By on August 6, 2016

Untitled

It’s hot, it’s the middle of summer, and the beach beckons from afar. But if stripping down around a bunch of muscle-bound surfer hunks causes bouts of anxiety and insecurity, fear not. Ford Motor Company has a solution.

The great thing about 1960s car commercials is the complete disregard for political correctness and subtlety when it comes to stroking a driver’s ego. It’s hard to imagine a world where manufacturers so nakedly sold a lifestyle by pumping out vast quantities of innuendo in a bid to lure buyers into dealerships. Trigger warning!

Hocking a menacing GTO or Charger is easy, but what if you had to sell a low-priced base model in the ’60s? Easy. Stick with the plan.

To get up-and-coming Boomers (who just landed their first real job) to buy 1965 Mustang convertibles, Ford riffed on the old Charles Atlas body-building ads. The result? This commercial, in which young Albert’s teenage girlfriend laments, “Every time I went to the beach with Albert, some big muscle guy was always kicking sand in his face. It made me so mad. He tried all the exercises, went through the diets… I wonder what ever happened to him.”

Cue the sultry “Mrs. Robinson” voice. That pale, wimpy guy you knew from the beach still has the body of a budding accountant, but his new Ford just delivered a heaping dose of confidence.

“Albert’s a Mustanger now,” says the voice-over, as if speaking naughtily to a friend. “Nothing soft about this car, except the all-vinyl interior and the carpeting.”

Wait – what, huh? A nation of male television viewers slowly rouses themselves from their slumber.

“With a big, 200 cubic-inch strong-arm six, he’s got a tough, new kind of action.”

A nation’s drinks collectively spill on the sofa. Yes, that’s the Ford Falcon’s base engine, many think. But now it sounds sexy and compelling and I’d step over my neighbour’s body for one taste of –

“Put a few kicks in your life – take a new Mustang out for a little road work,” says the velvet-voiced lady, as Albert suggestively works the shift lever in his new ‘stang, kicking sand into the face of a surfer with his rear wheels.

You can just imagine Albert’s thoughts: The punk probably works in a burger stand – he’ll never know the thrill of Mustang life. Thank you, capitalism. Just try getting one of these babies in Russia. I dare you.

Just to make sure the audience — now sitting rigidly upright while pondering their life’s many mistakes — gets the message, the breathy voice-over repeats the words “Mustang…Mustang….. Mustang,” for their benefit.

It’s seductive, exploitative, and very lucrative. Ford sold 559,500 Mustangs in 1965, and made its entry-level 120 hp straight-six seem like the heart of an untamed, primal warrior. For just $2,614, a glamorous — and quite sexy — middle-class lifestyle awaits, or so the ad would have your believe.

These days, all we’re allowed to do is refine our #DadBrand or slyly cheat our insurers (thanks to automatic braking). The ’60s, for better or for worse, are truly over.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

135 Comments on “Hitting the Gym Won’t Restore Your Masculinity, but Buying a Six-cylinder Ford Will...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’d say the fake masculinity bar is higher now.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      SCE to AUX,
      I don’t think people have changed, look at the article below with the overly powered Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Yes, but is it as blatant? There’s a mother lode of publicity to be mined by returning to the unsubtle, in your face advertising of yesteryear. Sure, there will be protests, but when you go Hollywood, there’s no such thing as bad publicity, especially when it’s free.

      You can always say it’s retro, and meant as a parody. Underscore that argument by including free fuzzy dice for every sale. If Sergio had thought to do it, the 200s and Darts would be flying out of dealerships!

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        You never see an Old Spice ad from Wieden+Kennedy? Pretty much half of that agencies work is what you’re wishing for, but the Old Spice campaign is more blatent than blatent.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “I’d say the fake masculinity bar is higher now.”

      I got one word for ya: Thundercougerfalconbird!

      http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=83SQ9Runp2Y

    • 0 avatar
      macmcmacmac

      Vaping.

    • 0 avatar
      Grant404

      Yeah, today it would need to have a fart can and a big wing on it.

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    I thought this was going to be about the need for a 3.5l ecoboost F150 Supercrew 4wd.

  • avatar
    Instant_Karma

    A million times better than those stupid Buick commercials.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    I thought the Falcon’s base 6 was 170 cid, and the 200 cid was optional.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Wasn’t there a 221 in the 60s as well?

      • 0 avatar
        Joe Btfsplk

        The 221 was a V8… the first member of the 221-260-289-302 family.

      • 0 avatar
        skor

        The 221 was a V8 first used in the Fairlane for 1962, and a gutless wonder is was. After 1962, the engine was bored out to 260 cid. The 260 was used in the Falcon, Fairlane, and “64 1/2” Mustang. In 1964 the engine was bored out to 289, the classic Mustang small block V8. The 289 was a gem of an engine, hitting the right balance between power, weight, durability and economy.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I’m pretty sure there was a bigger straight six in the late ’60s, and not the big six that was the base engine on full size cars and trucks. Not that people bought many Mustangs with sixes after the 289 and 302 became available.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Lorenzo,
        When I was a kid in the States my old man had a Galaxy with a 300 straight six.

      • 0 avatar
        CobraJet

        The 65 full size fords had a 240 six. As a kid my friend’s mom needed a new car. She couldn’t afford much as a widow with 4 young kids. Ford used to have a spring “white sale”. All the cars were white in color and stripped down. The car she bought was a 65 Ford Custom with the only options being full wheel covers and whitewall tires. It was probably as cheap as the six cyl Mustang.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        @Lorenzo: There was the 250 Thriftpower, a stroked 200. Unrelated to the 240 and 300 “Big Sixes.”

        The 250 was used on various compact/mid-size Fords through about 1980, whereas the 240 was used on some fleet special Customs and F-100/250 Customs through 1973ish. The 300, of course, soldiered on in the F-Series until 1997 (and even later in some specialty applications).

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The Falcon had a 144 I6 as its only engine the first year; in 1961 stroke was increased to make the 170, the base engine on both the Falcon and Mustang. The 200, a stroked 170, came later. Then the 200 was stroked again to make the 250, used on ’69 Mustangs and Mavericks, as well as other small/mid-size Fords, through about 1980. It was also used in some agricultural applications–our late ’70s Owatonna (OMC) swather has a 200 painted lime green like the rest of the machine, but with a Ford plate on the side. It’s gutless and spews various fluids from time to time, but it’ll run all day.

      The 240 “Big Six,” which was a different engine entirely, was used in full-size cars and trucks, along with its bored-out big brother, the venerable 300. It might have also been used in some Fairlanes, not quite sure.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Our Falcon started to diverge from the US original in spactacular ways,most dramatic mid 1970’s Falcon in the Mad Max movies

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I can see why surfing never really took off in the US with vehicles like this for the young beach goers (joking).

    Whilst you guy had in line sixes, V8’s ruled here.

    The Aussie panel van is more Aussie than the ute, not many people realise this. They were an adaptation of the ute.

    In 81 we ran an HQ van at the drags and pulled consistent 12s, this is from a 308 as well and not a Chev. I did read someone describing acceleration back in them days. This was rapid for it’s time.

    http://www.mediadynamics.com.au/streetlight/the_vans_that_rocked.html

    http://www.mediadynamics.com.au/streetlight/images/Ch12-Holden-HZ-Sea-Witch.jpg

    Holden vans were called Sandman,

    http://www.adelaiderememberwhen.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Shaggin-Wagon-2.jpg

    http://www.seabreeze.com.au/img/photos/surfing/9423116.jpg

    https://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NDI1WDY0MA==/z/O-AAAOSw1KxXNDna/$_35.JPG

    https://www.garageart.com.au/uploads/holden-hz-panelvan-1-sm.jpg

    Valiant van called the Drifter,

    https://doogiesdiecast.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/drifter-van-white-01.jpg

    http://ih1.redbubble.net/image.29449754.8327/flat,800×800,070,f.jpg

    Ford vans were called Surferoo vans,

    http://www.earlyfalconcarclubqld.org.au/images/cars/546.jpg

    For the budget minded they even had Ford Escort vans, Japanese vans as well.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Lol, the shaggin’ wagon.

      Conversion vans filled the same niche in the US for a while, until they became stereotyped as RV pullers for old folks, or mobile charnel houses for perverts (and eventually devolved into the ‘free candy’ van).

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Vans could have been redesigned decades ago to beat the stigma.

        But the core customers didn’t care, and the manufacturers didn’t want to turn off the money-press long enough to update the models…

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        bumpy ii,
        Many of these vans were similar to muscle cars of the era. Smallish and light vehicles fitted with a V8, some tuned V8s as well.

        The working vans mainly had an inline 6, with a few V8s. But, like pickups most ended up becoming a young mans toy.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Actually, the sixes were base engines here. Most people bought a V8 if it was offered. The base engine and base everything else provided the low advertised price, but buyers optioned up.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “The great thing about 1960s car commercials is the complete disregard for political correctness and subtlety when it comes to stroking a driver’s ego.”

    Political correctness didn’t exist in the 1960’s.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Have you seen the recent ad for the Colorado? Same theme, maybe a little more subtle.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        VoGo,
        Utes here have always used the beach and macho image to attract males to buy them.

        Sexism is rife in motor vehicle ads. Maybe TTAC can do an article on how the marketing people try and attract a certain type of person to their vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      rpol35,
      I do think the motor vehicle is viewed by many males as their bower. Like a Bower Bird they think it will attract the “best” female.

      Bowerbirds /ˈbaʊərbɜːrd/ make up the bird family Ptilonorhynchidae. They are renowned for their unique courtship behaviour, where males build a structure and decorate it with sticks and brightly coloured objects in an attempt to attract a mate.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowerbird

      I do worry about some of the pickup frat, why are they trying to attract males?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @BigAl – You got that all wrong.
        Guys who use “props” to attract females aren’t looking for the “best female”. They just want to get laid and any port in a storm (or back seat) will do.

        Must be an Aussie thing, using pickups to attract males.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Dumb car ads are nothing new…check this beaut from Land Rover…

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ff8Eg-cjBLI

      So incredibly dumb on so many levels.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        “So incredibly dumb on so many levels.”.
        .
        Kidding right ? this was _BRILLIANT_ ~ I bet it boosted the hell out of sales in West Los Angeles , Sta. Monica , Topanga and other rugged places mere mortals feared to tread .
        .
        -Nate

  • avatar
    carveman

    The author’s obvious envious masculinity issues aside one has to view the Mustang even the six cylinder version in the context of the times.

  • avatar
    BobinPgh

    One thing was politically correct there, they had Albert fasten the lap belt. I also notice he was wearing dockers (without the logo) before they were on the market.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Political Correctness is the trend towards eliminating racist language in favor of more inclusive word choices.

      Wearing a seat belt is about not being a complete fool. These are different.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        VoGo,
        I think political correctness is an attempt by the left to replace good old fashion manners.

        If someone is a d!ck, tell them, if someone doesn’t pass an exam or screws up call them a failure. This is viewed as incorrect.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Big Al,
          There has been a trend towards trying to boost children’s self esteems by not confronting them with hard truths. It’s come under a lot of criticism, much of it justified.

          But that is different from bring politically correct.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The truth hurts.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Some of the changes made to help with kids self esteem that are welcome. Consider when I was a kid the gym teacher would pick the two best athletes and have them pick their teams in front of everybody. All those in the bottom half were shamed; those who were picked last really were humiliated. Practices such as this should never return.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I can’t speak to your experience, but I was typically in the middle to the end of such things as I was the skinny kid with no muscle tone. I don’t remember being mocked for it but then again it was almost 30 years ago (that’s also not to say I hadn’t dealt with a bully or two either for different reasons). My suggestion to those who feel bad about being in such a situation is to be coached on stepping up and bettering yourself. Yes a six year old has a different emotional perspective than an adult but if a teacher/coach/parent allows them to think “they can’t” at age six, they will grow up thinking as such instead of “yes I can do anything I put my mind too”.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Golden2husky:
            “Consider when I was a kid the gym teacher would pick the two best athletes and have them pick their teams in front of everybody. All those in the bottom half were shamed; those who were picked last really were humiliated.”

            Yes, this kind of BS ruined sports for me, and by extension, exercise. It pretty much undermined everything that was supposed to be taught in gym class.

            I got over the exercise problem on my own, and I exercise now. But a good teacher could have saves me the trouble of figuring it out on my own. (And sorting out the teacher’s BS from the real information.)

            I got.l my self esteem in other ways. I’m a pretty good software engineer. But trying to humiliate me into giving a $#!t about gym class didn’t “encourage me to do better”, it encouraged me to dismiss athleticism and everything related to it as pointless.

            P.S. According to Facebook, the kids who were at the top of that pecking order mostly peaked in high school.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “If someone is a d!ck, tell them”

            How can I respond without triggering censorship?

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          “I think political correctness is an attempt by the left to replace good old fashion manners.”

          Not quite. But you’re closer than most.

          What you people call “political correctness” is just a set of basic manners to keep you from looking foolish in a college town, city centers, or sone other multicultural setting.

          It’s a set of rough manners that will keep you until you get to know everyone.

          Alas, this is missed by most of people who push “political correctness” and all of people who dislike it. But I live in a college town (which is where it started), and the problem it’s supposed to he solving is obvious.

          But, hey, manners are optional. Being judged by people who have them is going to hapen of course, but you don’t have to care.

          • 0 avatar
            JD23

            “Consider when I was a kid the gym teacher would pick the two best athletes and have them pick their teams in front of everybody. All those in the bottom half were shamed; those who were picked last really were humiliated. Practices such as this should never return.”

            Isn’t this a microcosm for how the world works, whether it be relationships, work, or education?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I think we’re just saying that in this modern age we’ve figured out how to separate kids into 2 teams without being d1cks about it.

            The kids already know who the best players are; no need to rub it in the faces of those who need a little longer to develop.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Luke42 – your comment about peaking in High School bears out at least anecdotally.
            I was talking to a buddy about this. We both went to separate schools and when we went through the list of jocks, popular chicks, nerds, egg heads, stoners et cetera the most successful tended to be the smart nerds and “mid-pack” types. The popular chicks married young and never got out of the pecking order mentality and so did many of the popular/jock guys. The “mid-pack” types were used to working hard and that continued on in life. Many of the smart nerds continued on to good careers.
            The rest expected life to follow the same high school pecking order where they always succeeded without much effort.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            As hurtful as those gym teachers were back in the day, the one thing that is the great equalizer is time. Occasionally I will see some high school classmates on the train or the gym. Most of the top jocks now sport bloated bellies that hang over their belt, have little or no muscle definition and a decided shortage of hair. When I see them I laugh inside. Back then I would have never thought that I would be in far better shape and apperance than the jocks.

            ….Isn’t this a microcosm for how the world works, whether it be relationships, work, or education?….

            Perhaps, but there is no reason to intentionally inject hurt into the psyche of an eight year old. That is not to be confused with the Millennial approach of a medal for everyone. I’m not suggesting that. But there shouldn’t be a “reverse medal” where somebody wears the badge of shame because they botched the rotation in volleyball.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        “Political Correctness is the trend towards eliminating racist language..”

        Only racist? Just making an obligatory observation as a freakin’ feminist.

      • 0 avatar
        GeneralMalaise

        Political correctness is all about control. You have no right to not be offended.

        http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2016/08/government-says-wearing-dont-tread-on-me-insignia-might-be-unlawful-racial-harassment.php

        You can see the results of this horse stuff on college campuses with “safe spaces”, claims of fearing for personal safety when all but leftwingers make appearances on campuses, etc., etc.. It fools no one.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          People may start to take you seriously when you start citing respected news sources, rather than right wing blogs.

          People opposed to being politically correct are essentially saying that they want to use racist and sexist language and not get called out on it.

          • 0 avatar

            Will the Washington Post do?

            https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/wp/2016/08/03/wearing-dont-tread-on-me-insignia-could-be-punishable-racial-harassment/

            Eugene Volokh is a professor of constitutional law (a real law professor, unlike one part time lecturer whose acolytes refer to as a constitutional law professor) at UCLA.

            I guess George Orwell must have been in favor of racist and sexist language: https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/orwell46.htm

            Doesn’t holding yourselves up as moral avatars get a little tiring after a while?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Granted BTSR was over the top and rude, especially on political issues, but you’re the TTAC Trotsky.

            Why is this acceptable behavior?

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            You speak for your ilk, Vogo. Here’s an example of your idea of a “respected news source”:

            http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/09/science/fire-smoke-evolution-tuberculosis.html?src=twr&smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0

            ‘Nuff said…

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            No, Mr. Malaise,
            I speak only for myself. Not for an ilk, a tribe, or anything else.

            I’m not a moral avatar. I don’t even know what that means. I’m just a regular guy who likes cars and occasionally tries to clear up lies when I see them on a site about the truth.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            Now he’s a victim… sheesh.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Malaise, but when you continually attack someone without provocation, you’re going to get that kind of response.

            By the way, since we are citing sources today, please check out my new favorite website:

            http://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/2016-election-forecast/?ex_cid=rrpromo

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Eugene Volokh is a far-right blogger, not a journalist.

            Unfortunately, with all of the hacks in the right-wing blogosphere who are so eager to be opinionated for the sake of it that they can’t be expected to get their facts straight about a non-story, we’re left to relying upon Snopes to debunk Volokh’s argument.

            http://www.snopes.com/president-obama-is-banning-the-dont-tread-on-me-flag/

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            Re-read the initial post and your response to it, Vogo. There was no attack on you, so don’t whine.

        • 0 avatar

          +Infinity on that one, General. What parts aren’t about control are about virtue signalling and expressions of tribal affiliations.

          Regarding that ridiculous (as in worthy of ridicule) EEOC ruling, by the standards expressed therein, a pretty strong argument could be made on behalf of someone objecting to a co-worker’s hijab or other Muslim garb on the grounds that in some “contexts” there are associations between those things and bad stuff.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Ronnie,
            All I did was explain what political correctness means. I don’t know why you feel the need to jump all over me. I could not care less about New Hampshire’s flag.

            Every time I write something you don’t like, you accuse me of virtue signaling, which is nonsense, given that for virtue signaling to work, the person doing it cannot be anonymous.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            simpering, Low-T twaddle…

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Now look at who brought up Trump again!

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            “simpering, Low-T hucksterism…”

            Bejayzuz! He’s right!

            VoGo, tell me this ain’t you:

            https://ideasofthevagabond.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/simper.jpg?w=480&h=320

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            Snopes has been shown to err on the side of the left numerous times. Don’t look to them to augment what remaining critical thinking skills you may have.
            A recent example…

            Snopes “completely ignores several major factors, including that Iran’s own government insisted that the payment was a ransom for the men.

            “Iranian press reports have quoted senior Iranian defense officials describing the cash as a ransom payment. The Iranian foreign ministry didn’t respond to a request for comment,” The Wall Street Journal said (via the Federalist Papers Project).

            And then there’s Iran’s Fars News Agency, which quoted the leader of Iran’s Basij Militia, Brig. Gen. Mohammad Reza Naqdi, openly saying that it was a ransom payment.

            “The annulment of sanctions against Iran’s Bank Sepah and reclaiming of $1.7 billion of Iran’s frozen assets after 36 years showed that the U.S. doesn’t understand anything but the language of force. This money was returned for the freedom of the U.S. spy,” he said, referring to released U.S. Marine Amir Hekmati.”

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The brain cell count isn’t exactly high around here, either.

          • 0 avatar

            Those who engage in virtue signaling first and foremost are telling themselves how righteous they are.

            Eugene Volokh is a libertarian. Learn some taxonomy.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            He’s on the far right.

            But in any case, here’s a thought: Instead of behaving like a sheep and relying upon him to tell you how to think, why don’t you read the EEOC “ruling” and figure out what it actually says? (Big hint: It didn’t rule on the case.)

          • 0 avatar

            “The brain cell count isn’t exactly high around here, either.”

            You’re still here?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Whenever the law is the topic at hand, you manage to screw it up. This is no exception.

            You really should stay away from anything related to the law until you learn enough to comment intelligently. Otherwise we get 2000+ word screeds about bankruptcy or parking signs or whatever that are riddled with inaccuracies.

          • 0 avatar

            So it wasn’t a formal ruling – they allowed the case to be investigated. Oh, that’s right, there’s never a “chilling effect” when you’re on the side of those making new rules.

            There’s certainly enough in there to figure out where the EEOC is headed with this.

            In any case, if you’re going to quibble about “ruling”, Prof. Volokh never said a word about Pres. Obama banning that flag, so the Snopes (whose own balance is in question) post is irrelevant to this discussion.

          • 0 avatar

            Some folks really yearn to be the commissars.

            Oh “the law”, which can only be understood by well trained adepts, loyal to the guild.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You really don’t understand the law. At all.

            It’s a procedural issue. The complaint should not have been ignored, given the nature of the allegations.

            Ignoring the complaint creates grounds for yet another complaint. Do you really want there to be two separate complaints arising from this?

            As for your militant dedication to getting the facts wrong, that’s a personal problem that you ought to solve on your own outside of TTAC. Why they give you a byline, I don’t know.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            You can lead a mule to water, Ronnie… pay no mind to the self anointed arbiters, it’s their personality flaw to work on and their brain-cell deficiency to overcome.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I’ll confess to a resemblance, Kenmore.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            “As for your militant dedication to getting the facts wrong, that’s a personal problem that you ought to solve on your own outside of TTAC. Why they give you a byline, I don’t know.”

            I actually like when Ronnie writes about cars. It’s when he strays off topic that he embarrasses himself.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            It will drive them insane, Ronnie. Facts and truth don’t adhere to their narrative and they dislike being reminded of that.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You should be thrilled that you have the village idiot on your side, Mr. Schreiber.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            kvelling?

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            Far-left kvetching,…

  • avatar
    pannkake

    Great commercial. It’s obviously tongue-in-cheek. Those cars must have been a joy to drive with out the “optional” power brakes.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I’ve driven 1960s cars without power assist, and it’s not like dragging a stick or anything. You quickly realize how long stopping distances are from various speeds and adjust your driving style to match. Hydraulic drum brakes on all four wheels provided adequate stopping. Power assist and front discs were just better.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I see nothing wrong here. It’s a tv ad for a car after all, take it seriously at your own risk. I found it mildly amusing.

  • avatar

    Back in the day, the aspirational buy was the big 8. This guy, though, with a normal job, could buy the six, probably have money for dates, and pay off the car in 36 months…on a not-spectacular but steady job. The eight was too much $ with the rent for his one bedroom. His supervisor could buy the 8.

    So, feelgood marketing with a touch of satire…

    This guy today lives with mom, has two jobs with zero benefits, drives a 90’s honda, and can’t afford dates but as “netflix and chill’ is today’s date, he’s OK. Has a nice iPhone, though.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Bring on the asteroid.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Now, Now, Society is just going through a phase. This one is usually followed by a retrenchment and sweeping away of excesses, and a new burst of energy and growth. It happens every few generations, usually triggered by conflict of some sort, either war or some kind of “we’re mad as hell and not going to take it anymore” attitude that runs amok. That period is what the Chinese mean by the curse ‘May you live in interesting times’, and we may be getting close to that now, worldwide.

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      “This guy today lives with mom, has two jobs with zero benefits, drives a 90’s honda, and can’t afford dates but as “netflix and chill’ is today’s date, he’s OK. Has a nice iPhone, though.”

      Not *two* jobs – Social Security and a gig as a Wal-Mart greeter to pay for prescriptions.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    This guy is not a wimp. I am a wimp. I’d have bought a Falcon.

    In fact I did, an eleven-year-old station wagon.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’d rather go for a 2-door Monterey with an Interceptor 390.

    What was the price difference between the V8 Falcon and an I6 Mustang?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I couldn’t find original MSRP for the V8 Falcon with no other options. The step up in price for the base Mercury Comet I6 vs. the V8 was $154 in 1965, though.

      The Falcon Futura convertible I6 was $2481 base, and the Mustang Convertible I6 was $2614 base.

      Chances are the Falcon V8 was about the same price as the I6 Mustang in 1965, but the biggest difference was styling. That’s why over 73,000 Mustang convertibles were sold to about 7,000 Falcon convertibles.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    C’mon guys….. that commercial was satirical. Have you no sense of irony?

    The.”kick sand in the face” thing was from Charles Atlas ads in comic books that hadn’t changed since the thirties and was a running joke by then, sort of like “Help I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” Only more so.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    The 200 six wasn’t even good by 60s inline six standards.

    Bet a 250 Camaro would dust a 200 Mustang at the drags any day.

  • avatar
    thelastdriver

    Buying a 1989 Camry Wagon LE V6 made me feel like a man again… For $800

    http://i.imgur.com/PqmD0Bl.jpg

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I don’t even remember seeing commercials for current generation of Mustang and Camaro. I know I have seen the Dodge brothers and Challenger series of commercials about various Challengers and Vipers and all, but I really can’t remember last time the current Mustang and Camaro were featured in commercials on TV.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “A nation’s drinks collectively spill on the sofa.”

    Young Man, you set that drink down on the TV tray this instant!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    There were many cars with 6 cylinders and 3 speed manuals and many were bought because of their lower price but many were bought because many were use to straight sixes and manual transmissions. With a manual transmission this Mustang would have still had decent acceleration but it would not have burned rubber. I would rather have the V-8 but when I was young I would have just been happy to have had this car with the six and the manual transmission in a hardtop. As for the brakes and the steering these were light enough that they were not that hard to drive but today’s power disc brakes and the power assist steering are better. You need to put these vehicles in the context of their time and realize that with safety equipment today’s vehicles are much heavier and would be harder to drive without power assist steering and brakes. I would rather not have power steering on one of these Mustangs since the power steering would have over steered and had no feeling. I drove many cars without power steering and power brakes for years especially Japanese. I would love to have this Mustang today even with the straight 6, it would still be a neat car and fun to drive.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Good point. The original Mustang hardtop was based on the Falcon/Comet, and weighed about 2,500 lbs. Today’s Mustang GT hardtop weighs 3,700 lbs.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      The American I6 never got any love, even though an I6 can be used as the foundation for a fine performance engine. I6 Mustangs and Camaros were considered ‘secretary’s cars’, while I6 Falcons and Darts were ‘cheap bastard’ specials. Back in the day Pontiac produced a nifty little overhead cam I6 for the Firebird, and nobody bought it.

      Of the 60s American I6 engines, the Ford 144/170/200/250 were especially wimpy because the cylinder head used a integral cast intake manifold that had the internal dimensions of a wormhole. Fitted with a primitive single barrel carb, they made very little power, and short of extensive machine work, they could not be modded easily.

      In the land of Oz, Ford took the North American I6 and produced proper heads. The result was some of the finest I6 engines anywhere. Watch this first gen Mustang, fitted with a Ford Oz turbo I6, run the quarter in 9.4 seconds.

      youtube.com/watch?v=siWqyB87LNs

  • avatar
    tonyola

    My first car was a somewhat scruffy maroon ’65 Mustang convertible equipped with the 200 six and a three-on-floor stick – also no power steering or brakes. It served me fairly well in the four years I had it (’74-’78) including a three-month jaunt from Florida to southern Mexico and back. There were a few electrical gremlins due to a clueless previous owner’s attempt at underhood wiring and the shift linkage came adrift once leaving me with only second gear. Fortunately repairs were cheap and easy even for one with my limited skills. I learned how to double-clutch because of the non-syncro first gear.

  • avatar
    skor

    Ford North America produced 3 different I6 engine families in the 60s which were used in passenger cars and some trucks. The 215/223/262 family of I6 engines….a 1950s holdover engine design. The 240/300 used mostly in trucks but some cars as well. The 300 I6 was build in the North America until 1996 and was loved by UPS. The 144/170/200/250 family of engines used in Falcons, Fairlanes, Comets, Mustangs, Cougars, Granadas….etc.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I6s were very popular in the 60’s. It is what you are use to driving and what you grew up with. My father had a 1962 Chevy II 300 4 door with a 194 cubic inch I6 with 120 horse power and I believe the carburetor was a Rochester 1 barrel with a Powerglide automatic. It had a padded dash, side chrome strips with a chrome strip on the rear which were all optional. My father special ordered it in Roman Red exterior and matching red interior with red rims and hubcaps and an AM radio. My two older brothers and I drove it to high school and I drove it the first couple of years in college. The car ran well over 100k miles and my father had it for 12 years. For its time it was a nice compact and it could comfortably carry 6 people. I loved that old Chevy II and kept it waxed and in perfect shape.

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    I learned how to drive in my dad’s ’61 Ford Ranchero… a straight 6 with 3-on-the-tree. I wouldn’t mind owning one of ’em today, if I had room in my garage.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    One of my Army Buddies made it home intact from Vietnam in 1965 and used his muster pay to buy a new white Mustang Convertible ~ he wanted a V8 and slush box but only had enough $ to get a 6 banger stick shift (three speed IIRC) Convertible….
    .
    He only sold it a few years ago , for stupid $ , unrestored but not beat to heck either , California rust free car .
    .
    -Nate

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Actually I think the word is “hawking”, not “hocking”. Hocking usually refers to selling something to a pawn shop, or expectorating.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m struggling to find the point of this article. The comments were by and large, typical.

    If the man had any sense of self worth he’d get a V8 Oldsmobile coupe and skip the V6 Stang. He was too old for beach nonsense. Get a briefcase.

  • avatar

    My folks grabbed a 65′ with a 289 V8 back in the nineties. Bought from the couple that had purchased it new. Good lord, I loved that car. Someday, I’ll have one of my own.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      The Falcon based Stangs with the 289 were a good combination of weight and power, even if they didn’t turn or stop very well, but then again, what American cars of that era did?

Read all comments

Recent Comments

  • wolfwagen: And those ultra-liberal radicals will be the only ones with ICE. When “The Beast” goes...
  • Goatshadow: RiviVan or Vivian, which is what I first read the post title as.
  • ToolGuy: “Plus a gas powered generator is a much better option as it has a far greater range of uses over an...
  • pmirp1: el scotto, this winter as you pay more for gas to heat your rooms, go scream support for wind mills and solar...
  • MitchConner: One issue is when people get a company F150 a gas card comes with it. Drive to work sites. Drive home....

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber