By on December 29, 2016

chief

The secret is out: my intrepid and long(ish)-suffering wife, Danger Girl, is the new owner of Matt Farah’s Corvette. This was my idea, for better or worse. She was all set on ordering a new Grand Sport for the 2017 autocross/trackday season, but I thought that it would be a better idea for her to experience all of the new-Vette-owner rituals (nose scraping, rocker panel ripping, mirror scratching, lurid 130mph backwards-facing exits into Mid-Ohio’s “China Beach”) with a used car. So now she has a “learner” Vette, albeit one with 421RWHP, Pfadt coilovers, a half-cage, and fixed Sparcos.

With just 32,200 miles at the time of sale, DG’s Corvette is still well out of warranty thanks to an in-service date from the (Bill) Clinton administration. (I guess I don’t have to put that qualifier in there any more, do I?) As my wife found out last week, however, having a car that’s under warranty isn’t always a blessing. In fact, sometimes it’s an outright curse.


The Corvette is the second car that DG has bought from Mr. Farah; the first was his COBB-tuned Fiesta ST. As of right now, we have no plans to get rid of the little blue Ford. It’s been a fun, practical car that does ninety-five percent of what we need from a daily driver in unobtrusive, economical fashion. The sneaky charm of the Fiesta is that after you’ve had one for a while you start to really question whether any car needs to be larger than a “supermini”. It’s comfortable enough for a cross-country drive while also being dead easy to park. Unlike the small cars of previous generations — I’m thinking ’82 Civic and that sort of thing — the Fiesta is tall enough to register with SUV drivers in traffic, while the sit-up-and-beg seating makes it feel just as spacious as a Camry. From the front seat, anyway.

There’s just one little issue with the ST as it sits right now, however; when the temperature dips below freezing, the first-gear synchro becomes a little fussy. The first time it happened, I figured Matt had put some California-friendly Redline gear oil in the transmission. No suck luck; it’s the factory fill. And the colder it gets, the less it likes first gear. Note that the second gear synchro is just fine, despite a whole season of autocrossing. The car is just a little fussy from rest.

Danger Girl doesn’t like this. She’d like Ford to fix it. So I took a look at the various forums. Yes, the Fiesta can occasionally need a first-gear synchro. I would no more trust a modern dealership to replace a synchro in a transmission than I would trust them to do my next knee replacement, but Ford’s approved procedure for bad synchros is just to swap the transmission.

(A brief digression: Isn’t it interesting how the disappearance of American manufacturing has coupled with the disappearance of American tech-college skills to turn “repairs” into “swaps”? I can still remember paying a gunsmith real money back in 1991 to wind a new spring for my Colt Gold Cup pistol. He made it out of wire stock. It wasn’t that we couldn’t buy a spring; it was that he trusted himself to make a better spring than he could get out of a catalog. Today, we swap entire transmissions to fix a synchro, because the transmissions are made in Mexico out of Chinese steel and they have an intrinsic value somewhere around that of a water-stained Pog.)

Knowing that we’d be out of town a while on our Corvette-buying mission, I encouraged DG to drop the car off early last week. The next day, we got the call that I expected: “We can’t duplicate the problem. Had three different techs drive the car. You can come pick it up.” (The odometer would later show that the Fiesta had traveled just under two miles in the dealer’s custody.) That was the good news. The bad news: they’d lost the keys to the Fiesta.

Danger Girl took her backup set to the dealer so they could move the car around while they searched for the missing keys. “I think they are setting us up to come back and steal the car,” she told me. Before you snort the way I did at the time, I should mention that Mrs. Baruth was born and raised in Albuquerque, where shit like that happens all the time. That city truly is a wretched hive of scum and villainy. In fact, to paraphrase Orwell’s O’Brien, if you want an advance vision of Mr. Obama’s open-borders American future, imagine the K-Mart in ABQ. Half-empty shelves, everything with a value over $9.99 padlocked to the wall, people shopping barefoot, women dispassionately slapping each other in the plus-sized clothing area while their slack-jawed children stare at the floor, cashiers who can’t read the error messages on their own idiot-proof cash registers, and a nightmarish aural miasma of nine different Mexican pop songs clashing with eachother in the parking-lot-slash-town-square. It makes a rural-Ohio jail cell look like a wine-tasting party in a Manhattan co-op.

Two days later, the dealer called us back. “Good news! We didn’t find your key, but we programmed a new fob for you at no charge.” DG handed the phone to me.

“You lost the keys.”

“Yes, but we got you a new fob.”

“What about the old fob? What if somebody tries to use it?”

“Oh, you can’t. It’s been deprogrammed.”

“What about the physical key in the fob? Will that still work?”

“There’s no physical key in a Fiesta fob.” This lie was delivered with such sincere conviction that for a brief, shining moment I seriously considered the idea that the service adviser was a drooling moron rather than the certainty that the service adviser considered me to be a drooling moron.

“I’m pretty sure there’s a key in the fob,” I replied. “I say this because I’ve taken apart the keys to change the batteries and you can see the key in there.”

“Well,” he breezily replied, “you still can’t start the car.”

“That may be so,” I said. “However, in the event that my wife gets in the car one day and there is a crazy person waiting for her in the back seat, I have to say that I’m going to hold you personally responsible for whatever happens to her. Rape, murder, that sort of thing. I’d take it amiss. Can I get your full name?”

“You know what,” the service rep said, after a measurable pause, “I think there is a key in that fob.”

“Why don’t you get new physical keys and swap the tumblers,” I suggested. Turns out that swapping the tumblers wasn’t enough. We got a new lock cylinder to go with our new keyfob. Took four days.

At the cashier’s desk, they gave Danger Girl a note from the tech and a stuffed bear.

“Oh, look,” I laughed, “they called you ‘Chief’. That’s very respectful of your Native American ancestry. Hey,” I cried, as DG battered my skull with her surprisingly robust fists, “take it easy there, Sacagawea!”

“YOU,” she screamed, taking a breath then delivering a right hook that wouldn’t have disgraced Wes Studi’s Magua directly to my kidney, “are never driving my Corvette!”

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200 Comments on “No Fixed Abode: Sorry ‘Bout That, Chief...”


  • avatar
    dal20402

    Some things just aren’t worth the hassle, like trying to get a random Ford dealer to do a transmission repair of sufficient quality to please a discerning driver. You might as well be trying to teach the room of monkeys to type Shakespeare.

    Find the best transmission shop in Ohio, have them fix the problem, and just pay for it. Set your guitar-buying schedule back a few months. You will be thankful for the simplicity and peace of mind.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The problem with that idea is that if Ford says you need to replace the transmission to correct the problem then they probably don’t sell the synchro individually and with the low volume the aftermarket will not offer it either.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        So then replace the transmission, but have a competent shop do it.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          I would start by replacing the fluid with a good quality synthetic.

          • 0 avatar
            yamahog

            Manual transmission rebuilds are such a lost art. My dad had an old integra, he blew out the third gear synchro at 220k miles – all the clutchless shifts caught up with it.

            He had a guy in California rebuild it – some old guy, always smoking a cigarette, and always working on something Mechanical-with-a-capital-M. Had a ton of BMW motorcycle finals drives hanging around his shop in various states of assembly.

            Anyhow, the guy rebuilt the transmission and I’ll be damned if that wasn’t the sweetest piece of machinery in the house. The shift throws were so light, precise, and snickety. I couldn’t believe it was a cable operated FWD transmission, it felt better than some of the sequential, linkage-less boxes I’ve used.

            As a younger fella, I’d never imagine that a person could beat the factory but apparently it can happen and I wish it were more common.

            The easy thing to do is better fluid and live with it. If you go to a shop, then you have the option of fixing it and putting in a LSD. In a car like this – why not?

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            “If you go to a shop, then you have the option of fixing it and putting in a LSD. In a car like this – why not?”

            You’ve got me convinced!

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          So he should spend $2K, $3K or more on something that should be covered under warranty? While this dealer may not be the best I’m sure there are other ones and with all the warranty work on the power shift You have a way better chance of getting someone that knows how to R&R the transmission correctly w/o causing damage along the way.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            In my long life of owning cars I’ve encountered exactly one dealership tech, a crusty old guy at Revord Buick, who I would have trusted to R&R a glovebox door, let alone a transmission. He was excellent in working through the damage that rodents caused to the electrical system of my G8. And everyone in the Seattle area had said he was the only guy in the area that was good with the G8.

            On the other hand, I’ve had multiple cars returned with various types of service-bay rash, one with the tires inflated to 25 psi, one with more than half a quart too much oil, and one where an attempt to “fix” a turn-signal-stalk rattle made it much worse.

            If I wanted to keep the car for a long time, yes, I’d pay, unless I could find a referral to a dealer where I knew there was a top-notch tech.

          • 0 avatar
            yamahog

            “So he should spend $2K, $3K or more on something that should be covered under warranty?”

            If he goes to the right place, he’ll get an LSD and a transmission that’s better than the one that left the factory. Perhaps that’s worth the price to him?

            I don’t dispute that ford should take care of him (unless the car was abused but it seems like Farah knows how to drive a stick and Jack’s a straight-enough shooter, I’d imagine he’d own up to anything that he or DG might have done to cause the issue.

