By on February 12, 2017

engine parts

A Houston man says his Lexus went missing after the local auto repair shop, which he entrusted to fix his car, closed without notice. Returning to the mechanic to make a prearranged twice-monthly payment, he noticed an eviction notice and a completely empty parking lot.

“I’m thinking this guy has stolen my car,” said Randy Exom of the mechanic after being unable to find his automobile. 

According to KPRC2, Exom had gone to Houston’s On Site Auto Repair on January 19th to make an installment for work being done on a used Lexus he had purchased in November. When he arrived to see a barren parking lot and shuttered workshop, he believed the owner, Shawn Gee, had stolen his car.

“Everything was going fine up until I came there to make a payment and there was an eviction sign posted on the door, and the regular cars that were in the lot weren’t there anymore,” Exom explained in an interview.

After calling the owner of the repair shop looking for answers, he said it was explained to him that the business had moved locations but wasn’t given an exact address — just the name’s two intersecting streets. Looking into that second location, Exom uncovered this is not the first time a car had gone missing while under the Gee family’s care.

Last fall, KPRC2 reported cases of cars missing from the second location too, which is run by Shawn Gee’s brother. Gee worked there prior to opening his own shop and appears to have returned now that it is closed.

Exom found his car on Friday after nearly a month of searching. It had been impounded and will cost him $800 to get out of the lockup. Many of the other missing cars turned up there as well.

“My thing is my car was in your possession and you should have made some type of contact with me and say, ‘Hey this is what’s going on, sir,'” said an annoyed Exom.

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75 Comments on “Possibly the Best Reason to Have Your Vehicle Serviced by an Accredited Dealer...”


  • avatar
    wintermutt

    my father had his vehicle stolen while getting it detailed. while my Porsche was getting new brakes AT A PORSCHE DEALER someone stole an alternator and a fuel safety cut off valve from my car. dealership was very uncooperative. my suggestion – get your car work done in a low crime area. you can look up crime stats by zip code online.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Gawrsh… look at all that fussy, adjusty mechanical junk to go wrong on just a 4-cyl engine.

    And car guys are all like “MOAR SILLUNDERZ!”

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      Look at all the messy nasty stuff that can go wrong with normal car’s suspension and drivetrain.

      And all the grumpy a§§ old guyz r like “MOARRR RIDEEEE HHHHIIITTTEE ENNNN AWWW WEEEEEL DRRIVVEEEE!!!”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      My V8 only has one camshaft and 16 valves. And my favorite V6 uses one camshaft and 12 valves.

      More displacement means less “fussy, adjusty mechanical junk” is needed.

      • 0 avatar
        OldManPants

        You’re not a Car Guy, ajla. You’re a Smart Person.

        Recuse yourself, Sir.

        • 0 avatar
          iNeon

          MultiAir scares me.

          • 0 avatar
            indi500fan

            Mechanical complexity in engines and transmissions is proliferating fast as part of the quest for for mandated fuel economy.
            We’ll be seeing all kinds of variable displacement / switchable oil pumps, complex valve train mechanisms, kerosene viscosity lubes, etc.

            Like all systems, there will have to be what was called back in my day “reliability growth”. Some of which is during the customer usage period.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            Fuel Injection was once thought of by some as being overly complex adjusty mechanical junk.

            I don’t know about any of you, but I am not going back to the black magic voodoo of the carburetor.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Fuel Injection was once thought of by some as being overly complex adjusty mechanical junk.”

            Fuel injection used to be overly complex adjusty mechanical junk. And it was fairly expensive. It didn’t just show up in the late 1980s 100% ready for full mainstream implementation. It took decades to sort it all out. So I can see where the sentiment comes from.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Fuel injection used to be overly complex adjusty mechanical junk. And it was fairly expensive. So I can see where the sentiment comes from.”

            ah yes. remember the shiny, braided K-Jetronic fuel lines snaking around the engine bays of German cars in the ’80s.

          • 0 avatar
            indi500fan

            I acquired a Rochester mech injection system for SB Chevy back in the 70s. Cool looking but fussy.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            I should have mentioned it I was referring to EFI primarily. Oops.

            And yes, it was certainly not perfect immediately but carburetors were far far far from flawless. Carburetors have been the number one downfall of my lawnmowers over the year, recently got one with EFI not looking back.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            MultiAir has worked out fine on my Abarth for 5 years now, iNeon. Don’t fear the keeper.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Ethanol has been the number one downfall of my lawnmowers over the years. – fixed it for you.

            Most carburetors really weren’t overly problematic until emissions became a concern and then ethanol was mandated. The first reason was a legitimate one for adopting a more accurate way of metering fuel and air. The second reason is an example of why we really should try having a government that isn’t big enough to control every aspect of our lives.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Whoa. Randy. If you need to make semi-monthly payments to your mechanic, then maybe buying a Lexus wasn’t the best choice given your current financial situation?

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    Okay, I may be missing something here, and I’d sincerely appreciate if someone would enlighten me.

    Assuming I have a place to store the vehicle in need of repair, I think I’d rather keep the vehicle in my own custody and pay the installments to myself, wait until I have enough to pay for the repairs, and only then would I turn the vehicle over to a shop for the repairs to be made.

    Again, I may be missing something, but what is the advantage of this sort of “layaway plan,” unless it’s for an extensive body and mechanical restoration of a classic? You’re not only at risk of the shop disappearing; as others reported, there is also the risk of theft or vandalism while at the shop. It’s not that I have a paranoid mistrust of others, but it just seems like you’re complicating things and accepting an inordinate amount of risk with this guy’s method.

    Please help me understand.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      OK Buzz dog I will take a shot at how this could happen, one buy a cheap Lux car for a “screaming deal” after all these Lexus never break down or need maintenance ( no idea what year or model) takes it to this repair shop for either a good once over after purchase or more likely something broke, after the repair shop sees the car , surprise it needs either a ton of maintenance work done or something major done. The car is now there and can not be driven safely or is in pieces, guy discover Lux cars are a little pricey to repair and does not have the say $1500 for a timing belt and hate pump job so goes on the payment plan until his great ride is back in his passion , just a guess but have seen it a few times at shops I do business with.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        That’s a real thing. There are also sociopaths who assume the car is the shop’s problem until he or she pays for the repairs and they’re completed. Meanwhile, the thoughtless owner doesn’t have to worry about alternate side parking rules, a full driveway, scummy neighbors, a snooty HOA, etc…

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      And unless you have the car to the garage in the first place, you’ll not know how much it’ll cost.

      Or you could save up $500 to cover a good service, turns out it needs brakes, a timing belt, a few other items and suddenly the garage is quoting $1000 for work performed “because we couldn’t get hold of you on the phone / because it won’t be safe to drive otherwise”.

      Suddenly your original $500 is gone and you are carless until you can stump up the remaining $500.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    A Morgan dealership/repair facility in VA once helped themselves to some parts from my old man’s Plus 8 while they were ripping him off supposedly doing some other repairs, which of course they did completely half assed and wrong for the most part.

    I think the dealership is closed now. I would say that if you want something done right do it yourself, but when it comes to automotive wrenching that is not always possible.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I’ve seen a fair number of Morgan Plus 8s in Virginia through the years. Where were they selling them? I used to know a guy in Stanardsville that raced a 4/4 and had a healthy restoration/pre-owned sales business for Austin-Healeys, Truimphs and Morgans. Looking back, I’m surprised that I haven’t caught up with him in over twenty years. Whoops. Been meaning to get back there. A bit of internet research reveals no trace of him. That’s unfortunate.

  • avatar
    brn

    What a horseshit title. One local repair shop screws someone and you condemn all local repair shops? I’m sure there’s never been an issue with a certified dealer.

    TTAC, you’re heading down a slippery slope.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Unfortunately things like this happen.
    Many decades ago a dealer for a European brand got in trouble for ‘borrowing’ a fender from a customer’s car that was in for service. Another car, same model, year, and color, had been waiting in the dealer body shop for a fender that was on order. Apparently the dealer management thought that could get the car out of the body shop and back to its owner and that the fender would come in soon enough to get painted and installed on the car in for service.
    This did not happen. So there were two angry customers.
    More recently there was a repair shop here in SoCal that got in a dispute with a customer over an engine repair. The car owner authorized a diagnosis, but the shop went ahead with the full repair job without getting permission. The shop wanted to be paid for the work, but the owner refused. The shop would not let the customer take their car.
    Legal note: In most states, California is one, unless a business has a signed contract (repair order) it is not legal to retain something, such as a car, to obtain payment. This is called taking someone’s property without due process.
    Later the car owner retrieved their car off the repair shop lot after the shop had closed. On the drive home a further complication occurred, the head gasket on the repaired engine failed.
    Then the shop owners did something very stupid, they broke into the person’s garage and took the car back to their shop.
    This ended up in court with the shop having to pay for another repair facility to properly repair the engine and substantial monthly payments to the car owner for all the trouble.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    Even if the service center is a dealer , it doesn’t warrant trust.

    When the pinion bearing failed on my Camaro it wasn’t a job I could do properly at home. Setting gears properly ain’t in my DIY skillset -but it’s a V8 car without a valet key.

    So I logged the mileage and left a hidden video camera in the backseat,set to record by detecting movement and/or sounds. It was interesting hearing the mechanics piss and moan about how hard my car was to work on…….

  • avatar
    Not_a_luddite

    After having my wife’s Ford Escape serviced for the issue where it would just randomly stop running, got it back and the engine cover was missing… No big deal. However when I was performing an oil change the following month, I noticed the handle for a screwdriver. I pulled it down and found that the tech had left a 24″ Snapon flat blade under the hood.

    So, now we use a different dealer to execute the warranty, and I have a nice 24″ Snapon flat blade screwdriver.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I’ve picked up a few nice tools while jogging…funny how many mechanics must leave tools behind.

    • 0 avatar
      dchturbo

      This actually happens pretty routinely, regardless of the tech’s abilities.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Yeah, I have nice 8mm extended hex socket that got left in my old Jaguar’s engine bay, and SnapOn LED light that the Mini mechanic forgot when he fixed one of the seat heaters. Then there was the time I discovered that all my sparkplugs had been installed finger-tight at my last tune-up…

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      The last independent repair shop I let work on a car left behind an 18″ Snap-On flat blade and a 1/2 inch Snap-On ratchet. They couldn’t be bothered to properly replace the gasket around the timing belt, leaving at least half of it hanging out and flapping around.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        To be fair, I’ve run into my share of poor dealer service as well. I’m sure there are good independent shops out there. The issue is that there really is no reliable way of identifying them without a large body of trustworthy evidence from third parties.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I’ve always believed in the adage: “Take good care of your car and your car will take good care of you.” I always serviced my vehicles at the dealer and it hasn’t really cost me a whole lot more than a private shop, but the piece of mind is worth the slight extra cost. The few times the dealerships have botched something over the years, they’ve always taken full responsibility and fixed the problems at no charge.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      Yep, you find a good, reputable dealer, you are money ahead in ongoing maintenance costs

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Does this apply to people who will sell Fords? My hometown Ford dealer is under its third owner. So far, they’ve all been grist for the worst dealer service stereotypes. I know of two crimes committed against my buddy’s shop by customers. The first one involved a Ford dealer service employee leaving a set of wheels and tires as collateral for a new set of tires they couldn’t pay for and then never coming back. The Ford dealer claimed they were no longer in contact with the guy, although his truck was seen there a number of times after the theft. Next, a family member of the Ford dealer used a company credit card to make a several hundred dollar purchase that his relative at the dealership denied payment of. Nice. They also hired away a good service writer, promising him the world and then laying him off a couple months later. In this town, it is considered dealer SOP to mess with other repair facilities this way.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    Dealerships can be manky, too. Back in the 1900s I blew the clutch in my Tempo. I drove it to a Ford dealership for a quote on a replacement. Extremely friendly and helpful, the service manager offered to have a mechanic look at it for the estimate. I was initially impressed. The quote came back rather high so I said I’d think about it. Still very friendly she gave me a sheet of paper, which I thought was a printout of the estimate. Nope – it was a bill for 0.5 hours of shop time, including the use of a hoist. $75 in 1992 was a lot of money for a broke guitar player. I said that I didn’t authorize any work and she replied that she won’t return my keys until I pay. I told her my wallet was in the car; walked outside; retrieved the spare keys from the magnetized plastic box under the car; and drove away.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    The Honda dealership that I used to deal with had someone break into their fenced yard and then break into the vehicles parked there all awaiting service. Broke a side or back window in each and then stole anything worthwhile out of each vehicle. The dealership paid to repair and damage but would not pay to replace stolen items, claiming that the owners should do that through their own insurance. Most did.

    The Hyundai dealership that I purchased my vehicle from botched a repair job when replacing an interior piece under warranty. Scratched the steering wheel very badly. And refused to take any responsibility. The have not seen me since.

  • avatar
    Gedrven

    How many people with Isuzu C223 engines in their rigs actually have them serviced at the dealer? That’s my guess for the engine in the photo.

    • 0 avatar
      Pinzgauer

      I have an old railroad track car with a c223 in it. I highly doubt the Canadian Pacific Railroad or any of its past owners had it serived by Isuzu. GREAT motor by the way. Will start immediately even in very low temps despite that it hasnt run for months.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    “Fuel Injection was once thought of by some as being overly complex adjusty mechanical junk.”

  • avatar
    Jeff Zekas

    You can get screwed by dealers as well as private mechanics. When we lived in Cali, we took my wife’s wagon to the Chevy dealer. The service advisor pulled me aside and said, “Your kid plays little league with mine, so I’ll be straight with you: we are told to always put ‘extra’ repairs on the bill”. When we moved north, I had what I thought was an honest mechanic. When the economy nose dived in ’08 the “honest” guy started doing half arsed repairs (stripped an oil pan and “fixed” it with a rubber plug, among other bogus repairs). The final straw was when a drug addict broke into my son’s car whilst it was sitting at the shop. To his credit, the mechanic paid for a new stereo, but it was still expensive to get it installed.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Jeff Zekas
      In many cases all they ” check” is too change the oil for a new car under warranty.. All the other ” areas of inspection” are ticked automatically

  • avatar
    Gedrven

    While dealers are pretty much guaranteed not to abruptly pack up and leave like in the example, they are certainly no less capable of sheisty or incompetent actions than are their independent competitors, and invariably cost more at the same time.

    I used to work for one of said competitors, and recall the case of a ~10 year old Jetta 5-pot that had a misfire on cold mornings and CEL for same. The car came to us after the local VW dealer took about six weeks and $4000 of the customer’s money, installed a brand new cylinder head among other things, and accomplished nothing. It came with some half-dozen printed pages of invoicing and technician’s notes. None of those notes mentioned a compression test. I let the car sit over the weekend and did a cold dry compression test first thing Monday morning. 200-210-90-190-210. Splashed a little oil into #3 and that 90 became 190. The compresson test – which unequivocally narrowed down the problem to piston rings – took 20 minutes, or about $40 at our shop rates, or literally 1/100th of what the dealer charged to replace parts that 1. not only were not defective, but much worse, 2. could have been determined to not be the problem with one of the most basic diagnostic procedures. Instead, they blindly threw parts – major, expensive, labor-intensive parts, all at the customer’s expense – to the tune of half the car’s value.

    Sometimes there’s a blurry line between malice and gross incompetence.

  • avatar
    brn

    Seeing that my other post, not speaking well of TTAC, has been waiting moderation all day, I’ll repost with symbols to elude the block bot.

    What a h0rs3sh!t title. One local repair shop scr3ws someone and you condemn all local repair shops? I’m sure there’s never been an issue with a certified dealer.

    TTAC, you’re heading down a slippery slope.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Who writes this nonsense and these headlines? First off, dealers are franchised, not accredited. Secondly, plenty of franchised new car dealers have ripped people off, had cars stolen and so on. During the troubles of 2008-2010 a whole lot of people got stuck when dealerships fell on bad times. Finally, what kind of a person buys a used Lexus then leaves it at a repair shop for months while making payments twice a month until they can have their car back?

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Trusting new-car dealer “Service” is a big mistake, for out-of-warranty repairs. For routine maintenance, they’re usually fine, as long as that’s all you let them do. I’m certainly not saying all or most are thieves and criminals, but you’re more likely to find them at franchise dealers, than independents, mom-n-pops, etc.

    For any nationwide chain, Aamco, Meineke, Pep Boys, etc, having an endless stream of customers “locked-in” is an opportunity to rip off their customers. They’re not relying on local word-of-mouth. And those “just passin’ through” are less likely ask around for referrals to honest, independent shops.

    Nationwide chains, dealers especially, are way more likely to have “on commission” staff, just there for the “upsell”, unneeded repairs and service, and not give a sh!t about anything else, like if you’re ever coming back. 6 month later, they’re be working somewhere else around the corner, again, not giving a sh!t, just maximum commission.

    They’re trying to get at least $1,000 from every customer/victim that walks through the door. They usually get it!

    Another thing dealers/chains like to do is intentionally sell you the wrong repair, knowing you don’t know any better. Or you’re just there for the “diagnosis” and plan on doing the “parts swap”, yourself, which they hate.

    But when you “approve” the fix and waiting for completion, they’ll call you back, informing you there’s “coincidentally” a 2nd problem, more parts/labor are necessary, except that’s the *actual* “fix” you came in for. Or they may try have the 3rd repair, as the actual fix.

    If you decline at any time, your car isn’t fixed, you may need to tow it home, or to another shop, (possibly with it torn apart), but the dealer/franchise shop you’re at, wins either way. Usually a $400 repair ends up closer to $2,000. But what alternative do you have once you’re there? You’re kinda stuck, and they love it.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I always have my dealership service my car. Now that’s it well out of warranty though – depending on what type of repair it needs – I’ll go to where I buy my tires, as they do an excellent job.

    However, if I keep the car and when something real serious happens, I’ll decide then whether to fix or sell/trade.

    Maybe that’ll be the time I pick out my favorite Yaris…

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    “Maybe that’ll be the time I pick out my favorite Yaris…”

    Though I think you’re being facetious there, people our age are mostly in the keep-your-last-car-cheap mentality. I like the couple of Corollas friends of mine have bought in that frame of mind.

    Push to shove, money/fear wins out over Tall, sad to say. Still, a Corolla would be livable given how little I willingly drive.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    Mildly amusing anecdote of the day…

    Random local auto repair shop disaster story, personal edition, relatively short version:

    Circa very late 1990’s, my mid-eighties Audi 5000 is at a local import specialty shop for a new head gasket. At work one morning, co-worker notices a car on the TV news, similar to mine, involved in an incident. Mentions to me that a gray Audi suspiciously like mine is on the news. Within minutes, phone call comes in for me, it’s the police.

    Long story short, some teenage kids stole the Audi, a VW Vanagon, and some random other car I can’t remember from the repair shop. They drove the Audi head on into the entryway of their high school. Great carnage to the car and building’s entrance. Kids fled the scene pretty much uninjured, a testament to the A5k’s crash worthiness. The kids weren’t the brightest, but were apparently wise enough to understand that crashing a 5000 into a building was more intelligent than a Vanagon, from a survival standpoint.

    Car was a heap, liability only insurance, shop was a great shop, not worth going after them for the cost of the car, etc. I wrote it off for various reasons beyond the scope of this post. Anyway, several years later, out of the blue, a get a check in the mail from the county. Someone in the judicial system had eventually recovered some money from the kids and doled it out to those of us whose cars were ruined. I think I got something like $800-$900 I wasn’t expecting. Bonus! Probably about what the car was worth, anyway.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    Is it just me, or am I the only one pissed off by the $800 “impound fee” that the victim has to pay to get his car back. Presumably, this is by a towing yard contracted by the police.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Back in the 1990s I followed these matters more closely.
    About once a year one of the local TV stations would rig up a car with hidden video cameras and have it checked out by an AAA repair shop. Typical vehicle was about 5-7 years old with 50-75K miles. Everything would be good except brake pads that were worn about 75% would be installed.
    Then car was taken to one of the chain repair shops, often a ‘tune-up’ shop. It would be brought in by a female that worked at the TV station, but not on on air person.
    They would tell the counter person at the shop that they wanted the car checked as they were going on a long driving trip.
    The shop would later call them with a estimate of needed repairs/maintenance. Even though the car was running fine, no CEL on, or any other problems beyond the nearly worn out brakes, it was recommended that ignition coils, spark plugs, plug wires, and so on be replaced. Of course all fluids and filters were recommended replace/changed also even though that was recently done and of course, FLUSH THE FUEL INJECTION SYSTEM.
    Following along with the sting, the car owner okayed the work/estimate.
    The hidden video cameras revealed that nothing was done to the car during the day and since there was a van with a hidden camera across the street, all that happened was the car was moved around the parking area and the fuel injection “flushed”. BTW the worn brakes were ignored.
    Later after the car was picked up and paid for the TV producers went into the shop with a small video player and the work order.
    When confronted the manager ducked out the back and the other counter employees were extremely flustered.
    Later, after calling in the District Attorney/Consumer Affairs the shop refunded the money paid for the “work”.
    Not everyone has a TV station to back them up.
    I used to get the newsletter from the State Consumer Affairs dept about vehicle repair. In every issue the chain repair shops were cited for doing this type of stuff.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    My “accredited” dealer story was years ago having my Ford Thunderbird serviced. When I got it back, the window was split in two. I don’t mean a hairline crack, I mean it look like it had a beveled edge down the middle.

    Clearly, someone had dropped something really heavy on it or worse. Dealership refused to take responsibility, said I must have brought it in that way.

    Decided to simply run it through my insurance rather than suing the dealership over it.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Sometimes the Customer brings this on them selves IMO :
    .
    In the 1990’s my Brother took his old & battered 1979 VW Diesel Rabbit to an Indie VW Shop in Glendale, ca. because ” it shakes too much ” (he meant engine vibration) ~ it was filthy but ran perfectly and had five brand new tires .
    .
    As he was dropping it off he told the Service Writer ” no hurry, whenever you get to it if that will save me money ” .
    .
    I grabbed his arm and said ” Idiot ! they’ll never fix it now ! “.
    He ignored me and a YEAR LATER got a telephone call from the Glendale police telling him his car was impounded…..
    .
    We drove by the impound lot to retrieve his vanity tags and discovered a bare shell with wheels ~ when they removed the driveline they’d chopped right through the main harness, the grimy and worn out seats were gone ~ everything .
    .
    I always tell people that when you think you’ve saving$ by telling the shop/Mechanic ‘ work on it in your spare time ‘, what they hear is ” I don’t care if I never see this piece of junk again ” ~ NO EXCEPTIONS, EVER .
    .
    Anyone in The Auto Trade or who’s had Classic Car body work done can tell you horror stories .
    .
    I have Dealer stories too but this isn’t the place for them .
    .
    CAVEAT EMPTOR ! .
    .
    -Nate

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