and somewhat trackable and not over $40-45K and not too many reliability issues. Mind you, if it’s the same AWD/center diff system that’s already having issues in the Fusion with mild tuning, then not THAT interested.. Current “model of interest” is a Q50 TT..

    On the other hand, we had a rental Flex last year, and even though they claimed it was “fast”, it ended up being the 2.0T FWD model, not the 2.7TT AWD, and even with tiny amounts of rain on the road (i.e. a drizzle), I could spin the front tires at will, anywhere between 5-40 mph. Plus, a little cramped inside for the driver..

    • 0 avatar
      Chris FOM

      The Flex has only been offered with a 3.5L V6, in either NA or twin-turbo guise. Ford’s never put any of their other engines in it, unless that’s a very recent change.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    If you gotta have a crossover, this one will at least be a little fun. I’m in that camp, and have rented an Edge a few times, and found it generally pleasing.

    But to REALLY qualify as an ST, it needs the 3.5 L EcoBoost, and I’d personally prefer an ST version of the Escape with 2.3L turbo and 6 MT.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    In theory, this is appealing – if the market must go all CUV-crazy, then performance models are a good thing. I have a feeling this thing’s gonna check in at around fifty large, though. What’s the point? I can’t see this selling.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I don’t see how there’s a market for this beyond what the Edge Sport already served.

    The “ST” moniker doesn’t really have any prestige behind it to court badge chasers, traditional CUV shoppers would be happier with a Titanium or Nautilus, and it isn’t as butch as a Tahoe or Durango RT.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Well, at least Ford is trying – a little bit. Only looks good next to the appearance packages Chevy calls “RS”.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    “Sportifying” an SUV gives you the worst of both worlds. It’s like a mermaid built upside down. You see those long, stylish legs, but above that, it’s just an ugly fish.

    My wife’s been driving something like this for four years, and I dislike it more every year. Our Tiguan came with 19 inch wheels and “sports suspension.” Yes, it does corner flat and carve the turns, but at the price of a non-compliant ride that magnifies every bump. The high riding position magnifies every dip in the road, too, amplifying side-to-side head toss. That “commanding driving position” does little good amid a sea of even taller pickups, and it acts to make it appear you’re driving slower than you are. Go-karts and vintage sports cars seem faster because the pavement zips by just below eye levels, and this gives the opposite impression.

    There’s a use for sports cars and for SUVs- it’s just the opposite use, with conflicting demands and constraints.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Some day, we’re all going to look back on this era with a lot of shame and embarrassment, the way most people look at the landau/brougham land yacht era now. “What were we thinking?”

    You won’t be able to give this car away, if it hasn’t gone to crusher yet because of a dead infotainment screen.

  • avatar

    The Focus ST and Fiesta ST both have a 50%-plus power increase over the standard models, with commensurate braking and handling improvements.

    This has 6% more go than the next Edge down the ladder.

    The Fusion Sport has a 40% power bump over the Titanium, but they wouldn’t ST one of those.

    I don’t see how they can slap an ST badge on this with a straight face.

  • avatar
    Jeremiah Mckenna

    Have you driven an X5 M after driving an X5? There is a huge difference in performance, handling and of course braking.

  • avatar
    alfaromeo

    Interesting. But the real-life fuel economy and reliability of ecoboost engines make me worry.

  • avatar
    gtem

    I’ve had a few Edge rentals (2.0Ts), and found them really easy and nice highway cars that soak up bad roads well. Fuel economy hovered around 24-25 mpg mostly highway, I thought power was perfectly adequate if somewhat non-linearly delivered.

    My biggest qualms are the exterior panel gaps and trim fit/alignment. They still suck, years into this generation.

    A nice rental, but I wouldn’t spend my own money on one.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      My experience with the Ford Edge leads me to pretty much the opposite opinion of yours :) I got the chance to put a few hundred miles on an edge 2.0T last month, and while I don’t hate it, I really don’t like it. My primary gripes are with the seating position, the “hugeness” of that dash, the odd rake of the windscreen, and the $5 flashlights Ford calls headlights. I’m not opposed in any way to “sported-up” CUVs (because hey, sometimes CUVs are the best compromise – you might as well get one with a tight suspension and a quick 0-60 time), but there’s no way I’d buy a sported-up Edge. It just makes me feel like I’m driving a Sprinter.

      Conversely, I can’t say enough good things about the Flex. It’s huge but drives like a much smaller vehicle. I’d probably buy a “Flex ST” if I needed a 7-seater, but apparently nobody else will.

  • avatar

    What’s the big deal? Ford’s just following the lead of Audi, and Porsche, which offer performance versions of the Cayenne, Macan, and Q5. One could also include Maserati, Lamborghini, and Alfa Romeo, whose CUVs also could be considered performance vehicles.

    When I reviewed the Audi SQ5, I didn’t understand the need for a performance CUV until I was sitting, interminably, behind a Porsche Cayenne Turbo S at a roundabout while taking my mother to a medical appointment. Once she finally pulled into the traffic circle, the woman at the wheel of the Cayenne sedately drove to a nearby shopping center. That’s when the lightbulb lit up. Performance SUVs like the SQ5, Cayenne Turbo, and now Edge ST exist so mom can have suburban status cred and dad can have a little fun driving the kids to soccer on Sunday.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    SRT Durango please.

  • avatar
    scott25

    I feel like everyone is missing the obvious; that Ford sells the Edge all over the world, ST is a badge known everywhere, Sport is North America specific, so Edge ST makes sense as a world car. (Perhaps someone can correct me and say the old Edge Sport was sold in Europe and Asia as well, but I figured it was NA only).

    Edge Sports always disappear from our lots within a week or two of arriving, so this will be a huge hit now it has a badge that means something, but it’s still strange. This dilutes the ST badge more than applying M, S, R/T and AMG to a crossover does, mostly because ST was in a precarious position here because it’s so new to North Americans. So now I assume this will mean ST will replace Sport across the range eventually.

    Edge (and Explorer) Sports always handled very well for crossovers, so improving the suspension can only be a good thing, as long as they don’t make it too harsh. That would be a fatal flaw.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    A great shining example of where the NA market is heading. I just called Honda Finance about buying my 6-speed Accord Sport after the lease expires later this year. Thank God I can!

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    lost. The. Plot.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’m looking forward to it. It serves a clear purpose.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    I had a leased ’13 Edge Limited, which I turned in last year. Overall, I really liked it. When I leased it, I had considered the Sport. I found the difference in ride quality between the 22s on the Sport and the 20s on the Limited to be negligible… tho tire cost did concern me. The Edge could have used more power… and I did not see much of an improvement with the 3.7L in the Sport over the 3.5 in the Limited. It was a big, heavy trucklet. Now, granted, that weight gave it a smooth, comfortable ride… and it was quiet as a tomb inside… but you really had to mash the pedal to get it going. Mileage was never the strong suit of the Edge… and I never understood all the carping about the MyFordTouch system. I found it to be excellent. Sure, it could be a bit laggy & under-processored, but overall, it worked great. For all the raves given to CDJR’s UConnect system, I’ve been underwhelmed with it in my ’16 Ram 2500 ccsb. It’s ok… but nothing spectacular.

    The Edge’s styling refresh in ’15 really did nothing for me… I preferred the previous style… but to each his own. And this current refresh on the Edge leaves me somewhat tepid. It’s ok, tho a bit over the top for my tastes, with the fake scoops & vents. The black wheels are a deal-breaker for me… puh-LEAZE… it looks like it’s over-compensating… but again, to each his own.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    As usual, most of the B&B don’t recognize that women, wait for it; BUY CARS! The Edge is a big hit in the school dropoff/pickup line. A faster one? Enough soccer moms will say “yes please” to make this profitable for Ford. Now if I could start a hedge fund that invested in what most of the B&Bmdoesn’t like; I’d be a rich man.

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    Good move there Ford, kill your hot-hatch performance cars (that have sold very well for you) and pimp out an suv/cuv/thing.

    As I’ve mentioned before, I own a FiST. I bought a FiST because I wanted a hot-hatch and it is more interesting and enjoyable to drive than others that I tried (VW’s, Subies, Civics, Hyundai etc). Does Ford really think a hot-hatch buyer is going to move on to one of these? Whatever they think the answer is a resounding NO. A FiST/FoST/VW/Honda/Velosetor/fill in the blank hot hatch buyer IS NOT going to go for this.

    Good job there Ford on completely exiting a market. Well done, idiots.


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