By on January 24, 2017

Kia has released the price list for its new hybrid crossover, the Niro.

The Niro, which launches in the first quarter of this year, carries a base sticker price of $23,785 after destination. Carrying a brand name that doesn’t immediately spring to mind when utility-hungry shoppers think “crossovers,” the front-wheel-drive-only hybrid Niro stands out on the basis of its powertrain alone, but is it what people want?

The Niro comes in five trim levels, though each rung on the ladder has the same power on tap. An Atkinson-cycle 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine that delivers 104 horsepower and 109 lb-ft of torque joins forces with an electric motor, boosting total output to 139 hp and 195 lb-ft. The only transmission choice is a six-speed dual-clutch gearbox.

In base FE form, the Niro delivers a lot for the price. Providing features like a back-up camera, seven-inch touchscreen, keyless entry, and both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality, it’s not devoid of technology. Moving up to the LX only adds a push-button start, LED taillights, and rails to mount a roof rack. While it doesn’t receive a huge list of upgrades, the $24,095 LX is only a modest $310 step up.

For $27,595, you can get the EX, which comes with many more features. This trim level includes fog lamps, LED running lights, heated power-folding mirrors, heated seats, a steering wheel with leather, Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert and Lane Change Assist. A $2,500 increase might seem steep, but it is still priced much lower than any of its competitors.

The special Launch Edition is next with a $28,895 price tag. This package includes 18-inch alloys, a larger touchscreen, premium audio, and a 10-way driver seat. Top-end Touring trim adds another $1,650, topping out the range at $30,545. Standard equipment on that model includes a tilt/slide sunroof, heated steering wheel, and ventilated seats. Features from the Launch Edition are included with the Touring, as well.

Packages containing a host of driver-assist technologies are offered on various trim levels. Forward Collision Warning, Autonomous Emergency Braking, and Lane Departure Warning are available on the LX for an additional $1,450. These features are a $2,300 upgrade on the EX, but that package also adds cruise control and the same sunroof as the Touring.

The Touring has a $1,900 option that includes the driver-assist tech, plus HID headlights, a wireless phone charger, and a 110-volt power inverter.

While the Niro can be considered a trailblazer in the fledgling subcompact hybrid crossover market, stickering for $10,000 less than larger hybrid crossovers with comparable features, it remains to be seen if the sub-segment takes off or fizzles.

[Image: Kia Motors]

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56 Comments on “Kia Releases Pricing for Its Unusual 2017 Niro Hybrid...”


  • avatar
    Timothy Cain

    No AWD availability = #NotMyCrossover

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      FWD only = I’m in.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      AWD is overrated.

      In my experience FWD is just fine in wintry weather provided your car isn’t too heavy and has good tires.

      What makes cars heavy? AWD.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        They probably couldnt be bothered to engineer a hybrid 4WD platform… which is fair enough since they expect 99% of people to use this in cities. People who need 4WD would be pushed into the Sante Fe etc.

        Also no issue with the design, more conservative = better, ie. more mass appeal.

        Also conventional automatic = good, although six speeds is kind of old hat. Can’t see where they are losing here. They will sell out.

        If the thing has something like 30 miles pure EV range then its everything you could expect for the money, and more.

        • 0 avatar
          Timothy Cain

          I don’t need all-wheel drive. I drive a FWD minivan.

          What I dislike is the crossover definition being stretched to include vehicles that don’t even offer, as an option, four driven wheels.

          • 0 avatar
            TonyJZX

            I have more bile for cars like the $44,000 FWD Ford Edge.

            If your CUV is at the lower end and you’re offering a ‘hook’ (ie. EV) then I’m more open to FWD.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I would have liked to see a bit more verve in the design. I don’t mean a wild design like the new Prius or the Bolt. Indeed, this car’s appeal is in the fact that it is mostly shaped like a sawn-off Sorento. But they could have done a little something with the details to emphasize that you’re buying something special. I particularly think the headlights could be better-looking; the ones here could have been straight from a circa-2008 car.

