By on October 12, 2016

Ally Contract Marketing Website

I’ve always been suspicious of the word “ally.”

As a child, reading John Toland and William Shirer when most of my classmates were still sounding out words one syllable at a time, I didn’t much care for the Allies. Instead, I rather approved of the Axis powers — minus that treacherous Stalin, mind you. Save your disapproval. The rest of America must have secretly felt the same way or else we wouldn’t have surrendered our vehicle-manufacturing capabilities to Germany and Japan. Indeed, I think that President Bush made a mistake talking about the “Axis Of Evil.” First off, that sounds like a really bad-ass metal band. Second, it implies that the countries involved might eventually create reissues of the Messerschmitt Me262 Sturmvogel, which would be enough to sway any man with functioning testicles to their cause.

But “Ally” is also a euphemism for GMAC, the company that sucked up $17 billion worth of taxpayer money so it could offer 0-percent financing on Chinese-made Buick Envision SUVs. And since the nice people at Ally learned precisely nothing from that bailout, the same way your neighbor’s kid Chadwick learned precisely the wrong lesson from his parents’ decision to replace his 2014 Mercedes-Benz SLK 250 with a 2016 Mercedes-Benz SL 550 after Chadwick tripped out on Ecstasy and barrel-rolled said SLK into a kindergarten schoolyard, Ally busies itself offering all sorts of additional financial “products” via direct mail to all sorts of people.

I’m one of those people.

Ally wants to cover my 2014 Accord V6 (did you know I had one?) with a special service contract. Who’s the bigger fool here: Ally, for offering me a contract, or me, for considering it?

Ally sent me a piece of direct mail that asked me to assess my needs for protection. You can take this test a bunch of different ways; like a Choose Your Own Adventure book from the ’80s, most of the paths lead to the same conclusion, and that conclusion is to give Ally a chance.

If you want to give Ally a chance, you won’t find any way to do it on that web page; it wants you to see a “qualified dealer.” Presumably this is part of Ally’s agreement with its dealer base. Luckily for me, there’s a nearly identical Ally site that’ll let me buy protection direct. But how much protection should I buy? Right now, my Accord has been in service for 32 months and 40,000 miles. I decided to extend my protection to what I would have gotten had I purchased a Hyundai: 60 months and 60,000 miles.

The Ally site claims that it will quote you without a VIN, but it refuses to admit the existence of any Accord besides the Hybrid unless you plug in a VIN. I put in the VIN of the non-metallic black 2014 manual V6 coupe that I would have purchased had I not bought my “Modern Steel” coupe. This is what I got.

Choose Your Coverage Ally Quote Calculator

Twenty-four hundred bucks — or, as the site helpfully tells me, just $112.05 a month. What do I get for that money? I get sixty K’s worth of coverage for all items great (the engine) and small (the radio). But the devil is in the details:

Ally Service Contract Exclusions

The list is too big to fit on the screen of my 17-inch laptop, but here are some of the highlights:

  • Correction of noises/odors/squeaks/rattles: This is fair. It’s not really an extended bumper-to-bumper warranty, and even some manufacturers have a fixed period of time beyond which they won’t fix minor issues such as these.
  • Hoses of all kinds: If your radiator hose lets go, that’s a shame.
  • Shock absorbers and cross members: I don’t think this would have surprised anybody 20 years ago. Today, those items are expected to last 100,000 miles.
  • Chassis frame, sheet metal, hinges, rust: This is not a body warranty. I think it would be courageous and fascinating for Ally to warranty a Honda against rust, and possibly suicidal for them to warranty a Mazda against rust.
  • Convertible and vinyl tops: This one caused me to raise my eyebrows a bit, because I can see some owners of “hardtop” convertibles like the Benz SL or Miata PRHT being blindsided by this down the road.
  • Every possible wear or service item: This, on something that bills itself as a “service contract.” Don’t sleep on this, as the kids say, because it could easily include something like an alternator.

As has been the case since time immemorial, and discounting various stunts by people who purchase warranties on hood-rich shitty used exotics with questionable or nonexistent histories, these extended agreements/service contracts/whatevers are best considered as a way to fix certain costs ahead of time, with the understanding that in doing so one stands a very good chance of spending more money than one would have otherwise. It’s possible to swap a junkyard V6 into an eight-year-old Accord for about $4,000. If you want to spend $2,400 against the chance of that $4,000, then I don’t think I would call you a fool for doing so.

As a Ford salesman, I rarely pushed the Ford ESP plan, even though it’s actually very good and it will dramatically reduce your cost of ownership for an even moderately troublesome car. The exception to this rule of mine was when I had customers who were clearly at the very edge of their financial ability to own the car they were purchasing. I explained to them that if they were struggling to make a $475 payment (or whatever) right now on a car with no problems, they’d have a much harder time making that payment and replacing a transmission at the same time. Few of them took my advice. Human beings are always unreasonably optimistic about the future. Were that not the case, nobody would ride a motorcycle or date Taylor Swift.

I’m not going to buy the Ally contract on my Honda. I do, however, think that it’s worth consideration. The only fly in the ointment is that Ally might not be around long enough to honor the contract if you need it. Maybe that’s pessimism on my part. After all, history has shown us that Ally is “too big to fail” and “too big to jail.” But I also remember that “new GM” didn’t have to pay the “old GM” debts. So maybe if you decide to get a service contact for your car, you should consider finding a more reliable ally than this one.

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74 Comments on “No Fixed Abode: Putting out a Contract on That Honda...”


  • avatar
    MBella

    The Ford plan is actually very good. It also doesn’t have to be a Ford vehicle for them to cover it. They were the easiest aftermarket (on Mercedes) warranty to deal with. Half the time they paid to do more than we wanted. I have no experience with Ally as a warranty company.

    • 0 avatar
      jim brewer

      Ford also allows their dealers to advertise the price on the ‘net. $7xx dollars for 100k 7yr. ‘Base’ policy.

      A little over 2 years to go and no claims.

      My thinking is that over 7 years, $500 of that is a prepaid repair of some kind. The other $250 is the insurance part.

  • avatar
    thattruthguy

    An extended warranty has a couple of other advantages in addition to converting a variable to a fixed cost: It puts the repair decision in the hands of an expert, and the purchase cost is negotiated at the time when the buyer is in the best negotiating position.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Minus the wholesale murder of entire people groups, I too as a child held a kind of fascination with the Axis powers of WWII. I always played as Germany in an old turn-based strategy game I played online, and I was German for the Invasion of Normandy 24-hour scenario paintball game I participated in (we lost the “beach” in record time that year, but came back to win the war as they say.) My favorite European Theater WWII fighters were the ME-109/BF-109 (The Panther platform of fighters, serving well long into what should have been their obsolescence) and the TA-152.

    When first reading about the sinking of the Yamato, I found myself inwardly rooting for the underdog in the fight (interesting that the largest battleship in history could be considered the underdog, but there you have it.)

    And I always felt kind of sorry for how crappy a fighting force the Italians turned out to be. They had some pretty sexy planes too, though not terribly effective.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      My dream garage is a car from each of the three (main) Axis powers; my S2000, a German DD (911? M3?), and a Ferrari of some sort.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      For me the starkest contrast is German engineering in the context of the Eastern Front. Two different angles: the first being the brutal operating environment and ‘meat grinder’ aspect that many times wiped out the superior design/functionality of the German tech. Nicer gun sights and precisely machined and assembled parts don’t matter one whit when you just need to beef up a front with numbers, and your new shipment of Panthers just suffered a 50% failure rate of transmissions and engine fires. Russians meanwhile are cranking out incredibly hastily/poorly assembled T-34s (one inch gaps in armor welds not unheard of) but there was a lot of them, they worked ‘good enough,’ and they didn’t get mired in mud as easily.

      The second angle being that of the German’s surprise in 1941 as they first encountered the ‘untermensch’ engineered T34s and KV1/KV2 that out-armored and out-gunned anything the ‘super-humans’ had come up with at the time (Px II,III, early war IV).

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        And nothing has changed. If I were sent to Siberia I’d rather have that Niva Corey showed you yesterday than a G-Class.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Funny you mention that because G-class benzos are quite revered, at least West of the Urals. The most impressive thing is that there’s quite a few actually being used for offroading (and of course many more for posing). Undeniably sturdy and extremely capable, but not without their nuances. Land Cruisers rule the roost in the East as I have mentioned many-a-times. UAZ and Nivas are of course always popular in every part of the country (except wealthy parts of Moscow perhaps). Can’t beat the bang for the buck factor and their dirt cheap and super-available parts. A new UAZ Patriot has much of the overall brutalist vibe of a LC200, for a tenth of the price new vs new (and a tenth of the build quality).

          Offroading G-wagen, UAZ, and other 4wds:
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUmM26a82og

          Moscow’s “finest” out for a drive (FSB graduates, nepotism central):
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFZuivskHis

    • 0 avatar

      Oh, man. Here we are, in one of my favorite historical topics. And someone’s already mentioned Ten-Go, to boot.

      I love you guys.

      Anyway, the war is pretty well encapsulated by the board game Axis and Allies. The Axis was fighting a war of precision, and the Allies were fighting a war of attrition. I think, more than anything else, WWII hinged on logistics. There were actually very few decisive battles; almost every fight was something that either bought or lost someone time to ramp up production or move troops into play, or the like. Yamamoto understood that before Pearl Harbor.

      Take the Italians. They had a first-rate fleet (and they were gorgeous ships, by the way), but that’s not going to do a lot of good if you can’t get those Egyptian oil fields out of the hands of the Brits. And yeah, toys like the Elefant and the Panther were amazing, but that’s not going to do you a lot of good when you can’t get them to the front quick enough and once you do, they’re outnumbered three or six to one against an enemy that can sometimes roll them right off the factory floor and into combat (though I imagine the Russians understandably didn’t always see that as an advantage), and you actually lose more of the things to overloaded transmissions breaking down, and the like.

      I could talk about this stuff all day.

      • 0 avatar

        Fascism, unlike some other forms of socialism, doesn’t have the government own the means of production, companies just have to do what the government tells them to do. As I recall, the German high command assigned tank production to traditional heavy equipment manufacturers. There’s a difference between a crane manufacturer making a few dozen heavy cranes and building tens of thousands of tanks.

        While there was a War Production Board in the U.S. that assigned production once hostilities had begun, there was still a bid process and it was more open than what the Germans did. There were still issues though. American Bantam got screwed over jeep production after they pretty much designed it.

        One of the problems faced by the auto industry in the immediate postwar period, particularly startups like Kaiser Frazier and Tucker, was that wartime government oversight of industry continued for a while after the war and companies had a difficult time finding manufacturing space, components and materials. Preston Tucker ended up buying the remains of the Franklin car company that made horizontally opposed air-cooled helicopter engines just so he could get motors.

        From memory, I believe that the Germans ended up building about 25,000 heavy tanks, the Panthers and Tigers. Chrysler alone built 75,000 tanks. The Germans had, in many cases, superior weapons. The U.S. had an edge in terms of numbers. Ever since then, the debate has been between putting many cheap weapons in the field vs a smaller number of superior arms. F35 vs F22 (though I doubt the F35 program will be any cheaper in the long run).

