By on January 25, 2017

Lincoln Blackwood

We’re forever hearing the tap-tapping of superior keyboards around here and elsewhere on the wild and crazy interwebz, condemning those who drive CUVs for not having a real SUV, and those who have SUVs for not having trucks. And if you have a truck and don’t use it for these paramount truck activities, then you should be in a small sedan. End of discussion.

But since this is (North) America and freedom of choice abounds, I want us all to play a trucky little game for today’s Question of the Day.

I theorize there are certain truck models much less conducive to truck activities. Whether that means family hauling duty, puttering around to your early 4:15 p.m. dinner at the Cracker Barrel, or perhaps taking up too much room at the golf course, there are more non-truck activities than the inverse. Those last two duties used to be reserved for the Personal Luxury Coupe, for those of you old enough to remember Dallas or whatever.

How often do you see an F-150 Limited out on a farm track (if you happen across a farm)? How about a two-wheel-drive Tacoma with a cap, hauling anything but air? And obviously the Lincoln Blackwood above isn’t too prepared for real work. It has a mandatory two-wheel-drive configuration, four doors, carpeted cargo area, and hard-shell powered tonneau.

My charge to the B&B today is to submit a list of the five trucks you see (regularly, so Blackwood goes bye-bye) not being used for anything remotely near to truck use. Go as far as you like on the specifics with trim. No list of rules. Let’s see if you’re responsible with some free will. I’ll be around later to chastise your selections gather the results.

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176 Comments on “QOTD: Which Trucks are Least Likely to be Used Like Trucks?...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Chevy SSR.

    Worst truck and the 2003-2004 version was arguably the worst thing in existence.

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    Easy… Tonka.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      ahem…

      http://i749.photobucket.com/albums/xx140/dave_bernardin/20170121_112812_zpsqc1grjqy.jpg

      stay classy Alberta

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @General Malaise. Agreed. (If we consider current production pickups) My local dealer had a Tonka F150 for $135k. They had 2 Shelby F150’s for the same price. One Shelby is still sitting there on the lot. All of them have rigid tonneau covers and bed carpeting.

      The F150 Limited on 22 inch wheels is useless as well. The payload sucks and I wouldn’t want to run a tire with limited sidewall down a rough dirt road.

      In my part of the world 4×2’s could be considered a pickup limitation.

      Oh, almost forgot about those Ram Daytona’s with the big wing in the back.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    *heavily edited to comply with Corey’s tyrannical rules*

    I wanted to skip make and model and say any pickup with aftermarket ribbon tires and a gigantic boi-racer wing on the tailgate but I cannot, so:

    Ford F150
    Chevy Silverado 1500
    RAM 1500
    Nissan Titan
    Honda Ridgeline

    1-3 are based entirely on sales prominence and the assumption that if a certain proportion aren’t being used for truck things that this will multiply out. Higher trim levels increase chance of non-truck use.
    I never see a Titan hauling or pulling anything or a Ridgeline with anything in the bed. I’m probably wrong on all of this. Fact is, I rarely see anything that isn’t a heavy duty pickup doing *anything* more than hauling air and a few passengers down the road because even if you frequently use one as a truck the proportion of total miles devoted to that use could be very small.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      …and diesel rolln’ it.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Corey is definitely a tyrant, and I wholeheartedly approve of his vicious reign. May death come quickly to his enemies!

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      In November we spent a weekend in Fernie BC. There was a kids hockey tournament (12 year olds?) going on that weekend.

      It was ALL pickup trucks. The odd minivan. I figure a crew cab half ton with a tonneau cover or topper is the perfect vehicle for carrying a family, luggage, hockey bags and beer for a whole weekend.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        The appropriate beer in that situation is of course Labatt Blue, yeah?

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          Probably not, actually. In Canada, Blue is a pretty tired brand – declining market share, skews to an older demographic.

          When I was younger, you saw Blue everywhere. Your post reminds me that I can’t think of when I last saw anybody drinking or buying it.

          Labatts seem to be pushing Budweiser (which is truly a cheap, nasty swill) as their major brand these days. It and Molson Canadian are probably the 2 largest sellers.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Yeah, Labatts in general and Blue in particular is a bygone beer.

            Based on what I see (I’m not a beer drinker,) for larger brands, Keiths IPA, Coors light and banquet, MGD and light are pretty popular, and alot of craft or local beer. Around here, Bigrock is a big seller.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Corey Lewis – Nope. Kokanee beer. You’d be dragged behind a pickup and used as a toboggan for drinking Labatt’s.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            My uncle always has a drawer in the fridge at the cabin full of Kokanee. I don’t see anything special about it besides it being hard to find outside of northern MN.

            Is Labatt’s like Old Style, Milwaukee’s Best, Schlitz, or Hamm’s? An “old man beer”?

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            Labatt’s has a number of brands, Blue was their flagship lager for many years (alongside 50, which was their flagship ale), vying with Molson Canadian for market leadership.

            It was very popular with Baby Boomers, but Gens X, Y and whatever seem not to have taken to it. I don’t know where/if/how Labatt’s is promoting it these days.

            I always found it be a nondescript industrial lager, but taste is always a personal thing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Drzhivago138 – Kokanee isn’t much better/different than Blue or Canadian. Kokanee is brewed in the Kootenay’s region. So there is a bias towards local beer. I prefer it to Blue or Canadian but I’ve developed a taste for various Ales. I’m not a fan of any of the mass produced main stream stuff.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            I have to smile, considering that Kokanee is a Labatt brand…

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ect – F-A-K-E N-E-W-S

            The commercials push it as a local brew (at least in British Columbia)

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            I’m sure they do. At some point in the ’90s, Labatt’s introduced it in Ontario, complete with Rocky Mountain imagery. When it emerged that they were brewing it in London, there was much derision in the market, and they had to drop it.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Around here, Suburbans are the Official Hockey Mom Mobiles.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      But you see Tundras hard at work?

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Why yes I do, John!

        I picked 1-3 based on sales numbers, as explained, and there are several Tundras hooked to trailers in my neighborhood and I personally know of three others that are beat to crap in work duty by their owners, which is more than I see of Titans and Ridgelines.

        Now run along and post a cute little Toyota rant farther down the comment thread. There’s a review of a mediocre iM as well, so you have two chances to get your fix today. It’s a good day to be you.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I’m not sure that second paragraph was necessary.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            You’re right, it wasn’t and it was ruder than it needed to be. It also wasn’t untrue, though. I could learn a thing or two from your unflappable politeness.

            I’m feeling triggered so I shall now retreat to my safe zone–the Toyota build & price. No one gets angry there, just very sleepy and benign…they have Muzak…

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            It does have an element of truth to it. And if you were on my side of the screen when I get certain replies, you’d wonder where my “unflappable politeness” was.

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      I have a Titan with the towing pkg and utility bed pkg that Ive added rear airbags and front 14″ brakes to. I have hauled and towed heavy stuff with it for 12 years. So far it has been the most reliable of all the trucks Ive owned which includes F150, F250, Dodge D100, Chevy 2500, and International.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I don’t doubt it. I put it on there because I don’t see many of them period in my little locale and freely admit I could be wrong about it. Go ahead and strike it from the list.

        To me, Corey’s question could be interpreted two ways: trucks not all that capable of truck work and trucks that are but simply aren’t used that way. I stuck with the definition of truck = bed, otherwise there are a lot of SUVs that would have gone on the list instead.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    The Subaru Baja

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      I wanted a Baja Turbo so bad.

      WTF is wrong with me???

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        The Baja was ridiculous, but in a cool way. Park it next to your VehiCROSS and you’ve got most weirdness needs covered.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I was living in Gallup proper and the neighbors across the street had a extended cab Ranger 4×4 with V6 and manual trans along with a Subaru Baja with manual trans and a cap on the bed. Interesting combo.

          They were a retired couple with dogs.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            My current irrational-lust-worthy vehicle is a first-gen Sport Trac manual. It’s the American version of the crew cab Ranger we never got.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Sport tracs are cool, but to this day uHaul will not rent you a trailer if you have one because it is an Explorer.

            Not buying a midsize truck that I can’t rent a trailer with.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            To hell with that U-haul policy. Put a Mercury grille on the front and suddenly it’s a Mountaineer Sport Trac.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            If you are renting from U-haul you are doing it wrong. Chances are there is a local company that will rent you a trailer for less and it will probably be in better condition too. If you need to haul something cross country and not bring the trailer back to where you got it then maybe U-Haul is the only choice.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I may be an outlier, but I have had excellent luck with uHaul trailers. Always in great shape and nary an issue.

            I believe they keep their trailer and cargo van fleet pretty new. Its the moving vans that are a disaster.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The Subaru Baja not register in my brain as a pickup.

      The Hummer SUT is worse.

      • 0 avatar
        boozysmurf

        Beat me to it, Lou.

        Hummer H2 SUT, all the way. There’s dozens around Ottawa still, and all on 24-26″ wheels, with rubber bands wrapped around ’em.

        Despite the fact I’m likely to be buying a Ridgeline shortly, their regular use as true trucks is… marginal. I’ll probably be most of an outlier on that one and even then, it’ll be helping the local crew move engines around, and the Home Despot run.

        The fullsizers of any brand are the true offender though – the vast majority never haul anything but a family.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I don’t know? Most of them?

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Easy:

    Escalade
    Tahoe
    Yukon
    4Runner
    Suburban

    A more interesting question is “name the top 5 non-trucks most likely to be used as trucks.” The first-gen Sienna is my top choice. It seems like most of the ones I see have the back seats removed and replaced with painting/plumbing/construction supplies.

  • avatar
    mike1dog

    The El Camino and Ranchero, if you want to call them trucks. I once had a load of firewood delivered by a guy with one of the Falcon based Rancheros, though. That thing was literally dragging the ground and redefined the term “beat to hell.”

  • avatar
    Thorshammer_gp

    GMC Syclone?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    *The old Escalade EXT/Chevy Avalanche
    *Any truck in Douglas County, Colorado, save for the 13 that are used to haul around horse trailers
    *Chevy Colorado
    *Honda Ridgeline
    *Ford F150 Raptor

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      I always thought Avalanche owners were proud of the convertibility the truck provided, and used it!

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The biggest thing I ever saw being put into an Avalanche is super-sized bags of dog food. Or a stroller. Or stuff from Costco.

