By on February 16, 2017

Texting and Driving

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety (a research arm of AAA) released a report yesterday detailing their findings on hazardous driving behaviors across different age groups.

Unsurprisingly, Millennials fared about as well as they might if they stepped on your lawn.

Surveyed were 2,511 licensed drivers aged 16 and over who reported driving within the last 30 days. In particular, the survey asked about three hazardous driving behaviors that are just-so-Millennial: texting while driving (everyone’s favorite), running red lights, and speeding.

The survey divided drivers into six age groups, and tabulated results from there. Here are those results in descending order, with survey respondents who said they had participated in at least one of the three hazardous behaviors in the past month.

AAA Hazardous Driving Results Survey 2/15/2017

Drivers in the 19-24 age group were 1.6 times more likely than all drivers to read a text message or email when driving, and almost twice as likely to type or send a text or email while driving.

On speeding, those in the young Millennial group (age 19-24) were 1.4 times more likely to report driving 10 miles-per-hour over the speed limit on a residential street. And nearly 12 percent of Millennial drivers felt it was acceptable to drive over 10 miles-per-hour over the speed limit in a school zone. Less than 5 percent of all drivers felt the same way.

Running red lights was a favorite for drivers aged 19-24, as nearly 50 percent said they drove through a red light which had just turned red (though they were able to stop safely). Of all drivers combined, 36 percent reported positively when asked about this infraction.

Millennials seem to have a special attraction to these dangerous driving behaviors, more so than even teen drivers, or those in the oldest age bracket. Dr. David Yang, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety executive director, stated, “Alarmingly, some of the drivers ages 19-24 believe that their dangerous driving behavior is acceptable.”

Now, to be honest, who among us drove the same way at age 19 as they did at age 30 or 40? With more bills and responsibility comes a greater fear of a law enforcement officer with ticket in hand, not to mention insurance companies. Youthful invincibility is a fleeting sensation.

Unfortunately, this survey comes on the heels of published U.S. traffic death statistics for 2015, where the figure was 35,092 deaths for the year — an increase of over 7 percent, and the largest single-year increase in the last 50 years.

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77 Comments on “Study Shows Millennials are the Worst Drivers, Like You Didn’t Know...”


  • avatar
    Driver8

    Self reported results are self reported.

  • avatar

    There would be a LOT fewer “speeders” if we did not have so many posted speed limits arbitrarily and less-safely set 10 or more mph below the safest 85th percentile speed levels. There would be a LOT fewer split second red light violations of less than one second into the red if most places timed the yellow intervals for safety by using the ACTUAL perception/reaction times and ACTUAL approach speeds of at least 85% of the drivers (safest timing method).

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      85th percentile levels by themselves don’t take pedestrian or bicycle safety into account at all.

      The real fix for pedestrian and bicycle safety issues is roadway redesign, but sometimes that’s not possible in the short term.

      Also, on the red lights, you are assuming good-faith behavior on the part of drivers. That is not what you are getting from most red light runners. Lengthen yellows beyond what is specified in the MUCTD and you just get drivers pushing the reds even harder. What you need for red light runners is 1) no yellow *shorter* than MUCTD and 2) take-no-prisoners enforcement.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        I don’t live or drive in the city, thank God, so on that environment I’ll defer to the experience of people who do.

        In the exurbs where I do live, the cyclists only come out on the temperate weekends, pedestrians literally don’t exist, and any number of straight roads with wide shoulders and excellent visibility are posted 35 if not 30 anyway.

        The only safety being taken into account here is that of police officers to make warrantless stops.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          “pedestrians literally don’t exist”

          reads to me (city dweller) as

          “You’re totally trapped in your house without a car. If you’re too young or old to drive, or have a disability that makes driving impossible, you’re trapped in your house, period, unless someone takes mercy on you.”

          It’s hard for me to imagine not being able to step out my front door and walk less than a quarter mile, on safe and pleasant sidewalks, to the park or the store.

          Cars as “freedom” are a double-edged sword…

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t think I’ve spent more than 5 minutes outside this week…

            HOWEVER, it’s hard for me to imagine spending eleventy-zillion dollars for a dwelling that isn’t a mansion. So there’s trade-offs to both lifestyles.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The eleventy-zillion-dollar houses are another political problem (development limits intended to enrich current homeowners at everyone else’s expense).

            I’ve spent about an hour outside today already, between walking to work and walking to lunch. If more people could do that, public health would be better, for free…

          • 0 avatar
            Frylock350

            @dal20402,

            That’s why choice is awesome. I used to be a city dweller, for me it was hell on earth. I’ll happily trade walkability for car-centric if it gets me more space, quiet and privacy. Freedom means different things to different people. I like privacy. I like being outside too, I just want that outside to be outside my door and shared with nobody else. My truck is freedom to me. It leaves when I want it to; arrives when I want it to; etc. I’m not beholden to a bus or train schedule that does not go directly where I want or leave/arrive on my schedule. There’s plenty of other benefits to suburban sprawl as well; there far less traffic so biking on neighborhood streets is much safer. There’s far less crime, you begin to learn what actual quiet sounds like, etc. Personally I’d like somewhere rural where I’d have a stream or lake on my property, but its not realistic for me. It’s all your priorities. I don’t want to live in a box in the sky; I want a yard where I can relax, have a fire pit, smoke meats, grow a garden, etc. I want a private garage where I can work on woodworking projects. On a nice saturday evening, the kids can swing and climb while mom tends the garden and I apply a coat of poly to a new table. To me cars as freedom give me the space and privacy I desire.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        dal, in the real world, there are thousands of red light cameras, and a mountain of evidence that camera companies and municipalities have been gaming the yellow lights to lengths *shorter* than MUCTD. It’s been proven that this increases the number of tickets and the amount of revenue.

        In other words, those with skin in the game have proven to their own satisfaction that fewer red lights would be run if they lengthened the yellow. And accident statistics back that up, showing fewer accidents in fact have occurred at intersections where the yellow light has been lengthened.

        Hypothetically, is there a point where a yellow light could be made pointlessly or even counterproductively long? Sure. But is that a real-world problem right now? Looks like the opposite problem is a way bigger one.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          Speeding tickets are a major revenue source, plain and simple.

          As for walking around a big city, I am curious if the poorer air quality and UV rays reflected off the big shiny buildings negates the effects of the exercise.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            In my particular city, air quality is excellent and there is rarely any sun so there aren’t many reflected UV rays to worry about. Seasonal affective disorder is the local health issue…

        • 0 avatar
          Jimal

          Red light cameras are designed to catch scofflaws who try to beat the yellow light. What they don’t address is the distracted driver who enters an intersection randomly because they were looking at their smart phone or playing with their infotainment system instead of paying attention.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “Take-no-prisoners enforcement” sounds lovely, I suppose, but there are two basic problems with it:

        1. It doesn’t work (People respond to the odds of being caught, not the penalties associated with being caught)

        2. It’s impossible to execute, as live enforcement is ultimately a random and largely arbitrary cat-and-mouse game (absent a police state that no one should want, there will never be enough cops), while photo enforcement is prone to corruption.

        The answer lies in road design, as it allows for behavior modification. Adding more roundabouts would be a start.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      In Chicago all yellows are 3 seconds long; in the surrounding suburbs they’re 5 seconds long. Chicago’s yellows are often below MUCTD.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    So the least experienced drivers are the worse… can’t say I’m shocked.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      That’s not what the results indicate. Would you like to try again?

      • 0 avatar
        Higheriq

        Sounds like you need to actually read the article.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-Iron

        So the least experienced drivers are slightly more cautious than the second least, so what? Is there a historical study saying that millennials are any worse than any other 19-24 year olds in the history of automobiles? When I was in middle school roughly six kids from the high school died every year. It didn’t hardly register. Now if one kid dies it is regional news.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        The numbers, at least in my state with stricter Driver’s Ed requirements and graduated licensing, would support Cactuar’s statement. Here in Connecticut, the 16-18 year old driver has restrictions on what time of the day they can drive, and who can be in the car. The last driver in our family to get his license, my now 22 year-old nephew, was a pretty good driver during the probationary period, when he could only drive during the day and the only passengers allowed in the car were one of his adult relatives. As soon as the restrictions were lifted, the couldn’t crash fast enough or often enough.

        To the point that I wonder about possible unintended consequences of graduated licensing schemes.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          The problem with young drivers is that they’re young.

          It’s good when drivers have a fear of death. Feelings of immortality are not ideal for road safety.

          Raising the driving age to 18, coupled with a graduated licensing system with “L” placards for new drivers, would save a lot of lives. But the US will never do that.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Wait… I thought they were car sharing an Uber downtown?

  • avatar
    ArialATOMV8

    Great there goes my rates again. I’ve been driving for almost a year and have not received a single ticket or have been involved in any accidents. My phone is off while driving unlike most kids my age and, I even though I can admit I push my luck a lot with aggressive driving (I fit in right with Boston drivers in my area lol), I’m extremely familiar with my car’s limits (04 Highlander)

    However, I’m not surprised because my classmates have done stupid things while driving.

    Last year, there were 4 accidents around the school and 3 of them were kids(senior’s faults). [exception is a impatient parent speeding and fails to give a smart kid the right of way turning [same intersection as #3]. Ends up hitting him head-on. everyone was ok and, parent was blamed for accident] Here are a few stupid accidents my classmates (seniors) have gotten in last year…

    1. So much for skipping: A hs loser dropped his little sister off at school and decided to skip because he was going to have a test that day that he was going to flunk. As he was pulling away, he flipped off the school and failed to realize a parent in her minivan stopped at a stop sign after dropping off her kids. Ended up rear ending her (crash was so violent airbags went off) probably around 40 mph and, not only totaling his car and skyrocketing his premiums, but the Principal witnessed the crash and the loser got Saturday detention for a few weeks for causing this headache!

    the rest of the class was laughing histarically at this kid cause karmas a _____

    2. Snapchatting while driving a Hemi: This accident ticks me off the most. girl-1 has a 08 era Chrysler 300 Hemi C. This girl was Snapchatting while driving and loses control of the car (obviously one of her hands was off the wheel holding her phone) she runs into the woods and her car rolls a few times. Police Officer asks whats happened and, she says she lost control. (did not even ask if she was distracted) fortunately, she was ok but car was again totaled. Best of all, this girl brags about it all!

    3. Drifting with Bae: A girl-2 is in a mall parking lot near our school at night after hours on a date. Her Boyfriend is teaching her how to drift her base model 08 Versa[automatic] (as the story goes). Boyfriend shows her how to do drift and, as the girl plays around a bit, she slams right into a parking lot lamp totaling her car (her airbags went off too so, she was going somewhat fast. She also may have been snapchatting while drifting). Fortunately, no one was hurt. It worked out in the end because, she used the insurance money on a newer 2012 versa.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      “Her Boyfriend is teaching her how to drift her base model 08 Versa.”

      Apparently the young man in question also knows how to suspend the laws of physics.

      • 0 avatar
        ArialATOMV8

        Yeah its not the easiest thing to do but, drifting a FWD car is possible (kind of but it does not slide as well as a RWD car). She refused to broach on the subject of the crash so, this is all speculation but, she showed me the photos post collision and I noticed the following:

        1. both airbags went off indicating that her Boyfriend was in the car.
        2. driver airbag had a small bit of blood on it and, her face had a cut on it so we know she was driving at the time of the crash.
        3. Girl hit the poll at a weird offset indicating she lost control of what was either a drift or a autocross event between the parking lot poles.

        But, that night, Its known why that couple choose to use the versa instead of the boyfriends 4WD late model Cherokee. The Jeep is bulkier and does not handle as well as that Versa.
        ___________________________
        Yeah your right there are other factors that influence rates. On the bright side, I’m a college student right now who recieved good grades last term. If I keep up the good work, I can afford to insure a little toy “pleasure” when my rates go down due to aging out of the high risk group.

        Edit 2: I forgot to add I took Driver’s ED, a separate defensive driving class and a Street Survival class offered by BMWCCA [aimed for drivers under 21] (now the third one was fun and I earned a cool discount too lol)

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        “Apparently the young man in question also knows how to suspend the laws of physics.”

        Lunch trays under the rear wheels. Kid-tested, Physics-approved.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Age group aside, your credit worthiness, marital status, and education level have big impacts on your rate.

      College educated, good to great credit and single with no kids will go a,long way to minimizing the impact of your bill.

      IIRC an unwed mother with okay credit and a GED/Highschool Diploma paid much more ( nearly 1k I think ) compared to her married counterpart with a degree and decent credit and no kids.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        My wife’s monthly rate for a 2005 Vibe with Allstate (on her parent’s insurance and part of their multi-car discount) was roughly $125 per month. Her parents had it all broken down car by car and would have her pony up monthly. I switched to Allstate and we combined insurances, she very soon after purchased a 2016 Terrain and her monthly rate is $80.

        Amazing what the “married woman” discount is, almost as steep as the “married man” discount is.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    I was rear-ended just over a year ago on the freeway by a millenial – after 3 or 4 panic stops where he ALMOST hit me. This was in start/go (up to 40/50 mph)/stop traffic getting near a busy off-ramp. I was hoping that after 2 or 3 near misses he would have smartened up. He was reading text messages, AND listening to music with headphones on both ears (illegal, AFAIK).

    We grew up always leaving appropriate safety margins “just in case”. These days, it seems people are taking advantage of that fact. If each person is supposed to leave a 10% safety margin, one person will use up 17% of those combined 20% and expect the other person to stay at the full 10%. Total asshole behavior. Plus, it seems to me that many millenials view driving like a video game – with airbags, crumple zones, etc, if you do get into an accident, you just “reset” (using the bank of mom and dad) and try again…

    Won’t even get into bicyclists around here who (even older riders) who feel that bikes should be the ONLY vehicles on our roads. Red lights don’t even exist for them.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Understand the article, however without seeing crash statistics I am hesitant to assume anything based on “behaviors.” Show me millennials CRASH more and then we have something. Context matters, like are you texting in 5mph bumper to bumper traffic or going 75mph on the highway?

    Also, the last line is BS; don’t tell me how many deaths there were, tell me how many deaths there were PER MILLION MILES DRIVEN. A raw number is worthless without that context.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      Yep. As much as I would like all these millenials to git off ma lawn, this study is worthless.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      Texting while driving is risky behavior. Just like speeding and running red lights. Context doesn’t matter.

      Behaviors are indicative of events. Risky drivers are more likely to crash, just like people who smoke are more likely to have lung cancer. Neither are guaranteed; both are more likely.

      It’s a study.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “Texting while driving is risky behavior. Just like speeding and running red lights. Context doesn’t matter.”

        Don’t be silly. Texting in bumper to bumper traffic is “bad” but it isn’t risking anything other than a scuffed bumper. Texting at highway speeds risks death.

        Speeding, 75 in a 55 is called “the flow of traffic”, 45 in a 25 is reckless endangerment.

        Running red lights is generally bad all around, I’ll give you that, but I still will run them when the stupid Chicago area lights have a green light for the cross street which happens to be blocked BY A TRAIN GUARDRAIL BANG HEAD but I’ll at least come to a stop and look first.

    • 0 avatar

      The IIHS has you covered (http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/t/teenagers/fatalityfacts/teenagers) find this header “Fatal passenger vehicle crash involvements per 100 million miles traveled by driver age and gender, 2008”.

      If you don’t want to scroll, rate is highest with 16-19 age group and falls from there, starts going back up in the 70-79 age group.

  • avatar
    thunderjet

    So wait when did being 31 not count as a millennial anymore? Am I Gen Y now?

    Also in my almost 16 years of driving I’ve been in 4 accidents, all of which involved people hitting my car as it was sitting at a stop light…..

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      Naw; you’re in the Oregon Trail generation (google it). That age range (30-34) aren’t Gen X but aren’t really millennials either.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The people who came up with “Generation X” were blowing it out their tailpipes. Even the well-defined baby boom generation was actually three generations in one.

      Your generation, with the same life experiences, is usually people who were in high school at any time you were, 3-4 years older or younger than you. The 1946-1950 boomers remember the Mickey Mouse Club on TV (1955-1957), while the 1959-1964 late boomers don’t, and some middle boomers recall but others were too young or not born yet.

      Generations are not the 20 year blocks that were used for the boomer classification. If you still want to go with Gen X, you might have to slice it into Xa, or Xb, or Xc. Just name your own generation!

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Millennials are terrible drivers and as an aggregate demographic know less about basic motor vehicle mechanics or safety than any drivers who preceded them.

    Sounds like bad or absent parenting to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      The Participation Ribbon Parent has caused this, in some part yes.

    • 0 avatar

      Data says millennials aren’t any worse/better than any generation that came before them (http://www.iihs.org/iihs/topics/t/teenagers/fatalityfacts/teenagers). I haven’t found many boomers that know the basics of how their car works either, nor do they have some ingrained safety practices that younger generations are lacking. Regardless of age, most people treat driving the 2,000lb box that goes 75 mph with about a tenth the respect it deserves.

      “But, hur dur old people had it so tough, and the generation responsible for Jiffy Lube totally knows a ton about cars…”

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      Bad parenting?

      Or more distractions both inside and outside the vehicle as places become more populated ergo more congested, and infotainment having come a long way since an AM/FM “in-dash” and a Walkman “mobile device”?

      But, no, its the parents fault. Both of whom have to work their @$$e§ off to keep up in an outsourced economy combining with an increasingly saturated workforce also due to the population growth mentioned above.

      Well, we gotta blame somebody. Can’t possibly be different circumstances combining to produce an outcome.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    They’re also overweight, as illustrated by the meat planet in the photo.
    .
    .

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Meat planet? I was giving mental points for having an ample chest; not like she has a double chin.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Meat planet, that’s funny but cruel. I haven’t heard that one before.

      But for 47 states, obesity rate in the 45-64 year old age category is higher than the 26-44 year old group. 18-25 year olds have a lower rate than both. Granted, the now-maturing generation is probably the fattest that’s ever been for that age so they are well on their way to tragic adult obesity rates, but as it stands now Millenials are the thinnest of the bunch.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      “Meat planet”

      I want to go there!! And if I travel faster than light I should be young when I pop out there, no?

      Or more accurately, pop in. As much as possible.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      That’s what passes as “meat planet” these days? If I had to describe her I’d go with attractive.

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    Young drivers have always had the worst driving records with respect to accidents. The advent of smart phones, texting and apps like snapchat have only made matters worse. It used to be that having peers in the car was a big factor in the likelihood of a young driver having an accident. Phones now are virtual peers in the car. Only defense is to turn the thing off when driving.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      I had a young driver recently rear end me. I figure that she was not even looking ahead! I had come to a stop due to traffic being slow and sat there for 10 seconds when she hit me… it was not a sudden stop on my part.

      Her car still had the temp tag and she had no proof of insurance. After settling up with her dad afterwards, he told me that this was a replacement car to one that she had just totalled. (sigh)

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      “Only defense is to turn the thing off when driving.”

      And drive alone. Turning off the virtual peers only helps when there isn’t an actual peer to talk to and distract the driver, especially young women who have to LOOK at the person they’re talking to. Making eye contact is a social grace in conversations, but not for the person holding the steering wheel.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Phones pacify drivers. Distracted passivity is better for traffic safety than is attentive aggression.

  • avatar
    jdiaz34

    Loving the Blackberry Torch that the driver is using. There were so few apps for that phone at the end, texting is pretty much all you could do with it. :)

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      I was wondering if anyone else saw that. I had one and back in the day, I had plenty of apps to keep me happy. That was when Google made apps for BlackBerry instead of being d1cks about it. Not only did they not make apps, they disabled any that you had installed too.
      I’ll be sad when I have to give up my passport but the new mercury device looks nice. Got to play with one at rsa, pretty slick.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    I resemble these results.

    16-18, I hit 100 mph in my moms Sable a few times. Twice that I can remember.

    As I grew more confident, drove faster cars (worked at dealerships), got more opportunity (now in the highest percentage age group), I made dozens of cross country trips due to having family on both sides of the country, I would often choose deserted areas like 93 in Nevada at 3am. Great times. Lots of cars doing far faster than they should have. Race a deadbeat dad in a Stratus ES, sure. Pass 8+/- vehicles at one time in my girlfriend’s 1989 Ford Escort LX on a narrow but straight and flat country road? Why not? Embarass an Inline-5 powered Colorado on I-5 freeway in a 1978 Mercury with an I-6 in it? No problem.

    As I got older, I noticed myself driving slower and being okay with it rather than egging myself on to go faster. I would take curves at 65-70 in my old 1993 Taurus, which was in worse shape than my 1995 in which I do maybe 60 at most, more like in the 50’s MPH. Damn near same car, same road… Same driver, just older.

    I haven’t had a ticket in many years (knock on wood LOL) where as during the higher percentage age group above, I had them constantly. Nothing crazy like DUIs or causing an accident (none, ever). But, its probably safe to assume that my Tempo LX spent more time above 100 MPH than any other in history, LOL. I loved that car.

    I wasn’t texting when I got pulled over in the 1983 Zephyr doing 90 MPH in Utah (and I had backed off). I had a flip cell phone with NO service, so I wasn’t yacking to my buds. Simple: I was just young, dumb, and full of [EXPLETIVE DELETED].

    Hey, I was only going to say Testosterone. Geeze

  • avatar
    binksman

    I think more telling is that according to these results, AT BEST 67% of drivers in ALL AGE GROUPS engage in dangerous behavior.

    You want the next generation to have good behavior and morals, then you have to have that good behavior and morals yourself and display it. It doesn’t matter if you have kids or not. Set the example you woud want others to follow.

    • 0 avatar
      3XC

      By the standards of this survey, going 60 in a 55 is “speeding” and therefore dangerous.

      There is a WORLD of difference between driving 5-10 over on an open highway and texting while driving. Lumping the two together is a terrible false equivalence.

  • avatar
    user18081971

    im a ”””millennial””’ and i’m an excellent driver. i haven’t been in an accident, not even the most minor fenderbender, in 8 years of driving. my peers are complete idiots and i wish the worst for them.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I was a terrible driver (mostly when it came to backing up) until I got my own car. Since then, I’ve only backed into anything once, with no damage. I might still be a terrible driver, though. I haven’t checked my terriblemeter recently.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Sorting drivers by age makes no sense. It’s more WHERE you’re driving than WHO is driving around you.

    Travel up the Eastern seaboard. You’ll find a pretty steady rise in collective driver speed and aggression as you drive up NC, VA, DC, Baltimore, Philly, NYC, and finally, Boston.

    Congestion, infrastructure, geography and regional culture all play larger roles in the hazardousness of drivers than age.

  • avatar
    mtmmo

    Millennials lack critical thinking skills, can’t write, have poor social skills, and are often too immature for leadership positions. I hear this all the time from executives. To learn they’re also lousy drivers is not surprising.

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