By on December 16, 2016

Ford GT Factory Car 01

Ford Motor Company has started production of its 2017 GT supercar.

The first example of Ford’s next-generation halo car completed assembly earlier this morning at Multimatic Incorporated in Markham, Ontario. Vehicle number one rolled off the factory floor today to go home with Executive Chairman Bill Ford.

“When we kicked off 2016, we had two primary objectives for our Ford GT supercar — to excel at Le Mans, and to start deliveries before year-end,” Raj Nair, executive VP and head of Ford’s product development, said at the event. “We’ve achieved both.”

Ford has taken a Ferrari-like approach to the application process, aiming to limit ownership to Ford loyalists and ensure the new cars won’t be immediately flipped for profit. The company has informed applicants that they may only purchase a new GT if they “agree to retain ownership for a minimum of 24 months after delivery and not to re-sell the vehicle within this period of time.”

Ford limited production to a scant 250 units a year, despite receiving thousands of applications for the initial run. With the first 500 spoken for, Ford says it will extend production through the 2020 model year. The next ordering window won’t open until early 2018.

The 2017 Ford GT is powered by a 3.5-liter twin-turbocharged V6, which is claimed to make over 600 horsepower. The engine makes use of direct dual fuel injection and an extremely low-friction valvetrain. Ontario’s Multimatic, which also produced the De Macross GT1, is building the cars largely by hand. Starting price for the GT tops $400,000.

Surreptitiously developed in a basement design studio by a small team, the prototype GT was a massive hit in 2015. A lightly modified version won this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans on the 50th anniversary of Ford’s first victory. The GT40, which serves as the inspiration for the modern GT, dominated the French endurance circuit from 1966 to 1969.

Ford GT

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

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40 Comments on “First Production Ford GT Leaves the Factory, Failed Applicants Can Only Look on and Wait...”


  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Is Jezza getting one?

  • avatar
    raph

    >>aiming to limit ownership to Ford loyalists<<

    Uh huh… just like the Ford Loyalist Amy Macdonald getting her Ford GT which will sit right along side her other Ford products like the 488 GTB and 458

    http://www.carbuzz.com/news/2016/12/15/This-Singer-Bought-A-Ford-GT-Without-Ever-Having-Owned-Or-Driven-A-Ford-7736892/

    And the best part about that link "Singer-Bought-A-Ford-GT-Without-Ever-Having-Owned-Or-Driven-A-Ford"

    The application process isn't about weeding out people who aren't loyalist so much as it is to make sure it doesn't end up in the hands of somebody without some sort of notable media presence of some kind in addition to the Ford loyalists(in one case I know of a loyalist he owns several Ford GT's and has a bit of a following at a local C&C and on FB).

    So pretty much you have to be somebody and for the schmuck that has a fleet of various regular guy Fords with no media presence and hits the lottery and wants a GT they are just gonna have to wait till the cars start showing up used as Ford has no interest in selling them one.

    Personally I don't like this business model but these cars are rolling billboards and Ford is understandably picky about who gets one.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      Well, you coulda took singing lessons just like Amy did.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Hah, even with singing lessons the only way I’d get famous is with a time machine and a spot on the Gong Show and even then the sound of me crooning would most likely get me banned from any purchase of a Ford product for life.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Well, actually, Sajeev’s brother was approved for one, despite being a guy with a fleet of comparatively-ordinary Fords. That might have to do with Sajeev himself and his ties with the auto industry, but who knows.

      Meanwhile, even your so-called “lottery schmuck” could bring considerable good press to the Ford Performance brand. I think the GT’s biggest enemy, in Ford’s eyes, is collectors who will lock the cars away in a storage facility, never to be seen again. Ford wants these cars to be seen on the road and on the track, not in a climate-controlled garage until a Barrett-Jackson auction in the year 2066.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I normally don’t pay attention to supercars, but there’s something about the GT that really grabs me. Bill Ford, I will totally be your wingman!

    • 0 avatar
      jim brewer

      Grabs me too. You know why? Because it’s built for a real purpose—-winning LeMans.

      So-called Supercars seem to be more and more built out of the box to be a collector’s item. That makes them more like a ‘Diana Princess of Wales’ commemorative coin from the Franklin Mint than the pinnacle of automotive excellence.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Built by Trappist monks in a very quiet workplace.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Does Jay Leno get #2. Apparently he doesn’t own any Ferrari’s.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I saw that agreement. But what is Ford’s remedy if someone does decide to sell his vehicle prior to the two years? Will that person be blacklisted from any future Ford special-editions ever, or can he / she legally be sued by Ford?

  • avatar

    I got hooked on the GT back in the 60’s – great looking car and the 1-2-3 Le Mans win proved it was more than looks. A dealer in our capital city had one in for show several years back (maybe when they first re-introduced them??) I enjoyed seeing one up close. Love to drive one for a day, but an $11/hr job precludes that happening. It’ll be cool when Sajeev’s brother gets his.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged Miata Man

      Agreed, I’m genuinely excited about the GT (in spite of myself; I’m neither a Ford fan, nor a supercar enthusiast) and I’m really looking forward to watching the order, delivery, and ownership experience unfold.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Back in the late 60’s (yeah, I am that old) I remember having seen a couple of the road versions of the original GT40, in both cases parked at the curb in Paris. Cool car. A few years back I instructed in the 2005 GT. Kind of fun, but the car was a pastiche of the original and had a naff interior.

    This new GT on the other hand, well that I definitely wouldn’t kick out of bed.

  • avatar
    brn

    It appears that those assembling a Ford GT must wear the same color as the car they’re assembling.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    These cars are very derivative looking for the segment.

    I’d much prefer a mid to high-end Ferrari.

    Not only that, but these are Ford in name only, excepting for the (majorly tuned) motor. It almost feels as if Ford cheated here (because Multimatic actually is the builder, per Ford’s specs).

    Prognosis meh.

    • 0 avatar

      Contract assembly has been part of the car biz from the beginning.

      From the start of the Ford Motor Co. in 1903, into the next decade when they started their own car company, the Dodge brothers supplied Ford with most of Henry’s components, already assembled. The Dodge’s company delivered “machines”, to which Ford would mount bodies and wheels. All early Fords were essentially built by the Dodges.

      A century later, the 2003 Ford GT was not assembled by Ford but rather in a facility in Troy, Michigan operated by Saleen.

      For the matter, the NHRA certified COPO Camaro is not assembled at a GM plant, nor is the Drag Pack Challenger built in a Chrysler factory. The original Boss 429 Mustangs were modified and assembled by Kar Kraft.

      The new GT was designed and developed in Dearborn. I don’t think its styling is derivative of any road cars and it’s instantly identifiable. The way air is tunneled around the passenger cell, comes from prototype racing, but the flying buttresses back there are pretty original.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Ferrari designs and assembles its own vehicles, as does Lamborghini, as does Pagani (though the motor in the Huayra is a Mercedes AMG one), as does Porsche (including the 918), as do many other exotic vehicle brands.

    • 0 avatar
      jthorner

      The original Ford GT40 of the 1960s was designed and built by subcontractors in England. Valmet of Finland has built over one million vehicles for Porsche, Mercedes and others. Contracting out the manufacturing of specialty vehicles happens all the time in the auto industry. All of the VW Karmann Ghia’s ever made were built by a contractor (Karmann), and Karmann has built countless other vehicles for German companies. The original Volvo 1800 was made by Jensen in England. I could go on and on, but enough of a history lesson for now.

      It actually would have been highly unusual for Ford to build a low volume vehicle like the GT in house.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I’m not talking about those vehicles – I mentioned Ferrari, Pagani, Lamborghini & Porsche above.

        The Pagani Huayra, Porsche 918, most Ferraris, and the Lamborghini Centenario are certainly “low-volume” vehicles (only 20 Centenario built?).

        • 0 avatar

          Ferrari is ramping up to 9,000 units a year. Ford is going to sell 250 GTs annually. “Most Ferraris” are sold in greater volume than that. Most Lamborghinis too.

          I’m surprised you don’t complain that the higher performance versions of GM’s LTx V8 are built with cylinder blocks cast by a specialty supplier, not a GM foundry.

          In any case, Ferrari, Lamborghini and Porsche have had, as part of their operations from the beginning, the capacity to do limited production runs. Companies like Ford don’t. The BMW M1 was initially jobbed out to Lamborghini.

          As for Pagani, like Koenigsegg, it isn’t really an automobile manufacturer in the traditional sense. They build fewer functional cars than Metalcrafters does.

  • avatar
    skor

    Once upon a time Ferraris, Shelby Mustangs, Yenko Camaros, etc could be purchased by mere mortals….well, mortals with good jobs. Who can afford any of the current crop of ‘super’ cars? Hedge fund managers? Founders of high-tech companies? Members of Trump’s administration? Not only will I never be able to afford a Ford GT, I’ve never actually seen one in the wild, and I live only 10 miles from New York City. Cars made of unobtainium are as relative to my interests as is a Russian gangster’s Titanic-sized super yacht.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      Yah, well, at least you weren’t multiply raped and then beaten to death before your 14th birthday. Misfortune is relative.

      • 0 avatar
        Isaac Bickerstaff

        Yes, yes, a little perspective goes a long way. My father was at sea in 1941 at the age of sixteen and his buddy turned 17 on Saipan and then went to Iwo Jima and was invalided out of Korea after Chosin. Almost all of us in the Western nations have it very good right now. I am reading the memoirs of a English woman who was a nurse during the Great War. She lost her brother, his two best friends and her finance during the war, her entire circle and, while she lived a full live, never fully got over it and had her ashes spead on her brother’s war grave in Italy. Sixty thousand men went down the first day of the Somme. Meanwhile, we look at the massacres in Syria, what happened to the Yazidi Christians and all the victims of Islamism around the world and should feel fortunate.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Once upon a time Ferraris, Shelby Mustangs, Yenko Camaros, etc could be purchased by mere mortals…”

      lolwut?

      Ferraris have always been priced out of the reach of “mere mortals,” at least when new. and as far as Yenko Camaros and Shelby Mustangs, you can get them direct from Chevy and Ford these days. Surely you’re aware of the ZL1, 1LE, and GT350?

      • 0 avatar
        skor

        In 1970 a Ferrari Daytona cost about $12K new. About $75K in today’s money, so about what a mid-level Benz costs now. What does the cheapest new Ferrari cost now?

        • 0 avatar
          jim brewer

          Too facile Skor.

          That would be the rank inflation-adjusted price. But remember, in those days a rich guy would have a marginal tax rate, state and federal, of around 75%. About twice what it is now.

          A Ferrari of course, would be purchased with those 25 cent marginal dollars.

          So it would be more accurate to say that on the Rich Guy Purchasing Parity Index, the Ferrari Daytona sold for north of $140k in today’s dollars. Just as Harvard tuition, another rich guy item, in 1970 was $4,000 a year. It’s twice the inflation adjusted price now. That’s one reason why you didn’t see many Ferraris even back in the day.

          • 0 avatar
            Isaac Bickerstaff

            There are many, many more people with money today because there is a lot more of it.

            When I was young, even in Southern California, I would see a Ferrari or a Lamborghini a few times a year and it was the same for a Rolls Royce. My buddy had a 275GTB, which was a fairly common Ferrari and they made 900 of them. Another friend had a GTS which they made 200 of, then there was a Superfast two blocks away from my parent’s businss in Los Angeles. In recent years, Ferrari made 11,000 of the 355s, something like 15,000 of the less pretty 360, about 12,000 of the 430s. I don’t even know how many 458’s were sold and these are just figures for the one model.

            The Daytona was a very rare and expensive car in its day because the number of very wealthy people had not expanded to anywhere close to the numbers we see today. In a middle class community or average town, a Cadillac was something owned by the local banker or doctor and Mercedes were rare. Now, we see medium to high end Mercedes, BMWs and Audis in the hands of police officers, other public employees and small business owners.

            The money supply has expanded, then the uber-rich have left the rest of us far behind, creating a vastly larger car market and making an exotic a lot less special. I find myself less interested in a lot of the new stuff, but just as deeply in love with the voluptous cars from the 1950s and 1960s. I have a friend with a 59 Ferrari TR and I can stare at it, or a 275GTB, or an e-type for hours.

        • 0 avatar
          skor

          A new Lincoln or Cadillac cost around $6K back in 1970. So a new Ferrari at that time was worth two Cadillacs. Expensive to be sure, but still within the realm of an an ordinary doctor, or lawyer or owner of a trash hauling business. Today a price of a new Ferrari is around half a dozen new Cadillacs. Yes, as a percentage there are more wealthy people around today than in 1970, there are also more people people. Fact is that the middle class has shrunk over the last 40 years. Some of the former middle class has moved up, but the majority have moved down. Those numbers come straight from the US Census Bureau. I stand by but I said. Back in the day a fairly well to do professional or business owner could buy a new Ferrari, today only the hedge fund managers, Saudi princes, rap stars and the like can manage the sticker price. It’s why I don’t care even to look at ‘super’ cars anymore. Even if I won the Powerball, I don’t think I’d buy one only because I wouldn’t want to be in the company of the kind of people who currently own super cars.

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