            And frankly, I don’t know shit about shit, maybe Ford voids warranties of anyone who autocrosses, or maybe the tune has something to do with the issue. Maybe Matt Farah has a habit of putting the transmission in first gear at 25 mph when coming to a stop (don’t laugh, I know someone who did this on their accord, the car played along… for about 40k miles). Maybe this is as good as it gets from Ford. I don’t know.

            What I do know is that there are guys who know what they’re doing and they make transmissions work right, not just ‘within spec’.

            The best outcome from Ford is a new transmission that may or may not fix the issue.

            The best outcome from a person who can really rebuild the transmission is a transmission that’s never going to give them a hint of trouble for as long as they own the car and with an LSD to match.

            I’ll defer to the owners to weigh the costs and benefits, all I’m saying is that it’s an option.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            In my long life of being a Mechanic the number of competent and honest Mechanics I’ve met anywhere is pretty small .
            .
            A sad thing indeed .
            .
            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @ dal The reality is that you are at least as likely to find an incompetent tech at a independent shop as you are at a dealer. The former dealer techs I’ve met were former because they were incompetent, and got “laid off”, from there they bounced around to different independent shops.

            @ Yahmahog, no if he wants a LSD installed on top of that then add at least $1K to that cost. And as far as someone being able to make it last forever if the synchros are marginal they are marginal and how they are installed isn’t going to change that.

  • avatar
    ScarecrowRepair

    “Isn’t it interesting how the disappearance of American manufacturing”

    It’s more interesting that you repeat this myth.

    US manufacturing is better than ever, in value as measured by inflation-adjusted dollars. What’s down is manufacturing jobs, which is good the same way that there is a continual decline in agricultural jobs, coincidentally at the same time that agricultural output is growing all the time, and actually using less acreage at the same same time.

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      If only this were true instead of B.S. RahRah tripe .

      In my last job as a tool buyer I strove o buy only American made products as i was supplying the Police and several Municipal departments .

      Almost all of the American made stuff was total garbage and that’s a sad thing from the perspective of a life long Tradesman who takes the job and tools very seriously indeed .

      Even the hose nozzles were shyte ~ they leaked from day one where the Chinese crap ones I was forced to buy didn’t although they were direct copies of the American made ones just *much* cheaper and easier to break .

      -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Nate, I find that just the opposite is true. American tools seem to be made much better than the Chinese stuff. Especially hand tools and mechanics tools. Sadly, a lot of US brands are just names from the past with low grade imported products in the package. You can get good quality from China but you have to pay for it. Look at the crap at Harbor Freight. Ok for a tool you use once or twice but for real work, forget it.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Yes,
        .
        I bought lots and lots of American made hand tools .
        .
        I even was able to insist on American made shovels and an amazing variety of Gardening and janitorial tools .
        .
        Plastics are still made here, some are crap but most are pretty good .
        .
        -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Logged in to say the same and I see you beat me to it.

      “the disappearance of American manufacturing” is a falsitude pushed by people who have limited actual knowledge of American manufacturing and/or an agenda that is furthered by claiming that it is dead.

      Jack, by what measure is manufacturing disappearing from the US?

      • 0 avatar
        TOTitan

        Because Trump told him so.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        Everything you own is made in China.

        Most of the things I own are made in the United States.

        I’m perfectly, intimately aware of what is being made here and what is not. So whom should I believe… you or my own lying eyes?

        • 0 avatar
          bikegoesbaa

          “So whom should I believe”

          Pick any credible quantitative source, they’ll all say that US manufacturing output is higher now than it was in the past.

          Here are a couple to get you started:

          http://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-manufacturing-dead-output-has-doubled-in-three-decades-2016-03-28

          http://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2016/11/16/youre-not-going-to-believe-this-but-us-manufacturing-is-now-bigger-than-ever-before/#5ddfd8676e2c

          Relevant quote from Forbes: “it really is true to say that American manufacturing is now bigger than ever before.”

          If you have a source besides your own eyes and baseless assumptions about what I own and where it came from I would be very happy to see it. I bet you don’t.

          For what it’s worth, the Allen Edmonds I’m wearing right now were definitely made in Wisconsin.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Clearly, the exact stuff you buy represents the sum of all industrial output perfectly. I mean, it’s obvious.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “Most of the things I own are made in the United States.”

          Such as?

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Such as everything from my socks to my refrigerator to my car to my headphones to my belt to my furniture. I’m passionate about sourcing American goods wherever possible. I’ll make exceptions — there’s no American equivalent to the ZX14 or a Kiton jacket — but it’s rare.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thanks for the reply. I actually got to thinking what I own which is “Made in the USA” (or at least a First World nation) and outside of electronics and casual clothing, I too fit the mold (although most of what I own was purchased used).

            I find this very serendipitous as I actually acquired a Kiton suit a few months ago. I find it to be too good for my prole station I actually haven’t worn it out yet.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            Weather Tech floor mats? :)

            That’s all I can think of right now.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            I try to go local, then expand from there. For food, there are several local farms. My favorite grocery store tries to buy local and displays signs showing the origin of all of their produce – even naming the farm and location. I even drink local. Local distilleries and breweries almost exclusively. I can sip a glass of whiskey and honestly say I know the person that distilled it – and met the person that made the glass (Silo Distillery and Simon Pearce Glass). I even have multiple local choices for sake. Even the dog’s food comes from a company that’s located only a few miles from my home.

            The tough part is that it can be super expensive. They make some amazingly nice stuff in this country and you can see the quality. The trouble is the cost is tremendous. Still, for those of us that can afford it, we need to do our best to support these local craftsmen.

        • 0 avatar

          Jack,

          I suppose as a consumer you can make those choices but if you’re a business, you may not have the option of only buying American. I have a small embroidery shop. In my experience, embroidery thread made in Germany is better than that made in Korea which is better than U.S. made Coates & Clark.

          The Harmonicaster (TM) electric harmonica I’m developing uses German harmonica components by Seydel and pickups made by Lace in California. The little thumbwheel potentiometers that I’m using for volume and tone controls, however, can only be sourced in Asia, in this case Taiwan. FWIW, the importer, which sells a range of electronic stuff made in the East, says that Taiwanese companies have more consistent quality control than you find in China.

          Only buying American would mean that I couldn’t make and sell my own stuff.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            People are confusing manufacturing output with manufacturing employment. One is up, the other is down – mostly due to automation, and partly due to offshoring.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree automation is indeed up but it all started with offshoring in the 1990s. Although I don’t believe that amount of jobs will be coming back by a combination of further offshoring to SE Asia and automation, some jobs are slated for creation through incoming investment spurned by the President-elect. Whether that actually happens remains to be seen.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Meanwhile, we send an excess of $300 billion to China each year…

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        “Increasing trade imbalance” is not the same thing as “American manufacturing disappearing”.

        Both of the following are true:
        -The US makes more stuff now than we ever did. Much of it is consumed here.
        -China also makes more stuff than they ever did. Much of it is exported.

        China manufactures slightly more stuff than the US, but who cares? They also have 4x the population, so it’s actually pretty reasonable to expect that they would make more stuff.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          You’re making way too much sense, bikegoesbaa. How dare you?

        • 0 avatar
          Detroit-Iron

          The fact that the dollar value of an F35 is significantly higher than an Oxo “good grips” can opener does not alter the fact that almost nothing on the shelves at your Target was not made in China.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Exactly. It’s there for everybody with eyes to see. But most people would rather wear Chinese clothes and then rationalize the choice with a feel-good URL.

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            You’re assuming far too much. I’ve worked in US manufacturing for more than a decade and try to source as much of my stuff as I can from the US.

            If I can’t find a suitable American option I try to buy from countries with similar wages and worker/environmental protections.

            Low-cost Chinese or equivalent is a last resort.

            You an I appear to be on the same page with this.

            That doesn’t change the fact that American manufacturing *is not in decline* and has actually gone *up* over time. This is simply a verifiable fact, you don’t do yourself any favors by ignoring it.

            Looking at the shelves of your local Target is not a good way to evaluate the state of American manufacturing.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-Iron

            @bikegoesbaa

            “That doesn’t change the fact that American manufacturing *is not in decline* and has actually gone *up* over time. This is simply a verifiable fact, you don’t do yourself any favors by ignoring it.”

            You mean dollar value or jobs? Who gives a shit if the the top 0.00001% has a slight increase in their portfolio when you can walk down the street in Flint?

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Human productivity can never be cheaper than a CNC machine. That’s the biggest reason why US jobs disappeared, and Chinese jobs end up back as automated robotic output in the US.

      Blame China all you want, their jobs are now outsourced to Vietnam and Cambodia as we speak.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        +1, Panda.

      • 0 avatar
        fishiftstick

        The death of American manufacturing is greatly exaggerated, even invented. What has died is the job that allows you to graduate high school without any skills to speak of, and join the middle class as a high-wage factory worker.

        To sustain a high-wage low-skill work force, the products you make must be high value-added. Basic free-market economics (something Republicans used to be good at) say that as a product ages, the profit margin will decline.

        So yes, Jack, there is a correlation between the so-called “death of American manufacturing” and the replace-not-repair mentality. Only it has nothing to do with politics or policies: it’s just that these products don’t have the margin they used to.

      • 0 avatar

        CNC machining centers are poor examples of automation as they need highly skilled operators.

        It’s funny, I ordered a 3D printer from Prusa Research. Jo Prusa is part of the RepRap community of inventors trying to make self-replicating machines. Many of the parts of the Prusa i3 Mk2 printer are printed on i3 Mk2 printers, but all you need to do is watch one of Jo’s tutorial videos and you realize that the machines need humans to run them.

        We’ve heard stories of completely robotic factories that churn out products in darkness because robots don’t care how good the lighting is. All that machinery at the very least needs technicians to keep it running.

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatist

          CNC machining requires a small number of highly skilled people. Conventional machining required a larger number of skilled operators running full time and producing a limited number (hence high priced)of pieces.

          The couple of skilled operators on a CNC line produce many thousands of precision parts a day.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      What is your point?

    • 0 avatar

      While the U.S. is still one of the top manufacturing countries in terms of dollar value, high ticket Boeing aircraft and natural gas exports obscure the manufacturing job losses, many of which are due to productivity gains related to automation and computers.

      It will be interesting to see how lawyers and others who see themselves apart from the working class react when artificial intelligence and automation starts replacing them.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “It will be interesting to see how lawyers and others who see themselves apart from the working class react when artificial intelligence and automation starts replacing them.”

        THIS.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Ha, believe me they will prevent that from happening. Direct quote from an Of Counsel (lifetime lawyer): “attorneys are artists of the law”. He forget to add bullsh*t in front of artists but you get the drift. They will paint themselves exemptions through case law and lobby for legislation as such.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            As much as attorneys (and the legal system) is subject to scorn and ridicule, the last thing rational people would want is AI/algorithms to attempt to craft equitable solutions to many human-particular conditions and attempt to rectify such inequities.

            Shakespeare warned against the mob backlash against lawyers, but unfortunately, one of his most famous lines was grossly misinterpreted in popular culture:

            ‘Kill the Lawyers,’ A Line Misinterpreted

            Published: June 17, 1990

            In reference to the review of ”Guilty Conscience,” (May 20) Leah D. Frank is inaccurate when she states that when Shakespeare had one of his characters state ”Let’s kill all the lawyers,” it was the corrupt, unethical lawyers he was referring to. Shakespeare’s exact line ”The first thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers,” was stated by Dick the Butcher in ”Henry VI,” Part II, act IV, Scene II, Line 73. Dick the Butcher was a follower of the rebel Jack Cade, who thought that if he disturbed law and order, he could become king. Shakespeare meant it as a compliment to attorneys and judges who instill justice in society.”

            DEBBIE VOGEL

            Westbury

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            GREETINGS PROFESSOR FALKEN

            I HAVE DECIDED TO AWARD ALL YOUR BASES ARE BELONG TO THE PLAINTIFF.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            OK. That’s funny.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “It will be interesting to see how lawyers and others who see themselves apart from the working class react when artificial intelligence and automation starts replacing them.”

        Lawyers have been losing jobs to technology and offshoring since the mid-90s (although, as is the case with manufacturing, most of the jobs have been lost because of technological efficiency, not people in other countries).

        Instead of whining about technology or voting for orange con-artist clowns lawyers have mainly reacted by telling their kids not to be lawyers.

        http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/31/education/law-schools-applications-fall-as-costs-rise-and-jobs-are-cut.html

        The good jobs are not being “lawyers” or “MBAs” (that usually sucks unless you are very talented hustler), but instead being government parasites (cop, fire, teacher, administrator), who live off the private sector taxpayers and are hired in much larger quantities than needed and insulated from technological advances by their luddite unions.

        The one upside of Trump is that we will now likely have a Supreme Court ruling making public sector unions right work, after Scalia’s death unfortunately lead to a push on “Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association”.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          There are too many lawyers.

          Firms and corporations now utilize paralegals in ways that they would have never done so 20 years ago (or even 10)

          Soon, given clear trends, there will be an over-supply of physicians, given that med school applications and admissions are on the rise, as are foreign-born and educated (but licensed to practice in the U.S.) physicians in the U.S., and particularly, the loosening regulations on the ability of physicians assistants to provide treatment and care, and prescribe medications, that only physicians would be allowed to do just 5 years ago…

          …physicians assistants are going to be utilized by mega-care corporations (part of an increasingly concentrated oligarchy) to hold down or drive down physicians’ bargaining power, leverage and even possibly drive down physicians’ salaries, in the coming years.

          And automation is inevitably going to wipe out many medium and even high-skilled technical jobs in manufacturing, fabrication and even engineering and design vocations (as it already has wiped out a giant swath of low-skilled assembly positions).

          The biggest challenge the world faces from an economic perspective is ensuring that there will be enough jobs to pre ent all-out revolutions and serious and long-lasting civil strife in both emerging and developed nations as automation truly does replace large numbers of nearly every categories of workers, from those with technical skills to professionals and every classification in-between.

          China will be harder hit than most nations by the inevitable, rapid growth in increasingly sophisticated automation displacing human workers.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “physicians assistants are going to be utilized by mega-care corporations (part of an increasingly concentrated oligarchy) to hold down or drive down physicians’ bargaining power”

            This is already happening.

            “The biggest challenge the world faces from an economic perspective is ensuring that there will be enough jobs to pre ent all-out revolutions”

            Well said I couldn’t agree more. This is why mass deportation – far beyond what the President-elect has actually proposed – is necessary for the survival of the nation. Today’s cheap labor becomes tomorrow’s fifth column.

            “China will be harder hit than most nations by the inevitable, rapid growth”

            I predict China as a people will simply expand and spread out their excess population over Asia, The Americas, and Africa. Wherever their investments go, the Han Chinese will follow.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            We’re headed for such a massive train wreck in this country re healthcare (not to mention the economy in general, which again is being barely massaged enough to be shown as “growing” by understating inflation, overstating wage growth, underestimating benefit losses, and massively expanding private and public debt) that we’re literally going to have a crisis that will make 2008 look tepid by comparison.

            The worst part is that 99.4% of Americans have no clue as to how dire the situation is, as they somehow naively await upon republicans or democrats to somehow do something to fix the problem for American Families (rather than transfer even more wealth to big Health Insurance/Pharma).

            I post this as a die-hard independent, as the two-party political system in the U.S. is a literal failure of historic proportions, even as judged by a global perspective and over a century of time (it’s taken this long for both parties to help contribute to debt loads that are literally unplayable now absent hyperinflation or debt repudiation, aka defaulting on full faith and credit issuances):

            http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2017/01/trumpcare-obamacare-medicaid-medicare-and-the-veterans-administration.html

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Oh boy. Lucky all that Boy Scout popcorn I purchased from my son just got delivered.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    As always ,

    Entertaining, funny and informative too (?”pog” WTF?) .

    Since you’re both serious Drivers I don’t see why you couldn’t just double clutch it into first gear…..

    As a Journeyman Mechanic I too dislike the going away of both trade Schools and Dealers with any real Mechanics ~ Unit Parts changing is never the proper answer unless the old Unit is grenaded .

    Too bad I can’t post photos as I’m up to my eyeballs in a 57 year old low mileage engine that was very poorly ‘rebuilt’ just before being abandoned 3 years ago ~ I got it up and running quite well but it began to knock in 1,000 miles and upon teardown I’ve discovered multiple mistakes and some simple “duh, I have NO IDEA what I’m doing here “. issues….

    I once bought an S-10 with only 1,000 miles on it by mistake, it wouldn’t go into first gear and GM told me ‘ no parts available ‘ so I was forced to buy a two year old used one… Grrrrr.

    Any Tradesman worth their salt will usually make/repair things better than when it was made .

    Trusting your local Ford Dealer jack ? just wow .

    Truly, Albuquerque is a toilet bowl and it shouldn’t be as it’s in a physically nice place ~ i always enjoy my visits there .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Quick Double Nickel

      My dad, who has nearly 40 years experience in automotive service, tells me the same thing all the time. He’s rebuilt countless numbers of Muncies, T-5s, T-56s and he’s someone I’d classify more as a “mechanic” versus the more common term today of “technician”.

      He’s always telling me stories about how GM would rather the technician replace a part versus repair it. And it’s always big ticket items like an entire engine versus just replacing a bad rocker, or something like that. Maybe it just comes down to that those being trained for the job these days aren’t being trained to repair as much as they are being trained on how to appropriately replace a failed part. But paying a technician 20 hours to pull a motor and replace with a new one seems like a waist of money versus paying 2 hours to replace a failed rocker.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      “Since you’re both serious Drivers I don’t see why you couldn’t just double clutch it into first gear…..”

      I do that anyway. Maybe it’s the cold here, but I don’t expect first gear to be accessible without a double-clutch from any speed above 0. I’m not willing to apply the force to the shifter that it typically requires to put a manual into first while in motion without double-clutching.

      I’d leave it unless it’s so bad that it won’t even easily go into gear at rest, like how reverse sometimes takes an extra bump of the clutch to get it into a position where it will engage. But it is a great excuse to give the car the LSD it deserves.

      I couldn’t blame the manufacturer for a weak synchro on a used car. I’m not sure I’d even expect a dealer to repair it. It’s so easy to abuse those things.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      I don’t think it is a matter of trusting the local dealer, it is a warranty issue and your local indie isn’t approved to do the warranty repair.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Well ;
        .
        That’s certainly how it _should_ be, I’m of the age where ” Factory parts & Service is best ! ” was the by word but the blush went flying off that rose long before I worked in any Dealership….
        .
        I always enjoy reading any ‘ $tealer$hip ‘ stories because they ring so true .
        .
        -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Kmart is a cesspool, no matter what city it is located in. When the cashier at our local Kmart short-changed me and quickly walked away from the register (I busted her on it), that was the last time I set foot in that fluorescent-lit hellhole. It has now gone out of business, deservedly.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Yabbutt ;
        .
        Think of the myriad cultural/racist jokes they provide : Q ‘ know what the first words an (insert pejorative here) learns are ?’ .
        .
        A. : ‘ ATTENTION K-MART SHOPPERS ‘.
        .
        -Nate

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Oohh, look! Dog whistle politics and humble brags. Ummm, boring.

  • avatar
    ajla

    You gotta be rich to own a new car.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You gotta be rich to own *any car

      Fixed it.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        That works both ways.

        From a global perspective, if you own *any* car then you are by definition rich.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Yep. If you don’t have depreciation, you have maintenance expense. And you always have gas, insurance, registration, and parking (whether by having to pay for parking directly or by needing more space). By forcing almost all poor people in the USA to live places where they have to own cars to survive, we make them a lot poorer.

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          ” By forcing almost all poor people in the USA to live places where they have to own cars to survive, we make them a lot poorer.”
          .
          So then :
          .
          Suck it up buttercup, drive a beater and stop smoking/drinking (BIG $ savings here) and work your way out of the Ghetto .
          .
          It’s really not that difficult once you set your mind to it ~ I did it, Jack did it as have many others here .
          .
          If you want fine things and a fancy house, _WORK_ for them .
          .
          -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            tell that to a kid condemned to go through Detroit Public Schools. if “getting out of the ghetto” is so damn easy it can be explained with two sentences from some old white guy, a lot more people would be doing it. But it isn’t that easy.

            http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-things-nobody-tells-you-about-being-poor/

            http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21663262-why-low-income-americans-often-have-pay-more-its-expensive-be-poor

            and if we could ease off on the butt-kissing, that’d be great.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Choices. It all comes down to choices.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            “Suck it up buttercup, drive a beater and stop smoking/drinking (BIG $ savings here) and work your way out of the Ghetto .”

            That’s certainly a good first step. Another step they could take, as you lamented in your comment further down, is to be a dishonest mechanic. But that puts one in a spiritually bereft kind of hole, doesn’t it.

            And I’m not sure fine things and a fancy house are on their radar… more like clean water and a decent education.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Yep ;
            .
            I was very lucky to be educated in the late 50’s & early 60’s before the current privatization and trending away from the basics .
            .
            I didn’t always have clean water nor a dry/warm house to live in as a Child ~ my two dreams were to live in a warm & dry place and never go to bed hungry .
            .
            I have achieved this and I teach my ideas and methodology to unwanted mostly Black Foster boys, guess what ? the FWDC Dept. says if one out of _5_ makes it we’re way ahead .
            .
            I refuse to settle and we only loose one every few years, so far not one has died .
            .
            I find that being supportive of a Man who made the change from poverty dwelling drug dealer to responsible Citizen who shows others a way out , to be called ‘ butt kissing ‘ sad .
            .
            Those many who mostly kicked my lazy ass and occasionally gave me a helping hand were certainly not butt kissers ~ they knew that productive and happy Citizens co$t less in tax dollars over the long run .
            Less likely to encounter me in a bad mood with empty pockets and a gun in my hand too .
            .
            -Nate

  • avatar
    dougjp

    First-gear synchro and everything else related to the Mustang GT in the cold is worse. There’s pages in the Ford forums about that tranny and shifter. Ford won’t fix those either.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Welcome to the club – my 350Z is on tranny #2 due to crap synchros. The new (actually used but revised version) still grinds 3th and 5th – when cold. Luckily I live in FL so “cold” only lasts for about 2 miles. I’ve got synthetic Royal Purple in now but a custom Redline mix is recommended by techies on the Z sites. Other people on those forums blame the dual mass flywheel claiming its too heavy for weak synchros. Kind of interesting to share major drivetrain parts with the Pathfinder SUV. Never had this problem with my previous Hondas, those synchros were so good I could shift clutchless.

      • 0 avatar
        yamahog

        For a fella interested in the 370z, do you know if is it fair to say that the ‘synchrorev’ match does a good job of protecting the synchros / transmission from misuse?

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          Unless you’re double-clutching, rev-matching does not benefit the synchros. Any non-double-clutched high-rev downshifts are going to be hard on those. It would smooth things out for the rest of the drivetrain though.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Part of the reason I went with an automatic in mine. Test drove the manual three times, and just did not like it. Ford has no faith in their Chinese-made Getrag in the GT, which is why it’s not good enough for the Shelby. The Shelby gets a Tremec unit.

  • avatar
    AK

    I just wrapped up a year and a half filled with MANY god awful encounters with Ford service departments.

    The highlight was having the police called on me and subsequently being banned from the property that had possession of my car.

    Ford service is the best.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Jeezus, you need to tell us more.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      AK, agreed – you need to enlighten us.

      I despise Ford primarily because of my experiences with 5 separate Ford dealerships and Ford HQ NA when I was younger and foolish enough to purchase Ford vehicles (which puts me into conflict with the blue oval promoters on TTAC, many of whom write for TTAC, and many of whom probably – conjecture here – receive perks, remuneration or some tangible benefits to wave the Ford Fanboy Flag).

      Never. Purchase. Another. Ford. Or. Lincoln. Vehicle. Ever.

  • avatar
    carguy67

    Got some free time, so I’ve been watching the ‘Breaking Bad’ marathon. Sounds like the producers picked the perfect locale–Albuquerque–for the show.

  • avatar
    Snooder

    Question, in your dystopian vision of Alberquque, does it really matter much that the radio songs are mexican, and not, say, country songs.

    Cause it bears a high resemblance to the nightmare of shopping in a Walmart in East Texas that appears to have had Duck Dynasty ejaculated all over it. When some motherfucker actually gets away with licensing and selling Duck Dynasty themed camo lingerie (plus sized of course), that’s a sign of the goddamn endtimes. And that shit ain’t coming from our southern friends.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      In BaruthWorld, ‘Mexican’ is synonymous with ‘evil’. Also, ‘liberal’ is used to mean ‘anyone with an opinion different from my own, and therefore immoral, stupid and foreign’.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Do you happen to be reading from Rules for Radicals? Because that’s the definition I have seen expressed by leftists for years.

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          “does it really matter much that the radio songs are Mexican, and not, say, country songs.”
          .
          Actually, Albuquerque has a really good Oldies radio station, it has a strong signal so I was able to hear it all over The Navajo nation and into Colorado too…
          .
          It is a beautiful place but Jacks dead bang on, unless you’ve been there you cannot possibly imagine how the bad parts are .
          .
          -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Vogo – I thought you would have learnt not to take Jack on over topics like immigration and manufacturing after the last time you two tangled.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    If you want some internal documentation for that synchro, hit me up.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    As someone who deals with full scale, automated manufacturing once in a while. I’d have to say I trust a rebuild inside the factory way more than a mechanic in a shop who does it once every couple of months.

    A lot of steps in automated factory is done by computer, test by computer connected equipments, calibrated by computers, and human with hand tools just doesn’t have the consistency to do it right vs a factory that is already setup to do so.

    • 0 avatar
      yamahog

      Yeah, yeah we’ve all heard it before. But the choice isn’t always – ‘really great computer controlled factory’ vs ‘well-meaning guy who does it a few times per year’.

      1) If you buy a new transmission, it’s coming out of the same factory that did such a good job with the OG transmission.

      2) Some specialists are really, really good with their craft. A friend’s dad rebuilt the 350 in their family’s full size van in 1984-ish. The 350 he rebuilt keep better oil pressure at idle and through the rev range than the L99 my friend blew up.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “In fact, to paraphrase Orwell’s O’Brien, if you want an advance vision of *Mr. Trump’s privatized-school, screw-the-poor* American future, imagine the Wal-Mart in *Waxahachee, Alabama.* Half-empty shelves, everything with a value over $9.99 padlocked to the wall, people shopping barefoot, women dispassionately slapping each other in the plus-sized clothing area while their slack-jawed children stare at the floor, cashiers who can’t read the error messages on their own idiot-proof cash registers, and a nightmarish aural miasma of nine different *country music tunes* clashing with *Skynyrd* in the parking-lot-slash-town-square.”

    There, fixed it for you!

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      I’ve been to Wal-Marts in rural Alabama.

      What you describe isn’t the future, it’s the world we live in right now.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        I’m moving to Alabama. I’d advise some of you to get off your high horse and recall that while enlightend utopias like Ohio we’re building Chevy Vegas, Alabama was busy bolting together Saturn V rockets. YesWe got it…Wal Mart sucks no matter where you go.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          I hope Big Al will remember,
          Southern man don’t need him around, anyhow.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          You’re implying Alabama is, or has been, a sophisticated place because they bolted together Saturn V rockets 50 years ago?

          A couple of points:

          1. Those rockets were derivatives of weapons developed by Nazis and assembled by slave labor.

          2. Those same Nazis oversaw the Saturn V (among other) rocket programs.

          3. So the Alabamans bolting together Saturn Vs are analogous to the forced labor at Peenemunde/Nordhausen/Dora bolting together V2s – not a flattering comparison.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            that’s stretched way past the breaking point.

          • 0 avatar
            Flipper35

            You forgot designed by Chrysler Corporation.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            1. Distant ancestors, I’d have to dig through some old books I have but by Saturn V nearly all of the A4 technology was exhausted.

            2. True.

            3. Alabamans were paid and not assembling rockets during wartime conditions, so this is not accurate.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            #3 – how is it not flattering to be compared to Jews who were worked to death?

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            Let me be explicit since it’s obvious something was lost in translation:

            BAFM claims Alabama is not objectively worse than Ohio b/c Alabamans bolted together rockets while Ohioans bolted together Vegas. One could argue that he’s actually implying that Alabama is objectively better than Ohio – again, b/c they bolted together rockets, not Vegas.

            My claim is that the original rockets were bolted together by slave labor during WW2, or in other words, extremely poor circumstances.

            Thus, I refute BAFM’s claim that bolting together rockets in Alabama is a basis for claiming Alabama is a good place, perhaps a better place than Ohio, because rockets have been bolted together under conditions worse than what has existed, or that currently exist, in either Ohio or Alabama – despite what you imagine may be occurring within the Walmarts of those respective states.

            My point is that BAFM actually undermined his point with the evidence he chose to support it.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I thought the whole point was to prove which was worse: Lynyrd Skynyrd or unnamed music, presumably imported from Mexico on the wet backs of illegal immigrants.

            We can’t be a site about cars until we get this resolved, people. Jalopnik is laughing at us, and time is getting short.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      Mr Trump isn’t going to be able to create enough new jobs – he’s fighting automation. So he can try and lure jobs from elsewhere with a more favorable tax climate. With a high corporate tax compared to most of the first world, the US government often gets 35% of nothing – might be better to get 15% – 25% of something and get some jobs back as well.

      As for screwing the poor, I haven’t heard anything yet that beats Mr Obama’s open borders policy for doing that.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Don’t worry, you’re better than those people. I can tell.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I’m absolutely better.

        The aural miasma from me is Springsteen and Marvel superhero soundtracks. So there!

        (And that scene you describe at K-Mart pretty much describes ANY K-Mart…Sears as a whole is screwed.)

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          “Yes We got it…Wal Mart sucks no matter where you go.”.
          .
          Yes but the up side is : wally-marts can be very entertaining ! . if you’re bothered by the wallymartians cooties or general stench, just look up ‘ the peopleofwallmart.com ‘ for hours of fun .
          .
          A little fact check : President Obama (not my fav) has deported more illegals than any TWO gop Presidents combined .

          Let’s try to stick to facts as dog-whistle bullshit makes us True Conservatives look bad .
          .
          -Nate

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    If we are all going to see past the whole ‘dealership is trying to set you up for a future car theft’-thing, and just discuss manufacturing, OK, here my 2 cents;
    I’m all for ‘replacing the whole thing that is broken’ instead of trying to fix it , especially when it comes to modern complicated expensive stuf that is still under warranty. There are often a whole bunch of things that can go wrong with an engine or transmission, and often the problem you are trying to fix is either just the symptom of another problem, or it will be the cause of another problem down the line.
    This is especially true any place where metal bits that contact each other share the same oil as other metal bits that touch each other. If the synchro ring is worn, there are going to be metal particles in places where you don’t want them to be, and if they just change the worn ring and the oil, the odds of the transmission failing again later are not odds I would like to have as a dealership.
    The case would be even worse if it was a failing rocker assembly in any modern multicam motor.
    Secondly, changing the whole transmission takes less time, as the transmission is going to have to go in and out of the car anyway. And now the factory or dealership have all the time in the world to play with the old transmission trying to figure out what went wrong, or for a technician or mechanic to strip for parts so that in 32 years he can do shadetree repairs on some old Fiesta that you bought for sentimental reasons long after Ford stopped making parts for them.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave W

      Our ’11 Fiesta would not stay in reverse, A significant problem when backing up a snowy driveway is part of my winter life. The dealer took the car back “fixed” it in 3 days, next time I had to give it gas in reverse out it popped. I lobbied then for a new transmission figuring that Ford would want to look at our unit to see what went wrong. Instead they “fixed” it again, and again no backward go. The 3rd time in they admitted that being a new (to N.A.) product there were no manuals to spare, as the all production was being funneled to Mexico to build new cars. I mean it’s a new car, why do we need to keep replacement transmissions in stock yet? They wanted us to lemon law it, but said it would be a 6 month wait for another 5 speed Fiesta so we told them to fix it. We put lots of miles on the loaner Foci they gave us in the month it took for the new box to show up. No other problems with the car (84K later) It sometimes won’t go all the way into R on the first try, but once it’s truly into gear it stays there, no problems with any other gear.

  • avatar
    RRocket

    So the Vette is going to be a track-only toy? Never to be used on the street?

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Just curious, was the suggested transmission replacement going to be for a new transmission, or a “refurbished” (aka “used”) one?

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    That Firethorn is hawt!

  • avatar
    claytori

    Many years ago I did some off-road racing in 1200cc dune buggies. The series sponsor was a lubricant company called Molyslip (was Mr. Moly in the US)They gave our team a box with a number of their products. One of these was Molyslip G (for Gear). This is absolute magic in a manual gearbox, especially for the synchronizers. It only takes a small amount. The buggy had a VW bug transmission, on which virtually all had bad 2nd gear synchros. This one was extra bad. One ounce of this stuff and the synchro was smooth as silk. Magic. I still have about 2 ounces left of this stuff, saving for emergencies. I use it in the power steering system if they start to complain. The PS pump on my Saturn failed after 380,000 km, but only because the snap ring holding the end plate in rusted away. No wear, no seal leakage. I am still sold on the benefits of MoS2 (Molybdenum Disulphide). This product is still available, but the distribution is poor. There is a competing product called Liqui-Moly. This should fix your synchro problem. If not, you aren’t out much.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Funny, the going fix for reluctant syncros in freezing weather for the NC Miata is Motorcraft synth fluid.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      Motorcraft XT-M5-QS?

      • 0 avatar
        JuniperBug

        Probably. At least that’s what we NA/NB Miata cretins use. In my case, it made an already nice 65k mile shifter shift even a little better.

        Not knowing anything specific about Fords, though, reluctance to get into only first gear would have me double-checking the clutch cable or hydraulics to make sure the clutch was disengaging completely.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Changing the fluid is worth a try. IMO, it’s long overdue if you’re still on the factory fill.

    I like Redline manual transmission fluids, though it wasn’t successful for improving a weak synchro on an RX-8 last spring. Maybe an additive would help, or a different brand of fluid.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      you generally don’t want to change the viscosity of the fluid*, but different brands can have varying additives which might help cure a problem.

      * exception would be the MT-82 in the 2011 and 2012 Mustang; the factory fill was 75W-90 synthetic, and was changed to the dual-clutch transmission oil to cure hard shifting when cold. I had to have it done on mine and it made a world of difference.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      After my 3rd S1 gearbox in my RX-8, I installed an S2 and it was the best decision I’ve made with that car.

      For the S2 gearbox, I really like Motorcraft XT-M5-QS. I’ve read it’s also good in the S1 gearbox.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I would trust a shop that specialized in rebuilding manual transmissions. And, I assumed this story would be about the Corvette

  • avatar
    SirRaoulDuke

    Ah, Albuquerque: where people steal cars just to drive them into the desert and set them on fire, just for shits and giggles.

    Lucky for DG, that is a fine Corvette.

    On a side note, I read the article about the snow trip on summer tires. I once drove the soon-to-be ex’s Mustang GT on summer tires in a surprise snow squall (as in it was supposed to be warmer and raining that day). As soon as the snow hit I took her the Mazda and coxed the Mustang home, because there was no way she would have made it. I don’t think my asshole has ever been puckered that tight. It seemed like a one-millimeter change in throttle pressure instantly put the rear end into a slide.

  • avatar
    bluegoose

    She should record some video on her phone when it happens and show it to them. I think they are going to do what they can to kick the can down the road until its out of warranty.

    The last manual transmission I had on a car that detonated took almost two months to repair through a transmission repair specialist. I can understand why its easier to just swap out a transmission off the shelf. Especially at the dealership where most of the mechanics are part timers who don’t have the skill to do it.

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    ““Oh, look,” I laughed, “they called you ‘Chief’. That’s very respectful of your Native American ancestry.”

    When I saw the title of this post, my thoughts turned to “Get Smart.” Do Jack and DG resemble agent 86 and 99 in some way?

  • avatar

    Man… Jack… how did you get out of that first paragraph without also mentioning your Por-SHA or that you’ve owned super expensive Volkswagens?! The humbling bragging is really getting old.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Plural.

      Por-SHAs.

      I have more than one.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Interesting .
        .
        I see no ‘humble bragging’ here, I see :
        .
        I came, I saw, I wanted, I have .
        .
        Nothing humble, just enjoying the fruits of hard labor .
        .
        Jack has said repeatedly ‘ I like style and what I like’ (paraphrased) .
        .
        It ain’t me but it’s nothing to be ashamed of either .
        .
        -Nate

  • avatar
    mtmmo

    “Your wife is no Sacagawea. I knew Sacagawea.”

    – Senator Elizabeth Pocahontas Warren

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Thank God TTAC exists to provide a forum for mtmmo to attack a woman in power, specifically the one who has done the most to protect poor and middle income Americans from corporate usury. No irony here.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        I saw the comment last night while I was taking a break from studying. It’s not my favorite, but it’s pretty benign. At least he worked the article’s material into his ridiculous comment. I won’t get into the “Is Elizabeth Warren Native American” debate though.

        • 0 avatar
          mtmmo

          The only thing that’s ridiculous is that you even commented. As far as my comment not being your ‘favorite’ send me the ‘Adam Tonge Favorite Commenting’ guide and I’ll see what I can do. In the meantime perhaps you and vogo can upgrade to a bigger safe space.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            It made me laugh. I’ll give it that.

            I don’t care about the politics either way. I’m not a fan of Elizabeth Warren or Donald Trump. I don’t need a safe space either.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            I think my favorite comment of yours is when you suggested that we were filtering out Pro-Trump comments. Since I’ve been here, very few comments have been flagged (single digits). None of them had anything to do with Donald Trump.

            I haven’t censored anything from either side. I can promise you that.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Senator Pocahontas can feel free to stroke out at any time.

        Wait, that’s an insult to Pocahontas. What would the senator’s Native American name be… perhaps Old Lying Sorner?

        mentalfloss.com/article/61819/42-old-english-insults

        • 0 avatar
          mtmmo

          What a great list. Given my recent experience above CUMBERWORLD comes to mind.

          5. CUMBERWORLD
          Also called a cumberground—someone who is so useless, they just serve to take up space.

          Shakespeare would approve.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            A lot of hate for a female senator and founder of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. I wonder why. It surely can’t be because the big banks she has been bringing to heal are funding the alt right brainwashing. That surely can’t be why.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The same ones who funded the Wicked Witch and the kindergartner with three weeks to go?

            Say it ain’t so.

            http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2016/mar/07/hillary-clinton/hillary-clinton-barack-obama-set-new-wall-street-f/

            https://www.opensecrets.org/pres08/contrib.php?cid=N00009638

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Kindergartner? Was ‘boy’ too obviously racist?

            That doesn’t make you look good, man.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Nice ignoring of funding facts.

            Lately I’ve been going with clown, but today’s antics were those of a kindergartner in need of a time out.

            I also read another one recently which I liked which sums up the past eight years: Obortion.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            28CL,
            It’s as if we see completely different worlds. I see an economy that is the longest growing in economic history, with unemployment at 4.6%, the stock market breaking new records every day and minimal inflation.

            90% of our troops are home from Iraq and Afghanistan. Almost no terrorist attacks on our soil, except by the Dylan Roots of the world. Real progress in righting income inequality, climate change and threats from rogue nations.

            This is exactly the state that every Republican has promised in every election, and yet nearly half the country sees it as an ‘Obortion’. Strange days, indeed.

            Well, you wanted change from an outsider; let’s see how that works for you.

            And it’s not that I ignored the funding facts, it’s that they aren’t relevant to the original insults to our senator – not that that was relevant either. I just wondered why it is so very important to the alt right to insult Senator Warren on a site about cars. Don’t you?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            VoGo:

            To be fair, the picture you paint has largely left behind the swath of the country that 28 lives in. Coastal cities, the richer parts of the South, and the mountain West are going gangbusters while the Rust Belt (where he lives) and the poorer parts of the South tread water at best.

            28:

            I think you are falling into the trap of blaming Obama for “anything that happened in the past 8 years that I didn’t like.” What did he do — he, specifically, not Congress or the Supreme Court or state/local governments or larger economic forces — that makes the last 8 years an “Obortion?”

            Most of the things that have gone wrong in the past 8 years, especially domestically, I would lay at the feet of state governments, with Congress playing a supporting role. The reason is that most of what has gone wrong in the last 8 years is due to tax and fiscal policy at both the state and federal levels (with state being worst). It has hammered the working class relentlessly, almost entirely due to decisions at the state level. Federal policy has mostly hurt the upper middle class. Both have let the very rich (top 0.1%) skate. The thing is that Obama (or Trump, in a couple weeks) has very little ability to influence any of that.

            Of course you may have a different view about why Obama is bad but it should focus on what he did.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m on the fence for positive change coming, it would be welcome but is not expected. What I expect is:

            -A winding down of Pentagon war theatre in Ukraine but possibly expanding the one in Syria under the cover of ISIS which I now expect the CIA/Mossad/Saudis/Qataris to stop backing. Something may be negotiated with Moscow to allow for the Saudi/Qatari natural gas pipeline to be constructed and Assad remain in power. Maybe. It depends on what Trump offers for Gazprom to give up its monopoly.

            -Some kind of renegotiation of some trade treaties and some sort of tariff or VAT be placed on imports.

            -Some amount of jobs to be created as has already started but how many and of what quality remains to be seen. We already know job creation 2009-15 was of poor quality part time jobs.

            -Token deportations but not nearly the scale which is needed.

            -Increased respect and fear from the world, possibly due to the expected “madman” policy of Trump against ISIS (Think Nixon/Operation Linebacker 1972).

            -Some kind of token wall be created.

            -In order to placate the Pentagon/MIC, look for a possible cold war to be developed in Asia most likely with PRC. This assumes Trump and Putin become allies over ISIS, and if so, I predict Russia will try to play a more neutral third wheel in a US-Soviet-China relationship as opposed to a real ally. I’m also weary of the Golitsyn Thesis in this scenario as the US/Israeli/Saudi/Qatari backed ISIS is just too good of a “common enemy” of Moscow and DC.

            -Le Pen to win “election” in France and the EU be dismantled during the Trump administration (thank God).

            -Trump will find opposition from Rs to his grand debt fueled infrastructure plan, but something will be worked out.

            -The regions of the Clinton Archipelago will double down on their Bolshevist ideas, but the effort will fail and simply draw them further away from the centrist nature of Trump’s rule in isolation. This will further foment the eventual planned dissolution of the Republic (whether Trump is even aware of these plans or is part of them I do not know).

            -Barring either unexpected failure of these policies or other unforeseen events, Trump will easily be reelected but he will resign about halfway through his second term. Watch to see if Pence stays on the ticket for 2020.

            “Almost no terrorist attacks on our soil, except by the Dylan Roots of the world.”

            Boston Bombing.
            San Bernardino Attack.
            Ft Hood 2009 and 2014.
            Austin IRS attack 2010.
            Giffords Shooting/Roll Assassination.
            Sandy Hook.
            Chattanooga Navy Base Attack 2015.
            Oklahoma City Beheading.
            Orlando Attack.
            Dallas Sniper Attack.
            NYC Bombs Sept 2016.
            OSU Attack Nov 2016.

            They are all in this handy list:

            http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/terrorism/wrjp255a.html

            “with unemployment at 4.6%, the stock market breaking new records every day ”

            “Real progress in righting income inequality, climate change and threats from rogue nations.”

            The Bernanke/Yellen asset bubble is what exacerbated “income inequality” and rapidly accelerated inflation of real assets. BLS unemployment figures are fiction and have been for some time, U-6 puts unemployment at 9.7% in June.

            http://www.cnbc.com/2016/06/03/charts-whats-the-real-unemployment-rate.html

            If people wanted to get serious about climate change, they would embark on a campaign to rapidly reduce the population of the third world, not invite them in for dinner.

            The threatening rogue nation has been this one from 2001-2016.

            Peace.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Dal’s insular elitism is showing, and he is insufferably obnoxious at present, when he makes statements (which are really deep digs towards at least 70% of Americans) such as this gem:

            “To be fair, the picture you paint has largely left behind the swath of the country that 28 lives in. Coastal cities, the richer parts of the South, and the mountain West are going gangbusters while the Rust Belt (where he lives) and the poorer parts of the South tread water at best.”

            For the record, I’m pretty “privileged” economically, partly due to my parents, partly due to hard work, and partly due to pure luck, and as a resident of Michigan, aka a slice of the geographic “rust belt” Dal correspondingly ridicules, I can affirmatively state that Michigan is roaring economically, and the state still voted for Trump over Clinton (though I voted for neither, and despise both).

            Dal is part of the insular bubble crowd of the type that Anthony Bourdain intelligently described Bill Maher as in his excellent interview with Reason Magazine.

            Dal stealthily insinuates that economic desperation is nearly the sole reason that Trump essentially rolled over Hillary Clinton in essentially 86% of the geographic territory of the United States (and corresponding electoral college), which is a smug and erroneous notion.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            p.s. – The ultimate irony in the statements Dal makes, which are the byproduct of ignorance about loving standards outside of areas like Seattle and its outer ring, where he lives, is that many of the people living in high-cost of housing (and everything else) markets such as Seattle-San Francisco-San-Diego-Philadelphia-Boston-New York City-Miami coastal areas, have an inferior quality of life, with more stress, less recreational time, etc., than those of us living in areas such as suburbs of Detroit (such as Lansing or Troy or Rochester Hills or Northville) or Cincinnati, Ohio, Nashville, Tennessee, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Atlanta, Georgia, Cleveland, etc.

            I’ve rarely seen more stressed-out, unhappy, miserable people than in New York City (particularly in the dense, vertical areas), Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami (it’s really a miserable place; three of my uncles, one of whom is a major real estate developer, live there), and other major hubs. Seattle may not quality as quite so unhappy, but I have in-law family there, too, and the Seattle “freeze” is a real thing, as far as I can tell, and the cost of living in Seattle, Bellevue, and similar areas is crazy, with not exactly commensurate benefits for the price tag.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            DeadWeight, no ridicule intended toward anyone, just a statement of fact. If anything, I was trying to be sympathetic to why VoGo’s description of the US economy, basically accurate as a whole, might seem odd to someone in 28’s position.

            Gains have not been evenly distributed at all and the lion’s share by far has gone to places like the one where I live (btw, in the City of Seattle now). I’m glad to hear that things are going well where you are. I’m sure I’m oversimplifying when I make statements about the whole “Rust Belt.” But, as a whole, the area took longer to recover from the recession and has grown far less since the lowest point.

            There is a pretty stark inverse correlation between Trump votes and local economic performance, which holds in every part of the country except for the Deep South, where race is a better predictor of vote than economics. If there was one thing both sides agreed on, it was that Hillary represented status quo — the sharp disagreement was whether status quo was a good or bad thing.

            Edit: One more thing. I couldn’t live in New York. (Well, unless I were ludicrously wealthy.) The place is a pain in the ass. The reason isn’t really density, though; it’s a bunch of factors that have more to do with local culture. The most pleasant place I’ve ever lived, which is the City of Geneva, Switzerland, is also the densest.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Happy New Year!

            Genève is a beautiful but strange place, I do recommend everyone at least visit if they ever have the opportunity.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Elizabeth Warren was my professor (for bankruptcy class) and reading group leader in law school, so I have a different perspective on her.

          As a professor, she was the best I had during either college or law school, and it wasn’t close. (Although she was more than a bit of a hardass and lots of people can tell stories of getting reamed for lack of preparation for class.)

          As a reading group leader, she was warm, personally involved, and very insightful. Her reading group material focused on the treatment of debtors throughout American history. The reading group illuminated the development the bankruptcy process and the contrast between the unforgiving moral opinions we have of debtors and the recognition we’ve gone through that throwing the legal book at them just doesn’t work for the economy as a whole.

          In her capacity as a senator, I’ve been pleased by her continued focus on financial abuse of the working class, which I’d think would be an issue that the populists in the Trump coalition could get behind. At best, banks have been taking advantage of information asymmetry and transaction costs of changing to extract bigger rents from the poor than they do from others. At worst, some of them have been committing outright fraud on their poorer customers.

          She has occasionally fallen into demagoguery on other issues that she doesn’t know as well, but she really is a force for good in the areas she knows.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thanks for the “insider” view.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            @dal20402 – thanks for the insights.

            I’m among those who respect Elizabeth Warren, and regardless of any controversy surrounding her heritage, I know she’s working for the average person.

            I particularly liked the way she went after Wells Fargo for their opening scam accounts in their customers’ names. Even though the idea stemmed from John Stumpf, the CEO, his act of personal responsibility was to blame and fire 5,000+ low level employees. Elizabeth Warren held him accountable and managed to get him to step down.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I missed all this before.

          @Dal

          Actually this overall region has grown economically since about 2006/7 with perhaps a year or two of less than avg growth in the period but mostly consistent in the positive direction. However what has been happening is outside of IT/medical/gov’t (which have grown) job quality has been in decline which I think is reflective of most of the nation (although other regions may have had industries which have shown positive growth other than those three). Now if you go outside of the tri-state area, job growth is virtually non-existent.

          I’d rather not hash out everything of the past eight years, my view is we had a moron as CIC which Obama was supposed to be the antidote too, and he proved to be just the opposite. In addition to continuing on a wrong path (debt, domestic spying, etc), his administration started whole new wars, his domestic policies were wrong almost every time, he divided the country deeper than his predecessor did (to the point where a complete unknown was preferable to whom he sort of endorsed), and his level of arrogance literally insulted my intelligence.

          The results of the election are as much a rejection of this man, and not only the Democratic presidential candidate, as his 2008 victory was the rejection of his Republican predecessor. My hope is for him to fade into obscurity like Carter but I suspect he won’t be shutting his mouth on anything, which will only serve to fuel his opponents further than to allow them to be receptive to a new leader/candidate in 2020. Maybe he will recognize how divisive he is and for the good of his party enjoy a retirement, although I sincerely doubt it.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        She’s a congenital liar, she’s a racist, and she’s a piece of human garbage.

        If you knew any actual Native Americans, you’d be disgusted by her.

        My wife refused to take scholarships for Native Americans, even though she qualified, because she didn’t want to take a spot from someone who was trying to escape the reservation. And Lia-watha there decided to MAKE SHIT UP so she could get into a school for which she wasn’t qualified.

        Fuck her.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Your facts are wrong. I’d say you’re the one that’s MAKING SHIT UP, but, really, you’re just regurgitating stuff from others who are.

          Warren applied as white to college at U of H, to law school at Rutgers Law, and for her first faculty position at UT. The first time she made the claim was AFTER she was already a professor at UT, and she didn’t make it in any job or grant applications — just in a directory of professors. Conservative professor Charles Fried confirms that it was not a factor in her hiring at Harvard Law.

          It’s fair game to criticize her for listing herself that way in the directory, but she got no apparent benefit from it. Harvard Law, on the other hand, did try to milk it for publicity benefit after she was already a tenured professor there.

          The full story with correct facts is here: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2012/05/is-elizabeth-warren-native-american-or-what/257415/

          Also, it’s quite an assertion to say without any evidence that she “wasn’t qualified” for any school, whether as a student or as faculty. She’s been a straight-A student her entire life, and if you even sat in on a single class with her you’d see that’s inevitable given her personality. Or you could see the same thing by reading any example of her scholarship. If there’s one thing she is, it’s studious and prepared.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            I liked some of my professors too.

            But they never claimed Native American ancestry that they hadn’t earned.

            All that Atlantic article shows is that Ms. Warren claims to be white when it suits her and she claims to be Native American when it suits her. Disgusting.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Suit yourself, but be aware that pretty much all of those who know her personally, including those who disagree vehemently with her politics, have a different opinion of her character than the people who learned what they know about her from Breitbart.

          • 0 avatar

            Just wondering, do you hold Thomas Sowell in the same respect you accord to Sen. Warren?

          • 0 avatar

            “Suit yourself, but be aware that pretty much all of those who know him personally, including those who disagree vehemently with his politics, have a different opinion of his character than the people who learned what they know about Mr. Trump from the Huffington Post.”

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Ronnie:

            1) I don’t know; I’ve never met Prof. Sowell. I have no beef with him, though, other than the obvious ideological disagreement. A better example might be John Yoo, whom I’ve also never met, but who is beloved by his students at the same time he’s excoriated and vilified by the left in general for writing the “torture memos.”

            2) Lots of people who have worked with Mr. Trump have complained of his poor character, including suppliers he stiffed and customers he cheated. There are also plenty out there who praise him, but opinion is divided at best. You won’t find former students out there making the same kinds of personal criticism toward Elizabeth Warren. Even the conservative ones tend to love her at the same time they argue with her over politics and ideology.

          • 0 avatar
            mtmmo

            I remember a few years ago the NYT called out Senator Pocahontas for lying about auto dealer markups. Senator Pocahontas tried citing a flawed study that claimed auto dealer markups cost consumers $26 Billion a year. Problem is the study only collected data on subprime auto loans which at the time only accounted for 1/5 of the market. When pressed by the NYT Senator Pocahontas finally admitted the data didn’t support her ‘All auto dealers rip off the public through mark-ups’ narrative. Senator Pocahontas is a lying parasite.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Thank you, Jack, for suggesting to others the New Years resolution to ‘Take a moment to consider the value of someone else’s opinion’.

          It’s always refreshing to read the moral teachings of a drug dealer.

      • 0 avatar

        VoGo,

        If it wasn’t for spurious accusations of racism and sexism, you’d have nothing.

        • 0 avatar
          mtmmo

          Bingo.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Ronnie,
          If it weren’t for your attacks on me, you’d have a 3D Picture of Cars website (i.e., nothing).

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Vogo, you seem to have neatly ignored in yourist the Muslim terrorist attacks. Funny you only specified one and that was a white supremist – seems you do pick only examples that suit your world view.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Mike,
            Please name the last time a terrorist organization from outside the US planned and executed an attack on US soil.

            All I’m saying is that it’s been a while. Unlike under W.

            I picked a white supremacist because the vast majority of terrorizing murders in the US are by white Christians. That’s not to say that I believe that radical Christians are all terrorists, only to state the facts.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            I agree a named organisation has not attacked the US, just that your one example fits your world view. Whereas there are more numerous examples of radical Muslim attacks and Muslims make up just 1% if the population. Whereas Christians make up a much greater percentage of the population. Wouldn’t you say that was disproportionate?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Mike,
            What is disproportionate is the media attention to the few attacks by Muslims, vs. the reality that the vast majority of attacks on Americans are by Christians.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Vogo – you brought up terrorist attacks, so can we just keep on that without you clouding the issue. Do you agree that over the past 8 years (using your time period) that the majority of terrorist attacks the involved people dying involved Muslims. Would you also agree that there are c. 50 times as many Christians than Muslims?
            Both of these are facts as far as I am aware, unless you can show otherwise, so it is therefore fair to say that terrorists in the US are disproportionately Muslim. This is not to say alluslims are terrorists any more than all Christians are completely law abiding.
            Let’s leave out other crimes like assault etc as they are not terrorism in the usually accepted definition.

