By on April 13, 2017

Jaguar F-Type 4cyl

Jaguar announced at the New York Auto Show a refresh for its F-Type sports coupe that lops two cylinders off the base model V6. It won’t be quite that indelicate of a procedure and the supercharged 3.0-liter V6 will likely remain the most popular choice.

For 2018, the F-Type will provide six individual engine options. The F-Type will persist with its 340 horsepower six-cylinder mill, or 380 horsepower if you option for the R-Dynamic model. Next year’s Jags will also see the return or the previous 5.0-liter V8 trims — including the 550 hp R and 575 hp SVR. However, if you’re more into the F-Type for its charming looks than its bonkers performance, Jaguar will soon offer a 2.0-liter turbo for under $60,000. 

The four-cylinder coupe won’t be useless as its 296 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque should at least make it more lively than your everyday family hauler. However, if you want to run through the gears yourself, then this isn’t the car for you. The turbo four will only be available with an eight-speed automatic transmission, leaving the 340 hp F-Type S as the singular option for those wanting a six-speed stick.

Jaguar says the 2.0 liter F-Type weighs in at around 3,360 pounds and is capable of a 5.4 second 0–60 mph time with a 155 mph limiter. Fuel efficiency, one of the sole reasons for picking this model, has yet to be disclosed for the North American market, but it’s certain to outperform the V6 and V8 in terms of efficiency.

If you’re looking for an economical F-Type, pricing begins at $59,900 plus the $995 destination fee. Just do us the honor of explaining why you’re buying this beforehand.

[Image: Jaguar]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

39 Comments on “2017 NYIAS: 2018 Jaguar F-Type to Get Turbo Four, Sub-$60,000 Price...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Christ on a bike, a new low.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    HEy everyone look…look what you can get for 60k big ones and a 4 cylinder.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/688218174/overview/

      $60k is a bargain!

      I decided not to use the BMW 7 series or Volvo XC90 hybrids for my example.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      Have you noticed that a new Porsche Cayman 718 comes with a turbo four cylinder and typically goes for $90K and up?

      I always get a laugh when people say, “I’d never spend $XXXX on a car with a 4-cylinder engine!” as more and more cars are moving towards turbo fours.

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        Just because more cars are moving that way doesnt mean more folks are buying them. With Porsche it could be chalked up as repeat buyers.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          Oh, but people obviously are buying them. Look around. See all those 2.0T badges on the back of virtually any brand? Hell, my very first 2.0T car was a 1990 Eagle Talon. I loved small turbo engines back then and I still love them now.

          And lets not forgot all those 1.8T and 1.4T badges (VW, Chevy, Hyundai, etc…) that have also been popping up on a lot of cars too.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      I think Baby Boomers have a problem with lower cylinder counts, but not later generations (as a whole).
      Obviously, you’ll meet the odd “V8 or walk” person in later gens, but the peak F-Type customers (40-60) grew-up in the “Integra Type R vs. WRX vs. Evo” era.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        I own a turbo 4 from 2007. It has been fine for me, but I’ve heard a lot of other owners have major problems with theirs. So I’ve gotten pretty gun shy about anything with a turbo now. I have to assume reliability has improved, but I still feel like more time needs to pass before the final verdict is in.

        I also prefer the smoothness of an N/A car versus a higher strung turbo. I would rather less total power if it means a more linear acceleration. But again, I’ve heard that lag has improved as well, so maybe this car’s setup would really be the best solution to those who love the look of this car but don’t need to blow everyone’s doors off.

  • avatar
    Ermel

    For those who buy a Jag to pose, and I daresay that’s the majority, not a bad option — provided they get it to sound right.

  • avatar
    ajla

    When is the inline 6 coming?

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “…lops two cylinders off the base model V6.”

    Really? So it’s a V4 then. Is it two and two, or maybe three cylinders in one bank and just one in the other?

    Unless of course we have a case of sloppy writing and twisted metaphor.

  • avatar
    jmo

    The 4 vs. 6 is sort of like automatic vs. manual. There is a lot of talk amongst the B&B but when it comes to actually buying something, all the talk goes out the window.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    “For 2018, the F-Type will provide six individual engine options. The F-Type will persist with its 340 horsepower six-cylinder mill, or 380 horsepower if you option for the R-Dynamic model…leaving the 340 hp F-Type S as the singular option for those wanting a six-speed stick.”

