By on November 28, 2017

honda crossover patent, Image: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Given the way the industry’s going, this website might soon have to change its name to The Truth About Crossovers. Thankfully, the acronym remains the same.

A U.S. design patent granted to Honda on Tuesday reveals that three utility vehicles might not be enough for the Japanese automaker’s American lineup. As car companies both domestic and foreign scramble to fill in gaps in their showrooms, it seems Honda hasn’t yet reached the crossover saturation point.

The patent, which carries a filing date of August 2nd, 2016, shows a two-row crossover with a more steeply raked rear window than either the compact CR-V or midsize Pilot. There’s no headroom for a third row back there. A spoiler adorns the top of the liftgate.

Basically, if the defunct Honda Crosstour and Ford Edge had a baby, it might look a lot like this. The appearance of high-end flourishes, such as a chrome fender vents and integrated twin tailpipes with some surrounding brightwork, lend credence to Automotive News‘ prediction of a potential near-premium two-row arriving next year as a 2019 model.

Dealers apparently pressed Honda for a larger model positioned above the CR-V, designed to do battle with swankier rivals. The model would shun the CR-V’s platform in favor of that of the three-row Pilot.

Not only would the larger platform give backseat passengers room to stretch out, it would also add more acreage aft of the rear seats, allowing for rakish rear glass in the now-commonplace four-door SUV coupe tradition. The model would surely borrow the Pilot’s powertrain, and would be built in Alabama alongside its three-row sibling.

Should it make it to production (what automaker says no to a new crossover?), Honda had better not use the “c” (coupe) word.

[Images: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office]

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36 Comments on “You Asked; Honda Answered? Mysterious Crossover Appears in Design Patent...”


  • avatar
    sirwired

    I’m trying to figure out how one would need even MORE rear seat room than the CR-V, and I’m coming up blank; I’m 6′ 2″ and I can easily sit behind myself. This gives unneeded rear seat room and compromises cargo space. What possible use does it serve?

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I used to think of the 2-row midsize crossover class as superfluous when compact CUVs have as much interior room (by the numbers) but then I had a few Ford Edge rentals that changed my mind. These two row midsizers are just nicer to drive and feel more substantial. Better rides, better NVH control, the added cabin width does add to the sensation of roominess and just being a more luxurious vehicle. This being built on the Pilot platform rather than the CRV drives the point home. Like the Edge being closer to an Explorer rather than a Focus-based Escape.

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        Same deal with compact vs. midsize sedans. Though the compacts may have nearly as much interior room, the midsizers are just nicer in every way with practically no fuel economy penalty.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Some guys take the middle seat out of minivans; for legroom in third row….. And in “high end” houses, 12-14 foot ceilings aren’t uncommon. Even in butt cold Montana.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      More rear legroom? Think Chinese market, and to see what extra 2nd row leg room translates to in real life terms take a look at the 2nd row of the Ford Flex.

  • avatar
    matt3319

    Looks like a next gen CrossTour to me with more conventional styling versus the air pumped original.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Somewhere a modern day Sloan has decreed…a crossover for every purse and purpose.

    This has to be great for profitability, they sell at a nice premium to sedans, likely with little added content / manufacturing cost.

  • avatar
    dwford

    That’s the production version of the Concept D concept car from the 2015 Shanghai auto show.

    https://www.autoblog.com/2015/04/20/honda-concept-d-crossover-shanghai-2015/

  • avatar
    RHD

    What will it be called? We have already had the Honda CRX, CR-V, and CRZ… my guess is that the 100th SUV/CUV on the market will be called the CR-Y.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The CR-Y. It’ll make you want to.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        That would have been the appropriate name for the original Crosstour.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          I don’t get the Crosstour hate. That thing was about the best driving crossover ever built. And was low enough to make roof racks/top boxes practical. While having a dead flat load floor long enough to sleep in for even tall people. Anything built on a Pilot platform, is bound to be infinitely more cumbersome and clumsy.

          • 0 avatar
            Higheriq

            Same here – the Crosstour just needed bigger wheels to make it look proportional.

          • 0 avatar
            kvndoom

            The hate is because it was @55 ugly to most. Nothing more, nothing less.

            Ask anyone who owned one and they will tell you that the Aztek was an amazing vehicle. But it will never be remembered for its good traits.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Don’t see how this thing qualifies for a patent; the design is hardly new or even different, outside of just a little more rake to the rear window for a vehicle that size. Honestly, it’s more of an enlarged, four-door CVCC of the ’70s/’80s than anything really original. Even the Pontiac Aztec had this general shape.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Design patents are specific to the “ornamental non-functional design for an object” rather than the more commonly thought of utility patents.

      Things like screen fonts can be covered by design patents.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      Came here to say the same thing. Looks more Aztek than not.

      But…but….the Aztek was ugly! It was so ugly it would kill your dog and maim your grandmother!!!!!

      (of course, in a world full of BMW 4 and 6 series SUV 4 door coupes, the Aztek could have been dressed up as a Cadillac and made tons of money.)

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        The Aztek’s biggest problem was that the wheels and tires were disproportionate to the size of the vehicle. Its second biggest problem was that even with a V6, it was underpowered… in my opinion, critically underpowered. It had so many things going for it that my wife and I both wanted–we even liked its look, outside of the wheels– but especially with AWD it needed more power and a way to get that power to the ground.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Based on the fact it’s based on a concept shown in China, this is most likely a response to the Mazda CX-4, maybe China only?

  • avatar
    musicalmcs8706

    I would hope that this has the Pilot drivetrain, but my guess would be it has the 2.0 turbo from the 2018 Accord…

  • avatar
    Fred

    I think it looks like a Toyota Venza. Which could also morph into a Acura, and we know they need more SUVs

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      Came here to say this also. It’s pure Venza.

      The question is, was Toyota ahead of its time–or is Honda behind the times, sketching out a vehicle that the market has already decided doesn’t fit?

  • avatar
    2o6

    This car is already on sale in China, and has been for like two years now.

    It’s either the Honda Avancier (Honda Guangqi) or slightly restyled and sold by Dongfeng Honda as the Honda UR-V.

    https://paultan.org/2017/03/20/honda-ur-v-launched-in-china-dongfengs-avancier/

  • avatar
    deanst

    It looks like Hondas interpretation of a 1977 Chevy Chevette. I would guess its to fill the gap between the crv and pilot.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Perhaps the content chosen fits the prescription more than all possible news and content in the industry. Just maybe… mmkay?

  • avatar
    Jtslater89

    This is the Honda UR-V the Avancier looks slightly different. I prefer the UR-V I like the tail lights on it better than the Avancier

  • avatar
    gespo04

    Why the **** hasn’t Honda made a second generation Honda Element yet? That funky box was their most practical offering, they sold over 338,000 of the things and it would undoubtedly be even more popular in our crossover-crazed automotive landscape.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    More crossovers….more…..MORE…..MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    I thought that a few months back, “rumor control” had Honda doing some sort of a “Pilot Jr.,” slotted between the CR-V and the existing Pilot. This is probably it.

    Engines? Thought I saw another mention around the time I mentioned of the latest Odyssey being the last newly-developed vehicle with the J-Series V6, so some iteration of the 2.0T/10A from the Accord would be a good guess, unless there’s another small, boosted V6 in the pipe.

  • avatar
    crossx5

    Better looking crv!! Was definitely needed.

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