          • 0 avatar

            VoGo,

            You can mock me all that you want, it’s a free country.

            You can accuse me of being an accessory to Jew-hatred because I less than enthusiastically voted for a guy who, oh by the way happens to have Jewish grandkids, but you’re the guy who does the bidding of George Soros, a chancre of a human being who helped Nazis hunt down Jews. I’m pretty sure which one of us would be on the Judenrat and which one would be with the Bielski brothers. You play the “shande fun de goyim” card, this is what you get, paskudnyak.

            If I’m such a loser and you’re oh so successful in life, what are you doing punching down?

            Go ahead, make fun of Cars In Depth. The site is modestly profitable and it’s still the largest archive of 3D photos and videos of cars anywhere. As a result the makers of the Vuze VR camera that’s being released in the spring are sending me an early production sample to be a content partner.

            I have a full life. I have many interests. I’m part of a faith community. I go hear live music a couple of times a week. I like technology, the human pageant, and I can discuss sports at a bar without sounding like an idiot.

            Depending on the day there are three or four different things that I could be doing to make money, which keeps things from getting boring. The work that I do in all of those things is regarded as generally high quality, if not always delivered on time.

            I have three children and three grandchildren whom I love, my siblings, whom I also love, are all alive, as is my 92 year old mother, whom I also love. We’ve all had tragedies, my sister lost a child, my other sister is a widow as is my mom, and I’m divorced, but I believe very strongly in seizing whatever joy you can wring out of life because God knows we’ll get plenty of grief.

            I don’t have a huge number of friends, but the ones I have are well worth having and are capable of calling me out on my BS.

            As far as my writing goes, my colleagues and plenty of my readers respect my work. So far I’ve written for pay for about a half dozen publications and in all of those cases the publisher asked me to contribute or I was suggested by a colleague. I get McLarens to drive so I must be doing something correctly.

            I’m not the world’s best embroidery digitizer, and not all of my work is perfect, but I (with the help of some software and a commercial embroidery machine, and the good Lord above) generally impress my customers. Most return for more work, though I recently lost a customer. She retired and is closing her Judaica shop.

            I just applied for my second patent, this one for an truly electric harmonica, the Harmonicaster (TM). When I have delusions of grandeur I see myself as the Leo Fender of the harmonica – not the Les Paul. Les was one of the best guitarists ever. Leo couldn’t play. I make some noise in key but I know a bunch of people who can really play. Along with a number of local musicians, a couple of world-class harmonica players, Peter “Madcat” Ruth, and Jason Ricci, have played the first prototype and have been very encouraging. The folks at Seydel harmonicas, the oldest harmonica company in the world, think it’s a cool enough idea that they’re working with me, as is Jeff Lace, at Lace Music, the guitar pickup company in California. They make Eric Clapton’s pickups. For the past two years I’ve been working with a couple of designers at a 3D print shop to turn my fully functioning but crude looking original prototype into something that looks like it came out of a factory. The last prints worked but needed revisions. We’re close enough that I believe the next print will be production ready. That’s why I ordered a 3D printer from Jo Prusa in the Czech Republic. Knowing how to use embroidery software is a bit of a help learning how to use the slicing software the generates G-code for the printer. You do know what G-code is, don’t you?

            At the advice of the guy behind the BeatBuddy drum machine in a pedal, who thinks the Harmonicaster is an “awesome invention”, I’m going to set up a crowdfunding page, likely at Indiegogo, to raise enough money to be able to buy parts in quantity, get a booth at the summer NAMM show in Nashville, and put on a presentation at the big harmonica convention in August. It might be a big deal, it could be nothing, but at least I can say that took it as far as I could.

            Like I said, my life is full. I have my complaints, but it doesn’t earn me a dime to share them with others.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    The US continues to hover at all-time high exports, and that’s just a fact. They aren’t all agricultural or petroleum based either. I’m impressed that the rest of the board promptly called Jack on that.

    As to Jack’s fairly clumsy trolling about Albuquerque, New Mexico, I admit my experience is limited. I also have to admit there’s a grain of truth to that. The place has something like 8 X the number of police shootings as New York City. It’s a good bet that the 10 o clock news tops whatever police show you saw earlier that evening; truly bizarre stuff, like someone hijacking a school bus and then careening down the wrong side of I-40, or maybe a bunch of people piling into a car and driving to Canada to try and murder Justin Bieber for some reason.

    As Jack well knows, the state has redeeming features, such as: Athabaskan Babes. Try finding those in Ohio.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I irony is if the work had been done here in New Mexico there is a high probability it would have been signed: “Sorry about that, Boss.”

  • avatar
    -Nate

    RE : Ed-U-Ma-KASHUN :
    .
    I never graduated High School even though I’m pretty sure it was a good curriculum .
    .
    My Son went to a High School with a greater than 50 % dropout rate so I set him down and explained he’d best toughen up and make the best of every and any education opportunities he encountered .
    .
    He managed a 4.0 GPA all the way through and for two years of College before dropping out and becoming a Journeyman Mechanic like me (GAH !) .
    My point is : getting a decent Education is paramount of you want to go places in life . if one isn’t offered YOU MUST CHOOSE TO MAKE IT HAPPEN
    .
    Kind of a hot button topic for me
    obviously .
    .
    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      what “choices” do you expect a third grader with (maybe) one parent in a decrepit inner-city school system to have? You’re doing the usual “old white guy” thing of 1) pretending you worked harder for what you have than you actually did, and 2) pretending everyone else on the planet has the same options and opportunities. neither are true.

      • 0 avatar
        mtmmo

        Overt racism being espoused by you. So ugly and pathetic.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          MTMMO,
          Thank you for your leadership on things ugly and pathetic.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Let me help you clarify that, mtmmo, because it’s pretty muddled.

          Complaining about *words* that often get said by old white guys is not racism.

          Complaining about what you see as inherent characteristics of white guys is probably racism.

          JimZ did one of those things and not the other.

          (And Nate’s message isn’t exactly wrong, but fails to take into account some of the circumstances, including the usual absence of a parental figure as generous as he is with time and emotion.)

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Fair enough Jim ;
            .
            FWIW, my Father bugged out pretty early on and I left home by age 8, no pity party for me please ~ I was *very* lucky indeed to make it out alive much less to where I am to – day .
            .
            Until I see kids walking with cardboard in their shoes and digging sewer ditches by hand, in January in Rural New England I’ll happily keep thinking I worked my ass off thankyouverymuch .
            .
            I am keenly aware that I benefited greatly from white privilege, no doubt about that .
            .
            Doesn’t make it O.K. for anyone to do the random stupid shit I see kids doing every damn day in the ghetto and then being not held accountable “because they’re Black you see Nate ?” .

            .
            I apply my same rules to my Teenage Foster boys that I did to my Son and yes, they all whine and cry ” but everyone else…” just like he did but those who stay with us and follow my iron clad rules also come back years later and say ” thank you for standing firm ” .
            .
            YMMV, I obviously don’t know even 1/10th of the answers but the basics are always good to fall back upon IMO .
            .
            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            mtmmo

            “Old white guys”

            That’s prejudice and prejudice fuels racism. I’m not surprised you wouldn’t comprehend given your stated education.

            Full disclosure: Though I received my MBA from Columbia I still know racism when I read it.

            Your comment “Nate’s message isn’t exactly wrong” is feeble. There’s nothing wrong with Nate’s post only your interpretation of it.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            mtmmo,
            So that MBA taught you how to wad up your pants in a bunch and shove them up your ass?

            Money well spent.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          boo-f***ing-hoo.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Jack, if it makes you feel any better, should you ever decide to purchase a Viper and should that Viper develop synchro issues, the appropriate service procedure is to replace the synchros the way Click and Clack intended.

  • avatar
    prj3ctm4yh3m

    Re Fiesta synchros…it may just be the shafts dont line up quite right. Shift to second and then back to first and i bet it goes in everytime.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Ford’s always had problems with things as basic as getting synchros to engage properly on their manual transmission equipped vehicles; it was this way with an early 90’s Mustang LX 5.0 I owned and it’s still the case with modern Ford’s so equipped.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    FWIW ;
    .
    Life is pretty dang good in Los Angeles and remember please : I live in the Ghetto part of it.
    .
    Our economy is robust, the only businesses that have left were the ones that didn’t want to pay reasonable taxes or decent wages so they’re not missed by anyone who actually _lives_here_ .
    .
    I’ve been to Seattle, S.F. , Boise and so on, I won’t belabor the few Cities/Towns anywhere in America that really are miserable places to live because it’s the _Individual’s_ choice to be happy or a miserable complaining sonofabitch .
    .
    -Nate

  • avatar
    hotdog453

    As a Columbus resident who has seen the blue Fiesta zipping around around Sawmill, I look forward to possibly seeing the old Corvette as well.

    I have very low goals in life, so seeing a car I’ve seen on Youtube in real life counts as an accomplishment.

    #LowExpectations

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