    This is all kinds of gooned up according to Jag’s website.

    The 380hp six is the S model, and available with the 6-speed manual.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I didn’t realize the F-Type was that light. It seems like such a big car in person, I thought it would be more like 3,800.

    This seems rather pointless, if even Jaguar thinks the V6 will be more popular. Call it the Trophy Wife edition, I guess, for when a Miata just isn’t good enough.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    For a person buying a Jaguar at nearly $60,000, fuel economy is not a concern. This is lame.

  • avatar
    bobdod04

    a proper 6 cylinder F-Type currently on sale starts at $61,400. You must be a special kind of idiot to think a $1,500 savings for an inferior motor on a $60,000 car is worth it.

  • avatar
    cdnsfan27

    Until CAFE rules change manufacturers will continue to have to offer smaller, more efficient engines even though people don’t want them. Jaguar can’t give away the XE’s and XF’s with the 2.0l turbo-diesel, I don’t see the turbo 4 selling much in the F-Type. It will however sell well in the 2018 F-Pace where a lot of customers have told us they don’t need/want or want to pay for the 340HP supercharged 6.

    I wonder what the take rate is on the MB 4 cylinder E-Class?

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “I wonder what the take rate is on the MB 4 cylinder E-Class?”

      Probably pretty high given that the 6cyl option is stratospherically priced, starting at $20k over the base 4cyl.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        Same case now with the 5-Series as well. The A6 will give you the 3.0T at just a $9,000 premium over the 2.0T AWD.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Eh? According to BMWUSA.com, the 530i starts at $51,200, and the 540i starts at $56,450. Is that not the latest model? Is the latest model really going to jack up the 540i price that much?

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Oh sorry I wasn’t clear. What I was thinking (but didn’t type) is how you can option a 5-Series up sky high and still have the 2.0 in it.

            Mercedes is indeed the worst offender for the 6-cylinder upcharge.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            Gotcha. Yeah, if I was in the 5-series market I’d definitely take less options and an I6 over more options and the 4cyl.

  • avatar
    derekson

    The sole reason is cost or fuel economy?

    How about the fact that the 4 cylinder is something like 110 pounds lighter, all weight off of the nose of the car while only losing 44 horsepower and 37 lb-ft of torque?

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Pretty much this – granted, if you’re buying the F-Type, I’m not sure you’re as interested in balance as just the grand theatre of a boisterous sports car, but the smaller engine has merit (especially when it’s clearly not underpowered).

      That said, I don’t see too many of the B&B opening up their chequebooks to prove how much they value the F-Type keeping six and eight cylinder options.

  • avatar

    Good. Truly thrashing the nuts out of a four-cylinder turbo mill is a very satisfying experience. If we forget about looking at this as a de-contented F-Type and instead think of it as a faster GT86 or Integra Type R that looks and feels like a Jag, I doubt we’ll be disappointed.

  • avatar
    redliner

    Small turbo engines of today can produce equivalent power to a Corvette V8 from 15 years ago but weigh less, are more compact, and under certain circumstances have the ability to produce better mpg (no gass guzzler tax).

  • avatar
    KOKing

    Hey, as long as it makes the same amazeballs sounds as the other motors, that’s fine by me. That’s one of the main failings of the Mustang EcoBoost, as it wheezes more like a Fusion than any excuse for a Mustang.

  • avatar
    9Exponent

    Wasn’t the best characteristic of the F-Type its sound? Something may be lost in translation.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    This would make much more sense to me if Jaguar knocked $5000 of the list price. It would actually be a very sensible move.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • onyxtape: Very nice! I had almost the identical situation as you. I had a 7-year-old RWD G37 that I wanted to replace...
  • tankinbeans: Were it my father, he probably would have tried to weasel out of buying a new car because said rusty car...
  • ravenuer: Guess they really want you to think this is a Buick. (portholes, just in case….)
  • sgeffe: Wow!!
  • sgeffe: The A/G-Bodies weren’t well-protected against rust. (Neither were the later A- (Ciera, Celebrity) or...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States