    Oh well, gotta have something for the refresh, I suppose.

    But this whole design really reeks of “We’re only building this as a compliance car, and we’re not putting any extra effort into it.” Except that, unlike GM, FCA or Ford (the last of whom actually *does* put forth effort with its EVs and hybrids), Kia has no gas guzzlers to offset with a compliance car. So why not make it interesting?

    Pricing is downright reasonable, though. For under $30K, you could walk away with a car that gets notably higher fuel economy than similarly-sized cars, at a similar price.

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      But you aren’t buying something special, which is rather the point.

      It’s a cheap crossover with slightly better gas mileage. That’s it. That’s what you are buying.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        That seems to be what Kia is thinking, too. I still think they could have done just that little bit more, though.

        • 0 avatar
          mshenzi

          Actually, I’m interested in looking at this as a potential replacement to the TDi Golf I’m turning in next month. I’m thinking of it less as a crossover and more as a slightly stretched 5 door FWD hatch, (the present Golf is 168″ long, I think the Niro’s around 170″). The Niro’s available at a pretty high content level for the size/segment, and my iteration of the TDi Golf (2010) was a draw partly because it was equipped at the high end of the model’s spectrum. Like the TDi, too, a big part of the sell is the high mpg.

          For me the big remaining question is how it drives, which was a strong suit for the Golf. I’m not expecting that standard, but, for the price it’ll cost, I want it to be at least a little engaging.

          • 0 avatar
            brettc

            I’m thinking of one as well to replace my Sportwagen. It’s either the Niro, the C-Max or the Volt. The Niro is between a Golf and a Golf wagon in size. I don’t consider it a crossover despite the cheesy plastic cladding.

            Best thing of all – these things will probably be cheap in late 2018 on the used market, which is when I’ll be looking to buy.

      • 0 avatar
        sarcheer

        slightly better… 50mpg is prius territory.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      Dimensions are in the CX-3/HR-V ballpark:

      length 171.5″ height 60.4″, width 71.1″, ground clearance 6.3″, curb weight 3100-3200lbs

      http://www.kiamedia.com/us/en/models/niro/2017/specifications

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      I guess they didn’t want to overshadow the quirkier Soul.

      Come to think of it, they missed an opportunity not naming the Niro the “Shadow.”

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        That side pic makes it more clear… its basically a Rio on stilts.

        The top photo makes it look more like a traditional CUV like a RAV4.

        Misses out for me. IMO if you’re in a CUV you may as well get something mid sized. Subcompact CUVs compromise too much.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I have pictures of one of these in my phone – I saw it in traffic back in October, wearing Michigan MFR plates. It was in a weird blue-aqua color.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I snapped some pictures of a camouflaged Kia in August. Couldn’t figure out what it was at the time, but looking at the pictures, the Niro is likely. Everything matches up except the wheels, and the black cladding is missing from the car I saw.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    That photo…

    Hold on… Ima run down the street and see if Becky’s kid’s Rio5 is still there.

    *Old* Rio 5.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, it’s not like Kia hasn’t sold crossovers without AWD before. Soul, anyone?

    My question is: what’s the mileage like? That’ll be the decider.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I always thought the Soul was a tall hatchback until we bought one, and then I realized they were marketing it as a subcompact CUV.

      • 0 avatar
        mshenzi

        Kyree, do you still have that Soul, and how has it been to live with? Can you picture it/have your driven it with the new 200hp turbo motor?

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Well, it’s my grandmother’s, but for various reasons, I currently have it in my possession and am storing it for her. We bought it new in mid-2014, and she drives so infrequently that it’s only got 10,800 miles on it. Truly a little-old-lady car (although my grandmother is built more like Madea than a little old lady, haha).

          I have not driven the new one and didn’t know there was a new engine, but I don’t think the structure lends itself to anything particularly high-powered. Overall, the car is not my cup of tea because of the dreadful noise it makes anytime you rev the engine, and what I would consider to be poor fuel economy for a crossover of that size (low 20s on average, with me driving), but it works excellently for my grandmother.

          • 0 avatar
            mshenzi

            Thanks. Apparently the turbo motor gets rid of the thrashy noise AND has better MPG. Comes only on the top trim (Exclaim). Part of me wonders if it’s a car I should consider to replace the Golf TDi, rather than the Niro.So far, though, they’re very rare. I live in DC, and the Kia website located the nearest one to here in Tennessee the last time I checked.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Ours is a Plus with navigation and the premium audio, rather than the Exclaim; I don’t think Grandma would have been willing to pony up for the turbo motor were it available at the time of purchase.

            I think the Niro is a better idea as a Golf TDI replacement, although you may find that the handling is not to your liking.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      51/46
      Car and Driver has a first take review fairly positive.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Except that neither the Soul nor the Niro are crossovers.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Jack it up and add AWD. Maybe some cladding. You’re welcome.

  • avatar
    Sloomis

    I’m not totally up to speed with Hyundai/Kia long-term reliability, but is the added complexity of a hybrid system something one can trust with these brands?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Hybrids in general seem to be quite reliable. Prius sets the bar high.

      My 13 Optima Hybrid has almost 50k trouble-free miles on it (early, I know, but it’s all I have to go on). My only complaint is its rough electric-to-gas transition. Fuel economy has been mid-30s.

    • 0 avatar
      sarcheer

      Current generation of hybrids from H/K (I have a ’16) are exceptionally smooth transitioning from gas to electric to the point where you can barely tell. Hopefully that is maintained from the 6-speed AT to the 6-speed DCT. Hybrids overall are generally more reliable than ICE only vehicles, even if only considering the reduced wear on the ICE engine components.

      10yr/100k warranty on hybrid components helps too. Hyundai offers a lifetime battery warranty as well.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’ve been waiting for the Niro’s arrival for quite a while.

    One early review thought the DCT was extremely smooth; another later review said it was balky and weak – so I’m tentative.

    The Niro will supposedly be available in hybrid, PHEV, and EV trim, just like the Hyundai Ioniq. A BEV Niro could be a Tesla Model Y killer if they put 60 kWh in it.

  • avatar
    deanst

    “In base FE form, the Niro delivers a lot for the price. Providing features like a back-up camera, seven-inch touchscreen, keyless entry, and both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality, it’s not devoid of technology. Moving up to the LX only adds a push-button start, LED taillights, and rails to mount a roof rack. While it doesn’t receive a huge list of upgrades, the $24,095 LX is only a modest $310 step up.

    For $27,595, you can get the EX, which comes with many more features. This trim level includes fog lamps, LED running lights, heated power-folding mirrors, heated seats, a steering wheel with leather, Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert and Lane Change Assist. A $2,500 increase might seem steep, but it is still priced much lower than any of its competitors.”

    $27,595 minus $24,095 does not equal $2,500.

  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    Something without pushbutton start? In!

  • avatar
    bobmaxed

    How about THE C-MAX. Of course Kia see’s no reason to be compared to a non popular vehicle. But there are a lot of similarities. A pretty light weight article

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I see this as a direct C-Max competitor. Of course almost no one (including Ford) knows that the C-Max exists because they don’t advertise it. The Niro apparently weighs about 400 pounds less though, which is significant for fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      stevelovescars

      I’m curious about the size of this.

      The C-Max is an interesting car. I hadn’t really thought of them much, either, but while looking at some new car options I came across a used (non-Energi) example used on a local car lot. It was really comfortable and very quiet on the road.

      Their resale value is abysmal, seemingly making them great used car buys as well. $14k for the sub-20k mile example I saw seemed like a good. The few owner reports I could find online seem to indicate that they have been reliable and pleasant to own.

      The cargo area packaging isn’t the greatest on the C-Max (the batteries essentially raise the cargo floor) but it’s essentially a Focus on stilts, isn’t it. If this Kia really gets 50 mpg, that would be significantly higher than the C-Max but it seems like a smaller, less powerful, and lighter vehicle, too.

      • 0 avatar
        brettc

        Yep, the Energi models are easier to find used than the regular hybrids and they have terrible resale value. They lose a lot of hatch space but 19 miles on battery only is not bad.

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        The CMax is actually not that tall at all. The points the CMax get are that its fun to drive (sorta speak) and a pretty decent interior. I would like to have one as a second car.

  • avatar
    Thinkin...

    How on earth could TTAC fail to mention the mileage? This is a crossover that gets 52mpg city / 49mpg highway / 50 mpg combined. Frankly those are Prius numbers out of a small SUV, and with a dual clutch transmission. That’s the newsworthy part of this release, far more so than the trim levels.

    In other news – it will also offer a power memory driver seat (not sure if it’s standard in the EX or part of a package.) Pity that cruise control is an option (should be standard these days), and that the sunroof isn’t panoramic, especially in the top trim.

  • avatar
    DanyloS

    Looks like a nice simply styled handsome wagon.

  • avatar
    probert

    Don’t get the premise. Kia makes the Sportage and Sorrento – they’re in the game. They also have some of the best styling in the game – and this looks like a tidy package.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    How does this compare to Subaru XV cross trek?

    I like the concept and as a former wagon owner, I have a soft spot for them, but I’m considering JGC/Durango for my next whip, there are no wagons out there that do it for me, this doesn’t change that.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Twice the mileage – that’s the big draw of the Niro. EPA 50mpg combined.

      For comparison, the CrossTrek is 26mpg combined. Helluva difference at the same price.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    This has been sold in Norway for a while and I see them everywhere already. People are waking up to Kia producing very good transportation units. That’s what they are, and this car is a pretty rational choice for those looking for a minivan in all but name and sliding doors.

  • avatar

    I really like this, but you’re also talking to a guy that loves the styling of the first-gen Highlander.

    With this and the Soul, I see it as a 1-2 combo to take on the rest of the subcompact CUV market. I feel like they have all of their bases covered.

  • avatar
    Raevox

    I like the idea of this, but much like the Santa Fe Sport, Sonata Eco, and Elantra Sport (which I still really want but probably won’t buy), I have a LOT of apprehension toward the DCT. More specifically, regarding DRY DCT setups.

    I’ve read a lot of kerfluff over Santa Fe no-power and overheating conditions in the Santa Fe. We also have a ’16 Fiesta with the PowerShift DCT. Yes, different automaker, but when comparing wet and dry clutch DCTs, clearly the wet clutch is superior (VW…)

    The caveat is that I have not yet driven Hyundai’s DCTs, and I SHOULD (and will) be giving them a try. Plus it has the excellent 10/100 warranty that should generally ease anyone’s apprehension. But as much as I like the direct drive feel of a dual-clutch setup, and being a manual enthusiast who has spent more than half his licensed life drivinfg manuals for daily driving, I’ve found the Fiesta impossible to drive smoothly and without shift shock unless the throttle is pinned to the floor.

    Even in manual mode, too, the DCT gets a bit confused from time to time… and there’s been a couple situations, even in Sport mode, where it’s been caught between gears at a rolling stop and just kind of… rolls for a second or two before finally kicking down a gear and going. Kind of unnerving with traffic behind you.

    If Hyundai offered a wet clutch setup, maintenance-be-damned, I’d feel a lot more comfortable. And a lot more confident that a couple hard launches in 100 degree-plus California Summers in rush hour traffic won’t result in overheat warnings from the car.

  • avatar
    TimK

    I must not be paying attention. For some reason I thought the Niro was AWD, with electric motors on the rear wheels. It’s much less interesting to me as a FWD — not much different than the Soul in terms of utility. Will the fuel savings make up for the higher price?

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