        I did kind of like the styling on those, though. And the fact that Christopher Moltisanti finally departed the Earth in an EXT is a plus in my book.

        • 0 avatar
          Corey Lewis

          I guess I need to look at them more. Usually they’ve got the bed cover on, so it’s impossible to see what type of air is in there.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Just going by what I see going in the back of them.

            Although I’m pretty sure big screen TVs go in there too. And golf clubs. And bags full of soccer gear.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I actually liked the concept of the Avalanche and I used to have a neighbor who would regularly fill that bed to the brim–even to dropping the back seat and loading it to its fullest capacity while still being able to use the tonneau to cover the load. Typically took it on weekend camping trips.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        For real… Avalanche owners are like the swiss-army-knife owning 8 year olds. They are looking for every opportunity they can to use that crazy level of functionality offered by it.

        They probably out do F350 owners.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      My old boss about 7-8 years ago had 3 first gen EXTs. They were awesome. We hauled gravel in them, he used them up on his hobby farm, throwing freshly peeled sheep in the back then hosing it out later. Great at hauling a trailer with the 6.0L underhood. Lame old GM interiors but overall, satisfying vehicles that were a really great option if you had to pick one vehicle to do it all, in my opinion.

      I’d love a last gen Avalanche in pearl white, but only if the buttresses are painted to match and not black plastic.

    • 0 avatar
      Redshift

      I LOVE my Avalanche. I’m so sad they never did a 3rd generation as my 08 LTZ is starting to suffer from aging GM disease. (Stupid little things breaking, random electrical glitches etc.)
      It is the ultimate jack of all trades for my lifestyle. It is nice enough that I can take it to customer meetings during the week, it is reasonable enough in size that I can park it, it has a big back seat for dogs, it has enough tow capacity to tow my race car, the locking bed with covers is secure for my tools, weekend shopping etc, but, I can pop the covers off to haul furniture, mulch, etc and I can fold down the seats to haul drywall, building materials etc and I have done all of that regularly.
      I had a pickup first, but, was annoyed that the open bed wasn’t secure so I couldn’t leave stuff in it, use it running errands etc and hauling anything 8 feet long was exposed, or, required a much bigger truck. A pickup with an 8 ft bed is a horrible daily driver.
      Then I had an SUV, which was great as stuff was dry and secure, but, anything messy (mulch) or tall (taking my snowblower home from the shop) required getting a trailer.
      The Avalanche might not be for everybody, but, it really is the only thing that does what it can.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        I understand the midgate died, but the High Desert is pretty much the same thing:
        http://media.chevrolet.com/media/us/en/chevrolet/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2016/oct/sema/930/1031-high-desert.html

        I actually picked up a Ram 1500 after the Avalanche because I thought it was as close as you could get (rambox cargo management system, coil suspension)

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Great summary of the Avalanche, but curious–what are the buttresses for? Are they functional or decorative? It was always an eccentricity of that truck that made it easy to poke fun at without appreciating the massive utility and cleverness of that vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          the Avalanche is a Suburban… this is important to note because I’m not sure if its because it looks silly without a break before the bed, or if its actually necessary for structural support.

          I always thought- as an owner- it was for the structural support since it didn’t have a “back” (The center section is a midgate, not structural)

          Thats the only reason I can think of that we haven’t seen midgates in the full size trucks. I mean the midgate concept is brilliant, but my understanding is its only possible because the entire avalanche is an SUV with an open back instead of a truck/cab configurement.

          To support the structural theory, its not just black plastic pieces, but its actually steel underneath those. that’s important to note because they wouldn’t waste weight and tubular formed steel if its not necessary. Its clear that the tubular formed steer (architecturally formed to be more correct) serves structural purposes.

          Therefore they are functional to offer structural support.

          http://www.bmgsite.com/mytruck/images/PIC-0032.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            The structural integrity because of the open back makes perfect sense, thanks. That pic is helpful too. I wonder if there was a collective moment of panic from the engineers and designers when the first group realized that such a buttress was needed and the second realized what it would have to look like. Kind of sad to see this thing gone, really.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Exactly right, Arach. Thats also why you saw the same kind of supports on the old Ridgeline; they served the same purpose. Honda just chose to cover them with sheet metal rather than hiding them with plastic.

  • avatar
    andyinatl

    Non-long bed Double Cab Tacoma. The bed is very shallow and short, so can’t fit much in there. But man i love the way it looks, especially the last body style in Prerunner trim….

  • avatar
    zoomzoomfan

    Any Ram, Silverado, or F-150 loaded to the max and offered in its highest trim level.

    I was behind a “Platinum” Ford F-150 the other day that I guarantee is just a status symbol. It was spotless and likely to stay that way.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      Can’t damage the pearlcoat!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, you can practically drop S-Class Benz or Tesla Model S money on one of those top-of-the-line F-150s these days, so yeah, I guess it’s a status symbol.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Limited is even higher than Platinum, and even more useless with the 22″ wheels. My uncle uses his ’14 Limited for truck stuff (mostly pulling a trailer) at his contracting business–but I’m pretty sure he’s the only one. I have to wonder what he’s trying to prove.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        Time for family intervention.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Naw, he’s not hurting anyone with it. And apart from the Model S, it’s also his everyday car too, the one most likely to be used to take the whole family up to the cabin in the winter months.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            If Tesla made a truck do you think he’d get that as well? Sometimes I wonder what other cars Tesla S owners typically have.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Hopefully something that won’t run out of fuel 200 miles from the nearest power outlet.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Where in the US are you going to find a place that’s 200 miles away from a power outlet… except maybe in Alaska?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I think you took my post a bit literally, Vulpine.

            Though a) I can think of some spots here in Colorado where you’d possibly be 40-50 miles from the nearest plug, and b) if you run out of juice in an an electric car, it might as well be 200 miles from the nearest plug, because that car Ain’t. Going. Anywhere. It’s not like Bob’s Towing can show up with a couple of gallons of gas and get you on your way.

            (On the subject of on-the-road refuels…anyone know if there’s such a thing as a mobile recharge service?)

            Unfortunately, even Teslas have to contend with range and recharge limitations.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Range is currently the limiting factor in using the Model S during the winter, since the heater obviously draws down the battery. If it’s below freezing, he only drives it between home and work, never to the cabin. He did bring it over to Grandma’s house (right down the road from ours) for Christmas, and needed to plug it in there just to be safe.

            I dunno if he’s interested in a Model X or any theoretical Tesla pickup. I’d think he would be, but he might be waiting for the infrastructure to get built up enough that he could use it for more than just local trips. In the meantime, he’s pretty happy with the effect it’s having on his gas budget. The EcoBoost in his F-150 is always on Boost, never Eco.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Zhivago, I think I read somewhere that electric range in the winter is lower, due to less efficient transmission of electricity in the cold, something like that. I’m no expert on electricity, so I wonder if anyone knows if that’s the case or not.

            And in the summer, I’d have to think the Tesla owner is running the A/C at full blast. It’s no fun showing up for a meeting with sweat stains on your designer suit, y’know.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I can’t speak for the transmission efficiency, but it is my uncle’s experience (and apparently many other EV drivers’) that the heater draws more charge in bitter cold than the A/C in sweltering heat.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            OK, so I’ll answer my own question.

            Turns out lower range for electric cars in cold weather IS a thing, due to battery tech. Apparently electrons move slower in cold temperatures, and the battery needs to be heated to solve this problem. My guess is that’s why your uncle gets less range in the winter.

            http://blog.ucsusa.org/dave-reichmuth/electric-cars-cold-weather-temperatures

            You learn something new every day here on TTAC, folks.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            So it’s not actually the heater (or at least, not _just_ the heater), it’s the battery. I did not know that.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I didn’t either, until about 13 minutes ago. :)

            Makes sense that electric car manufacturers might target a state like California. Leaving aside the whole “greenie driver” thing, the cars will work better there because of the climate.

            I do see a ton of Teslas around Denver…and while winters here are a lot less severe and cold than some people might think, there’s no shortage of cold weather to contend with. I wonder about a place like Minneapolis, though.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Wouldn’t an electric car warn you if you stray too far from a charger?

            One rental recently told me “You are low on gas, do you want directions to the nearest gas station?”

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            ” out lower range for electric cars in cold weather IS a thing, due to battery tech. Apparently electrons move slower in cold temperatures, and the battery needs to be heated to solve this problem. My guess is that’s why your uncle gets less range in the winter.”

            The first thing I noticed with my Volt is that I can see a noticeable difference in EV range between a 50F and a 70F degree day. I really didn’t expect that. Figured temperatures would need to approach almost freezing before EV range loss was noticeable .

            The statement that running the AC in the summer has little effect on EV range is right on. It lowers it, but hardly noticeable. And it works great (in EV mode) because your not fighting all that heat under the hood from an ICE. On the other side heating up the car & defrosting the windows during the winter kills your range.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Vulpine – round tip means 100 miles one way.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Ok, show me where you can go where there’s not an electrical outlet within 100 miles (and roads to drive on.)

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            On the Tesla heater use, don’t forget that the car is running a heater for the batteries as well, so they stay ready to run. I’m sure we’re all familiar with how extreme cold makes even conventional lead-acid batteries weaker, at least until they warm up somewhat under the hood.

            Summertime isn’t quite as bad for the batteries, but even there Tesla uses liquid cooling to help keep the batteries from overheating. It’s one of the reasons Tesla’s batteries have so far outlasted the early Nissan Leaf’s batteries.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      ‘I was behind a “Platinum” Ford F-150 the other day that I guarantee is just a status symbol. It was spotless and likely to stay that way.”

      Those are the trucks you want to get your hands on used.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Exactly. One of my cousins got “a heckuva deal” on a final-year F-150 Harley-Davidson because it had 122K miles on it, but they were all easy highway miles put on by the previous (first) owner, a retired gentleman in central SD. And you could tell the truck hadn’t seen any of the wear that comes from hauling or even towing.

        • 0 avatar
          Corey Lewis

          Like in regular cars, high trim version is usually taken care of better, and costs pennies more on the dollar to buy used.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            In my part of the world Platinum Super Duties, Denali 3500’s, Laramie Limited HD’s are popular with loggers. Most are full bling. Contractors can write-off the extra cost on taxes.

    • 0 avatar
      IHateCars

      OMG! A truck owner actually wants to keep his truck clean?! Oh, the heresy! He must be a poseur!

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    All of them. There are plenty of F-150s, Silverados and RAMS in my corporate job parking lot

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      But what do they do with them on the weekends?

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Exactly. I generally never had a reason to hook any of my toys to the back of my truck when I went to work.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Same thing that’s done with minivans or Explorers on weekends, I’d guess. I’m sure some folks use trucks “seriously,” but most don’t…just like most Corvette or 911 owners don’t do racing, or hammer them down back roads at the bleeding edge of tire adhesion.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Lets ask the same question of sports cars.

          What “Sports Cars” are least used as Sports Cars?

          answer: all of them.

          High end sports cars are too valuable to race. Low end sports cars are prized by their blue-collar owners (nothing against that, but do you know how many “babied” corvete z06s never see 70 MPH or 4000 RPM?)

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            OK, arach, but riddle me this:

            Of the folks who own a Z06 ‘Vette, a) how many of them ACTUALLY drive it the way it’s designed to be driven, and more importantly, b) how many of them have the kind of skill it takes to drive it the way it’s designed to be driven?

            I’d go with a low percentage for a) and a very low percentage for b), with video evidence available on YouTube under the search terms “cars and coffee Corvette”.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Another good point. “Using” a sporty car at a similar high level takes skill. Anybody can dump things into the back of a truck they own.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            My answer to that is “how many mid-80’s S-Classes are ACTUALLY used to make contraband weapons deals down by the docks?”

          • 0 avatar
            arach

            @FreedMike

            I drove a z06 in the SCCA for many years. Unfortunately I’m biased because many of my co-classed racers drive vettes too… haha.

            But the population is certainly minuscule.

            But they buy it to DREAM of how it could be driven, and I’m not in the industry of crushing dreams.

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    PT Cruiser is legally a truck.

    I’ve yet to see one hauling livestock or having boulders dropped on it or doing any of the other “truck stuff” they feature in pickup ads.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Ram 1500
    Toyota Tundra
    Silverado 1500
    Sierra 1500
    Nissan Titan

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    Fun fact: the Dodge Magnum wagon is also legally a truck.

    I don’t recall seeing one of those do “truck things” very often either.

  • avatar
    George B

    I’ve never seen a Range Rover used as anything other than a luxury car on city streets. In contrast, the GMC Yukon Denali, Cadillac Escalade, and Lincoln Navigator become work trucks when they get old and inexpensive enough. They easily pull a trailer full of lawn mowers and carry a full crew of landscape workers.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    I always see these guys in their 20s-30s driving lifted heavy duty “brodozers”. They buy them to peacock around town and agitate other motorists with their rolling coal crap. It’s the machismo automotive equivalent of high heal shoes for women. For them, it’s obviously a fashion statement.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      God I hate the people you are describing, they are everywhere around here. Sometimes, though, they have a 20-foot trailer hitch drop attachment so they can occasionally connect to their ATV or snowmobile trailer.

      Problem is, though, I have a friend who drives a lifted F350 diesel which LOOKS like it is a dead ringer for this stereotype. But he isn’t, he’s one of the nicest and softest-spoken guys I’ve met. He uses the truck as a truck and doesn’t roll coal or intimidate other drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Rolling coal is lame, but I fully understand the appeal of peacocking and driving a fashion statement.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I agree.

      Which is why I have an F350 Lariat that I use to take my dog to the dog park. It was actually my wife’s doing. She LOVES trucks and wants a big truck.

      Issue is, besides occaisonally taking my race cars to the race track, our boats to the lake, or a car to the shop, we don’t do any truck stuff… Her SUV (Porsche Cayenne) can haul every other object the truck can.

      I don’t think its just machoism though. I also consider some of it mid-life-crisising. You see, when you realize you spend your day in front of a computer and the most macho thing you do in your day is shave your beard stubble, it is kind of nice to “dream” of the things you could do some day.

      We talk about getting a 5th wheel camper and a huge boat. I know they’ll never happen, but buying the “brodozer” makes us feel like maybe our life isn’t hopelessly depressing.

      So I do read your hate about me and others like me, but what can I say… I am what I am.

      (but note- I do NOT roll coal. I don’t think that is cool at all. If its a tractor pull and its a byproduct of performance, it doesn’t bother me, but if the drivers intent is to have a billow of pollution rolling out of their tail pipe, then that really disgusts me)

  • avatar
    dchturbo

    I second the any truck with a wing sentiment. There’s a dually here that has that. WHY?????!?!?!?

    The SSR is the most stupid thing ever created. I don’t understand why it existed.

    That being said, I bought my truck because I like it. I drove a customer’s vehicle and it just felt awesome. So I bought my own.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      The SSR was originally conceived to be a throwback style to 50s vintage trucks while offering a replacement to the El Camino. It failed miserably because it was grossly over-engineered (the convertible hard top) and priced almost double over its original target market. The rule of K.I.S.S. should have applied here and it is because it wasn’t that the SSR died so shortly after birth.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I can look out my window right now and see…
    • A bright blue Ram regular cab that has never carried anything but air (but the owner treats the thing like brand new and always does his own work on it.)
    • A silver 4-door Silverado that carries nothing but people–not once have I seen anything in the bed.
    • A black Avalanche that, again, almost never carries anything in the bed, though it carries a black Great Dane in the back seat regularly.

    Despite the amount of farm land and horse farms in my vicinity…
    • Roughly 75% of all Fords I see are so polished and blinged up (and typically ‘tuned’) to show they never carry anything heavier than their tonneau cover in the bed.
    • Roughly 50% of all GMC/Chevys similar to those Fords.

    What’s really interesting is that when I see a Ram, it is almost always marked with some corporate logo and hauling a load of cars behind it; typically no fewer than three cars and in one case three trucks plus two cars.
    Those Fords and Chevys that are working? As often as not hauling bales of hay in the bed to six feet and more above the roof and commonly pulling a trailer stacked just as high. And yes, I even see them pulling farm implements along the highway from worksite to worksite as a tractor is pulling a bigger piece of gear to the same job.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I look out my window and see my garage…….. so does that mean everyone has a garage?

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I suggest, Lou, that you go back up to the article and see what it asks for. I chose to look out my window and describe what I know to be true. For you, where you live, the truth may be different but it doesn’t make my observations any less true.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    “condemning those who drive CUVs for not having a real SUV”

    Back in the 90s/00s, it was “you don’t need SUV capability and they get bad MPG, handle awfully, and for each one sold, and they electrocute a baby seal!”

    So, people moved to car-like CUVs, which don’t have any off-road capability, handle less like a truck, get somewhat better MPG and they only kill one seal for every 3 sold. But, the armchair quarterbacks are still pi§§ed.

    Ya can’t win.

    I do prefer a BOF, “real” SUV, but if I became a father several times over, a Ford Flex or GMC Acadia would find its way into my life rather than a minivan.

    On to the question:
    1.Toyota Tundra- all I see are glitzy and pretty and have obviously never seen anything harsher than a gravel driveway.

    2.Toyota Tacoma- same as above.

    3. Cadillac Escalade EXT- work? That’s for people without money, son.

    4. Ram 1500 2wd- a macho fashion statement for those who work in an office.

    5. Nissan Titan- I actually do see some of these kinda beat up, that have obviously been used for far more than a grocery getter.

    I know of people who drive Laramie Long Horns and Platinums and High Country’s as work trucks. Just because they are in the woods or at a construction site all day does not mean they must drive a model with a black grille, vinyl seats and steel wheels. This is why Ford made rubber floors an option in its high-end trucks.

    Sure, some use these kinds of trucks the same way someone uses a BMW 5 series or a Mercedes E class. But, that’s their business.

    People buy sports cars and never take them to the track. People buy 7 passenger CUVs/minivans that haul only four people max. People buy V-6 Camrys to drive the speed limit or below everywhere. People buy luxury sedans to commute in.

    Point? Lots of people who don’t own trucks buy way more than they need in their non-truck vehicles. But, none of the truck haterz who B¡tch about people not using their truck as a truck have an issue with them.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    I am the bad man. I traded a 3-series for an F-150 Platinum. It tows the boat (which is nowhere near its 10k# tow rating, to be fair), so it occasionally gets used for “Truck Things,” but most of its time is spent carting me around with an empty bed. I know, I know. Something’s wrong with me. But I did it because I got tired of our crappy roads destroying my BMW. Wheels bend, alignment goes out, all the bushings and such get beaten up and need frequent replacing, and the runflat tires (which are an incredible and unnecessary misery) develop sidewall bubbles if you speak to them in an unkind tone. The truck suffers none of these problems. Except for swiveling headlights and a stickshift, the truck doesn’t give up any features to the car, and it never has problems, let alone the kind that happen to you once or twice and the dealer can’t replicate.

    Granted, it’s not a high-end brand, so you lose some of the dealer-experience frippery, but that also means the end of $300 oil changes and service “professionals” who take it personally if you don’t use their branded washer fluid.

    Yes, it’s less fun to drive. And, yes, it uses more fuel. No, I don’t feel more manly because TRUCK! Yes, I could have gotten a smaller truck or SUV that would have done what I needed, but I don’t have kids and don’t want an SUV, and the smaller trucks aren’t really better or cheaper, they’re just smaller. So. Fire at will.

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      smartascii If you get rid of the run flats all of the problems you mentioned go away. At 40K my 335d had 3 bent wheels. I got new wheels and conventional tires and am now at 100K with no issues.

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        I’ve heard this from other sources. My problem with that is that I drive to rural county courthouses for work, and a flat in the wrong place would leave me a very long tow from anyplace that stocks tires that fit a BMW. There is a kind of a well for a spare tire, but I asked the dealer about getting one and they looked at me like I was crazy and told me how I’d pollute the purity of the driving experience because the car was designed for runflats. Utter nonsense, of course, but it’s a pretty good encapsulation of the general attitude of BMW dealers, which seems to be, “Our wundercar is perfect, so what did you do to it, and why do you keep trying to ruin everything?”

        • 0 avatar
          TOTitan

          I bought a space saver spare tire and jack kit from Bimmerzone. It doesnt take up all that much space, the car handles way better, and does not bent wheels any more. My BMW dealer actually admitted that they have to replace at least one and sometimes all of wheels on every run flat equipped car they take in trade before they resell it.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Sounds like you made the right choice for your use and roads. The run flat thing is ridiculous.

      I’m also guessing you can now replace the battery without registering it with the truck’s computer and paying $300.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        Haha… I sold my BMW and bought a cadillac. I swear the difference between the two cars can be summarized in the battery.

        BMW: Can’t replace battery by self. Take to independent shop. They can’t do it. Take it to dealer. Dealer wants over $500 to do it. Have to program the thing. Its a battery.

        Cadillac: Walmart, Autozone, you name it will replace it for free. Battery cost $59.99.

        Thats been about my experience with both cars over every single repair took each one from 50k miles to 130k.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Funny. I considered off-lease 328is last year because the price was just to good to ignore. It didn’t make the cut for a number of reasons but that battery issue and lack of a spare tire (you can buy one from BMW for extra–there is a well for it in the trunk) just put me off.

          I decided that if I was balking at the privilege of spending 300-500 for a battery that I just wasn’t BMW material.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    Wow….almost 70 posts and Raptor was only mentioned once! Mind you BAFO must still be having breakfast so I expect many posts referring to pick ups and Raptors in particular as “hairdresser’s rides” very shortly.

    Can we have a thread titled “QOTD: Which Sportscars are Least Likely to be Used Like Sportscars?” with “penis extenders” referenced throughout?

    I vote Corvettes driven very slowly by old fat guys with Tommy Bahama shirts and Barrett Jackson ballcaps!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “I vote Corvettes driven very slowly by old fat guys with Tommy Bahama shirts and Barrett Jackson ballcaps!”

      And ladies of a certain age with big hair and circa-1988 wardrobes…let’s not be sexist.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Raptors a trick question because it CAN’T do truck stuff.

      if its not designed to do truck stuff, is it really a contender?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Watchu talkin’ ’bout, Willis? It can still haul and tow. Not nearly as much as any other pickup, but still more than your typical passenger car or CUV.

  • avatar
    No Nickname Required

    Ironically, I did see an F150 Limited out in the fields one day. It appeared to have been driven by an older gentleman whose time was spent helping his kids and grandkids on their family farm. He didn’t seem to mind driving it out to wherever they were working (dirt roads, muddy fields, etc). I should mention that I am surrounded by farms and seeing an F150 Limited being used for farm work should theoretically be an everyday occurrence.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The Limited and Harley-Davidson before it are really only mechanically limited (no pun intended) in their practicality by the 22″ wheels. Switch to a more usable 18″ rim, or heck, even the 20″ wheels off a Platinum, and you’ve got something about as practical as any SuperCrew/5.5′ F-150 with a 3.5 EB or 6.2.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Honda Ridgeline probably has the highest percentage of people buying it with no intention of using it as a truck. I only know one Ridgeline owner and she’s a marriage and family therapist.

    Make of that what you will.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    This is simple.

    Just look at the top 5 best selling midsize and 1/2 ton pickups.

    Remember 75% are mainly hauling air. 50% are business write offs. Which indicates people are interpreting their taxes in a creative fashion.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Aaaaaand there it is.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Everytime I go to a boat landing, RV park or into the UP of Michigan snowmobiling I’m always amazed that there’s never a PU to be found. Same thing at any amateur racing event. Enclosed race trailers everywhere but damned if you can find a PU hooked to or parked next to one. Then there’s hunting during the fall with all those ATV/UTV’s being trailered from the metro areas into the great white north. And again, not a PU in sight. Guess they all got left in town for hauling air!…..LOL

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    Forgive me for falling for the clickbait. This is like putting a sign out in front of the cafeteria:

    FOOD FIGHT, HERE

    To the question. First, we have to settle some terms. What is “use like a truck?” Does that mean loading to the GWV limits? Half-loaded?

    How often is a contractor truck used “like a truck” and how often is it used to get to the diner for lunch, or to the post office to mail invoices?

    The snarky comment of the Tacoma hauling nothing but air. Are you as contempuous of a Camry hauling nothing but an empty trunk and backseat? Should there be a minimum load limit on each car, and those without, made to ride scooters?

    My 2WD Tacoma is lighter than many cars. It’s more fuel-efficient than half the cars out there; and what resources used in its making, were used 20 years ago. So is it wrong I use it to go to the grocery store with an empty bed, getting 25 miles a gallon? Or do I need a fleet of cars, depending on how much I plan to carry?

    And to the nub of the OP question: The bigger, plainer and less-expensive rigs will be used like trucks. Only a fool is going to beat on a $70,000 vehicle – be it a BMW or a Bro-Dozer. Of course, IMHO, only a fool is going to buy a $70,000 Cummins Bro-Dozer…but that wasn’t the question.

    Older trucks are more likely to be used like trucks than newer trucks. 2WD trucks more likely than 4x4s. Trucks with lower beds are more likely to be used like trucks than lifted diesels with stacks poking through the bed.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Fair point, and by the same token, you only see a small minority of Corvettes, 911s or Shelby Mustangs being hammered down a racetrack, or down some back road at the bleeding edge of tire adhesion, which is what they’re “designed to do.”

      I think you’re perceiving some kind of anti-truck snark where there isn’t any, though…we’re just talking about the difference between ‘dude trucks’ and ‘working trucks’.

    • 0 avatar
      AVT

      Agreed. In Minnesota, I see many Yukon Denali Xl’s being used as tow vehicles with 175,000+ miles on them. Many of the owners (including our neighbors) bought it used and use it primarily as the 3rd vehicle choice as needed. Ironically, the most truck I’ve seen used as a truck in a GMC Envoy XUT; the one with the sliding roof and back that converts into a retro trailblazer/crew cab silverado setup. In my experience, trucks are just to expensive to really abuse when bought new unless its a lease or fleet or rental item. That being said, towing 6500 pounds of pronto pups for the MN state fair in a regular cab s10 rwd with a small block v8 drop and pipes and headers, a vehicle that for all intended purposes, was a show truck, that we did not use as such.

  • avatar
    lon888

    Any truck that is jacked up 3 feet in the air along with the usual assortment of fancy shocks (at least 2 per corner, chrome roll bar and bumpers and at least a half of a gazillion lights that are always on. A quick look at immaculate paint gives them away.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    1. Every single bro-dozer that’s running around Chicago. Especially the ones that are running those LED light bars that blind everyone.

    2. Dodge Dakota convertible. (I see one on a regular basis.)

    3. Escalade EXT

    4. Subaru Baja (followed one this morning that was in pretty decent shape).

    5. Ridgeline

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Dakota convertible is kind of low-hanging fruit, methinks. I don’t think anyone bought one thinking, “At last! A new pickup truck that’s also a convertible! I can finally trade in my Model A!”

  • avatar
    Funky

    It depends on the venue.

    When I’m in a small town rural area, the only type of truck I often see that is not performing truck jobs/activities is the Toyota Tundra. All others (including the smaller Toyota Tacoma, Chevys, Fords, Rams, and Nissans, of all shapes, sizes, and ages and, yes, this includes my neighbor’s Raptor which I sometimes see him using as a farm vehicle in his fields) can often be seen performing typical truck duties. This is something I notice when driving at any time of day on any day of the week.

    When I’m in a suburban environment, I’d say I see a 50/50 mix of trucks in various shapes, sizes, and ages performing truck jobs/activities. If I’m out and about during rush hour, I think I mostly see trucks that are not performing truck activities. When I’m out during the daytime (during business hours), I think I see mostly trucks that are performing truck activities. And, in the evening, I’d say it’s about 50/50.

    When I’m in an office park, university campus, or downtown urban environment, I believe that I rarely see a truck that is being used to perform typical truck jobs/activities (in these locations I usually see only pristine, polished, trucks which don’t appear that they’d ever be used as a truck). Typically, I visit these types of places only during the daytime (during business hours).

    The only anomaly that has stood out to me is the Toyota Tundra which I mentioned in the above paragraph. Otherwise, I don’t believe I’ve seen anything noteworthy regard to the question.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Where I am Tundras and Tacos get used pretty hard, but more by their second owners than their first owners. Its the quad cab domestics that are basically the equivalent of family cars. My dad when he was in good health had an F-150 4×4 that was too pretty for real work, so they bought my 93 Mazda B2200 with all of maybe 102 horsepower. That thing got used harder than the F150 ever would, and is still going on its 5th or 6th owner and must be creeping towards 200k miles by now.

  • avatar
    ajla

    In honor of this thread, I’m going to go buy this Stinger Yellow Ram 1500 on Saturday and a get a personalized plate that says “AIR HLR” for it.

    tinyurl.com/guyprtn

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    anything with a hard bed cover

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    From a UK/Ireland perspective:

    – Nissan Navara. Mostly because if they were used for anything strenuous, the chassis cracks in two.

    – Isuzu D Max. Usually with big chrome wheels. The commercial vehicle tax family car special.

    – VW Amarok. See D Max, but with the VW snob badge to impress the neighbours.

    – Ford Ranger. Especially the customised. Bought by those who envy the US midwest lifestyle, but live in the English Cotswolds.

    – Skoda Felicia Fun. OK a bit of a cheat this as it is no longer on sale, and was never really intended as a serious workhorse. But this is not the type of vehicle you will see doing heavy graft.

    Vs The grafters:
    – Mitsubishi L200. Has been on the go for years, usually driven by building contractors with a truck bed full of timber.

    – Toyota Hilux. Legendary for being indistructable, another vehicle that is at home on a bumpy building site pulling a trailer with a digger on.

    – Great Wall. Sold in rural showrooms, a Chinese copy of the Isuzu D Max. No image, but cheap, usually seen as a farm machine.

  • avatar
    MercerTransit

    I spent the first part of the week at an enormous open pit mine in Mexico. The kind with those dump trucks the size of a 3-story house. The majority of the workers have VW Amoraks and there must have been 400-500 around the site, all doing truck jobs. One of the geologists i worked with explained that everyone is assigned an Amorak and they’re driven until they break, at which point they’re replaced by another Amorak.

    Apropos of this thread, I’m the third owner of a 1997 rebuilt-title Tacoma v6 4×4. I bought it from an OCD Boeing engineer who used it to haul his boat and camp. I added a lumber rack and an extra leaf in the back, and it hauls and pulls. It’s not my daily driver but when it works, it’s working. When it’s not working, it’s a petri dish for Northwest moss species. The daily is about to change: the ’11 STi is sold and the ’17 Holden Commodore arrives in 8 weeks. And i expect the Commodore to haul as well.

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