        BTW, the Chrysler tank plant in Warren, Michigan was started well before the U.S. was engaged in hostilities. As a matter of fact, in the spring of 1941, many months before Pearl Harbor, all of the major American automakers had publicly announced that due to the work they were doing for the American and British militaries there would be no new 1943 models. They simply did not have the engineering resources. This was even before the legendary “Arsenal of Democracy” switched from civilian consumer goods to weaponry.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Fascism isn’t socialism. Give your revisionist politics a rest.

          • 0 avatar

            If National Socialism wasn’t socialism do I get to say that “democratic socialism” isn’t democratic?

          • 0 avatar
            nitroxide

            Perhaps you should learn history properly the first time. The official name for the Nazi Party in Germany was Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, which translates exactly to National SOCIALIST German Workers Party (emphasis mine).

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            So the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was run by Republicans. Thanks for the tip.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Socialism means something precise and concrete. And the Nazis didn’t practice it, no matter what was in their name.

            Do you also think that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is democratic or for the people?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Jellyfish are not made of jelly and they aren’t fish. This sort of thing must confuse right-wingers to no end.

            Anyone who has studied political science understands why the Nazis were a right-wing movement. A basic distinction between right and left is that the left favors some degree of social leveling while the right supports the notion of hierarchy. The Nazis were social Darwinists, which put them firmly on the right.

            The right also tends to favor a call to tradition and heritage. Well, the Nazis had a third empire — they believed that their imperialism was a continuation of Germany’s pre-Weimar/WWI glory days — and liked to talk a lot about making Germany great again.

            If you actually knew anything about German history, then you would know that its social welfare traditions came from the right. Government retirement payments were seen as a tool for keeping workers in industry and were touted by the conservative monarchist Bismarck. But I suppose that they skip this stuff over on Breitbart and the other nonsense where you get your news.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Republicans don’t speak for the Republic and Democrats do not speak for the power of the people, especially since the latter disenfranchised the entire Sanders movement in addition to the rest of the deplorables and everyday Americans a certain psychopath despises.

            Language does not equate to truth.

          • 0 avatar

            Speaking of revisionist history, one of the most successful PR/reeducation campaigns of the 20th century was how, post Operation Barbarossa, the National Socialists came to be regarded as enemies, not allies, of the left.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Er, those who volunteered to fight against Franco and the Nazis during the Spanish Civil War were anti-fascists on the left. The US referred to them in retrospect as “premature anti-fascists”, which was a polite way of saying that they were communists.

            The Nazis’ most vehement opponents in Germany prior to their takeover were socialists and communists. The industrial right cooperated with and benefited from Nazi rule, and Hitler’s adoration of Henry Ford was no secret.

            You simply have no clue about what you’re talking about.

    • 0 avatar
      DirtRoads

      FW-190 for me, but I’m a bit moody so I could choose something with an in-line V-12 as well.

      When I was a kid studying that fascinating war, it was clearly good vs. evil. But my German heritage didn’t allow complete damnation of the race, you know?

      I choose Patton as the best warrior of the war.

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    If I thought there was a reasonable chance of my new car grenading the engine or transmission within 60 or 100 thousand miles I’d find another new car.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Is it possible the quote is based on 6 years and 60,000 miles of coverage starting today? If the price is for merely covering your next 20K miles of travel, then it seems excessive in light of the number of exclusions. If they’re covering your engine and transmission until your car is 9 years old or has 100,000 miles, maybe it is worth thinking about, although with a better company.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    yeah, the problem with a lot of third-party “extended warranties” is that they’re really insurance policies with a minefield of exclusions.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Extended warranty? How can I lose!

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    When I bought my Olds Aurora 01 back in 03 it had 30k miles on it. I went to the local Caddie dealer and the actually gave me a Cadillac extended warranty. The sales guy said that if I had waiting until it was 34k I would have to have taken a third party one. Caddie at that time had a pretty nice ext warranty. Thank God I got it. I loved my Olds (both) but they had alot of electronic gremlins.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Maybe that list of exclusions tells you more about GM cars than about Ally.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Waiting for the horror stories to begin rolling in .

    In 1989 we bought my (thankfully) ex Wife a new Honda Accord . they offered an extended warranty and took my offer of 50% off , it turned out to be a wise decision ~ it covered lots of little things, carpets and so on .

    Of course the running gear never needed anything .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    The master of first sentences! And quite possibly the last as well.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I got a chance to see a real ME-262 live in the flesh at the RAF museum outside of London. What a machine. If those were in service in large numbers over the Atlantic being flown by the best German pilots instead of a few hundred here or there desperately trying to take down a few Liberators and Flying Fortresses, the war would’ve gone *very* differently. The Hurricanes and Spitfires would’ve been blown out of the sky before they even knew what hit them.

    That goes double if the Germans had ever put any real effort into building a fleet of aircraft carriers, instead of spending all of their time and money on the quickly doomed Bismarck, and its never even used sister ship Tirpitz, which sat hiding in a fjord until it was eventually pummeled to death by bombers. They never had a serious long range strategic bomber either, so the idea of attacking the US mainland was always nothing more than a pipe dream.

    The biggest failing of the axis militaries was not recognizing that the era of giant gunships was already over before the war had even started. Bismarck and Yamato should never have been built. What they needed were more U-boats, and a fleet of carriers.

    Even more than that, breaking the non-agression pact with Russia due to a squabble over a tiny, meaningless scrap of land cost Germany the war. We like to think that we single-handedly won the war, but the truth is that the Russians won it by throwing endless waves of their citizens into the meat grinder. We helped a bit, that’s all.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “We helped a bit, that’s all.”

      Germany sure, Russia took the brunt of that. But the US only “helped” against Japan?

      • 0 avatar
        Davekaybsc

        Sorry, I meant the war in Europe. Obviously the Pacific theater was a totally different story, though there is some evidence to suggest that it was a planned Russian invasion that brought the Japanese to the table, and not a couple of nuclear weapons. They were desperate to not have the northern islands become their equivalent of East Germany.

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      I agree with most of what you’re saying here, especially in the aerospace and naval sections, but to say the US “helped a bit, that’s all” patently undersells our Pacific contributions and the engagement of the Western and Southern fronts, especially after 6/6/44. That said, the Russians were absolutely invaluable in keeping Hitler engaged and eventually repulsing and crushing Germany.

      Side note: I used to volunteer flightline duty at a local WWII airshow, and got to direct and escort F4Us, P-40Fs, Spitfire Mk. IXs, an Avro Lancaster, and a B-17G, converted to an “F” model for the movie “The Memphis Belle.”

      Standing in front of those big radials, firing up one-by-one… chills, man.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Kinda the same feeling I got when my son graduated from USAFA back in ’13. It was the only year the Thunderbirds didn’t fly (thank you, sequestration). But we were treated to several vintage aircraft that volunteered to do the graduation day flyover. It. Was. Epic! I think seeing those aircraft fly overhead brought more feeling to the ceremony than any quick flyover of the Thunderbirds would ever do.

        Yes, the Russians lost a heckuva lot more personnel than did the US, but to say that the 400,000+ lost on the US side was just a trivial assist does a disservice.

      • 0 avatar

        The “movie Belle” flew over my house one day, pretty low. Quite a treat.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaMaximaCulpa

        The western and southern fronts was mostly icing on the cake. Having said that, I think that the best description of WW2 in Europe that I’ve heard is something along the lines of “The Russians won the war and the Americans avoided loosing to the Russians” in a way I do think that the most important contribution by the Americans(and British, Australian, Canadian etc) was that without them the Russians would have finished the Germans eventually and all of Europe would have become something like the worst parts of Eastern Europe. That is something I, as a European, am very grateful for.

    • 0 avatar
      ExPatBrit

      The British had the Gloster Meteor jet in 1944 , they didn’t deploy them because they felt they didn’t need to. They also were worried about the Germans or Russians getting their hands on one. Used for V1 interception and tactical training, mock attacks to help B24 and B17 crews to learn how to defend against jet aircraft.

      The engines on the Meteor were less powerful but much more reliable and had a longer service life. The aerodynamics of the ME 262 were better and the air-frame was more rugged. They were faster but never had enough range to be useful in the Atlantic.

      If the ME 262 had been available in 1942, it might have made a difference but by 1944 it was too late.

      • 0 avatar
        Davekaybsc

        The Battle of Britain was 1940. The war was already over in ’44. By then the operational capacity of Germany to fight back was almost nill. If large squadrons of 262s had been in the air of the Atlantic in 1940, and the Jumo engines could be made to last longer than about 20 minutes before needing a complete overhaul, Britain would’ve lost.

        The Meteor Jet and our Shooting Star never made any difference because they both came too late to matter. Same with Germany’s rocket plane, and the V2s. The Buzz Bombs could be dealt with, but the V2s were unstoppable. They were also way too late to have any real impact.

        • 0 avatar
          ExPatBrit

          It was obvious in late 1942/ early 1943. After El Alamein, Stalingrad and Kursk it was obvious who was going to win.

          Meteor and ME 262 both became operational about the same time.

          The ME 262 had a theoretical range of about 600 miles, even with reliable engines not enough range to control the Atlantic. The first carrier launch and landing of a Vampire jet was in December 1945.

          They would have had some effect over the English Channel during the Battle of Britain.

    • 0 avatar

      Check out some of the hardware the Japanese were working on, too, like some of their upcoming fighters.

      I think Russia deserves the bulk of the credit for beating Nazi Germany, and the U.S. deserves the bulk of the credit for defeating Imperial Japan.

      We lost 10k+ guys at Iwo Jima. I take nothing away from what they did, but it’s worth noting that Iwo Jima was one of our very worst battles in terms of losses. In the west, you had Germany and Soviet Russia losing a million guys in some of these major battles.

      Edit: And gals, too, in the case of the Soviets.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaMaximaCulpa

        Yeah, I’m not “throwing shade” on the people who fought and died in Iwo Jima but the combined losses of the Germans and the Russians at the battle of Kursk was in excess of a million soldiers. The Russians lost thousand of TANKS and in excess of a Thousand airplanes. The scale is mind boggling.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          “The scale is mind boggling.”

          It’s so hard to comprehend in total that it can sometimes be better understood on a smaller scale and then extrapolate. For example take my great grandfather who was part of the Siberian divisions transferred from the Far East in time to defend Moscow in the late fall/winter of 1941. He never came back from the war, listed as MIA. Quite literally not a single man that was drafted from his small village near Khabarovsk in June of 1941 came back from the war. On my mom’s side we have a veteran of the defense of Leningrad, and another who was part of the fighting in late summer 1942 near Stalingrad who spent some time in a Nazi POW camp (it was very different for the average Soviet POW compared to the relatively humane treatment of Western Allied POWs). In any small village you will find a WW2 memorial with names of KIA/MIA. All too often, you will see a whole row of the same last name with some shared middle name initials. That’s fathers, sons, uncles, from the same family, all dead.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Sometimes a mechanic and or service writer who’s effective at advocating on your behalf with the extended warranty (insurance) company is a very important component. Without that branch the strategic alliance isn’t worth much.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    I would not purchase an extended warranty on most cars, especially a Honda. Not saying a Honda would never break, but probably not going to get your money back. But my wife recently purchased a VW GSW. She did the purchase herself alone and called me from the finance office about purchasing a warranty. The finance guy gave her a fair price on it. I asked it was a VW warranty as I would only purchased a non third party one. Was told yes. Well I was surprised when she came home with a Fidelity contract with the VW logo on it. So Fidelity does the VW extended warranties. Bummer my 8yr 100k warranty basicly doesn’t voer anything after 5 years 60k miles if you read the fine print. Buyer beware. I should have had her cancel it, but I bet a VW will go through 2k of repairs between 36k miles and 50k miles. I hate Fidelity warranties.

  • avatar
    jco

    I took out a contract on my 4Runner that had 105k miles at the time I started the contract. I knew it would need certain items replaced during the 2/24 the contract was active, so I treated it as a instalment loan on service. it cost me 2400 and it ended up covering close to 5k in expenses. these aren’t always dumb ideas.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    I toy around with the idea of buying a European sled from CAR MAX and getting the Doug Demuro warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      If the price was cheap enough that the “Super Ultra Platinum Extended Until The Sun Engulfs the Earth” warranty didn’t make the total cost silly – I’d be right with you.

      Unfortunately with CarMax you are paying for the privilege of not haggling.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        From what I’ve seen, CarMax cars are 3-5k above most sellers and is often above franchise dealer prices on the same make/model. Crazy.

        Had my first CarMax experience a few weeks ago. The place was packed mid-day on a Tuesday.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        If you could find a Carmax model priced reasonably, which was worth buying, and which allowed you to abuse the $39,99/mo warranty than have at it. Otherwise my general rule is, f*** Carmax.

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      “the Doug Demuro warranty.”

      For $39.95/mo, CARMAX will tell everyone within earshot you have said European sled.
      (excludes taxes, fees, and biting wit)

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    “Instead, I rather approved of the Axis powers — minus that treacherous Stalin, mind you.” Russia was an Ally in WWII. The Axis powers were Germany, Japan, and Italy.

    • 0 avatar
      Davekaybsc

      Yup. They were on our side until we met them in Berlin. Then things got tense for about 50 years.

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      Russia’s relationship to the Allies was akin to a Facebook “It’s Complicated” status. While never technically an Axis power, they assisted Germany in the invasion of Poland, then tried to remain uncommitted until Germany invaded them. Then, of course, the shit really hit the fan once the war was over…

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Russia was an Ally in WWII.”

      not initially. They were at least not going to fight each other by the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, but it was actually Hitler who broke the pact by invading the Soviet Union.

      Stalin’s alliance with the West was very much a “the enemy of my enemy is my friend” arrangement.

  • avatar

    ” Instead, I rather approved of the Axis powers — minus that treacherous Stalin, mind you. ”

    Clever to use the past tense there.

    One would hope that even as a small, albeit precocious, child that your approval didn’t extend to the desire of some of the Axis to exterminate a group of people that would have included your only child.

  • avatar
    kobo1d

    Ally’s 1% Online Savings Accounts are pretty nice.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    So what’s covered?

    Engine. Maybe transmission/parts of transmission.

    What’s not covered?

    Every other component or material possible.

    I think for $1344 a year I’ll just pick a model with a solid drivetrain, or if buying the warranty, seek out a model with a blowup motor but everything else is of a high quality (do those exist?)

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      This! Well my reasons are slightly different.

      Whenever I purchase a car the two most frustrating moments for the dealership upsale person comes to trying to sell me an extended warranty and service contract.

      The conversation usually revolves around me telling them that a) I have a garage and perform all my own maintenance (I really don’t trust dealerships with the minor stuff) and b) since I didn’t purchase a service contract and extended warranty companies are pretty smart about not losing money anything that’s going to break can neatly be categorized under racing, off-road abuse and so on. It also doesn’t help that (in the words of one young lad bussing tables) I look like a scary biker dude with my FB approved racist starter kit brat pack goatee and shaven pate.

  • avatar
    DaPlugg

    My family and I have purchased collectively about $8000 dollars worth of Honda care on 5 different hondas, to date it hasnt paid a penny, my advice if you are buying toyota ot honda skip the service contract

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    As someone who has killed 3 Honda engines, I must say this is not a good deal for anyone even remotely savvy in the world of auto repairs. I just had my Civic engine replaced for about $1100 parts and labor. 99% of the population won’t downshift to 2nd at 70+ MPH, or drive a lowered Accord in the pockmarked hellish landscape of NYC, so with regular oil changes they shouldn’t have to replace a Honda engine, like, ever.

  • avatar
    fvfvsix

    Why would anyone pay $2400 for an Ally contract when Honda will sell you the same thing for $700 with a bit of negotiating?

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    “As a child, reading John Toland and William Shirer when most of my classmates were still sounding out words one syllable at a time”

    :-D :-D :-D

    OK, OK… I’ll buy the veal and tip like crazy if you just stay here all week!

  • avatar
    DirtRoads

    Had a 94 Eldorado I bought still under factory warranty but bought an extended warranty for it anyway. The best thing that ever did for me was to pay for repairs when the schlubb I sold it to came to me with a list of computer-generated “problems” about which I had absolutely no idea until he took it to the same dealer I’d been taking it to. The warranty stated it didn’t transfer, but somehow the guy got them to pay for the repairs.

    That damned car was so nice to drive but it depreciated as fast as I paid it off.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Shoulda bought an extended warranty on my Lexus. It would have paid for itself with the front control arm replacement. The thing hasn’t had a single other issue, but one is all it takes.

    • 0 avatar
      DukeGanote

      We wondered if it would be trick-or-treat in October. Here’s the saga: My eldest daughter bought her first car, a top-end Ford Focus with 60K mileage, from Kings Chrysler Dodge 3 years ago. They offered the usual extended warranty at closing. We declined… until they finally offered a 4-year, *unlimited* mileage warranty honored at every Chrysler dealer. Done.

      In October, with 130K mileage, the transmission started making grinding noises. Two weeks of various loaner vehicles later (a Jeep Compass is handy for hauling furniture and moving friends) and after purported disputes between Chrysler and Ford on responsibility, the transmission is fine… She definitely broke even on that one incident!

  • avatar
    Dapip33

    I’m surprised nobody brought up Geico’s mechanical breakdown insurance:

    https://www.geico.com/auto-insurance/mechanical-breakdown-insurance/

    I tacked this onto my auto insurance when switching to GEICO and am pleased to get extended warranty on my Mazda 6 (which has a wimpy warranty) up to 100k miles from GEICO. Granted, the aforementioned Honda in this article wouldn’t qualify, but for newer vehicles I think it’s a great way to go.

  • avatar
    Bill

    I wasted five years of my life/career working as a claims rep for an aftermarket service contract company. While a few people came out well ahead (I recall one person had $10,000 in repairs covered by a contract they paid $1,200 for) the reality is most of the customers lost and lost bad.

    On top of the usual exclusions the company I worked for would stretch the definitions of some exclusions when convenient. For example we covered split CV boots until one day the boss decided that we were spending too much money on cv boot claims and that they were no longer covered since they were now considered “maintenance items”. And don’t get me started on what constituted “abuse”.

    The absolute worst though was when we partnered with many of the direct marketing companies that were so prevalent in 2008-10. I left the company in 2009 so I don’t remember all the coverage details but we had a special series of contracts for them that basically excluded all the high frequency claim items, things like ball joints, seals and gaskets if the vehicle had over 75k miles, etc. Truly horrid contracts with horrid companies selling them. A few months after I got fed up and quit the Missouri AG sued quite a few of the companies we partnered with for their business practices.

    When selling the contract, dealers liked to explain them as covering everything except for maintenance/wear items, which really isn’t true and can cost big. For example if your direct injected engine suffers from carbon deposits clogging up the intake ports and needs work to fix that, that isn’t covered on any contract I know of since deposits and damage resulting from them would be excluded.

    Before I worked at the service contract company I would have said service contracts are a gamble, but a potentially worthwhile gamble. Now I would never recommend a service contract to anybody.

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