By on March 23, 2017

2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV

General Motors began taking pre-orders in South Korea last week for the all-electric Bolt. In under two hours, the entirety of the first shipment was spoken for. By the end of that day, March 17, more than 2,000 additional orders had been placed, proving — once again — that GM is killing it in Asia and Koreans are tech-obsessed.

Incredibly, most of those customers hadn’t even laid eyes on the vehicle. The Bolt doesn’t make its official Korean debut until March 30th, when it will appear at the 2017 Seoul Motor Show. 

After the swift depletion of GM’s EV stock, a group of enthusiasts drove a Bolt from southern Seoul to Busan, ferried over to Jeju Island, and finally drove across the island to the southern port of Seogwipo. In addition to 60 miles of water, the trip covered 293 miles worth of road — and the team managed it on a single charge. That’s leaps and bounds over the official EPA rating of 238 miles.

According to WardsAuto, GM will place new production orders immediately to ensure more vehicles get to Korea as soon as possible. However, the automaker will still have to hold a drawing to ensure the available supply is allocated fairly, as pre-orders continue rolling in ahead of the Bolt’s sales launch. While that date remains unspecified, it’s expected to be early next month.

That’s rather interesting, considering nationwide deliveries haven’t yet begun in the United States. Michigan residents, who live in the state where the Bolt is assembled, won’t even be able to place their orders until July.

[Image: General Motors]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

29 Comments on “Every Bolt in GM’s First Shipment to Korea was Reserved Within Hours...”


  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Hey! Over here by da big lakes…

    What are we, chopped venison?

  • avatar

    The Bolt EV in question was driven from Seoul to Mokpo, not Busan as mentioned in this article, and then ferried to Jeju.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “They’re just fawning Mary Barra worshippers, who want to show off their purchase to everybody. Someday, when the whole company collapses, GM’s investors will realize what a fraud she was, and the Bolt was just another EV thrown together by a bunch of tech-happy dreamers.”

    –end sarc–

  • avatar
    Rday

    Well i hope GM can make it and the bolt sounds promising. I need them to stay in business because i just bought a 3500 Denali and don’t want to take it in the shorts because of a GM collapse.
    I am disappointed in how far behind toyota…. Gm is when it comes to advanced electronic features…..radar cruise control, automatic dimming headlamps on all models, even the cheap ones, etc, etc.
    Lucky for GM/Detoit toyota has not entered the heavy duty diesel pickup markets yet. WHen you pay exorbitant UAW wages/ benefits then you don’t have the money to invest in top of the line electronics, etc. My wife worked for the UAW and i know all of the tricks and lies.
    THe exorbitant cost of union/UAW wages pushed much of the manufacturing to china and mexico. Americans need a working wage and not the job breaking wages the unions always propose.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Those other dreamers at T*s*a have a similar problem:

    http://insideevs.com/tesla-model-s-popular-south-korea-wait-list-test-drives-6-months/

  • avatar

    The Bolt is currently GM’s slowest selling car. I don’t see more than 5,000 being sold a year. Let Telsa concentrate on electric cars. Besides all GM cares about is trimming their divisions and increasing their stock price.

    This is yet another flop for GM.

    POS

  • avatar
    stingray65

    The Bolt seems like quite a bargain compared to Leafs, e-Golfs, i3, etc. which have much shorter range, less power, and are not significantly cheaper, but then again GM loses an estimated $9,000 on every Bolt they sell, so shipping them to Korea isn’t likely to help GM share prices.

  • avatar
    shaker

    “but then again GM loses an estimated $9,000 on every Bolt they sell”

    I’m missing a sarcasm flag here, right?

    I don’t think that GM would be shipping ZEV tax credits overseas at a loss – unless it’s a payoff for some Daewoo scandal.

    The BEV “pipe dream” approaches reality, which strikes fear and loathing into some – why?

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      Unfortunately I wasn’t being sarcastic with the $9,000 loss – here is the link. I wish I could assume that GM management was sharp enough to build a compliance car and only sell it where they need the compliance, but that is probably giving them too much credit.

      http://www.cnbc.com/2016/11/30/gm-stands-to-lose-9000-dollars-per-car-on-chevy-bolt.html

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Who cares if they’re losing money on the Bolt right now. Long term strategic planning in EV’s is the right thing for GM to do. Cheap gas and stellar PU sales won’t last forever. The market will change and they need to be ready for it on a number of fronts.

        • 0 avatar

          GM is not capable of making rational long term decisons​. The Bolt will fail just like the Feiro, Saturn, and EV1.

          POS

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            The Bolt is one of the better EV’s on the market right now. The 1st & 2nd Gen Volt is proof that GM is a leader in battery technology.

            Calling the Bolt a POS just shows how f$%&ing ignorant you are.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            akear…I implore you to do better.
            When you drove the Bolt, what made it a POS?
            When you drove a Volt, what made it a POS?

            I spent a lot of time in Volt, and have to say that I found the car to be awesome, mostly because for the 40k miles my business partner put on it were flawless. But he probably got lucky or something.

        • 0 avatar
          indi500fan

          Cheap gas may well last a very long time.
          With all the gas that Musk is saving by selling zillions of Teslas, there will be plenty of petrol for my lifetime.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “The Bolt’s anticipated per-sale loss of roughly $8,000 to $9,000 is an estimate based on a sticker price of $37,500, according to a person familiar with the matter.”

        Well, maybe “a person familiar with the matter” is mistaken.

        But, if not, we’ll just have to see how it shakes out – I believe that the Bolt can be much more than a “compliance car”, but it’s getting kneecapped by low gas prices.

        I hope these low oil prices at least are hurting Putin enough to cause him to slip up – maybe look to Trump for some relief. And when Trump caves, we dump Trump. One can only hope.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        A “report” based on a single unnamed source.

    • 0 avatar
      amca

      That’s less than GM lost on each ’57 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham!

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    If this car turns out to be half decent, it’s only because GM outsourced the important stuff to LG.

    Having said that, I’m not convinced the Koreans know how to make reliable electronics. My LG blue ray player was a POS that failed to boot up half the time. I ended up chucking it 20 feet in the air onto my concrete patio to take out my frustrations. I should have known to buy Japanese…
    .
    .

  • avatar

    The reason this car sold out in under two hours is that the Korean government was offering subsidies of up to $23,0000 on the Bolt EV’s base price of $42,0000. In other words, the car could be had for, in a best-case-scenario, less than $20,000.

    Teslas, on the other hand, do not receive government subsidies in Korea and are priced 15% higher than in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      And they’re beating down the doors to get Teslas, also:

      http://insideevs.com/tesla-model-s-popular-south-korea-wait-list-test-drives-6-months/

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      Well, if Kim Jong-Un starts any crap, a Korean with a nearly fully-charged Bolt can pretty much reach the furthest southern extent of the peninsula, while other panicked citizens are stacked up in line at gas stations.

      The seats-up cargo capacity won’t mean much if you have to leave in a hurry, either.

      At least that’s what I would be thinking.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Old_WRX: Of course, this leads to the questions: Whose research? Since this is such a politicized issue, it’s...
  • slavuta: After all, Toyota has a stake in Subaru so don’t expect lawsuit. Not long ago Subaru plant was...
  • speedlaw: I liked the pontiac version. My parents didn’t have a Grand Am, they had the Grand Prix. Same 455, I...
  • Lorenzo: You nailed the time period perfectly. The 1973 oil embargo drastically reduced Chrysler’s profits,...
  • DenverMike: I’m just a hack but I never push hard on the handle or wrench with a closed fist. It’s asking...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber