By on February 6, 2017

BMW USA CEO Bernhard Kuhnt - Image: BMW

Bernhard Kuhnt takes over as the chief executive officer of BMW’s U.S. outpost on March 1, Automotive News reports, replacing BMW’s western hemisphere boss, Ludwig Willisch, who is likely to retire by the end of the decade.

BMW sales grew year after year during Willisch’s tenure, reaching annual records in 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015. There were, at times, questionable tactics employed to maintain rapid growth.

Yet in 2016, as U.S. auto sales shot to record levels, BMW’s U.S. volume plunged by more than 9 percent. In 12 consecutive months, U.S. sales declined on year-over-year terms. At BMW’s Mini brand, three years after volume climbed to record levels in 2013, sales fell to a six-year low in 2016.

And yet no automaker is incentivizing to such a lofty degree.

Coinciding with Bernhard Kuhnt’s installation in the top post, former vice president for operations, Petter Witt, has moved on to other opportunities with a New Jersey-based 10-store dealer group, Holman Automotive. Kuhnt leaves a role in which he had his fingers in BMW’s sales operations in 80-plus markets, but he has extensive U.S. experience. Kuhnt worked in sales for Mercedes-Benz for more than 25 years before a six-year stint at Jaguar Land Rover.

Kuhnt is now tasked with turning around a greatly suffering brand as consumers turn away from passenger cars. In 2016, while U.S. car sales fell 9 percent, BMW’s car volume plunged 21 percent. The 3 Series and 4 Series, long BMW’s security blanket, combined to lose more than 34,000 sales compared with 2015. The 5 Series, 6 Series, i3, i8, and Z4 all posted additional declines.

All auto brands are now faced with the task of shifting production and inventory levels to meet a shift in demand. BMW utility vehicle volume increased in 2016, but not nearly enough to make up for the dearth of car sales. X4, X5, and X6 sales actually decreased in 2016, as well.

2016 BMW X1 - Image: BMW

But the shift is underway. BMW has contracted out production of the surging X1, the entry-level crossover, to VDL Nedcar in the Netherlands. Dutch production of the X1 will begin in August and boost supply of a model that accounted for 21 percent of BMW USA’s SAV volume in 2016, up from 12 percent one year before. December, with 4,185 X1 sales, was BMW USA’s best-ever month for X1 volume. Of BMW’s five utility vehicles, the X1 is the only one not assembled in South Carolina.

Across great swathes of the BMW lineup, however, significant discounts are required to move metal. In January 2017, for instance, BMW finally broke the 12-month-long streak of declining sales — with a 0.1-percent, 27-unit uptick — partly due to an average $6,016 in incentives per vehicle sale, according to ALG. To be fair, BMW’s average transaction prices, at $48,732 in January, are among the highest in the industry. Thus, BMW’s incentive spend as a percentage of average transaction price in January was still lower than FCA, GM, Kia, Nissan, and the Volkswagen Group.

Still, BMW’s average incentive spend jumped 44 percent, year-over-year, and the average transaction price slid 3 percent.

A number of factors conspired for BMW to need new U.S. leadership in early 2017. Regardless of the background, Bernhard Kuhnt has his work cut out for him. For the time being, Ludwig Willisch continues in his position at the top of the heap for BMW Group Region Americas.

As for the operations position vacated by Petter Witt, a statement from BMW Personnel says, “Bernhard Kuhnt will have a clear priority to appoint a successor for this position in the period ahead.”

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

72 Comments on “There’s a New Sheriff in Town: BMW Installs New US CEO After Sales Slide and Incentives Soar...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “It looks, after all, as if you will see Berlin before I do.”

    FYI, in case anyone’s interested…BMW has the same problem as Cadillac: soft demand for sedans.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      This is why Cadillac is going to abandon Johan’s 12 billion dollar plan to be the next BMW and just rebadge Chevy and GMC CUVs as Cadillacs, completely reminiscent of Roger Smith’s brilliance.

      Johan, Melody & Uwe talked so long, (allegedly), passionately, longingly, and with such seeming conviction about how they were going to turn Cadillac into a German-besting wunderbrand, with an emphasis on the ‘brand,’ as a representation of edgy, hip, opulent, socially connected, ecoluxury, SoHoness, and for all their years of sound, fury, sponsorship of New York Fashion Week, ads featuring playing-with-dolls-and-dresses, designer Jason Wu, and trumping brand over product Uwe-speak, Cadillac’s lineup will soon consist of:

      XT1 – Rebadged Chevy Spark-based CUV (this can actually be seen in the Cadillac Urban Luxury concept)

      XT2 – Rebadged Chevy Sonic-based CUV

      XT3 – Rebadged Chevy Cruze-based CUV

      XT4 – Rebadged Chevy Malibu-based CUV

      XT5 – *exists*

      XT6 – Rebadged Chevy Impala-based CUV

      Escalade – *exists*

      And there’s your future Cadillac lineup, that Roger Smith himself would proudly bring to market and ensure that pleather trim, CUE and the storied Cadillac emblem, now monochromatized and devoid of wreath, are distinguishing, standard features separating the Cadillacs (“standard of the world”) from their less prestigious GM siblings….

      ….and better service department coffee, hopefully.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Rencen – Sell the division now while you can still get something for it.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          RenCen circa- 2013 –

          We love your ‘2020,’ 12 billion dollar, beat BMW, Mercedes & Audi plan that you just pitched, Johan. Go execute it effectively with our blessing!

          RenCen now –

          This idea of abandoning your prior plan, that we already spent approx 5 billion on, to simply rebadge Chevy CUVs as Cadillacs, is brilliant, Johan! Please make sure to feel free to fully utilize Melody Lee & Uwe Ellinghaus to execute the #MillennialSohoArenaDareGreatlyBrand>Product marketing aspect of the revised plan, and thanks be to you for your incredible foresight!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            A complete rebadge competes with GMC and Buick, which already compete with each other. I wonder if there is a word for this, supercilious? Can a corporation become the Donner Party>

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            A complete rebadge competes with GMC and Buick, which already compete with each other. I wonder if there is a word for this, supercilious? Can a corporation become the Donner Party?

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        DW,
        I think I’d rather let it die on the vine a la Mulally genius rather than having both OEM’s putting lipstick on the rotten corpse.

        Hell, look at what Fields is doing with Lincoln! Billions wasted. Sure, we may have a RWD Conti or MkZ soon, and that appeals to my enthusiast thirst… but it’s going to cost the company so much profit. It’s just a sheer waste.

        Adding complexity and capacity where it will only cannibalize capacity and program dollars from another internal plant….

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Other than the BOF trucks, is GM really “rebadging” anything in the same market these days? All of the other vehicles have unique styling and bodyshells

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    If I’m in the to mood to be ignored by sales people, I can always visit my local BMW dealer. I may be wearing a hooded sweatshirt, but I can afford to buy anything in the showroom.
    .
    .

  • avatar

    I suspect the reason(s) for the declining sales may have to do with too many models/trims…or people are tired of BMWs and are buying something else.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The problem is that with a few exceptions, sales of luxury sedans are down across the board. And it’s happening to every manufacturer.

      The luxury market has gone CUV-loopy.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Yep…. benchmarks like the 3 series, the brand new E class, and the class leading S class are all down.

        And yet manufacturers seem all too eager to try to squeeze in more sedan entrants. If I were a luxury brand getting a fresh start or pursuing a revival I wouldn’t even bother with a sedan. I’d make a platform capable of building sedans and crossovers on, but wait and see where the market goes. Because right now it looks like sedans- mainstream and luxury (aside from the C-segment)- are headed towards a crossover black hole. It’s hard to see a future in segments that have continued to shrink in a consistently growing market.

        It’s a shame because I prefer sedans. Hopefully this downturn prompts companies to make dynamics a priority as that’s going to become the main driver to get people into sedans. It looks like Toyota came to that realization with the Camry. Like I keep saying… “the sedan is the new coupe”… and the crossover is the new sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        BMW’s sedan offerings have been hit harder than those of Mercedes and Audi though. It isn’t just that total sales are falling, their market share is sinking in these segments too.

        And some of their CUVs (like the X5 and X6) aren’t really on fire either.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          A change in demand from sedans to cuvs, pretty much presupposes a simultaneous lowering of the relative value placed on driving dynamics. Which, more so than for the others, have been BMWs USP for decades.

          If RWD, 50/50 weight distribution, creamy I6s, availability of manuals etc., etc. is no longer valued much at all, compared to a few inches higher hip point and some cubic inches of internal airspace, that is bound to require a bigger culture change at BMW, as well as at Mazda, than at most other makes.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          Because BMW doesn’t actually do luxury well. Their interiors are nowhere near as nice as Mercedes or Audi (or the new Volvos).

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      In-segment market share isn’t BMW’s best metric right now (in the US). Their sedans have gotten too soft and their utilities are too hard. No one cares what a CUV did on the burgerkingonionring Nordschleife. A CUV that chips or cracks it’s rims on a pot hole is not very useful in this country. On GDR roads? Perfection. It’s nothing but product driving the fall. They are burning through the most valuable brand perceived value in the US automotive market. The multi year lag between product change and perception change may be keeping them from realizing the cause.

    • 0 avatar
      Erikstrawn

      Check how many BMWs are available on craigslist dirt cheap, but “needs engine”. I think it’s starting to hurt their reputation.

    • 0 avatar
      Driver123

      They simply lost their core buyer base, CUVs or not. I owned several BMWs but not that must interested anymore. BMWs used to be different, special. Ultimate Driving Machine? Nope. Maybe 340 M-Sport and M3/4 but that’s about it. Numb electrical steering, cheaper materials. Had 328i as a loaner, meh.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I wonder if BMW is running into the same problem as Caddy?

    Nobody wants to actually own one, so they are leased, and all the 2 and 3 year lease cars come back to the market. The market knows about the high cost of long term ownership due to expensive failures in the out years, and
    the lease returns are falling in price to move them out.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Meh, I don’t think leasing is the problem per se – unless I’m way off, most luxury vehicles are leased, no matter who builds them. Otherwise, a $50,000 car is going to have a massive monthly payment, for a depreciating asset. Folks who have some money usually know better than to sign up for that.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        Leasing doesn’t reduce the depreciation hit. It just masks it with a lower payment.
        .
        .

        • 0 avatar
          tnk479

          No, what leasing does is locks in the precise amount of the depreciation hit up front.

          A lot of people judge leasing negatively and they should reconsider, especially in an era of rapidly out of date “infotainment” systems.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Not quite, baiter, with a lease you pay for the depreciation *you use*, plus interest. That’s why the payment is lower.

          This makes sense for any car, but particularly for an expensive one. I just leased my first vehicle (which wasn’t expensive), and wonder why the hell I never did it earlier.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        I agree leasing isn’t the problem.

        The problem is that resale on the lease returns is lousy because people realize how expensive it is to own these as they age out.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, yeah, indi, if you keep a BMW past its’ lease, it becomes expensive. That’s why no one does it. Plus, these are luxury car buyers. They don’t want to drive these cars until they die – they want something new every few years.

          And this is also why luxury makes like BMW do warranties and CPO programs on the lease turn-ins.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “They don’t want to drive these cars until they die – they want something new every few years.”

            See, there’s where there’s a missed opportunity.

            I’d like something nice that is also enduring. An heirloom-quality car.

            I don’t want to just piss away money and get a new car every 3 years. I can piss away less money by trading up to a newer Honda Civic, and still be relatively happy with the results at less than half the cost.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Why buy a new 3-series, when you can buy a 2007 model for 1/3 the price, and your neighbor won’t know the difference anyway? They look the same. Just clear the haze off the headlights, and replaced the 328 badge with one that says 330, and you’re good. Because that’s about the only incentive BMW has provided to get a new one – they changed the model number, not the car.

      Any yes, I realize the E90 and F30 are different cars, but they look similar enough for most people.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    The shift is upon us. In 2016, all the luxury SUVs gained almost exactly what the luxury cars lost in units sold. In the interim the companies that will succeed are the ones that have the capacity to meet the changing demand.

    Frighteningly though we are getting inundated with a deluge of choice in sedans just as the downturn in sedan segments begins to accelerate. Folks who thought the ATS/CTS decline was bad ain’t seen nothing yet. Alfa, Jag, Volvo, Maserati, Genesis and all the newcomers and hail-mary self-reinventers should have lead their revivals/introductions with crossovers, not sedans. Genesis especially worries me with how stuffy and conservative their cars are… who is the market for something like a G90?

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “The shift is upon us. In 2016, all the luxury SUVs gained almost exactly what the luxury cars lost in units sold.”

      The article points out that BMW’s SUV sales are not following the market, so something else is going on.

      IMHO it’s that other manufacturers have closed the gap and are able to offer high end features for less money. Look at the Volvo XC90. Those sales are going to people who would cross-shop the X5.
      .
      .

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I have been seeing a lot of new XC90s running around. I think people get roped in with that stupid infotainment interface. Great dealership bait, terrible to use on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The X1 and X3 are both up – sharply.

        http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2017/01/usa-luxury-suv-sales-by-model-december-2016-year-end.html

        The X5 is down somewhat (it’s an older model). Probably competition from the Q7.

    • 0 avatar
      Caboose

      I would be. A G90 is, in my mind, the spiritual successor to my ’04 LS430. So me and…that one other guy… are gonna be getting great deals on some G90 goodness.

    • 0 avatar
      bluegoose

      The issue is these new sedans were planned 5 years ago. It is difficult to predict shifts in the market like this.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Is it though? SRX outperformed CTS for most years of its 2nd generation. RX has been Lexus’ top seller probably since its debut. MDX has been Acura’s top seller for most of its years on the market. I get that sport sedans are sexier and easier to market, but even 10 years ago crossovers were a force to be reckoned with, which is why the Germans beat these 3rd tier players to the punch with stuff like the Q5, ML, X3/X5 etc. We also had JLR’s brands to compare and contrast back then…. its clear which of the two brands was doing the heavy lifting.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Koreans will always be in the market for the G90. That’s who they’ve always made it for, back when it was still called the Equus. It’s a pretty low risk maneuver to bring over a car they were building anyway to fill out their lineup.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        If Genesis is to become a global brand, as I imagine their global launch would indicate their intent to be, they are going to have to build vehicles for other markets. Bringing over the G90 becomes a high risk proposition when you are sinking capital into launching dealerships and marketing. If the benchmark S-class is down, what chance does the G90 stand without the strong design and brand/marque cachet? Not much IMO

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    BMW needs to decide if it is a prestige brand or a volume brand. If it is a prestige brand then it needs to worry less about sales volume and maintain its pricing. If it wants to be a volume brand then it needs to lower its pricing.

    It can’t be both, no brand can.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      I certainly don’t view it as any kind of prestige brand. BMWs are as common as Accords and Camrys here in coastal OC. There are 10 or 12 on my block (much less my street) alone (though one is a 2002 and one is a dead 3.0, which are the only two I would want).

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      Prestige isn’t the problem. The issue is that they predominantly make cars, and three box coupes and sedans are passé.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    So…. how DO you pronounce this guy’s last name?

    Bernhard Kuhnt

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    At long last! An aptly named Euro CEO.

  • avatar

    BMW’s styling department needs an overhaul desperately. New models and older models look interchangeable. The styling gets fuzzier by the month. Sack them. There’s plenty of talent with fresh new ideas out there.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    BMW doesn’t need more prestige.

    They need to grow, and the way ahead for them and every modern luxury brand is CUVs. They cannot return to being a boutique builder of niche enthusiast cars -or they’ll end up like Saab.

    Range Rover moves the metal despite making Trabant quality iron and no enthusiast cars . That’s the business model BMW needs to Xerox and execute,with a quickness. One day in the future those driving Captivas and CRVs will want a status symbol. For that generation automotive success doesn’t look anything like a 760i or an M5. It’s a Range Rover sport.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      But, if they want to be taken seriously downmarket, they’re going to have to compete with Toyota and Honda on reliability, repairability, and value.

      The 2016 Honda Civic with Honda Sensing is a pretty compelling value proposition, to the point where we didn’t even bother to look at the 3-series. The only problem I’ve found with the Civic is that the panel gaps aren’t perfectly consistent, but it’s a nice looking car inside and out that’s loaded with well integrated tech. Oh, and I only paid $20k for a car that’s more competitive with the 3-series on utilitarian grounds. Also, we can reasonably expect to own the Civic beyond the warranty period without financial hardship — which is a big deal with the 30k miles/year my wife expecting to put on this car.

      Being competitive with the Civic s a pretty high bar — but that’s the game, if BMW were to chase volume.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    BMW’s problem is that competitors have fresher models – the A4, C-Class, XE, ATS and others have been introduced/new generationed since the current 3/4 series was launched. The XC90, F-Pace, Q7, XT5, etc. are all fresher than the X5. The new X1 is cannibalizing the X3 to some degree, since interior space is virtually the same and it has a lower price. I have to wonder if all the resources put into the slow selling and unprofitable i3 and i8 have come at the expense of maintaining/improving the mainstream models.

  • avatar

    It’s not just soft demand for sedans.

    It’s softened sedans.

    BMW has dumbed down what was once their strong suit – dynamic performance and fingertip-tingling feedback. Not to mention fake engine noise.

    In other words – it’s the product, dummies.

    Make BMW Great Again and the sales will follow.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Except…Caddy’s doing this and their sedans are failing too.

      I’d say, follow Mercedes’ lead, ala C-class, which isn’t up for 2016, but hasn’t taken the huge sales hit its’ competitors have, either. It’s nothing special performance-wise, though it’s certainly class-competitive. But look at the interior. It’s all first cabin stuff – it looks, feels and even smells like a VERY expensive car. Same can be said for the Audi A4, which had an up year sales-wise.

      And then look in the cabin of a 3-series BMW, or a Caddy ATS. It’s not even close.

      I think the way to succeed with luxury sedans is to emphasize luxury. And by that I don’t mean “make it on an old Panther platform and have it ride like a cloud” – I mean, a) make it interesting to drive, and b) sumptuous and meticulously finished. I believe that’s how the brands who succeed with sedans will do it.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Yep. Performance and competent dynamics are pretty much democratized. You’re not going to sell more cars with more horsepower, nor are you going to win anyone over with Ring Tuned Dynamics™. The main differentiators in the luxury segment are design and refinement. BMW would do well to focus there.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I think it’s more complicated than that.

      For starters, back in the day when BMW legitimately made “the ultimate driving machines” the average car was pretty awful dynamically. Now there’s not much to be gained in getting anything more than an Accord Sport for a fun to drive sedan besides horsepower. The game has moved forward and democratized the fun to drive sedan.

      Secondly the market has changed. If people wanted driving dynamics, the 3 series wouldn’t be in decline. The IS wouldn’t be 2nd tier in sales for its segment. The ATS/CTS wouldn’t be abject sales failures freefalling in a growing market. People wouldn’t be flocking to crossovers. So even if BMW held up the tradition there’s nothing to indicate that they would be in any better position…. and for what it’s worth, BMW makes the cheapest 6 cylinder sedan with a stickshift available in the 340i- which speaks to how different the market is today.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Sporty, I think that’s a big part of why luxury sedans are down… the mass market sedans and CUV’s look, feel and drive close enough to luxury brands that for many it’s not worth the extra money.

        Add to that the comparatively drab BMW interiors and silly options pricing and the delta gets even bigger. BMW still attracts the enthusiast who wants a 3rd pedal in sedans (well, just the 3 series now), but that’s a shrinking number of people and some prior customers have already jumped ship to Audi, MB, Porsche and now Volvo. I’d love to have an e39’ish 5 series with a manual, but they don’t make them available, and recent BMW reliability has been pretty bad.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    This is BMW’s own fault. Had they retained Land Rover and let Land Rover run themselves they would be seeing sales go up overall not down…

    As it is JLR are growing and maintaining margins… If I were BMW I’d relaunch Triumph, that would give them another premium brand and some relief.

  • avatar
    Keith Mercer

    It is over for BMW.. it will be at least 2 decades for them to even get close to competing with Mercedes or Audi.

  • avatar

    US Car makers have always sold you a small car for small money and big car for big money. Small cars were for years made intentionally cheap to move you up to the big car with the big price point. Euros and Japanese confused us a bit by sending over quality small cars, but in the US, legroom was clearly for those with money. Those other cars were small for tax and registration reasons in the home market…..not relevant here. A big BMW or MB is hugely expensive to run in the home market, both for gas and registration..more than we understand here.

    Trucks have changed this. It is harder to charge for size, as a truck starts off “big” and gets “bigger”. So, do you want a Sentra, or would your family fit better in a RAV 4 ? Those horrible Nissan Rogues I see often are the supersize car…low quality, but lots of it !!!

    The BMW intender will see that the 3 series vs. the execrable X3, if not enthusiast, will be X3-same reason…it’s bigger. Also, trucks tend to get the last generation of interior bits from the sedans, so the equipment in the truck is well amortized. I recently got an X3 loaner that had the same satnav my 2003 330i has…while ahead of its time, a DVD driven satnav in 2016 ? Bonus for the car maker…cheaper cost of production !!!

    BMW has lost the thread. When I get a Sport Package 328i loaner (F30) when my sport package e46 is in for wheel alignment, and the old car is better than the new one….
    I drive a friend’s 428i. Numb steering.
    I’ve a caddy that out drives the 5 series.
    They’ve slapped a BMW roundel on a FWD car.

    Also, everyone is up to the nose in “off leases”. I was told by a dealer recently that “we just send them back to BMW”, they don’t even try to sell the CPO…they have so many returns.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    BMW used to be an aspirational brand, beginning with Yuppies in the Eighties. But everything runs its course and they’re as common as dirt here so hardly aspirational anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      320i I4

      Equipped with standard features such as Bluetooth and USB, Leather Multifunction steering wheel, and Dynamic Cruise Control

      Leasing details

      $279 first month’s payment
      $2,750 down payment
      $0 security deposit
      $925 acquisition fee
      ———————
      $3,954 Due at Signing

      https://www.bmwusa.com/special-offers/lease.2016-320i-Sedan.html

      Accord I4 CVT

      $199/mo

      $1999 down

      MSRP $24,130.00 (includes destination, excludes tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Actual net capitalized cost $20,179.80. Net capitalized cost includes $595 acquisition fee.

      http://automobiles.honda.com/current-offers.aspx

      Granted you have to front 2K more and the Accord may be considered “bigger” but its strikingly close. I imagine much closer than it was in the 80s/90s.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    How much blame can be placed on the US CEO? Aren’t key strategic decisions made back in the Old Country?

  • avatar
    NMGOM

    Good. Maybe Bernhard can knock some sense into BMW skulls, and have them come up with a sporty BMW pickup truck, perhaps along the lines of a Honda Ridgeline but with a MUCH better suspension. They could start with the X5, chop the back end off, put on a box, and DONE! Even Mercedes Benz is seeing the light.

    =========================

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Saw an ad flash on my screen a couple of weeks ago; BMW would sell an off lease car on a seven year low-interest note.

    They perceive the off lease tidal wave as a problem.

    Yeah yeah I know that everyone leases luxury cars, but ‘disposable’ and ‘luxury’ don’t go together.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    They’ve gotten too expensive to buy AND service. That’s part of it.

    And why fight the trend? Judging by Subaru Outback and Audi Allroad sales, BMW has left a lot of money on the table by not giving their 3 Series wagon the same treatment.

    Instead, they seem determined to instead fight for approval of the “GT” approach. Salesman must have to really work to get those out the door.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Imagefont: I’ll be in Denver next week – I want it!!! Okay $4500 is a little high I think. A friend of mine had...
  • lstanley: I often wonder about the buyer of certain vehicles. Some are pretty obvious, like commuters buying a Camry...
  • jkross22: Ford’s got problems, but marketing won’t solve any of them.
  • mcs: @Art Vandalay: I know the PDP11 well. Actually, the backplanes were wire-wrapped and not the boards. Learned to...
  • lstanley: Just wait until this technology also won’t allow your car to start until the windshield is replaced....

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber