By on October 4, 2016

jessi

If you follow the auto-journo cool kids on Twitter… get a life! Seriously! Go out and learn to fly an airplane! Take your children camping! Volunteer at your local soup kitchen this November and help the homeless make it through Thanksgiving with dignity!

Anyway, there were a few dramatic Tweetstorms and whatnot lately. The first one is partially recapitulated above. Occasional Motor Trend contributor and brand advocate for Castrol and Meguiar’s, Jessi Lang, decided to dig up some old tweet by The Smoking Tire’s Matt Farah. I suspect she did this because Matt’s star is rising while her own personal profile in the business spiked a long time ago. You have to take your opportunities at self-promotion where you can get them.

For instance, two years ago, David Spade complained that I was singing “East Of The Sun” from my corner table at the Tower Bar in Los Angeles. I didn’t post about it because, you know, it was David Spade. But if it had been Hugh Jackman or ScarJo, I’d have broken my Twitter fingers complaining that they were trying to stifle my musical brilliance. So good for Jessi. If you’re interested in some wax, and you’re interested in Meguiar’s, you should definitely check out her Twitter profile, I guess.

The second drama du jour concerned my boss, Mark Stevenson, and his attempts to reach out to female writers for an open position here at TTAC. He was taken to task by a couple of people for… well, I’m not sure for what, exactly. He said that he hadn’t received any pitches from female writers lately, and he was told in return that he needed to seek out the female writers. Like they are Pokemon or something. “Jesus! Over there, beneath the grease trap! It’s a GirlJourno! We need to reach out to her and ask for content! Squirtle, I CHOOSE YOU!”

The fact of the matter is that we don’t need to seek out female autowriters. There are dozens of them, all around us. It’s just that nobody notices those women, because we are blinded by our own sexism and stereotypical preconceptions. I’ll explain, of course.

Some of our readers will find this difficult to believe, but I have considerable experience, both academic and personal, with feminism in the pre-intersectional era. While I was at university, I was an active participant in a variety of diversity-oriented programs and I worked closely with feminist intellectuals in my graduate classes. In those years, I shared my feminist friends’ opinion that the road towards gender equality would mostly consist of placing women in jobs, positions, and situations that were traditionally held by men. And I shared their naive and blind beliefs that women, once they had those jobs, positions, and situations, would behave just like men.

In other words, the perfect woman would be just like a man. Men, in turn, would become less like men. We’d all be alike, faithful citizens in Oceania’s crew-cut, grey-overall sexless future. I was very severe and earnest in those days; I did a lot of very serious writing about the future of humanity and that kind of drivel. I believed in EQUALITY, which I equated to SAMENESS.

Most of the discussion being done about women in automotive journalism comes from that same kind of belief: that female autojournos would be exactly the same as a man, except they would, you know, not be men. Think of it like going to McDonald’s: you expect the same service, and the same behavior, from the fry cook regardless of sex. As a former fast-food employee of long standing, I can tell you that such is actually not the case: women and men in McJobs tend to drift into predictable job patterns. Typically you put women up front where the customer can see them and you have men doing anything that is behind a partition or that involves a mop. But that’s besides the point.

There are a few women working in automotive journalism who meet the above standard. They produce work that is essentially identical to that of their male counterparts. Some of them are very good, some of them are not very good, but none of it has anything to do with the fact that they are women. Note, however, that very few women voluntarily enter the autojourno business on those terms. Very few women apply to be “road warriors” at print mags, very few women pitch stories to the major online venues, very few women are willing to work for free or for poverty wages.

Don’t get me wrong; there are thousands of women who are willing to write on those terms. But they don’t want to write about cars. They want to work for Jezebel, for Marie Claire, for Salon, for Slate, for the Huffington Post. There is an overwhelming flood of women who are on ThoughtCatalog trying to make their big break into writing — but virtually none of them give a damn about cars, and you can’t make them give a damn about cars.

Mr. Stevenson was pilloried on the Twitter for not working harder to find women who want to write about cars. But I should note that nobody ever tried to “seek me out” to write for Salon or Vogue or even xoJane. I’ve been a published professional writer with a nontrivial audience since 1992. I’ve written enough about bicycles for publication to fill a Moby Dick-sized book, three times over. Yet not once in my life have I been actively “recruited” for any writing position in a female-dominated industry. I can say with confidence that the same is true for virtually every other man writing in this business. Nobody is trying to convince us that we should be writing about fashion or makeup. So why should we be forcing women to write about cars?

“Sexist pig!” you’ll reply. “Women make more than half of automotive purchasing decisions! They should be writing about cars!” And you know what? They are writing about cars. Most new-car media introductions have one or more waves devoted almost exclusively to female writers. It’s just that they aren’t writing for TTAC or Jalopnik or Muscle Mustangs. They are social-media influencers. We call them “mommybloggers”, or we call them “sex bloggers”, or we just call them “people who get a free weekend at the Ritz-Carlton because they have 10,001 followers on Twitter.” The overwhelming majority of women who have chosen to write about cars — indeed, the overwhelming majority of women who fight tooth and nail to get invited to press events, to get loaner cars, and to receive free travel and/or gifts from the OEMS — are on the social/influencer/mommyblogger side of things.

I’m reminded of what happened when I went to get my son from his after-school care last week. When you enter the building, there’s a big room to the left with a projector. Invariably, there are thirty girls in there, playing some sort of dancing video game where you can be a panda or a princess and you can see your dance moves reflected on the screen. They’re huddled up, gossiping or playing games, watching the screen, chatting. Such was the case that day. Then I walked all the way out to the playground, where my son was engaged in some sort of scuffle with three other boys, all of them punching each other as hard as they could. It looked relatively serious. At one point my son was kind of knocking another kid’s head against the pavement. But then that kid saw me.

“John, your dad’s here!”

“Okay,” my son said, jumping up. “I have to go. See you tomorrow, Aidan!”

“See you tomorrow, John!” Aidan said, jumping up and waving goodbye with a forlorn face.

“That kid is so cool,” John said to me. “He can make a level in Minecraft where you can sit out on a ledge and shoot Endermen with a bow and arrow. He says he’ll help me make that level tomorrow.”

I had to laugh. I never see a little boy in the dancing-panda room, and I never see a little girl out on the playground punching people. Maybe that’s because our racist, sexist, patriarchy of a society warps the minds of children through Saturday-morning television. But I doubt it. I think that most people know what they like in this world. Most women don’t want to write about cars, or experience them, the same way that men do. That’s not universal. During my time as Editor-In-Chief at this site, I hired female writers, gay writers, and a transgender writer. All of them wanted to do the same thing that I do, or that Bark does, or that Mr. Stevenson does. They were all good fits here. But I didn’t go looking for them. They came looking for work, the same way that I did.

So my response to “Where are all the female writers?” is simple: They are already here. Some of them are running major divisions of Consumer Reports. Some of them are club racers. And some of them are mommybloggers, sex bloggers, and influencers. If you think that all of the women in the latter categories should be forced to act like the women in the former categories, then aren’t you the one who is forcing stereotypes on women? Who are you, to tell them what to do? I sentence you all to sensitivity training, and may Darwin have mercy on your souls!

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313 Comments on “No Fixed Abode: Where My Girls At? And By Girls, I Mean Qualified Womyn, Of Course...”


  • avatar
    April S

    Way too much snark. Maybe that passes for cleverness today.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Yeah, but he’s got a point. You don’t have to look hard for “women in math/science” or “women in police/military/etc.” push but how often do you see stuff about “men in nursing” or “men in teaching?” All of those traditionally gender dominated career fields are worthy places to spend your life and contribute to society, but there is about as much propaganda^H^H^H social media buzz encouraging men to seek out non traditional careers as there are dudes writing for Cosmo. (Which is to say almost none.)

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Interestingly enough, statistically and anecdotally, the majority of men that go into nursing had relatives in the profession. From the 70’s to now the number has doubled (3.9 – 8.1%). The irony of that is men tend to make more money than their female counterparts because they tend to move into specialized fields that pay more. Even within the profession there are jobs that are considered more “manly”.

        I do agree with Jack that there are biological differences between how boys and girls behave.

        In some respects the “equality” pendulum has swung to were we encourage girls to move into traditionally male jobs but somehow do not encourage men to go into traditionally female jobs.

        Stereotypes still exist but ultimately one should do what they want to do that realistically will provide them with satisfaction and pay the bills. We tend to have forgotten that latter part.

    • 0 avatar
      DirtRoads

      Too much truth, maybe that passes for snark.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      April S.,
      I want you to know that I logged into this website with an abhorrent interface (twice) just to call you an opinionated idiot.
      Sincerely,
      tresmonos

    • 0 avatar
      MoDo

      Lang never brought anything “extra” to the table. She didn’t really know much about cars, besides the trendy buzzwords etc. There’s a reason why there are a handful of auto-journo’s that get millions of views and then, the rest. It isn’t a male/female thing – but if I am going to listen to a typical BS jouro that brings nothing to the table, it may as well be from a blonde with a nice ass and not someone like, oh I don’t know – Johnny Lieberman.

    • 0 avatar
      old blue

      SNARKY !??

      I’ll give you snarky.

      As far as writing goes, Jack is no Denise McCluggage.

      Of course, the same can be said of his driving !

      Now that’s snarky !

      Pardon me Jack, I just couldn’t resist. Perhaps you’d like to tell the boys about
      Denise.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Here you go, based out of the GTA, Lorraine Sommerfeld.

    Able to go toe-to-toe with male auto journalists. Host of a call in show about automobiles.

    http://lorraineonline.ca/drive/

    • 0 avatar

      Lorraine is a friend of mine. I think she’s probably one of the best female writers in Canada. But even she’ll tell you that she’s no journalist.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Mark, you are correct. I posted quickly and could have chosen my words better.

        A great ‘columnist’? Either way, I am still a big fan and believe that she is much better at writing about autos and all things related to them than the vast majority of males who do so.

        Too bad that she left the TorStar fold or you might have been able to publish some of her content?

        But then as I have written and posted many times before I tend to believe that “automotive journalism” is an oxymoron. Too many ‘paid shills’ in the trade. Plus a number of old ‘columnists’ and beat writers put out to pasture in the ‘automotive’ section.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          “Too bad that she left the TorStar fold or you might have been able to publish some of her content?”

          The Wheels section of the Saturday paper has had some pretty good writing over the years- a lot of bang for the buck considering it is one section on one day of the week. I’ve been a fan of Kenzie’s writing, in particular, for a long time.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            A few years ago Jeremy Cato and Michael Vaughan put together an Auto Section for the Globe & Mail that I believe was the best that I have ever seen in a Canadian publication. I believe that they had Lorraine on their staff for a while.

            However the hands down best all Canadian based auto related columnists was Peter Cheney in the Globe & Mail. Peter paid for his education by working as a VW mechanic. Peter is a fabulous writer, with a great love for vehicles.

            Those interested can read about the last time he drove his son to one of his minor hockey games (a true tear jerker for us Canadian parents):

            http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-drive/culture/commuting/a-hockey-dads-last-ride/article4316934/

            Please note that I have edited this as I had originally posted some incorrect information. Mea Culpa.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Alright I am restricted from going to this lady’s website, who is she again and why do we care?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think she uses Meguiar’s leg hair and mustache removal products.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @28 – she is your type of girl.
      “As a Ph.D. in Cultural Studies Candidate at George Mason University, she’s researching the ways in which web-based self-representations facilitate interpersonal connections, reflect reality by engaging in the imaginary, and function as commodities that are subject to exploitation.”

      I’m not making this sh!t up.

      • 0 avatar
        SirRaoulDuke

        The hell? She writes about cars and hawks that Ph.D., I figured it was in mechanical engineering or something relevant to the field.

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        o_O

        After reading that 3 times, I think I can offer a translation. She studies virtual reality in social settings / games. Virtual money or objects of value can get translated into real world currency and objects (thru paypal or bitcoin I suppose).

        I was just joking when I said “PhD = piled higher and deeper.”

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I figured as such, although I don’t know enough about the uni to know if its a diploma mill or not.

      • 0 avatar
        JD23

        I have a PhD in an engineering discipline and don’t include the title in nearly all of my correspondence because I don’t want to appear pompous, whereas she uses a title for a degree she has not even completed.

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          It seems like she did eventually complete her PhD though it seems to have taken 11 years, she probably just never updated her website or whatever. Though I don’t really see how her PhD is really relevant to her day to day work.

          Still, Matt’s comment must be pretty crappy for someone read about themselves and I don’t really see why it’s necessary to attack her about it. There’s not really all that much fame to be gained by attacking auto journalists.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    you left out this part, Jack:

    “Yes, you said it 4 years ago- and yet I was asked about it just yesterday while being interviewed on a podcast…”

    https://twitter.com/ImJessiLang/status/775752117478842368

  • avatar
    hreardon

    Jack, good luck with the incoming fecal matter storm that will no doubt descend upon you by the SJWs hiding behind their keyboards.

    Sad that this kind of writing should be (in my eyes, at least), considered “brave” these days.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “SJW”

      that didn’t take long.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        To be fair, it took a full ten minutes longer than it took “April”, the 300-pound man who is pretending to be a pretty, pretty little girl, to post.*

        * that’s just, like, my opinion, man. I’ve never seen “April”.

        • 0 avatar
          April S

          Excuse me?

          Last time I checked “April” is the name listed on my Driver’s Licence.

          Also under “sex” there is an “F”

          Thanks for caring, sweetie.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Hey, I just figured you were a dude. No offense, xe*

            * or whatever your chosen pronoun is

          • 0 avatar
            April S

            ‘Hey, I just figured you were a dude. No offense’

            I figured you still live in your Mom’s basement.

            And a virgin.

            No offence

            P.S. I almost forgot. Never been kissed. Again, no offence.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Actually, I’ve been trying to convince my dad to let me move back into his basement. He’s in Hilton Head, so there’s no basement per se, but you get the idea.

            I also wouldn’t mind being a virgin. I could spend more time working on my race car.

            So no offense taken!

          • 0 avatar
            April S

            “I also wouldn’t mind being a virgin. I could spend more time working on my race car.”

            Virgin by choice? I don’t think so.

            No offence.

            By “race car” do you mean playing with your Hot Wheels?

          • 0 avatar

            “I also wouldn’t mind being a virgin. I could spend more time working on my race car.”

            You think that sublimation thing really works?

        • 0 avatar
          N8iveVA

          April’s avatar is the transgender flag so weather or not she was born female, transitioned to, or is an ally, is fine by me.

      • 0 avatar
        April S

        You would think he would bring up Godwin’s law too.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          The first person to bring up Godwin’s law loses the meta-argument.

          Just for the sake of clarification: you don’t actually claim to be a biological female in real life, do you? April is like your furrykin name or something? I was under the impression from your posts that you were a female “ally”, not an actual woman.

          If you are honestly claiming to be a woman, then that’s fine, we’re all on the text-based Internet here, I can’t see you and you can’t see me, for all you know, I’m an 18-year-old girl who uses stock photos of Dave Grohl on my LinkedIn.

        • 0 avatar
          indi500fan

          Godwin is the guy on Duck Dynasty, right?

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        This thread’s gettin’ entertaining….

      • 0 avatar
        MoDo

        Considering the full blown war against SJW’s is everywhere except the car sites, has had me visiting car sites more often lately. You can only watch so much Milo Yiannopolus, Alex Jones, Gavin Mcinnes, Lauren Southern, Paul Joseph Watson in day.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’m constantly puzzled by the notion that calling someone a SJW “Social Justice Warrior” is an insult.

      That tends to demonstrate the chasm that exists in the USA that leads to situations like an odd election whereby one is forced to vote based on whom they hate the least.

      “Social” refers to being a “social being” aka part of society and “being social” implies functioning well within a society. Each society has its “norms”. Those tend to be fluid and slowly change over time.

      “Justice” tends to refer to being just, fair, impartial and/or balanced.

      If we do not strive for social justice what do we have as an alternative?

      Jack is pointing out that you can’t find balance in situations where “naturally” it does not exist. There are genetically programmed differences between men and women. The challenge lies in sorting out the “nature” versus “nurture”.

      We need to strive to be open to various possibilities and alternative choices.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        The people using ‘SJW’ as an insult obviously are opposed to living in a fair society. They try to use insults to hold others down to institute a digital Jim Crow.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Life is not and will never be “fair”, this is a concept adhered to by children and the naive.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            OK, but the alternative isn’t apartheid, right? I know you tend towards the right, but are you really voicing support for racist and sexist laws and policies?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m tired of the “isms” and I’m tired of the Bolshevik bs in society. Evidently the countless millions who died as the result of these failed ideas in the Twentieth Century died for nothing if the same failed concepts continue to be parroted. We have learned nothing from the past hundred twenty years. I wish I had a realistic solution to offer but alas I do not, I just hope when the dust settles there is still a country and a future left for the sons and daughters of the United States. The cynic in me says no.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – “Life is not and will never be “fair””

            I’m not talking about “life”. I’m talking about how we react to each other and the events in life.

            Our actions and/or reactions to the unfairness of life define us. Life is unfair. We don’t need to be!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “I’m not talking about “life”. I’m talking about how we react to each other and the events in life.”

            Something to zen dwell on.

        • 0 avatar
          hreardon

          VoGo –

          Using SJW as an insult is directed at those special snowflakes who are incapable of using reason, logic and thought and who turn every topic into a conversation about race, gender and (in)equality.

          The college scene today is littered with this false premise that everything can and should be viewed through the lens of white male oppression and racism.

          A fair society doesn’t mean you get to win, nor does it mean that you are right. Funny how all of the college protests recently are those trying to shut down speakers with whom these kids disagree. God forbid they should hear a contrarian viewpoint or evidence demonstrating that they’re misguided.

          I’ve officially reached the “Get off my lawn!” stage of life it would seem. But contrary to what you suggest, VoGo, it does not mean that people like me believe in digital oppression. I’m tired of people who think that contrary positions immediately equal racism and hate and who are then vilified.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            hreardon,
            So if I hear you correctly, you want to live in a society where the laws and policies treat people equally and don’t favor one group over another because of their race, or gender, religion or orientation.

            But, you still want to insult the people working for that society by calling them special snowflakes. Do I have that right?

          • 0 avatar
            hreardon

            “you still want to insult the people working for that society”

            They’re not working for anyone but themselves when they try to shout down dissenting voices.

            Sure the concept of “social justice” sounds great, but too often the people who hold that flag are merely trying to find ways of shielding themselves from the big, bad, nasty, indifferent world.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            hreardon,
            Are you saying that all people who work towards social justice try to censor opposing voices?

            I’m with you that people could use to listen better to voices they may not agree with. But let’s not vilify a large group of people doing the right the thing, just because of a few whiners.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            “I’m tired of people who think that contrary positions immediately equal racism and hate and who are then vilified.”

            The term “racist” and “racism” is much like the word “sports car” these days. Whatever meaning it had has been bastardized by loudly complaining twits.

            On a related note I was entirely surprised and delighted today when Trevor Noah called Donald Trump a bigot and then showed footage of Trump supporters that could rightly be called racists.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        the problem is that the basement-dwellers who p!ss and moan about “SJWs” use the term to mean “how dare you tell me something I said was “not cool?”

        a *real* SJW would be calling and e-mailing Mark and everyone at VerticalScope non-stop to have Jack pilloried, castrated, and fired for writing this. All while spamming social media networks about all of his (real or perceived) transgressions.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          I think Marvel should launch a new character named SJW. She could be Luke Cage’s Jewish, single wingwoman.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          There’s a guy who is doing ALL OF THAT

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I know but that’s a personal beef.

            (why was beef chosen as the meat to represent dispute?)

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            The first use of “beef” to mean “complain” (as in the verb, not the noun “complaint or problem”) dates back to:

            “He’ll beef an’ kick like a steer an’ let on he won’t never wear ’em.” —New York World, 13 May 1888

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          “a *real* SJW would be calling and e-mailing Mark and everyone at VerticalScope non-stop to have Jack pilloried, castrated, and fired for writing this. All while spamming social media networks about all of his (real or perceived) transgressions.”

          And THAT’s why SJW is a derogatory epithet.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Well, I am happy to fight for social justice and willing to suffer the slings and arrows of those who support laws and policies that discriminate on religion, race, gender or orientation.

            And, I welcome Jack’s views and support his right to make a living (at least partially) at TTAC.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Wee Todd – You are saying that there are *real* SJW’s and *pseudo*SJW’s?

            All the while spamming social media networks about all of his (real or perceived) SJW’s.

            You really do make it way too easy ;)

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            So easy that you got confused by my use of quotes.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Todd – yup. Your posts are very confusing.

            I don’t blame you, really I don’t.

            Your two choices for Commander in chief involve rugs:

            Comb over

            or

            Comb under

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            It’s only used as an epithet by losers who blame women for their inability to get laid.

          • 0 avatar

            The illusion, VoGo, is that there’s no happy middle.

            The SJW-as-a-slap is directed at those to whom “fighting for equality” has become such a part of their identity that they look for a boxing match everywhere they go. It’s like some of these people walk around with little containers they have to continually fill up with conflict.

            For a group of people who preach love and happiness across gender, ethnic and other lines, I’ve always found the barely-contained tendency to rage deeply ironic.

            But then, I’m old school. I’m one of these troglodytes who thinks continually seeing the world in terms of demographics is actually the mark of a people in the retrograde; a progress that isn’t, and that this divisiveness is a product of both the extreme left and right.

            As if MLK’s “table of brotherhood” was ever intended to have assigned seating with labels out in front of the person proclaiming that individual’s biological or socio-political attributes, as if that was more important than the person behind the label. An enlightened society would not take note of the differences in skin tone, etc and pat themselves on the back. Rather, they’d never notice the differences in the first place. I thought that was the goal.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            It’s so sad that SJW was corrupted away from describing some of my favorite college experiences to now mean Social Justice Warrior.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Kenmore – “It’s so sad that SJW was corrupted away from describing some of my favorite college experiences to now mean Social Justice Warrior.”

            SJW = Stainless Jewel Westinghouse??????????

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            No, Mr. Lou, Single Jewish Women!

            Preferably of central European ancestry.
            Mmm-mmm-mmm! Their genetics admit of no Twiggys!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You can ply them with bagels and Manischewitz grape juice!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Kenmore – just frosting ya there or is that defrosting ya?

            LOL

            I’m from the Great White North. I don’t recall ever running across SJW’s. But then again I was a good Catholic boy ;)

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            I was a good Catholic boy, too, Lou. Never ran into Jewish kids until moving several states away for college where I ended up running with a small cabal.

            Blew my mind, those atheist, Protestant and Jewish kids in college. The SJWs were built just as sweet as our Catholic girls but with brain enhancements.

            They needed no other enhancements.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Kenmore – big brains are such a turn on :) I never liked dumb chicks.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Blog, blog, blog…
    Y’all are bloggers, not writers, not journalists.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Does that explain why I was the subject of a full-length feature in American Journalism Review? Does that also explain why you can walk into any bookstore in America right now and buy something that I’ve written?

      Not that “blogger” is necessarily a bad thing, I suppose.

    • 0 avatar

      I rarely, if ever, use the title, journalist. There was a time when the word meant amateur and too many who claim the title today disclaim their obvious biases. When the subject comes up I say “I write about cars”. My last name means writer in German and Yiddish.

      I suppose you could characterize Poor Richard’s Almanack as a blog by Ben Franklin.

    • 0 avatar
      an innocent man

      If you don’t think Jack is a writer, well then, there are no writers.

    • 0 avatar
      an innocent man

      Define ‘writer’ then, please?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      There is literally no difference.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You should prob check in with what the “journalists” have been up too in the past year. Journalists do not necessarily practice journalism these days.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        28-Cars-Later – agreed.
        Years ago I read about a journalist saying that he felt his job was to shine a light into the dark corners where no one chooses to look.

        Unfortunately that approach doesn’t sell magazines, books or ramps up Nielsen Ratings.

        Journalists are like kids playing with a laser pointer getting the ADHD Irish setter to chase the dot. Entertaining but serves zero purpose.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Much of what we call media in the US needs to simply die off. I look forward to the day.

          “Years ago I read about a journalist saying that he felt his job was to shine a light into the dark corners where no one chooses to look.”

          No matter your position, one of the darkest corners right now is the Clinton camp, yet its pass after pass on serious issues from MSM. That’s how you know media is rigged and owned by the same people who own/back HRC. Nixon was crucified for illegal activity through the work of Woodward and Bernstein, today is HRC applauded for things 3-10x worse. This is not to even mention the trail of scandals and dead bodies which go back thirty years. I mean really, WTF?

          Pay no attention to man behind the curtain…

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Please name a human on this planet who has endured more scrutiny than HRC. It is the height of absurdity to say that she has gone unresearched by “MSM” whatever that is.

            She is constantly criticized for her finances, while Trump has gotten away with not releasing his tax returns (first candidate since Nixon).

            Her marriage is under a microscope, while no one mentions that Trump knocked up Marla Maples while married to Ivanka, who claimed Trump raped her.

            For 2 years and at a cost of $7M, Congress investigated Benghazi – finding no wrongdoing – while Trump used his foundation to pay off attorneys general not to investigate Trump University.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – I’m sure that the skeletons in Hillary’s closet met the same end that Bin Laden did.
            Trump?
            I read somewhere that his grandfather ran a brothel during the Klondike Gold rush.

            A career politician versus a career egomaniac.

            No wonder why there is so much political discord in the USA.

            The Green Party should be looking real good by now.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Haven’t they essentially devolved into news entertainment specialist or whatever they call it these days by reporting on a constant stream of sensationalistic bad news to get those subscribers, clicks or ratings or whatever.

  • avatar
    seabrjim

    Touche’.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Maybe it’s just the fact that I’m an old phart, but anybody who has to proclaim their (non-medical) doctorate gets instant demerits in my grading system.

    • 0 avatar

      Perhaps she’s changed her view, but Miss Manners taught me that unless you have some kind of medical degree, you shouldn’t use the title “Doctor” in social settings. Tacking PhD after one’s name socially to me betrays at least a little insecurity.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I see people do that on their email signatures. I find especially annoying “JD” after a name, for someone who is not employed in a legal capacity and has not passed the Bar Exam.

        If I have a master’s degree in poetry and I work at US Bank, I don’t need to put that after my name.

        • 0 avatar
          hreardon

          Remember, Corey, everyone is a unique and special snowflake, so we must let them express themselves so that they feel validated.

          A poet banker is no doubt a future ‘protected class’. ;-)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            How long until emojis are an accepted accreditation? I’ve got some smiley pizzas I’d like to use. I’m a perfect pepperoni.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “I’m a perfect pepperoni.”

            Peppering written conversation with smiley pizza emoji seems like a cheesy thing to do.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            LOL

            People got some good jokes today!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            hreardon – We don’t seek the truth, we seek to validate our beliefs. That unfortunately is true on both sides of the political isle. It worked fine as cavemen protecting our little groups from rival knuckle-draggers but bogs down a large society such as ours. Censorship is a knife that cuts both ways.
            Freedom of speech is critical to a fair society but we much be very much aware that what we say may directly or indirectly curtail the freedom of others.
            It is a tough line to walk. Snowflakes melt quickly in the heat. We must not deliberately flame that sort of fire.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          JD here. It’s equally annoying when practicing lawyers do it.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “…unless you have some kind of medical degree, you shouldn’t use the title “Doctor” in social settings.”

        Etiquette is not my strongest suit but why is it okay for a medical doctor but not for a physicist or engineer?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          hubcap – I think it varies from culture to culture. We, the great huddled masses of the proletariat assume that any doctor happens to be a medical doctor. For many, it is all we know.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I can understand why an attractive blonde woman would list her PhD.

      • 0 avatar
        multicam

        I had a buddy who was a Lieutenant in the Army who was kind of the opposite of this. He was a trained chef, had a Ph.D in molecular biology and had an M.B.A. He was very humble about his credentials, so we always called him Chef Doctor Lieutenant John _____, M.B.A.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I read somewhere that Dolf Lundgren has a PhD in Chemical Engineering and an IQ of 160. They spoofed that in the Expendables.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Lou_BC
            He obtained that Degree at Sydney University. He went onto become a bouncer at a Sydney Nightclub.
            Dolph’s Lundgrens Australian connection

            “1982, Lundgren graduated with a master’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Sydney. During his time in Sydney, he earned a living as a bouncer in a nightclub in the renowned King’s Cross area. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1983. However, while preparing for the move to Boston, he was spotted in the nightclub he worked at in Sydney and was hired by Grace Jones as a bodyguard, and the two became lovers.[18] Their relationship developed dramatically, and he moved with her to New York City.[19]”

  • avatar
    dogn

    I don’t write for car rags because the pay is either non-existent or complete crap and there’s nobody who’s going to pay my bills while I’m living the life and “following the dream.”

    Also, I get more positive responses, less snark and random internet misogyny when I write as “Doug” instead of my real name “Katherine”.

    However, subjective anecdotes are subjective.

    • 0 avatar

      It would be interesting to compare your experiences with those of men who write on topics regarded as traditionally female in interest. Do men who write about women’s fashion experience snark and misandry?

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I would expect these men to earn 78% of the snark and misandry of a woman.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        ” Do men who write about women’s fashion experience snark and misandry?”

        I suspect they’d mostly get assumptions about their sexuality.

        • 0 avatar

          I’ve long wondered why women take fashion advice from gay men. Seems to me a bit like asking a Ford guy what color to paint your Chevy.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            “I’ve long wondered why women take fashion advice from gay me.”

            Ronnie, finally out of the closet I see. Congrats, bro!

          • 0 avatar

            If they saw what my closet looks like, nobody would take fashion advice from me.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “If they saw what my closet looks like, nobody would take fashion advice from me.”

            Ronnie, such a kidder. Your closet probably looks faaaabulous! Your writing is fabulous! Everybody is fabulous!!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Ronnie Schreiber – Most likely just a case of stereotyping. I’ve known a few gay men that had horrific fashion sense. Just another dude who doesn’t give a sh!t about clothing or hair.

            Many women I know like gay men because they don’t see them as a mate, therefore they aren’t threatening in any way shape or form. Women see other women as competition for mates. Straight guys are potential suitors as mates or predators.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Those are all astute observations Lou, but it still doesn’t explain why many women often let a subset of gay men tell them how they should look. It’s an industry, and one that may well play the driving role in some women having poor self-images about their appearance. Lord knows it isn’t straight men telling women to look like coat-hangers.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Yet more Calista Flockhart bashing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            ToddAtlasF1 – Thanks. If we try hard enough we all can find common ground.

            Are all fashion designers a subset of gay men?
            The age old misogynistic adage, “men define themselves by what they do and woman by who they do” is part of the self esteem problem. That is compounded by the false belief that health, wealth, youth, and beauty are the four pillars of happiness portrayed by mass media and virtually every business with a commodity to sell.

        • 0 avatar
          hreardon

          ba-bum-tsssss.

          nice.

      • 0 avatar
        dogn

        I’m sure someone’s done a study on that somewhere, but I couldn’t guess as to what the results would show. I would assume that the same sort of thing happens in all careers to some degree regardless of which gender is under-represented.

        There are a few times however when I’ve been taken aback by the vitriol that spews forth from some keyboards, accompanied by the attitude that if I’m offended by what has been said then perhaps “I should just go back to the kitchen.” As if I’m an interloper and have no business even forming an opinion about automotive design, manufacture, or trending, simply for the fact that I’m female.

        That being said, I would *love* to evaluate, review or critique automobiles and other forms of transportation professionally if there were any hope whatsoever of also being able to pay my mortgage with the income. :)

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          “There are a few times however when I’ve been taken aback by the vitriol that spews forth from some keyboards,”

          We had a commenter post here that he hoped my son would be killed in a car crash. Was that because I’m a man? Was it because my son was a boy?

          The internet is equal-opportunity abuse. If you’re a woman, someone will tell you to get in the kitchen. If you’re a man, someone will call you a virgin — see comments by “April” above.

          • 0 avatar
            April S

            I never said being a “virgin” was a bad thing.

            Yours truly,

            “April”

            P.S. You putting “quotes” around my name is rather weird. It comes off as if you are trying to discount my humanity. What gives?

          • 0 avatar
            DaPlugg

            And i happen to love it that way,the only people who need safe spaces are the weak minded anyways and we are better off not having their genes carried on… So is april a dude or nah

          • 0 avatar
            dogn

            “We had a commenter post here that he hoped my son would be killed in a car crash. Was that because I’m a man? Was it because my son was a boy?”

            No, it’s because the commenter is an ass.

            *zipping up SFI 3.2A/5 driving suit*

            However the commenter was also probably male. In my experience (which is of course entirely subjective), the most vitriolic and over-the-top offensive comments seem to come from men. :)

            I’ve made some observations regarding anonymous interaction between people in the ##cars channel over the years. Women seem to be inclined to make more shots at a person’s self-esteem or confidence, making fun of appearance, genitals, social stigma, etc. Men will hope your child dies in a car crash.

            It’s most likely that they don’t really *mean* what they’re saying, it’s just that the internet anonymity lends itself to outlandish “shock and awe” type behavior.

            I would be more inclined to say, “I hope your son wants an automatic Smart Fourtwo as his first car.” :D

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            There’s such a thing as going TOO FAR you know

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “I hope your son wants an automatic Smart Fourtwo as his first car.”

            I’ve threatened my son with a Prius. He would chose death over that fate. LOL

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I noticed Prii were very popular in Europe, why not Canada, eh?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – hard to look like a manly man when the moose you shot has to get strapped to the roof of a Prius ;)

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            Sigh… I never get stuff like that even when I brag about going deep into the triple digit speed territory out on the open road.

            One of these days maybe I will and then I can reply; “I hope your mom is riding with me face down in my lap that day”.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            In the case of your son, I suppose every kid wants that Mustang Cobra, but most of us end up driving the Celebrity or Mom’s Caravan. In the cass of the Prii, its a life lesson that looking tough does not equate to being tough.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – my oldest son wants a ’77 Firebird TransAm or a ’79 F250 or a new’er’ reg cab long box 4×4 pickup.
            My youngest seems to fit the profile of many nowadays. He couldn’t care less about cars or trucks :(

      • 0 avatar
        tekdemon

        I would doubt it, many successful fashion designers have been men. And in general men tend to do relatively well in traditionally female fields, which some people attribute to a so called “glass escalator” which I don’t really think is the fault of men or anything but at least at my mom’s workplace everyone wanted the one guy in their division (they’re all nurses) to get a promotion so he would be a manager since they thought it’d make him more appealing to women (he was a single guy). There’s just weird societal tendencies that can sometimes result in weird situations like that even when nobody is trying to be overtly sexist.

  • avatar
    tedward

    Excellent point! The same dynamic might exist in teaching by the way. I’ve had several female friends try to lure me too the field with promises that I’d be snapped up in a hot second as a coveted male non pe applicant. I’d love it but it’s not what I want to do all at the same time so I’ve never pursued that path.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “I believed in EQUALITY, which I equated to SAMENESS.”

    Ah, but it was never about sameness – it was about equality of opportunity.

    I think a lot of men (me among them) had a similar misconception about feminism and the equal rights movement.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      Agreed. I’ve boiled by understanding down to 3 things:

      1. Equal opportunity
      2. Equal pay for equal work
      3. A non-hostile workplace. This one is tricky… I’m not talking about safe spaces, just basic human courtesy.

      Everything else, from attire, to holding the door open, to who pays for dinner, is up for interpretation.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      I think a lot of people hear “feminist” and interpret it as “feminine supremacist.”

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Roger Ailes made a lot of money training his flock to think that. And when they hear climate science, they think “Chines Hoax” and when they hear Colin Kaepernick, they think “traitor.”

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Kind of a condescending strawman, isn’t it? You set up phony questions like tee-balls, and then knock them out of the park (or just the infield).

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Two things:

    1) Posts about drama between car writers are BORING to those of us who are not car writers. And somehow you are always the one making those posts. Other writers you like make fewer of them. Even other writers you strongly dislike make fewer of them. Reading them is like watching a high school clique fight. I’m too old for that sh!t. And I’m (barely) younger than you.

    2) Whether the gender imbalances we see in various subject matter areas are a matter of nature or nurture is a great unsolved conundrum. The certainty you have that it’s mostly nature is just as wrong as the certainty of second-wave feminists that it was all nurture all the time.

    But in any case it’s totally irrelevant to why Mark should go out of his way to find female contributors (which he should). It’s not about an inherent wish to have people with certain body parts on the site or an effort to meet some kind of quota. It’s about a wish to get more interesting writing. The more perspectives you get, the more interesting TTAC is to read, and some of the most refreshing perspectives from the point of view of the typical male car enthusiast have come from women, both those who have written for the site and those who (too seldom) participate in the comments. TTAC has been a bit formulaic lately, as I think Mark recognizes, and an able female writer would be more likely than your average shmoe to help with that.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      +1
      Excellent post.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      “an able female writer would be more likely than your average shmoe to help with that.”

      And why would that be? Are women better than men at writing about cars? If you’re saying that a good female writer is better than a bad male writer, wouldn’t the answer simply be to hire more qualified writers regardless of sex?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Women and men, speaking very generally, tend to have different perspectives — something I’d think you’d be happy to recognize given how much you talk about differences between genders. Breadth of perspectives leads to more interesting reading and more interesting comments too, even if quality of writing remains the same.

        Hell, even some of those mommyblogger car posts would provide plenty for the B&B to chew on.

        • 0 avatar
          Eiriksmal

          +1.

          It was like when that one guy at Jalopnik started the “Will it baby?” thing. It provides a very, very different respective on vehicles when you’re suddenly evaluating their ability to fit a rear-facing car seat. (Oh, sure, your 5’10” friend can happily scrunch up in the back of your sports coupe, but good luck fitting in a generic rear-facing Graco, brah!)

          I’m not specifically searching for a female writer on TTAC, but I agree that having diversity (crazy psychopath and interesting writer Mr. Baruth, Vojta’s eastern European contributions, Mr. Schreiber’s old-man/family man perspective, Mark/Bark and Steve May-He-Rest-In-Piece Lang’s dealer perspectives, etc.) strengthens the publication.

          I stopped reading Jalopnik and moved here because their posts are so similar, (pretty pictures, crude language (FOR THE LULS!!!), same-old crutch descriptions, etc.) despite the variety of generic young white males they employ to write for their… young white male audience.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          yeah. the “sexism” thing is not about whether men and women have inherent differences; we do. It’s about presuming those differences define our actions, capabilities, and worth.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        If I were in Mark’s shoes, I would mentor a cadre of writers who represent different perspectives to broaden TTAC’s readership. This place does occasionally reek of a frat house at an old folks home.

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        No Jack,
        They may not be (or they might be) better at writing about cars but they would be different. I think that was the point of the directive to Mark to find a woman writer.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    *Michael Jackson munching popcorn .gif*

    It’s definitely a cogent point Jack. BUT, going off of what dal said above in terms of Twitter dramas not being particularly interesting, do you think it’d be possible to ply the B&B or outside for someone with some automotive-related adventure stories following the roughnecks of the industry? Like a cabbie in NYC, a BHPH lot owner, fleet manager, someone working in the oil fields or trucking industry?

    I’ve become obsessed with the Gold Rush type story of car runners in Siberia in the free-wheeling capitalism days of early 90s Russia, when guys would take a train out to the Far Eastern ports with American dollars in hand to buy fresh off the boat 1980s Japanese sedans, and then take a combination of dirt roads and frozen rivers near the border with China to caravan their way back to major Siberian cities 3500km away for resale with a tidy profit. These guys were modern day cowboys, dealing with road bandits and the harsh elements. If you got lost or stuck, you had to run the car to keep warm. Once gas ran out you burned your tires. Then the interior trim, then whatever was left that was flammable. The frosts would freeze up standing trees to the point where the wood would not easily burn.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrnOBl_qX0Q

    Heck I’d be willing to research the topic and write something up. I’m sure similar stories exist about the used car trade in Africa or Central/South America.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      This sounds like a good movie plot.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Nat Geo did a pretty decent little write up some years ago:
        http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/2008/06/trans-siberian-highway/mckenzie-funk-text

        “Alexei was simultaneously one of the best and scariest drivers I have ever known. It was a Saturday morning when he picked us up at our overpriced Vladivostok hotel, a ridgetop tower that smelled strongly of smoke (they hadn’t mentioned the recent fire when we checked in). His car was a white Toyota luxury sedan with gold trim, leather seats, and an official piece of paper marked “Tranzit” stuck to the windshield—a recent arrival. Its steering wheel, like that of all Japanese imports here, was on the right, the wrong side in left-hand-drive Russia. Its stereo pumped out loud electronica that heightened the feeling of being in a video game, of it being OK to weave through traffic at 80 miles an hour. We raced down the hill, taking in views of Orthodox churches and windswept Golden Horn Bay, and entered a crowded six-lane road. We swerved from lane to lane, passing everyone. After ten minutes we took a roaring left up a hill and were surrounded by used cars.”

        “Alexei introduced us to a friend, Andrei Shtirkhunov, who was wearing black jeans, a black Versace jean jacket, a black Versace cap, and a black Dolce & Gabbana belt. He was hawking ten nearly new Toyota Land Cruisers, almost all of them silver or white, almost all of them with CD/DVD packages. Shtirkhunov told us he’d been in the car business since the birth of capitalism in 1991—a golden period of zero import tariffs, 100 percent profits, and exponential growth. Cars were shipped west on the train, still cheap in those days, or, during the long winter, driven through the Amur on frozen rivers. (Even today, the highway is faster and smoother in winter—ice and snow fill in the potholes—but caravans are mandatory; if a peregonchik breaks down while alone, he’ll freeze to death.) Sell one car back then and you could buy two. Sell two and you could buy four.

        “It was the ’90s,” Shtirkhunov said. “We were all teenagers running around with shaved heads and leather jackets.” Sailors were the only people bringing vehicles from Japan, and when their ships pulled into port, armed gangs sometimes attacked, stealing the cargo. He went into business with his four best friends, two of whom eventually died of gunshot wounds. The others got rich. Shtirkhunov told us he’d even become a candidate for city council. “So how did you raise the money to buy your first car?” I asked. “We attacked a ship and stole our first car,” he said.

        It was easy to spot the peregonchiks at Green Corner: packs of hard-faced men in fake Adidas tracksuits who never took their eyes off the wares. We tried to stop a few to ask if they would be driving west—”Excuse me, where are you from?” “Excuse me, are you driving to the Amur?”—but they barely acknowledged us, grunting that they were too busy to chat. In one back lot, a seller wearing a gold chain and a Slayer T-shirt suggested that we become peregonchiks ourselves: We’d earn a couple thousand dollars if we resold his Honda in Novosibirsk. He said 10,000 rubles (about $400) would buy us a letter from the mafia guaranteeing safe passage through the Amur.”

        The romanticism of that business is going by the wayside as import tariffs keep going up and the Federal highway across Siberia (the “Federalka”) becomes increasingly paved and civilized. More law, fewer bandits.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Everybody in this business, with the exception of TopGear, is working under severe economic constraints.

      To really write that up, you’d need what the guy who wrote about Russian bears for Outside recently got — maybe $50,000 worth of travel, lodging, resources, translators, assuming the writer himself was willing to take a buck or word or less.

      I could tell you how much it costs to do the Road&Track PCOTY test, or the Car and Driver Lightning Lap, but you wouldn’t believe it. We are talking enough money to buy a light aircraft, split up among multiple contributors.

      When I went to Malaysia for R&T a few years ago to compete in the time trial at Sepang, I took a pay cut so the magazine could afford to fly me there and back. And that’s an organization that is worth many times what TTAC is.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Fair enough, the best I can offer from my own experiences/perspective as a West Siberian (the somewhat more inhabited and somewhat civilized-ish part) is a photo-essay of the sorts of cars people drive, and a road trip report or two. My brother is currently working on slowly reviving our family’s old ’71 ZAZ 966 that we still have sitting in our commie-block garage, the ultimate goal is to re-create our family’s first road trip from Akademgorodok to Biysk back in 1991. My brother and I were toddlers and my dad had to deal with the constantly overheating air-cooled V4, asking strangers for spare motor oil, waiting in line for gas, patching flats in the tube-tires. Back then the road wasn’t even paved entirely, these days it’s decent enough (2 lanes undivided most of the way, imagine a regular secondary 55mph road here in the US). We’ve done trips out to the Altai Mountain range and crossed unpaved steppes in rental rwd ladas (both new and used, both comically poorly built), a worn out RHD Corolla on which the ignition failed from all the shaking offroad, and even a pair of old Moskvitches. You haven’t lived until you’ve climbed mountain passes in an overloaded, overheating late 70s Moskvitch 412 that can barely hold 2nd gear.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I keep waiting for you to write something here. I figured it would be 4×4 engineering-y oriented, and with a nice chart or two.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I actually think I’d run out of steam pretty quick on the 4wd hardware stuff, and honestly a mechanical engineer that works for an OEM could probably do it much more justice. My biggest peeve that really brings out the pedant in me is when a reviewer or commenter is listing off an ‘offroad edition’s’ hardware and says something to the effect of “all the offroad goodies like skid plates and locking diffs.” Which differentials are locking? Are they even actually locking? The total ignorance of the mechanics by the people who get paid to review cars (particularly offroad-oriented ones) for a living is unreal.

  • avatar
    NoID

    *low frequency clap*

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Feminism is the second worst thing after communism. Although, if you can make communism work, feminism will be the no#1 worst thing.

    Sample 1. Any time I talk to mechanic, it is a man. I don’t remember any woman ever working in any of the garages where I brought my car, save for the front desk wives.

    Sample 2. Take CNN. They will complain about Trump “treatment” of women. But at the same time, they work for the employer who puts only good looking women in front of the screen. I don’t see any my neighbor Jody-types with 150 x-tra pounds on them.

    Sample 3. A famous car blog, with few women reviewers. These women are brain-dead. They call horrible things “great” and generally, base their reviews on their gender.

    some women need to get back to reality. we don’t discriminate gender, we discriminate the work.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      FYI, the mechanic who took half of my Acura Legend’s engine apart to clean the intake, top end, and EGR system, which is the best way to keep Legend head gaskets from blowing, is a ~30-year-old woman. She also happens to be a piece of one of the best Japanese specialty crews on the west coast.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Very interesting tidbit of info dal, I wouldn’t have associated top end cleaning with cylinder pressure. Back in highschool I helped a Vietnamese friend’s trailer-mate sell a fairly worn 2nd gen Legend with blown headgaskets on craigslist for $1000 as I recall, for a $120 finders fee. My first car flip you could say :)

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          It’s an odd issue. What happens is that the EGR system gets clogged, mostly by dirty oil making its way into the intake from the PCV system. The primitive ECU has a mode where it runs leaner at cruise, relying on EGR gases to cool the cylinders. But the system is too dumb to know the EGR is clogged. Boom, heads get much hotter than they should at cruise. Then you punch it and end up with scorching heads and very high pressure. There’s a weak spot in the head gasket behind cylinder #3 (driver’s side, firewall end) and the gasket develops a seep. At that point it’s all over.

          Honda fixed the issue in the first-gen RL by adding a baffle to the intake manifold that kept PCV oil away from the EGR system.

          When I got the car, the EGR system was still flowing — but barely — and the intake was full of oil. Part of that oil was coming up from below — leaky valve cover gaskets, not an unexpected problem on a 186,000 mile Honda.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Ooh boy I love a good “who dun it” automotive-guts story like that. Good info. Those 2g Legends are just fantastically handsome cars. Past the gauche/over-the-top/boxy phase of the 1980s Japan (which I love by the way). Much more refined but still having some tell-tale Japanese-ness. I’d put my ES300 and the gen 1 Diamante into the same camp (Legend being the best looking though).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            What was the massive fail with the Diamante that took almost all of them off the roads?

            Someone told me once and now I can’t recall.

            PS. Diamante Wagon was very handsome.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I don’t think there really was a ‘smoking gun’ with older Diamantes, they’re pretty well put together cars. The Mitsu 6G family of V6s is simple and sturdy, but with a bit of a propensity to leak and burn a bit of oil, both solved easily enough. The later bigger 2nd gen cars lost some of that quality it seems, they were assembled in Australia I think? I think it’s more so a lack of sales when new (very spendy car for what you got IIRC), and lack of a good parts source.

            My brother’s friend had a a pretty well used black gen 1 as a grad student, I remember it having some sort of CEL or some sort of electrical issue(?) that wasn’t catastrophic but was annoying. They’re certainly very handsome cars indeed. The Gen 2s I don’t care for anywhere as much, and they seem to carry much more of a flavor of BHPH ghetto sled.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh yes the gen 2 is much more a joke. Non-cohesive styling, poor build quality, and an MSRP equal to an ES of the time.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Diamantes are forever?

    • 0 avatar
      April S

      And I thought Dinosaurs were extinct.

    • 0 avatar
      WildcatMatt

      Here’s a data point for claim #2:

      I went to college and later worked with a talented woman of (I think) Philippine stock who is a reporter and anchor in mid-market TV. She may not be 150 pounds overweight but she definitely is not of the body type that will win beauty contests.

      Recently she did some blogging on the amount of fat-shaming she and her station receives and it was staggering given the viewership size.

      Moving on to observation, it seems that men in the public eye have to reach Chris Christie size before their weight becomes a target, but women have to be in a pretty narrow BMI window to avoid being told to either eat a sammich or lay off the bonbons.

      I think Oprah is the one of the few women in the media (granted, not a journalist) who has been able to weather a struggle with weight and body-image in front of a national audience.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    Jessi Lang has a PhD? Wow, pretty and edumacated!

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      She was astonishingly sexy in the second King Kong movie.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      What makes you think she has a PhD?

      Oh, wait, she puts it after her name.

      —Jack Baruth, Infiniti Product Knowledge Certified, 1994-1995

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I have some questions about the J30.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          And I am here to answer them! Sir, have you heard of the Leopard J Ferie? Allow me to tell you why we don’t use a glass moonroof? It’s for your safety!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Haha, nice.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Jack, I’m a fellow of fine tastes, and see the Infiniti badge for the hack job that it is. What can you tell me about the Nissan Gloria Turbo Brougham VIP Super Selection Ⅱ? I need something with ashtrays for all seating positions and privacy curtains for when I go to the teahouse establishments with my fellow salarymen.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Please allow me to introduce myself
            I’m a man of wealth and taste
            I’ve been driving around for a long, long year
            In a Caddy with the logo of a wraith
            And I was ’round when Bob ‘Jesus’ Lutz
            Had his moment of doubt and pain
            Made damn sure that Honda Pilot
            Washed his hands and sealed his fate

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            @VoGo – “Please allow me to introduce myself
            I’m a man of wealth and taste … ”

            Lyrics from The Strolling Tones, right? :)

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Wile E. Coyote, Super Genius.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      Old joke about degrees:
      BS = Bull $hit
      MS = More $hit
      PhD = Piled higher and deeper.

      I don’t think Jessie needs to put it in her signature, but I do understand her need to prove herself, constantly. I think she would be second guessed more than her male counterparts.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        What % of Twitter users even KNOW what PhD means? Hiring managers look there to see your credentials?

        Might as well put MBA on the back of your BMW.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I worked with PhDs for years, their internal Outlook signatures did not note the degree, but then again these were educated people.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          Have you looked at LinkedIn profiles lately?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I generally do not, the most recent one I saw was of a PM at a company from which we are looking to hire contractors.

        • 0 avatar
          WheelMcCoy

          At IBM, the PhDs did subtly look down on employees only with an MS. While this is a running joke on the comedy Big Bang, there’s a kernel of truth to it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Perhaps its different for STEM advanced degrees.

            I’d also like to see some of the folks you describe do some actual work for a weekend outside of their field (i.e. rebuild a motor, build/repair something in construction etc). Generally speaking, I find reality is a good solvent for smug.

        • 0 avatar
          JD23

          I have a PhD, as do many of my coworkers, and very few people use the PhD title and these are people with PhDs in Electrical Engineering, Materials Science, and Chemistry. I have noticed that overuse of this title indicates insecurity, as it is generally a crutch for poorly reasoned arguments.

      • 0 avatar
        Dingleberrypiez_Returns

        I always thought it stood for “player hater degree,” which in this instance seems particularly appropriate.

        jk- I actually respect most anyone who attains higher education, and have no problem with using PhD in your title… I just think that Mase line is hilarious.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          People be hatin’ ‘stead of celebratin’.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            Agreed. I’m making jokes too, but in all seriousness, I’m all for degrees and advanced degrees. It takes curiosity, intelligence, and dedication to complete a PhD program… not to mention a willingness to live just above the poverty line for four years or so.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “not to mention a willingness to live just above the poverty line for four years or so.”

            Personally, I’m not willing to flirt with poverty for letters behind my name.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    Hey! I wrote a feature article in Turbo and High Tech Performance magazine back in the 90s. Hell, I was even paid 350 bones for my work. Does that mean I can say that I’m an Auto Journalist? And published?

  • avatar
    bill h.

    Whenever I see pontificating about women writing about automobiles, I think of the One who could never be outclassed, Denise McCluggage.

    Copied without permission from her still existing (but sadly now memorial) blog, about the 2013 Daytona pole position competition. May she rest in peace:

    “Back to my normally-scheduled post …
    So a woman driver, a punch line in jokes since the first carriage chugged down the road without a horse pulling it, turned in a faster time than anyone else that day thus winning the pole position in NASCAR’s biggest race of the year. Perversely, one that opens the season rather than closes it. She becomes the first woman ever to do that. Out of the scant handful, one might point out, who have been allowed to try.
    Ah, let us search for deep meaning in this; everyone else seems to have.
    I would say it means she was well-prepared, well-taught, well-equipped and performed impeccably. Need it means anything more?
    Poles are unique things. Run against a clock during the moment and against other cars only in comparison. No drafting, no faking out another driver or out-braking someone in a corner. It is a unique, detached, separate thing there simply because every race has one. But, whish, wave the green flag and it’s reset time.
    Pole winners are not any more likely to win the race – indeed less so – than other drivers who have qualified. And so ephemeral is the glory in winning a pole in an ordinary weekend of NASCAR racing that the late Monty Roberts, a marketing guy from Anheuser-Busch, came up with the idea for the Busch Clash, an end-of-season race open only to the pole winners of the season. Whatever they call it now – Shootout or something – the race definitely adds more lasting weight to the feat of qualifying first.
    Doing that at Daytona means you don’t have to sweat out will you make the clash this year?
    Danica, you’re in!
    The pole winner at Daytona has a little more importance in Sunday’s 500 than on other weekends: the Daytona pole means that person has locked in that position for Sunday. And the second fastest (Jeff Gordon in this case) has locked in his place. Otherwise they would be subjected to the willy-nilly-ness of how they finish in the two qualifying races that pad out the big opening week of the season.
    The other advantage of being in that front row is that everyone else is – as of that moment—behind you. You have a clear view ahead, clean air and a good chance of maybe, possibly, leading at least one lap.
    But all of the specialness of being first is quickly consumed by the roar, the intensity and the excitement of it all. The Pole is over: the Race has begun.
    This particular pole, however, will be different. First, the Daytona 2013 pole was a humdinger. I don’t care whether it was driven by Dan Patrick or Danica Patrick it was a thing of beauty executed to perfection.
    And it was Danica Patrick who did the driving. This slip of a long-haired beauty who became the first woman to accomplish that feat has made this pole special. Tony Stewart, owner of Danica’s racecar, holds some “firsts” as well as some “onlys” himself. As he said: “There’s only one first time.”
    This was rookie Danica’s first go at it. She aced it. First woman. That’s what this pole means.”

  • avatar
    DirtRoads

    No matter what you say these days, someone will come along and try to twist it, feign disgust and bring their friends to beat you up on the playground after school.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      It’s the victimization of America. Don’t worry you’re not alone; we get the same garbage in Canada.

      Now can we get back to being productive individuals instead of paying attention to full-time (lifelong) students?

      • 0 avatar
        April S

        I suppose if it gets too bad you can always swim to Russia.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Russia’s a pretty awesome place to spend some time, I must say, especially if you leave Moscow and spend some time out in the “regions.” But in a grass is greener kind of way. Yes you avoid the “professional victim” class and it is nice to see lots of families walking around, seems like everybody’s got a baby, tons of kids still playing outside on their own (what a novelty huh?). But the lack of decent jobs is hands down the biggest issue. Imagine the American Rust Belt, but worse, and across a much bigger part of the country. The result of state-propped-up factories all collapsing all at once. I’d say much of rural Russia is approximately like West Virginia in terms of the socio-economics, how people live, etc. I happen to enjoy it but it’s not for everyone. I could probably take all of my savings and buy a nice little house with a yard in my grandma’s village and live out the rest of my years doing some sustenance farming and raising some chickens and pigs… but I’m sure that would get old at some point.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “I suppose if it gets too bad you can always swim to Russia.”

          Those leftist types ALWAYS bringing up global warming!

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    Thoughtful piece Jack! Your boss is under pressure to bring in new readers and more clicks, so I imagine his bottomline overlords think adding female writers will double the readership. But we know that doesn’t work.

    Jean Jennings was editor of Automobile Magazine for a couple of years. She did a nice job and the pieces were well edited (better than the atrocious editing at MT), but I don’t think she pulled in a significant new female readership.

    I too, hung with some feminist friends in my college years. Nothing to fear guys. They keep you on your toes intellectually. But I didn’t believe women entering male dominated fields would behave the same as men. I feared they would adopt some of the worst habits of men to stay in the game.

    • 0 avatar

      “Your boss is under pressure to bring in new readers and more clicks, so I imagine his bottomline overlords think adding female writers will double the readership. But we know that doesn’t work.”

      My ‘overlords’ give me a budget and I spend it as I wish. That includes finding new talent.

      Here’s the truth: TTAC is completely male and almost wholly white. It’s time to get some diversity around here. I’d love to publish a story about donks from someone who’s black. I’d love to publish a story from a woman about the reasons why female buyers would purchase one car over another. This isn’t diversity for diversity’s sake. There are many demographics not represented here, so we have literally zero insight from the inside of that demographic.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Nothing wrong with having a goal to round things out here. Variety is the spice of life.

      • 0 avatar
        April S

        Hi Mark,
        It’s not completely male here. Well, unless they put me on super secret double probation again.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        What about Hispanic low riders? That would be an awesome article.

        • 0 avatar

          There’s literally an entire magazine empire devoted to lowriders.

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            Sure, but there’s a whole magazine empire dedicated to African American Donks as well.

            “Here’s the truth: TTAC is completely male and almost wholly white. It’s time to get some diversity around here. I’d love to publish a story about donks from someone who’s black. ”

            I took that to mean you were looking for ideas on increasing the diversity of TTAC. I stand by my statement; I think coverage of hispanic car culture would make for an excellent expansion of diversity around here.

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        “TTAC is completely male and almost wholly white”

        I think @VoGo put it best: “This place does occasionally reek of a frat house at an old folks home.”

        FWIW, even though my handle is WheelMcCoy, I’m not Irish. I’m Asian American… and given the April thread, I feel compelled to mention I’m a dude.

        The B&B political leanings seems to be equal parts left, equal parts centrist, and equal parts right, which is a good thing. I’ve also noticed popular articles (based on the number of comments) usually involve anything Honda/Acura, Mazda, Tesla, Fuel Cells, EVs, Ethanol, and the JB pieces like this one.

        I do, however, recognize the need for a bigger, “broader”, B&B. I have no answers, but I see a yellow light in the form of Jean Jennings. She had her own website devoted to cars, with a female target audience: http://www.jeanknowscars.com/

        Go there, and you will be greeted with an “Error 404”.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Once again, I have CLEARLY missed something going on at TTAC. Don’t visit for a few days and real entertainment happens.

    Who is April? What is this all about? I need more popcorn.

  • avatar
    B_C_R

    Wasn’t her (Lang) career torpedoed when she was involved in that terrible crash in Germany? I didn’t see much about her after that.

    There have been a number of solid female auto journalists that I’ve enjoyed reading over the years, mainly Erin Riches who used to work at Edmunds and Emme Hall who has worked for TFL and CNET among others.

    To bolster what Jack said, I really don’t mind or care if you’re a female or male or trans or whatever, so long as I enjoy your work.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    “(4011 is the produce number for bananas, btw.)”

    I know. It’s part of my lame joke go-to repertoire.

  • avatar
    Paul Alexander

    What’s the old truism, ‘Women writers/drivers, no survivors’?

  • avatar
    whitworth

    Women have different interests than men. We now have to deny that reality and pretend that’s not true.

    But the sooner we realize that the Twitter/HuffPo mob actually has no power, the better. These harpies can never be placated and there’s no “scalp” that will ever satisfy them before going after another.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    “As a former fast-food employee of long standing, I can tell you that such is actually not the case: women and men in McJobs tend to drift into predictable job patterns. Typically you put women up front where the customer can see them and you have men doing anything that is behind a partition or that involves a mop. But that’s besides the point.”

    You have never been to a McDonald’s in Texas then. It’s a little different. Up front are the guys/girls (really can be either) who speak the best English and Spanish. In back are the employees who are unilingual (Spanish only or English only).

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I grew up in an era before America had open borders, and I worked in Ohio. The crew was 80% white and 20% black at most places. Sometimes it was 100% white people.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Someone should go tell the 60,000 U.S. Customs and Border Protection workers that they are out of a job, since the subject of a full-length(!) feature in American Journalism Review has pronounced that we have open borders.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          And while you’re at it, tell the thirteen million people who strolled past those 60,000 people.

        • 0 avatar
          mike978

          Having 11-12 million illegal aliens ( or do you prefer undocumented immigrant?) In the US does not imply a well controlled border.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Jack,
            Your statement implies that America has opened its borders during your lifetime. The reality is that our borders were always porous.

            I guess I could be convinced to care about undocumented workers if:
            – we weren’t at full employment
            – there was an alternate means of getting our produce to market, meat processed, homes cleaned and tables bussed
            – it were proven they were less law abiding (they are not)
            – numbers of undocumented were rising (they actually fell by a million last year)
            – lawmakers proposed a rational policy to addressing the issue that did not involve deporting millions of people.

            Finally, keep in mind that half the undocumented migrants here didn’t cross the border in the middle of the night, evading border patrol. They flew here on visas, which they then overstayed. That’s not a border issue.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Mike,
            Undocumented is the more accurate term, because in many cases, it isn’t clear whether or not an immigrant is legal. Immigration law is complex, even for attorneys specializing in it, and a lot of people don’t understand their status.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Vogo – sorry, you are playing semantics. They are illegal because they are staying in contravention of the law. I emigrated to the US from the UK 11 years ago. I did that legally, involving fees, paperwork and an interview at the embassy in London. I then, in 2011, went through the process to become a citizen. Immigration law can be complex but it can be done legally. Agreed some do overstay visas but by your own numbers that still means 6 million came over the border – so calling it a border issue is justified. Also we are not at full employment. My wife, who is well educated an a native Ohio, has been unable in the 2 years we have been in PA (moving up from NC with my work relocation) to get a similar job to the one she had with Duke University. She has tried but for many of the positions (editing jobs and university admissions) there are hundreds of applicants.
            By the way, I became a citizen in part to vote for Obama in 2012. I may well vote Trump because illegal immigration, which you dismiss, is an issue. Immigration is a big issue you and the Democrats ignore at your peril (Brexit anyone!). It not only undermines the rule of law but does change the culture, when no-one was asked if they wanted the culture to morph into a Latin American one.

            I suspect that you think they should be allowed driving licences since they are here, then they should be allowed to vote since they after all have to live under the system our elected leaders run. Where does it stop?

            Your main argument seems to be “who will pick the fruit?” Hardly a key argument to design a sane policy around. I take you as a Bernie supporter (who I liked a lot), and am surprised you support big business importing cheap labour.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Mike,
            As you have been through the process, you realize how complex it can be. What you may not realize is that many people here do not know their status. Many for example are here legally as political refugees, depending on where they left, and why. I personally don’t make assumptions that people are ‘illegal aliens’ based on skin tone or language spoken.

            Being Jewish, I will never support a candidate who is running a campaign the centerpiece of which is vilifying 11 million people as rapists and criminals and targets them for resettlement elsewhere.

            As far as drivers licenses go, if you deny people the ability to get a license – they are still going to drive, but without insurance. That doesn’t seem wise.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Trillions spent yearly in the name of chasing our own tails. It’s stupid to ship them to their home countries while completely ignoring their employers that will hire the them right back when they or their cousins come on back. Of course Trump is already on the payroll of big industries hiring illegals. If there’s suddenly no jobs for them, they’d deport themselves!

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            “If there’s suddenly no jobs for them, they’d deport themselves!”

            They would have before they started qualifying for billions in handouts anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Vogo – you are being disingenuous. Yes the process can be complex but for those who sneak across the border or are smuggled over it isn’t a case of oops I forgot to completely fill in form I-171. They know their status and that status is illegal.
            You mentioned crime, there have been studies that show it is higher and other studies that show it is at the same rate. Even if it is at the same rate you will have had more crime with 6 million definitely illegal people being here who shouldn’t.
            As for driving licences the issue is you have then given them a commonly used form of ID which then normalises their illegal status. It then starts the slippery slope to them having other benefits and privileged of legal residency.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Kids have wandered into Canada playing Pokémon Go, but Mexico is evil.

            Or something.

            Look, *automation* has eliminated a lot of manufacturing jobs. Anyone who thinks there’s any chance we’ll return to the “utopia” of the 1950s where anyone can get a high paying unskilled job is living in a fantasy land. Scapegoating those filthy Mexicans isn’t going to help.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Todd – They come here for illegal jobs, and yes collect benefits here and there. That’s the price we pay for the benefit of big business, and really, all of us. Yes there’s trade offs, but more good than bad. And they pay billions in taxes collected, but not refunded, by use of bogus SS#’s and tax IDs. Plus sales tax by the billions. Illegal dollars spent are as good as anyone’s. The Feds know exactly what’s going down.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @DenverMike – your comment is correct. They are in the USA because they find jobs. They add value to the USA economy even though they send billions home to support other family.

            In Canada, back in the 70’s there was a huge influx of immigrants from the Indian subcontinent. They gobbled up all sorts of jobs like taxi drivers, most manual labour jobs and many saw mill jobs. Many of the locals especially First Nations peoples complained.
            My dad was as redneck as they come and was never one to mince words. His reply to the whiners, “If you lazy bastards took all of those jobs, they’d have nothing to come to.”

          • 0 avatar
            DirtRoads

            VoGo, being Jewish somehow gives you the moral high ground? Amazing.

            I’m Irish; I guess I can’t possibly have any moral standing eh?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Lou_BC – Whiners should keep updating their McDonands applications. Maybe management *ACCIDENTLY* deleted their files…

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            DirtRoads,
            You really work hard to find a way to get offended.

            I mentioned that as a Jew I am particularly sensitive to the idea of a country vilifying people and packing millions of them up for ‘resettlement’ because it echoes of the Holocaust.

            It doesn’t mean Jews are special and Irish are not, just that many Jews have a historical sensitivity around ideas like this. Perhaps if Trump had suggested that we allow Mexicans to only eat potatoes, and there was a blight — you might find that idea especially abhorrent.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        Huh. I admit that I was naive but I really didn’t think my statement would touch off this sort of firestorm. For me it was just a statement of fact. Where I live I have always lived, gone to school, and worked alongside hispanic people. It’s just life here.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      DevilsRotary86 – it is an election year. That means there is no such thing as an innocent remark ;)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    FWIW Jack, I miss Cameron Aubernon. She did a great work with assignments that weren’t glamorous. I wish she had gotten her driver’s license while she was here just so she could have done some reviews.

    B&B, I may not agree with your sentiments but dang it you made me laugh.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    I think this may overlap with the recent article about how sport package BMW track reviews are not relevent to propective car buyers. While that may be true, I don’t think it matters. Those articles sell magazines, and its not to the gender that we already know doesn’t give a damn about cars. While it would seem like a valuable resource to have (possibly female penned) articles about the practical ins and outs of minivans and crossovers, I frankly don’t think anyone would read it, least of all women.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      “While it would seem like a valuable resource to have (possibly female penned) articles about the practical ins and outs of minivans and crossovers, I frankly don’t think anyone would read it, least of all women.”

      I would, and then if thought there was a chance that it was so well written that it could persuade my wife to give a minivan a chance, I’d get her to read it. :-)

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Welp, today was a good day to drive into Iowa and get a new grain trailer. It was overcast and piddling rain since 5 A.M.

  • avatar
    tedward

    I just gave this article a thinking over and I’m entirely puzzled. If mark was using social media to solicit submissions and resumes doesn’t that exactly satisfy the definition of searching for women writers? If not, what the hell do the critics want? It’s certainly more involved and proactive than just posting a listing on random job sites, which is, you know, exactly how the job market in general basically works.

    Maybe they want ttac to find someone with no resume, maturity or knowledge in the field and bring them up from nothing. This is a thing of course but that person could look forward to getting savaged in the comments for the inevitable basic errors and poor assumptions that would populate their written work. It would hurt the ttac brand and mark’sreputation as an eic.

    It is extremely uncommon to find women who have immersed themselves for years in industry news and have driven a wide range of cars. Then (and these are unrelated to gender obviously) they would have to write well, be impressive critical thinkers and not already have pursued a corporate career in the industry which I’m sure pays better than this. Those odds are long as hell.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’m not much of a MotorTrend fan so I had never heard of Jessi Lang before this and decided to Google her name.

    I found this old thread on VWVortex and it is the Vortex at its most Vortex-y.

    forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?5056302-Who-is-Jessi-Lang

  • avatar

    Figured you folks could provide an explanation. Is not “offence” an older form of that word and “offense” the more modern (and perhaps more accepted) spelling of the word? Noticed this more often than I expected the last few days and, well you know, inquiring minds and the like it or not I’m coming to get what you owe me and I’m not taking no for an answer but rather a reply. So what do you think, Buffy? Hmmm.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Well here is a topic that has generated more comments than a story about compact pickups!

  • avatar
    Whittaker

    If different perspectives is what TTAC desires, it should seek out people with different perspectives. Sounds simple, right?
    But instead it is seeking people with particular chromosomes or skin pigment.
    The logic escapes me, as it escaped MLK…which is weird because I look nothing like him.

    • 0 avatar
      everybodyhatesscott

      They don’t really want different perspectives. They want the exact same perspective in a different package. They had a commenter that was a different pigment and offered a different perspective that a lot of other commenters actually liked and they banned him.

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