By on August 22, 2016

2015-ford-falcon-xr6-ute_100480760_h

Every country has its linguistic eccentricities. The Brits continue to call transport trucks “lorries” (and then there’s all that “boot” and “bonnet” stuff), while other locales adopt their own unique terminology for the same object or thing.

The first-generation Buick LaCrosse was sold as the Allure in Canada because “lacrosse” is Quebecois slang for something to which an entire Seinfeld episode is dedicated.

Australia is no different, but many people Down Under aren’t happy with a new term that is creeping into the country’s vernacular: “truck.”

According to the Aussie publication CarAdvice, the imminent demise of the country’s beloved “utes” — car-based pickups similar to the long-departed Chevrolet El Camino — is breeding a backlash to the proper terminology for their conventional replacements.

The land of dingoes and shrimp on the barbie spawned the car-based utility back in the 1930s, and they enjoyed a long run, even after the segment died out in North America. Last month, the Ford Falcon Ute ended a 55-year production run, and the Holden Ute’s looming death will seal the coffin.

Replacing them will be newfangled “pickup trucks,” such as the Ford Ranger and Holden Colorado (Chevrolet Colorado in the U.S.).

Rob Margeit, editorial production manager of CarAdvice, explains the reaction: “And this has, if you believe the multitude of social media channels that drive so much of today’s discourse, gotten up the collective noses like flies in a desert of a horde of patriotic and jingoistic Aussie car buyers.”

Of course, patriotism has clouded the conversation. Australia — where water swirls the opposite direction as it leaves the toilet bowl — already has a bevy of smaller pickups from the likes of Toyota, Mazda, Nissan, Mitsubishi and Izuzu.

Unlike the utes, these conventional vehicles have a cab and a utility bed, and are very clearly “pickups.” Utes were always a passenger car with the rear seating removed (and replaced with a bed). The two aren’t interchangeable, and “pickup” is the proper term, the publication writes.

“So it seems this latest disquiet is not so much about the loss of an Aussie icon itself, but rather the slipping from the lexicon of that most Australian of words, ute, in favour of yet another Americanism,” Margeit writes. His advice? Stop worrying, bogans.

Our advice is the same, only it also involves a case of Fosters and a ride on a kangaroo.

[Image: Ford Australia]

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127 Comments on “Maybe the Dingo Ate Your Terminology: Australians Angered by the Term ‘Truck’...”


  • avatar
    ExPatBrit

    This is a travesty.

    Pretty soon the “bogans” won’t be able to drive to the “bottle shop” in their “utes” to “pick up” some “coldies”.

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    Well, if they don’t like it they should come to America where hipster types fall all over themselves to co-opt foreign slang.

    There’s few things more insufferable than listening to someone from, say, western Michigan use “bloody” as an expletive with zero sense of irony. Ditto on the gearheads that have adopted “hooning;” No one outside the internet knows what you’re talking about, stop it.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I was in Albuquerque for the Tax Free Weekend saw a poor old Lexus SC400 (pearl white, deeply tinted windows) plastered with HOONIGAN! stickers obnoxiously placed. We were side by side in the Sonic parking spaces and his head sure turned when I fired my Highlander with the aftermarket muffler up.

      I think he was distracted by the TRD badge on the liftgate.

      But I did get a chuckle out of HOONIGAN on a Japanese car.

    • 0 avatar
      Carzzi

      “No one outside the internet knows what you’re talking about, stop it.”
      They’re posting inside the Internet. Not too many Luddites left outside the Internet anyway. Jeez, not another “cultural appropriation” proto-PC-SJW.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    Ugh. Enough with the swirling misinformation already!

    http://www.snopes.com/science/coriolis.asp

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    The Falcon (and I believe, the Holden) Ute could be had in a cab/chassis form, often upfitted with drop-side flatbeds.

    Are they pickups? The have a separate bed in that instance.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “shrimp on the barbie”

    Those would be “prawns”, mate.

    “a case of Fosters”

    They’re not really crazy about Fosters, either.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Those would be “prawns”, mate.”

      District 9! Fookin’ most cartoonishly bad movie evah!

      Well, after Avatar.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        It was supposed to be about District 6 the Coloured Area, in South Africa under Apartheid. Made into a SF movie to make the message., bit more palatable .

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        If you think District 9 was bad, you should watch the even dumber Elysium! It’s basically the same film, except about Mexico and a space station instead of South Africa and a slum.

        Jodie Foster’s accent is hilarious as she tries to mix upper-crust American with British at random times.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “..tries to mix upper-crust American with British at random times.”

          You just made me need to watch it, if only to learn what the Received Pronunciation of American is.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            As long as you’ve nothing else pressing to do, give it a watch. If you keep a critical eye open, you’ll have enough to notice and discuss to keep you occupied.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Watching High Hollywood Derp of a linguistic variety *is* something pressing to do :-D

            Especially when recommended by Grango!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Frend–

            Oh, I do can recommend you take in a viewing! When I saw probably two months before, I went to my Cousin’s flat. He say he has a movie which was a “DVD Screen Shot” so I think it must be a special edition of the DVD. I notice people once or two across the frontage of theatre…

            And I say to him, “This is reminding of like a Mystery Science Theatre 3000’s!”

            But Cousin Egraz isn’t as worldly-pleasuring like Grango is, so a reference flied away into space (like you do when you watch a Elysium! ha ah)

            Best-=
            Grango R.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Grazie arrigato!

      • 0 avatar
        46664

        The “prawns” in District 9 are not a reference to shrimp, but to the Parktown Prawn, which is a South African type of cricket. They’re a bit of a legend locally for being basically indestructible and having an extremely varied diet…

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      I had never met a beer I was repulsed by, until I tried a Fosters. Yuck.

      I don’t care much for Budweiser products, but at least (when cold anyway) I’m not tempted to pour it out rather than drink it.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Fosters wasn’t even sold in Australia for a long period of time until recently. It’s still not popular there though.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Next you are going to tell they don’t really like Subaru wagons either.

  • avatar
    ydnas7

    just opened the the local newspaper, and there’s a review of the new Mitsubishi Triton
    Powerful, Hardworking Ute blah blah blah

    the Toyota add below just says Hilux, (no mention of ute or truck or pickup)

    the only person i worked with who called a ute a truck was a pom. admittedly at that site a truck weighed 30-40 tonnes and carried an additional 30-40 tonnes of rock.

    since aussies have been driving asian utes since forever, just say Hilux, and everybody knows what your talking about.

    the word truck implies something like a Mack, or a B-double, or a Komatsu

    if the vehicle does not require a special license, then its probably not a truck (Fuso Canter style trucks are the exception)

    • 0 avatar
      Coopdeville

      Ok well don’t leave us hanging, what’s a “pom?” Is it someone who works on an open mining site? Google tells me it means “prisoner of mother England” but that doesn’t make much sense.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Pom is a slang term for an English person.

        The “prisoner of Mother England” and other notions of pom being an acronym are commonly believed but are incorrect. It was actually rhyming slang and may have referred to the sunburns that were common among the recently arrived Brits. (Australia today has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world; some things never change.)

        http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-pom1.htm

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “I got a Ford Superduty Hilux!”

  • avatar
    theonlydt

    Being a Brit, being able to distinguish what someone means when they say “truck” is actually pretty useful. Let me give an example:

    – A truck backed into my car and left a dent
    – Oh, a transport truck, or a pick-up truck?

    Or:
    – A lorry backed into my car and left a dent
    – Oh no, and only a day after that pick-up backed into it too!

    Ute is a good term, I hope Hyundai use it for the Santa Cruz, if it’s appropriately car based.

    • 0 avatar
      Macca

      Point taken, but it isn’t as if Americans only have the term ‘truck’ at their disposal…

      Lorries are typically called ‘semi’, ’18-wheeler’, or ‘tractor-trailer’.

      I like the different vernacular terms myself, especially ‘lorry’. On my visits to England, I just took exception to one lorry passing the other because his governor allows him to go 2 MPH faster, all the while blocking traffic.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        That happens in the US a lot. Takes 15 miles while they play yo-yo, because one truck can more easily maintain speed on hills, but the other has a slightly higher governor. So, down the hill, he gets 80% by him, going back up a hill, he’s 50% behind him, back and forth and back and forth and I’m sitting back there with everyone else, wondering if the shoulder is wide enough for me to slip by. (I have never, and would never attempt such.)

      • 0 avatar
        theonlydt

        I would use “semi” to indicate a state halfway to arousal…

        What’s an 18 wheeler when it only has 16 wheels? Or 14?

        Tractor-trailer – what do you call it when it doesn’t have its trailer? Yes, a tractor unit, but, then, what’s a tractor?

        I’m a Brit living in Canada, so I know the right terminology, and use it to not sound stupid, but there are certain words that are better on this side of the pond, and some that are worse.

        Lorries overtaking each other anywhere in the EU is absolutely painful. Miles and miles stuck behind them. Especially two laners like the M11. Canada has rules confining trucks to the inside lanes in certain areas and that’s a great way to do it.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    An article carefully selected about controversy surrounding trucks and utes in Australia? The banner should have a Big Al trigger warning.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    As an Aussie In canada, some of the words used here and the states just makes me shake my head.

    Tractor trailer is the first, this would imply a Tractor pulling a trailer, but it’s not even close. It’s a truck, just call it a truck.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      A tractor trailer is called that because the front part with the engine and driver is called a tractor. The part the tractor tows is a trailer. If they are attached, calling it a tractor-trailer seems quite logical.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Tractor Trailer, never used here. It is the type of truck. No Travel Trailers either,they are Caravans. Trailers are for
        Goods and livestock . A Group of caravans is a Convoy

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      In my earlier life, as a shipper receiver for GM, everything I shipped or received ,required me to enter the tractor, and the trailer number.

      • 0 avatar
        Alfisti

        So what do you call a tractor, as in the farming equipment?

        We just call it a semi trailor

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          That’s called a tractor, too. Its all in the context.

          “That tractor-trailer almost ran me off the road!”

          “The tractor got stuck while we were bailing hay, almost didn’t get back.”

          Pretty clear which is which, I don’t recall ever being confused as to which one was being referred to. Lots of people around here call them a “big truck” or “semi truck”. Some call them an “18 wheeler” but they don’t always have 18 wheels, so I avoid that one myself.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            *baling hay. You would only “bail” hay if you were sailing on a sea of hay and your boat suddenly sprang a leak.

            “The hayfield is an ocean in which no oar is dipped…”

          • 0 avatar
            warrant242

            Let him who has never bailed hay catch the first crab.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Indeed, the “truck” part never has 18 wheels, that I’ve seen.

            Typically 6 or 10, sometimes 12 or 14 with pneumatic axles.

            The whole *rig* is an 18 wheeler (nominally).

            But I’m kinda twitchy that way…

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      It’s a road tractor.

      Not a farm tractor.

      It’s not our fault Australians don’t speak English…

      (I kid, I kid.

      Mostly.)

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Perhaps they could lower the suspension on the trucks to around about where the old F-100 would have had it and then, by comparison, it can be a ute?

    We love Australians. They were the best tunnel clearers on our side in Vietnam. It’s a shame it took about 10 years too long to ship over a Holden and call it a Pontiac. No, they don’t like Fosters.

    • 0 avatar
      theonlydt

      I loved that where I was brought up in England we had “Bar Oz”, that very proudly sold Fosters, that was brewed in a massive facility on the outskirts of town. Both are now closed :(

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Maybe they’d prefer “brodozer”.

    /ducking

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “Truck” is one word for “chow”, food, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Vulpine,
      Food is called tucker, not truck.

      If you were in Australia and said “I’m goin to tuck into a feed and sink some p!ss”. Means you are most likely going to a BBQ or Pub/Tavern/Hotel (A hotel is a bar with single basic accommodation) to have a counterie. A counterie is a bar meal.

      So, you could say “I’m goin to waltz down to the pub for a counterie and some p!ss”.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Just make using the term “truck” a bootable offense.

    Problem solved.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      ajla,
      You’ve been watching too much of the Simpsons.

      • 0 avatar
        Trucky McTruckface

        And you haven’t been watching enough, because perhaps then you’d have a sense of humor. My God, must you and your wet blanket personality run roughshod over every comment thread even tangentially related to trucks and Australia?

        At least DeadWeight and BTSR’s threadjackings were mildly entertaining.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I’ll enter the fray.

    I tend to use US terminology lots on TTAC so my fellow US countrymen can have some comprehension of my scribes. Yes, this might surprise many I was actually born on Long Island NY and did Elementary School on the South Jersey shore were my step father owned fishing trawlers.

    As a kid in Australia we tended to use “ute” as anything other than a lorry or van. A van was a Morris Commercial van or a Thames type van.

    A lorry is a real truck, not a pickup, CUV, SUV, PT Cruiser, etc. A truck is purely for work. They are working vehicles. We don’t need to feel good and call a car alternative a truck, when it isn’t.

    A ute is anything with basically a style side tub or a “ute” front end with a trayback. These are mainly what we call “one tonners”. Why because the orignally carried one ton, later on one tonne. Some now can carry as much as the bottom end of the US’es 3/4 ton trucks.

    A “semi” (pronounced sem-eye) is what the Americans call a tractor and trailer. The thing pulling the trailer is a truck. A tractor is used in agriculture for plowing, cultivating, spreading, etc in Australia.

    A B Double is a one and a half trailer truck combo. A B triple is a trailer, plus two half trailers. A road train generally has three and a half trailers, essentially a B double pulling two full trailers. There are a few roads with a seven trailer limit.

    A Garden or Lawn tractor is called a “ride on mower”. What the the US calls a “weed eater” we call a “whipper snipper”. I have yet to see a whipper snipper eat weeds. They only eat the nylon snipper cord.

    Fosters is sh!t and no real Aussie will be seen holding one in his hands, let alone one in his stubbie cooler.

    We call beer “p!ss”. Beer can be bought in cartons of 24 or 30 in tinnies (cans) or stubbies (generally 375mm bottles). Carton are called slabs, cartons, and/or cases of p!ss. Beer drinking, fishing, camping and 4×4’ing is a great Aussie pastime. Especially during our 4 day Easter break.

    Don’t use the word “root” in Australia as it is more derogatory than using fnck. It’s about on par with using c*nt. A root is a cruder way of saying fnck. You never state “I’m rooting for so and so”. Bad move.

    A 4×4 wagon (real SUV) is normally called a 4×4. A 4×4 ute is called a 4×4 ute.

    It is not common to put a “shrimp” on the BBQ here either. It’s far more common to have a sausage sizzle or cook steaks and lamb chops with sh!tloads of p1ss. Every one is happy then.

    • 0 avatar
      Eyeflyistheeye

      Hey, what does Kristen from Richmond NSW (name changed to protect the nympho) and my Android phone have in common?

      Both of them became ten times better in my book after I took them home and gave them a good rooting.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      My recollection is that Aussie utes have beds that look entirely different from what we are accustomed to in the US. Are these what are called traybacks? In 2000 very few utes had beds like US pickups.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @jimbob457
        They are Utility Trays Many US Pickups have had their Pickup Beds changed to Utility Trays
        http://tyrerengineering.com.au/?page_id=19

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        jimbob457,
        In Australia now at least 3/4s of utes have an American style bed. Only a diehard trayback (flatbed) person and the majority of business people will use a trayback.

        Many sub contractors now buy a pickup as such and tow a tandem wheel trailer with his tools and stuff in the trailer.

        I don’t mind calling a ute a pickup, but I will not call them a pickup truck or truck. They are not trucks as such.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “I’ll enter the fray.”

      I’m sure you are the only one rooting for that.

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    I’d have called them chazzwazzers.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Robert Ryan,
    Why is it you never seem to enter into the cultural discussions involving Australia? Has me wondering, you know.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    Well, they can add an -a or an -o to settle the discussion and keep it culturally authentic. Like cup of coffee is a cuppa and right (as in “OK, you’re right”) becomes righto, I wonder if the antipodes would be satisfied by calling it a trucka or a trucko.

    Personally, as an American who’s dated Aussies, the only thing I refer to as a ute is a Commodore/Falcon with a bed.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Eyeflyistheeye,
      A “cuppa” is generally a cup of tea. This is from the British. A coffee is a coffee.

      In our homes we generally drink instant coffee and espressos. Most or at least many Aussie homes has an espresso machine.

      The Cafe culture in Australia is huge. Star Bucks couldn’t get a foothold because the cafe industry is to competitive. Most cafe’s are owner run as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Dann

        “Most or at least many Aussie homes has an espresso machine.”

        As an Australian myself, I find this highly unlikely.
        Instant coffee, or even pods, on the other hand…

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Dann,
          I haven’t seen you comment on TTAC before;) Its great to see an Aussie making a comment.

          I don’t what part of Australia you are supposed to be from???? Maybe not, eh.

          http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/home-espresso-machine-the-musthave-item-for-australian-kitchens/story-fneuz8wn-1226679246435

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            I don’t get those pod machines at all.

            Dooming yourself to a life of mediocre and overpriced coffee. I’m sure it’s an improvement for some, but it’s mostly a symptom of the “soft-drinkification” of coffee. It’s an excuse to drink lots of sugar and fat, with a subtle hint of coffee aroma.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Pods make me mad. When do I want a single cup of coffee which takes as much labour to make as a regular pot of it?

            It’s only sensible in places where you want to dispense small amounts of coffee for free – like a car dealer, hotel, or mechanic.

          • 0 avatar
            46664

            I live in Melbourne and I have never owned an espresso machine. Most people I know don’t own one either.
            There are a few Starbucks outlets in the Melbourne CBD, but I agree, they’ve never been able to compete with the small cafes.

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Here in Americaland, Nespresso pod machines aren’t proper “espresso machines”.

            (I mean, they probably ought to be considered that since they really are pump machines, but nevertheless, that’s how the terms work.

            Language doesn’t have to be rational as exemplified in this entire thread.)

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            heavy handle,
            A pod is filled with something akin to an instant coffee. The problem with pod coffee is the lack of flavour and crema. Crema is the non milk forth/cream.

            I’m not a big fan of use filtered coffee. Most can’t make a decent coffee. Wawa does make a great filtered coffee. Dunkin Donut coffee is really sh!tty. I will not even buy a Dunkin Donut coffee, even if I had coffee withdrawals.

            I think it comes down to the quality of the coffee beans used. Cheap coffee, equals cheap beans, equal a sh!t drink.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Still rooting about with that multi-poster paranoia of yours I see.

          • 0 avatar
            Dann

            @Big Al from Oz

            I’ve been around for a while, but my comments are few and far between. Like you, I too am from the Brisbane area (well, west of Brisbane).
            The article you refer to is ill-titled, it refers more to Nespresso/pod machines, rather than traditional espresso machines. I certainly wouldn’t refer to then as espresso machines.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Dann,
          Like Barista’s they are a growing phenomenon . Still a lot of very hot Tea with Milk drunk

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Eyeflyistheeye can add F250/F350’s as ” Big Utes” Ford/ Holden are the original Utes. Now every Asian Pickup is a Ute

  • avatar
    Rocket

    It sounded like a silly thing to take issue with, until I remembered how much I hate the term “coupe” being applied to anything with more than two doors. If it has four doors, IT’S NOT A COUPE! Curse the Germans automakers for starting that trend.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Coupe refers to the roofline, not to the door count. (Coupé is the French word for “cut.”) SAE has modified this somewhat so that a coupe is defined by interior volume.

      It is possible to have two-door sedans and four-door coupes, even though they usually aren’t.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        A coupé (/coo-pay/, or US coupe, /coop/) (from the French past participle coupé, of the infinitive couper, to cut) is a closed two-door car body style with a permanently attached fixed roof, that is shorter than a sedan or saloon (British and Irish English) of the same model, and it often has seating for two persons or …

        ………………………………………

        So, Pch101, it appear the “cut” as you term it might be in the length of the vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          The implication in a coupé is that it was “cut” from a larger car, such as a sedan. The number of doors is not implied, although most coupés have had two or three (hatchbacks).

          In other words, a VW CC, which is “cut” from a Passat, is a coupé. A Chrysler 200, which uses a similar roof line, is not a coupé because it is not derived from a high-roof or longer model.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “The implication in a coupé is that it was “cut” from a larger car, such as a sedan.”

            In the first coupes, the rear passengers were covered but the driver was not. Nothing to do with derivation.

            “A Chrysler 200, which uses a similar roof line, is not a coupé because it is not derived from a high-roof or longer model.”

            That has nothing to do with it.

            These days, it is determined by interior volume. Whether or not there is another car in the lineup is irrelevant.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            PCH, I was talking about where the term comes from, historically. These days it’s a marketing descriptor that manufacturers bestow upon a car if they think it will increase profits (through higher sales or margins).

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        “Refers” in some limited European usages.

        In *American* usage it hasn’t meant anything other than “the two door one” in *decades upon decades*.

        Words have varied meanings, not “A Single Meaning”.

        (SAE J1100 is said by the internet to define “Coupe” like that, but I can’t find any reference to the word in either the scans or the text extractions I’ve seen, so I’m not sure I believe it.

        But for that matter, while SAE can define anything it wants for purposes of the CFR it can’t dictate real-world use – and *descriptive use is how language works*.)

        The fairest statement I can find is that “coupe is a word whose meaning has varied over time” … and nobody has to accept this latest change prompted by ghastly German marketing.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        I agree with Pch101. The original term “coupe” refers to roofline.

    • 0 avatar
      Ermel

      Wasn’t us. It was the British, with their Rover P5 Coupé.

      But the trend sucks anyway. I even don’t call cars like the CLK or the two-door E36 “coupés”: they have B pillars all the way to the roof, so they’re two-door sedans in my parlance. The only way a B-pillared car can be a coupé is to have a totally distinct, low, sporty body style; the VW Karmann Ghia, Opel Calibra, or VW Corrado spring to mind.

      Oh, and btw I cringe when Americans say “coupe” to rhyme with “soup”. (Although to be fair, most of the cars described with that word are equally cringe-worthy ;-)

  • avatar
    JK43123

    They should just consider themselves lucky they have the small pickups to choose from.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It’s clear many Ozzies aren’t too happy about their domestic “Utes” going the way or the Dodo, and taking down the Ute term with it.

    But I suspect many aren’t real happy about the American coined term “pickups” winning out, since it’s an American original, as are the trucks themselves.

    So the “Ute” term will live on indefinitely in Oz/NZ, unofficially. Here’s a Caradvice article comparing 8 “Utes”. Of course they’re just midsize pickups to us. Except obviously, any other (China/India) Utes need not apply.

    caradvice.com.au/388419/ute-comparison-ford-ranger-v-holden-colorado-v-isuzu-d-max-v-mazda-bt-50-v-mitsubishi-triton-v-nissan-navara-v-toyota-hilux-v-volkswagen-amarok-2/

  • avatar
    bunkie

    In Britain (and, possibly, other commonwealth nations) a lorry is a subset of truck styles, what we here in the US would call a flat-bed truck. A permanently-enclosed truck body (Box Truck in US parlance) is known as a van.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    I can”t resist a coupla comments.
    I say Koopay but you can’t sing “Little deuce coupe” without the American pronunciation.
    On the tractor-trailer controversy, around here we always referred to the ‘tractor’ part as the prime mover.
    I own a Falcon one tonner with the tray back and have trouble deciding what to call it. (The owners manual says Falcon Ute)

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Spike_in_Brisbane,
      I’m living in Brisbane and I have yet to hear “tractor” used. My friend at works brother owns a heavy transport maintenance business repairing trailers and diesel work on the trucks.

      The term used in Australia for “tractor” is PRIME MOVER.

      Example; Read the name of the link, are you really an Aussie as well?

      https://www.machines4u.com.au/browse/Truck-and-Trailers/Prime-Mover-Trucks-354/Brisbane/

      • 0 avatar
        Jagboi

        Wherever I have worked a prime mover is the engine itself. E.G. in a diesel-electric railroad locomotive only the diesel engine itself is the prime mover, not the assembly of everything else (alternator, traction motors, frame etc) that makes it a locomotive.

        A tractor is a common term for the unit that would pull a trailer (typically 40′ long). Tractors would be made by Kennworth, Western Star etc, but could also be called trucks. A differentiator is they all have air brakes.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        paranoia will destroy ya

        Someone mail BAFO an aluminium hat or perhaps he needs to try an aluminum one.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “leetle doosay koopay”.

      I can.

      But I’m happy to butcher my own language for cheap wordplay, so honestly that shouldn’t count.

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