By on February 10, 2017

2016 Fiat Toro

Ralph Gilles, global design head for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, just loves the little Fiat Toro pickup. He can’t get enough of it.

Unfortunately for FCA, and especially the Fiat brand, Americans certainly can say “no” to FCA models adorned with a classic Italian badge. Fiat, which returned to these shores just six short years ago, is floundering in North America, so ears perked up in Chicago yesterday when Gilles seemed to imply the brand might introduce a life-saving model into the U.S. market.

Alas, the company appears to have no intention of trying something desperate to stop the sales bleeding.

The Fiat Toro, a cute little four-door unibody pickup with an odd face, rides atop the same platform as the Jeep Renegade and next-generation Compass. In Latin America, it’s the pickup people want (and can afford).

While speaking at the Chicago Auto Show, Gilles stated, “You’re going to be seeing more from Fiat on the truck side, especially.”

Say what? The brand most famous for the Fiat 500 — a car you could hide by standing in front of it and unbuttoning your coat — will start flinging trucks everywhere? Maybe in America’s direction? Could the unibody Honda Ridgeline gain a midsize competitor?

Hold your horses, said Gilles, after the speculation machine began venting steam.

“I must clear something up from this morning #MAMA “I meant I Love the new 2017 #Fiat Toro sold in Latin America, no plans to sell in the U.S,” Gilles tweeted shortly after making the statement.

Now, many will point out Gilles only said Fiat won’t bring Toro to the U.S., thus leaving the door open for the possibility that other Fiat trucks might. Of course, to pull it off, FCA would somehow need to sidestep the much-loathed chicken tax if any pickup were built outside of the current NAFTA nations.

Midsize trucks are a growing segment in the American automotive landscape, ruled by the Toyota Tacoma and Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon twins, but eyed greedily by others. The Ford Ranger will return for 2019. Fiat, as it turns out, sells the midsize, body-on-frame Fullback pickup (essentially, a rebadged Mitsubishi Triton/L200) in Europe and a slew of overseas countries, but FCA has never breathed a word about that model making it to North America.

Basically, we’re left hanging here. The adorable little Toro and its two-piece tailgate will not spur a unibody pickup sales war with Honda, and Fiat, by all available evidence, will continue to struggle and slip on the sales charts.

According to trade publication Automotive News‘ product chart, the only new offering we can expect from Fiat in the foreseeable future is a refreshed 500X in 2019. Besides that, tumbleweeds. Meanwhile, Fiat started off the new year in poor form, logging only 2,164 sales in the U.S. in January. Compare that to the 2,594 sales in January 2016, and 3,255 sales in January 2015.

The brand’s sales plateaued almost immediately after its U.S. rebirth, reaching a “high” point of 46,121 units in 2014. Last year’s tally was 32,742. If the Toro isn’t coming, what will Fiat offer consumers to reverse its death plunge?

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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89 Comments on “Sorry, America, this Potentially Popular Fiat Pickup Isn’t for You: Fiat Chrysler Design Head...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    #MAMA, doesn’t he mean #MAGA? ;-)

    TORO with optional steer horn ornamentation package.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    y’know, since it has the similar “low headlamps with DRL eyebrows” as the Cherokee, this would make a good candidate for the revival of the Comanche.

    • 0 avatar
      delow48

      That was exactly my thought when I saw the picture. Leave it to the Italians to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. If they brought this to the US it could stem a good bit of the tide until the new 500. What would be even better is to get a smaller truck similar to the Ranger, S-10, and the Japanese small trucks of the early 90’s. That is a size that would likely sell well as an entry level truck, and is sorely needed today with all the behemoths on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @delow is correct. GM cannot make enough Colorados/Canyons. Ford is rushing to bring back the Ranger. Standard pick-ups are too big and too expensive for many, yet under current conditions they are the ‘hot’ market.

        Fiat cannot bribe customers into their dealerships.

        So here is something that would bring in traffic/customers. That would give them entry into a hot market. That they are going to produce. Where all the development costs are already ‘sunk’.

        And then then they decide not to sell it?????????????

        Use some excess FCA production capacity in Canada or the USA. Make a ‘Dakota’ or even better as others have stated a ‘Commanche’ version.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “Standard pick-ups are too big and too expensive for many”

          10% difference in size and unless one looks a fleet spec trim, price isn’t much cheaper.

          In Canada a fleet spec 4×4 Colorado is around 33k. A fleet spec Silverado reg cab 4×4 is around 40k but rarely ever sells without a big factory discount. I was looking at them this fall and with discounts, the Silverado was around 3k more expensive. I’ll take the 4.3 V6 over any engine offered in the Colorado.

          Crew cab 4×4 Colorado’s are in the 40-50 k range. I saw a Silverado crew 4×4 with 6.2 and 8 speed LTZ2 trim with a 15k discount. Do the math, 68k minus 15k is 53k. Under those circumstances, I’ll buy the bigger truck every time.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Lou: a full sized, long bed, king cab pick-up is not something that a great many people would feel comfortable driving around in downtown Toronto.

            Downsizing to even extended cab Colorado type vehicle makes a considerable difference in their comfort levels.

            However the current crop of ‘intermediate’ size pick-ups are as you mentioned nearly as expensive as the fullsize.

            I probably should have said ‘too big or too expensive’?

            So do you pay that much for a smaller pick-up that is easier to drive or buy the larger one and then not want to drive it when you have to venture into dense urban areas?

            Something akin to the old Ranger/Dakota should be able to meet both requirements.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Arthur Dailey – valid points. There have been a few times where I wasn’t too comfortable with my 20 ft long F150 in Vancouver. That is usually in parking lots. I would have been perfectly fine in a full sized regular cab truck.

            I do prefer my big F150 on the freeways down there. Everyone is tailgating at 120 kph. I like the thought of 6 1/2 feet of box between my passengers and the idiot a few feet off of my back bumper. That and the fact that my truck sits high enough that incursions into the cab are more likely to be at leg level.

            One does have to take various factors into consideration.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        The Toro would fall roughly into the after-2004-sized Ranger market while the Strada (not mentioned in the article) would fall into the approximate 1980s-sized Ranger, S-10 and others. I’l personally consider the Strada first and I simply don’t need or want anything bigger but the Toro would be a decent second choice.

        Right now there are NO new trucks on the American market that I really like (they’re all much too big) but the Ridgeline is the best available fit for my needs.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Lou, I agree. Lots of considerations, and I think that a smaller, less expensive, yet ‘stylish’ pick-up might just check off a lot of those boxes.

          Most that I know, do not consider a Ridgeline to be a real truck. Yet Ridgelines are still either too large or too expensive to reach the mass market of those who want something higher and larger than a sedan or cute-ute and that they can fit their occasional garage sale/antique sale finds into. And not necessarly 4WD or even Awd but FWD because they would be scared to drive a RWD vehicle around in bad weather.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @ Vulpine
          ” You’re going to be seeing more from Fiat on the truck side, especially.”
          I think a very different FIAT, a truck from FIAT’s Truck Division, IVECO
          Interesting what though

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      JimZ,
      Using the Comanche name is a great idea. Also offer it with genuine hi-lo 4×4 and a small diesel.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    what Fiat need is gas prices about $4.00 a gallon , short of that not sure what they can do, they sell small fairly cheap cars with a so so rep ( and I am being kind) that do pretty well on gas and finding parking spots. Right now very few want small cheap cars good on gas, sad but true.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      What Fiat needs is product. They are always going to be a niche brand in the US, given that their cars are much smaller than the 180-200 inch sweet spot.

      That being said, they don’t steal any sales from other FCA brands, and they don’t cost much to bring-in, so the Fiat brand is still a win for FCA in the US.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    The Toro is an FCA truck. If it came here, they’d have to tack on a massive, ugly, chrome grille to tell the world how tough the driver is. Serously, though, how good (or bad) is fhe Mitsubishi Triton/L200 these days? More mid-sized trucks can’t be a bad thing.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Not enough chrome and ride height, it wouldn’t sell here.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      That’s what the aftermarket is for.

      SEMA will have the chrome goodies and lift kits for dealers to install on it (and increase those dealer profits) before you can say, “Fix it again, Tony.”

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    A Ridgeline competitor? In FCA’s “!!RAM!!” brand?

    Surely you jest. Even FCAs marketing department knows better. How would this thing look next to the factory option BroDozers ?

    As a Fiat it would work,but then it’s cannibalizing Jeep. So they’d have to badge it as a Jeep,which means investing production capital,and FCA is flat broke. They can’t even afford to redesign the !!RAM!! pickup.

  • avatar
    cleek

    “la strada” is no el camino

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    If they bring it here, they’ll bring it here as a RAM, not as a FIAT. At this point in time, the FIAT USA experiment is not a success. Might not be a failure quite yet, but it’s definitely not a success. A truck probably won’t help it, they need cars.

    RAM, like Jeep, can print money. If they want it to sell, put the crosshairs on it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    A face only a mother could love.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      You said that about the Cherokee, too. Yet the Cherokee is one of the most popular Jeep models now.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Doesn’t mean its pretty to look at. It can be ugly and a strong seller at the same time, many models have proven this.

        Making it good looking but not up to snuff underneath is what killed the Chrysler 200. The Mazda6 is a damn good looking car, it still sells only slightly more than fur coats and matching wool hats in Houston in August.

        Beauty doesn’t always equal sales. Ugly doesn’t always equal a flop.

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      “The Fiat Toro, a cute little four-door unibody pickup with an odd face”

      It’s less odd if you instead think of it as being three separate faces: smart brainy shiny tin-top bright-eyed face on top; introverted hard working, heavy breathing middle face; and swamp crawling, barrel-scraping, pavement-gnawing brawny underbite face on bottom.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “If the Toro isn’t coming, what will Fiat offer consumers to reverse its death plunge?”

    Well, here in Colorado, they could try doing weed dispensaries at the dealerships. Given the Fiat demographic, it might just work.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      “Dude!
      Check out this 500, man! Its…so…small! I bet we could hot box it easy!

      Wait, what was your question again? Nevermind, check out this 500 man!”

  • avatar
    wally109

    I say sell them as-is to everyone who hates the “truck mountain brodozer” culture; Girls, gays, hipsters, hippies and yuppies. It looks like the perfect thing for hauling some organic gardening fertilizer, or an antique dresser in need of restoring. Give it 4×4 and Chadwick can take it up to ski-chalet, or down to his favorite flyfishing inn.

  • avatar
    Clueless Economist

    FCA or Hyundai, please take my money and build a small truck.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    This just shows to go you, Sergio doesn’t know how to run a car company. FCA has a five million square foot assembly plant in Belvidere, Illinois that once had four assembly lines going simultanously, and all it’s assembling is the Cherokee. There’s plenty of room there to build this truck, and a couple other models. Sergio is paying off debt to make FCA’s balance sheet look good to a non-existent buyer/merger-partner, while he starves the company of product to sell, the one thing a buyer/partner would want.

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      You realize that “all it’s assembling is the Cherokee” is happening on all four lines to meet Cherokee demand? No, of course you don’t, you’re probably still sore that he killed the Dart and 200 to make room for the additional Cherokee production they need. ;)

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Heck, I’m still sore he renamed the Sebring, and killed off the Avenger!

        Killing off a first-gen model instead of fixing the flaws in the next-gen is incredibly stupid. Doing it to TWO new models after a huge up-front investment was made is borderline committable.

        You can say what you want about meeting Cherokee demand, but it looks like a gigantic waste of precious financial resources he couldn’t afford to waste and wee-wee poor plant management.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I read how some want this vehicle manufactured in the US. It would be nice, but reality would suggest otherwise.

    It will an expenive vehicle if it was manufactured in the US limiting the number available for the consumer.

    Another problem would be numbers. How many US built Toro’s will sell. Do the numbers support the investment needed.

    The chicken tax needs to go. Pickups are turning huge profits. Real competition across will make all pickups in the US cheaper.

    I would like to see this vehicle offered in Australia and who gives a damn if it is made in the US, Mexico, Brazil, etc. Just give it to us as cheap and competitivw as possible.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Considering the current political environment, there ain’t no way the Chicken Tax is going away for at least four years.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      FCA doesn’t have a billion or more to build a factory for this truck in the USA. Mexico is no longer an option. Pre-Great Trumpkin, Mexico would have been an ideal spot for the Toro. They could have built it for USA and Central/South American markets.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      All we need are pickups made it Thiland. That fixes EVERYTHING. Tow a house. Jump from one Rocky mountain to another. Waste Challenger Hellcats and get 47 mpg doing it all at the same time.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        The Colorado was designed by Brazilian engineers and built and tested in Thailand for global consumption. So that was close…. LOL.
        And yes, if we all listed to BAFO, the world would be a better place full of generic diesel powered little trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @For our little Trolling friends( John Taurus)
        Thai built vehicles have better build quality than what is coming out of the US
        Not going to see any soon in the US

  • avatar
    Rday

    I don’t think that americans are stupid enough to take chances on more italian cars/trucks in any numbers. Italian vehicles are just not up to par even with the detroit con men, let alone the Japanese.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Strangely, at least two “Italian cars” have become very popular in the US, though very probably because Americans driving them either don’t know or don’t care that they’re Italian.

      Honestly, people need to get rid of their preconceptions and actually give those Italian vehicles a try; they might be pleasantly surprised. I was.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Rday
      The Mitsubishi Fuso , what you term a MDT Truck has an Italian engine.

  • avatar
    Opus

    It’s a lifted Subaru Brat.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Its a pickup version of the Jeep Renegade and thus could (should?) be sold as such. As mid-sized trucks return to popularity where is a Jeep? This seems like a no brainer. Fiat makes no sense to me… their products should just carry a Dodge badge.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      The Toro would be more a pickup version of the Cherokee, not the Renegade. You’re probably thinking about the Comanche prototype shown at last year’s Easter Safari.

      • 0 avatar
        npaladin2000

        No, he’s right. It’s on the Renegade’s platform, not the Cherokee’s CUSW. Though the front clip granted has a lot more in common with the CHerokee than the Wrangler.

        Personally I’d want it as a RAM though. Sell it as a Jeep and you might end up stepping on that upcoming Wrangler Truck thing.

  • avatar
    B Buckner

    Millions of Americans already own a toro…….lawnmower.

  • avatar

    I was at the MAMA breakfast and from the context of his remarks it certainly sounded to me like Gilles implied the Toro was coming to the U.S. market. I even jotted it down and by the time I talked to him at the Chrysler display on the show floor (I don’t know if it was before or after his tweet) he was already in backtrack mode, so I wasn’t the only one who got that drift from his remarks.

    While a small, unibody based pickup might be good for the Fiat brand in North America, I’m not sure how it would fit in FCA’s overall scheme of things. They’re already going to be introducing a Wrangler based pickup, though I’m sure that would appeal to a completely different group of customers than something along the lines of a Honda Ridgeline.

    Speaking of the Ridgeline, I was doing some cleaning and organizing and I came across a box with press kits from the introduction of the original Ridgeline more than a decade ago. If I remember events accurately, while it’s had some measure of success, the Ridgeline hasn’t been proven to be the game-changer that many predicted it to be vis a vis traditional American pickups.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Can i ask what MAMA is?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        MAMA:
        Make American Motors Again

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          For reals? Can I get a modern Gremlin?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          MAMA 9- (N-Methyl-Aminomethyl) Anthracene
          MAMA Man-Machine
          MAMA Metadata Analysis and Mining Application
          MAMA Mothers Against Methamphetamine
          MAMA Mothers Against Misuse and Abuse
          MAMA Madison Area Music Awards
          MAMA Multi-Anode Microchannel Array
          MAMA Movimento Articulado de Mulheres da Amazonia (Portuguese: Articulated Movement of Women from the Amazon)
          MAMA Museum of Ancient and Modern Art (Penn Valley, CA)
          MAMA Modesto Area Music Association
          MAMA Mothers Against Murder and Aggression
          MAMA Mountain Acoustic Music Association
          MAMA Mothers Against MSBP Allegations
          MAMA memory allocator for multithreaded architectures
          MAMA Mobile Automatic Message Accounting
          MAMA Micro Adhesion Measurement Apparatus (contact mechanics)
          MAMA Mobile Area Modelers Association (Alabama)
          MAMA Mountain Area Medical Airlift (Asheville, NC)

      • 0 avatar

        Midwest Automotive Media Association or something like that. It started as a Chicago area media group but membership isn’t geographically restricted. I’ve thought about joining because they have a couple of large ride & drive events at Road America. They have a cozy relationship with automakers.

        One of their machers, a guy who rewrites press releases for a living, once called me a “parasite” because I started out getting media access to auto shows so I could sell swag on eBay. In light of the fact that his daily driver was a “long term loan” from a car company, an SUV big enough for his 300+ lb bulk, I thought his characterization of me was ironic. I don’t quite understand him thinking that I’m a leach. It’s not like there are fewer shrimp for him, I eat a kosher diet.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Thank you, Ronnie. That makes more sense.

          Funny, but someone reading you literally without knowledge of Yiddish will think that a ‘macher’ is someone who rewrites press releases for a living, rather than the actual meaning of an important or influential person.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I want my MAMA.

            My dad told me a story about a guy who got out of the drunk tank by yelling, “I want my MAMA” over and over again. He had the whole cell block yelling.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Ronnie Schreiber
      Ridgeline by definition was going to be a niche even with the US Midsizers. Cannot understand why Honda US wanted it as it wa never going to be a mass seller.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    Reminds me of one of the best jokes on King of the Hill:

    [Working on Hank’s pickup truck].

    Dale: You know what the problem is? It’s a Ford. You know what Ford stands for? Fix It Again Tony.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If it weren’t for President Trump’s talk about tariffs FCA might take a chance and build this truck in Mexico for the US market. Getting the cost of production down would lower the price enough to give it at least a chance. I could see this badged as a Fiat Toro and as a pickup truck version of the Jeep Cherokee. I doubt FCA would want to use their US plant capacity to produce this truck and the cost of UAW labor might make this not competitive. There might not be enough demand to be worth the risk unless the threat of tariffs is lifted.

  • avatar
    Longshift

    The Fullback/Ram 1200 (rebadged Mitsubishi Triton) would be the better product for FCA to bring over. In extended cab format, it is within an inch in length and width of the last U.S. Ranger, so significantly smaller than the Colorado. Since it is body-on-frame with a two-speed transfer case, it can tow and handle offroading as pickup users expect. If FCA’s factory capacity and the Chicken Tax are issues, then FCA should be able to arrange with Nissan to have it built in Nissan’s American truck factory, given that Mitsubishi has agreements with both FCA and Nissan. That factory should have plenty of capacity since the Titan is selling well below expectations.

    The Toro is almost a foot shorter in length than the extended cab version of the last U.S. Ranger, but it is almost exactly the same length as the Subaru Baja. The bed on the Toro is far too small to be useful. The bed on an extended cab Toro would probably be big enough, but Fiat doesn’t make an extended cab Toro. I don’t know that a crew cab Toro would sell much better than the Baja. An extended cab version would sell if it were cheap enough and reliable.

    Dimensions:

    2011 Ranger extended cab: 203.6” L x 69.4” W x 67.7” H

    2016 Mitsubishi Triton extended cab: 204.5” L x 70.3” W x 69.9” H

    2017 Fiat Toro crew cab: 193.5” L x 72.6” W x 68.3” H

    2006 Subaru Baja 193.3” L x 70.1” W x 65.1” H

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    An extended cab with a little longer bed would be better. I agree with one of the comments above that if this were marketed as a Fiat in the US it would be better not to call it a Toro because it might be identified with a lawn mower even though Toro is meant to be bull. I doubt we will ever see this in the US.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Bottom line, it has to sell well, chicken tax or no. It’s possible in theory, especially listening to the Vulpii demographic, but highly unlikely.

    The Subaru Baja was a slow selling disaster, but there’s another huge expense. The Baja likely divided up buyers that would’ve bought a new (highly profitable) Forester or other Subaru anyway.

    Meaning there’s a point of diminishing returns. Despite outcry, VW has 5 or 6 cars it flat-out refuses to sell in America. Why?

    Why offer VW buyers 18 completely different car choices on VW showrooms, when they can offer 12 (of the most profitable) and sell almost as many cars?

    Small pickups had their day in America. We moved on. We demand 4 doors/4 seaters, with a bed that’s not a complete joke. If there’s just room for luggage or groceries or dogs (remember when people could ride in pickup beds?), why have them exposed?

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Actually, about that… VW has Amarok, which is a much better truck than Toro. And yet, they aren’t selling it here. A 25% tax? Puleeeze. With that prices oscillating as they are, of course they’ll find buyers. Look how overpriced Tiguan is, and people still buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Strangely, Denver Mike, you said practically the exact same thing about the Chevy Colorado during the two years leading up to its release. If you were so wrong about that truck, what makes you so sure you’re right about this one?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        There’s a built-in market for real, BOF midsize pickups. These are something completely different, except for a pickup bed, so to speak.

        The Colorado/Canyon and the upsurge in the midsize pickup surprised everyone, not just me. I figured they’d severely cannibalize the Tacoma. They didn’t.

        A few years ago, Ford said the Ranger was only for the global market. Look at them now.

        Tiguan sales are something VW may be protecting by not selling the Amarok here. Every VW sold in Mexico and around the world, and not sold here, would harm the sales/profits of VWs that are sold here, some of which are very profitable, despite the TDI fiasco.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Volkswagen is a special case, for obvious reasons. But there’s also a built-in market for a REAL, unibody FWD El Camino-type too. Just don’t get hung up on box size or payload.

          The reason the El Camino and Ranchero were popular is because Dad “couldn’t” bring the kids and mother-in-law with him on errands. That chore got left to the wife and the family sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “The Colorado/Canyon and the upsurge in the midsize pickup surprised everyone, not just me.”

          No, they didn’t surprise everyone; they only surprised those who thought they knew everything there was to know about the market.

          I do know that a true compact pickup would sell enough to be kept on the market. Sure, it won’t compete in numbers with the full sized trucks but it would pull a decent chunk out of the compact to mid-sized CUV/SUV market and maybe eat away at some of the mid-sized truck market.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “…it would pull a decent chunk out of the compact to mid-sized CUV/SUV market and maybe eat away at some of the mid-sized truck market.”

            That’s a big part of the problem. OK, maybe FCA has nothing to lose, but normal OEMs don’t want a low-volume compact trucklette, perhaps trendy and interesting when 1st introduced (as was the BRAT, VW wabbitruck, Baja, Rampage, etc) on the same showroom and competing against their proven bread & butter cars, and or midsize pickup.

            I said I was surprised by the midsize truck “upsurge”. But you can’t exactly say you “called it” either. Except I can dig up a video interview of a Ford marketing exec saying (I’m paraphrasing here), the Ranger was only for the world/global market, and the F-150 for America *only*. He was questioned if the F-150 would ever be sold in Australia (despite strong Oz demand), and responded by saying the Ranger and F-150 were specifically designed for the markets currently in.

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