By on August 5, 2016

ford edge vignale

Ford doesn’t just want European SUV buyers to flock to its Edge, it wants luxury buyers, too.

The automaker is busy rolling out a refined version of its midsize CUV on the Continent, but an even plusher version is on the way, Automotive News Europe reports. With no Lincolns to sell, Ford figures it can turn one of its own into an Audi-fighter.

In Europe, the Edge counts as a large SUV, with nothing positioned above it. It’s the first full-sizer offered by Ford since the Explorer faded from the market in 2001.

According to the report, Ford’s European buyers are used to nicer things, so the American-market Edge just won’t do. Extra sound-deadening, reductions in noise, vibration and harshness, and technology borrowed from the upscale Mondeo Vignale come standard on the Euro Edge.

Ford can’t Brexit itself away from European Union regulators, so a 2.0-liter diesel is the only available engine. Don’t expect American EcoBoost fans to shed any tears over missing out.

With nothing else to work with, the automaker needs the Edge to be everything to everyone. That means transforming it into a quasi-Lincoln and selling that version as the Edge Vignale.

“We see the competition as the Volvo XC60 and Audi Q5,” Matthias Tonn, the European Edge’s chief engineer, told Automotive News Europe. “In the U.S., they are not our competition.”

The automaker expects buyers to flock to the newly civilized Edge, raising its annual sales expectations to 25,000–30,000. When it first unveiled the production Edge to customers in 2014, it only expected sales of 20,000.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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57 Comments on “Ford Builds a Better Edge, But You Won’t Find it Here...”


  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    So it’s an MKX that looks like an Edge?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Right, our “better Edge” is the MKX.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        Gimme the MKX with the 2.7TT, and eventually 3.0TT, over the high trim Euro Edge thing with a diesel.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I will say that Ford integrated the LEDs on this Euro-market Edge Vignale much better than they did on any variant of the American-market Edge.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Yes. But they stole the grill from Acura.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Sure did. The grille on the refreshed 2017 MDX—which should indicate a new front-fascia design language for Acura, and the end of the “power plenum” beak-grille—looks remarkably similar, except for being pentagonal as opposed to hexagonal.

            The front emblem on the ’17 MDX, however, is 33% bigger than it needs to be, and looks bad IMO.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Yeah. I’m not in love with the new look for the MDX. You would think that given all the criticism over the past decade that they’d get it right by now.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    With that black badge and grille, it sort of looks like a Kia.

    If they make Vignale badges which fit on the Fusion, I’d be into some Ebays.

  • avatar
    Uncle Mellow

    There is an option of a twin turbo diesel with 207 bhp and 332 lb of torque, but the Edge tips the scales at practically 2 tons, so it doesn’t really have the grunt to cut it with premium competitors.And maybe the old Edge was better-looking ?

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Uncle Mellow
      That is what I thought, tiny engine for the weight. At least it looks like a KIA, much more likeable than the MKK design language you get in NA

  • avatar
    Fred

    My nephew has an older Edge. Gave up his hot rod Integra for it. He likes it considering his young family and all. It fits in nicely between an Explorer and Escape size wise. Rides more like a car than truck.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    They also sell a long-wheelbase Edge for the Chinese market, as well as a CD4-based Taurus that doesn’t suck like our D3-based one does. I assume both are built there as well.

    As far as the American-market Edge, it would be really nice if you could get the top-trim version (the Sport with the 2.7TT) with full leather instead of partial suede.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Kyree,
      I would like to see the Edge longer, with the added length put at the back, so the Edge is more wagon than hatchback.

      As for the engines I agree with the 2.7 EcoThirst and add the 3 litre Lion diesel.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        They make a longer Edge. They just don’t sell it in most markets. It may be China only.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          What he means is that rather than lengthening the wheelbase, he’d like to see one in which the added length was behind the axles.

          This would probably be the next Explorer, since everything is moving to the CD4 platform.

          A lot of Cadillac’s woes would go away on the ATS if they brought over the ATS-L that’s sold in China, which has much more rear legroom. Of course, they’d either have to import the vehicles from China or revamp the tooling of the existing factory to make the LWB variant; neither of those is a cheap proposition.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            The Explorer will be RWD, so they’ll have to make something else. Flex replacement? S-Max? I dunno.

            I have a hard time differentiating the ATS-L from the CTS. Isn’t the CTS an ATS-XL?

            Edit: yes, the CTS is an ATS-XL

            ATS-L: 112.6 in wheelbase. 185.3 in length
            CTS: 113.4 in wheelbase. 190.1 in length

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Buick has gone Chinese, why not Cadillac? Its not as if either is still worth a damn.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Well, if they’re that close, dimensionally, it’s no wonder Cadillac won’t import or make an ATS-L here.

            And it makes sense, too. One point of the ATS-L is for customers that want a car as big as a CTS, but won’t buy a CTS because their boss or someone superior to them drives one (it’s taboo to have a car as nice as or nicer than that of your boss).

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          the Explorer already has the three-row segment covered.

          as does the unloved Flex.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Yeah, not buying it Ford. The EU Edge is just our version with an MKX instrument cluster. That’s it. Everything else is exactly the same, including the dirt cheap control stalks and slab ‘o plastic center stack. Audi and Volvo killer? Uh, no. You might have a tiny window since both of those cars are very very old and due for replacement, but when the second gen Q5 debuts, you’ve had it. Same deal if the next XC60 is anything like the XC90.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I prefer the looks of the MKX in and out. We get much better engines too. They can keep their Edge.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I read an article in relation to Australia receiving the Edge in 2018.

    With the manufacturing of the Ford Territory coming to an end there will be a year or so gap between the Territory and the Edge.

    The journalist also mentioned that the UK currently has the Edge which meant we could have a RHD Edge easily and added that Ford wanted to wait until the new model Edge was available for our market in 2018.

    If ours comes with a diesel I do hope it’s at least a Lion.

    As for engine choice here I would like to see the 2 litre EcoBoost and the 2.7 EcoBoost offered. The problem with these are FE, I do think the 2.7 will be better suited to an Edge rather than a F-150.

    I do like the Territory better from the looks department over the Edge, I don’t know what the “new” Edge will look like.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      I think this Territory replacement will struggle, a lot here like the current Territory. Big Al from Oz, the Ecoboost will not be that palatable to consumers here, seeing they were not impressed by the 2litre Ecoboost in the Falcon, which was lighter
      2litre Diesel would be a clunker in this as well. Unfortunately for Ford much better alternative around

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      I don’t know how Australia will accept the Edge as a Territory replacement. The Edge is certainly more refined and is basically a decade newer. But it isn’t RWD and is probably much worse off road (I haven’t driven either offroad). The next Explorer is probably a better replacement for the Territory.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Adam Tonge
        Your right, few would warm to the Euro Edge. From what I gather, the number of seats is less than the Territory as well. Explorer has had a disasterous reputation in Australia, the Territory was a replacement for the Explorer, which it did very well.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          It’ll have less seats. Unless you get the LWB Chinese version.

          The next Explorer will be the closest you’ll get to the Territory. They could even call it that in Australia. Same basic concept.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Adam Tonge
            Ford is not changing the names. Less seats, would be big negative as well. They are really going to struggle with any Territoy replacement.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            They’ll struggle, but how many Territories are they selling? Under 10K units a year. They sell more Explorers in a few weeks.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Adam Tonge
            Explorer has the same negative image as the unlamented Edsel, in Australia.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Robert,

            Was the Edsel sold in Australia? RHD or LHD?

            The problem with the Edsel is that it was over-hyped, and ended-up being just an unnecessary (and awkwardly styled) step between Ford and Mercury. As often happens with the Big 3, it was designed during an economic boom, and released during a recession. In other words, it was a step too far.

            Not sure what any of this has to do with the Explorer’s career in Australia. If we’re talking about the original 1990s Explorer, it was junk. Americans accept that, especially those who haven’t experienced non-Big 3 cars, but that blind spot only works with home-field advantage.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Adam,
        Your are correct the Territory is getting old and I do believe now is a good time to remove it from the market, as for it’s replacement, well???? The Edge just doesn’t have the edge in my opinion.

        The Everest will take up some of the Territory’s slack, but I don’t think the Edge is really “tough” enough to appease a large crowd.

        In Australia full chassis SUVs are a better seller than large CUVs. Small and medium CUVs seem to be going gang busters.

        Ford need a larger off road capable SUV to compete more with the Landcruiser, Land Rover, Range Rover, Patrol, etc. Large US style SUVs on a full chassis are not capable enough.

        If you look at our medium size SUV segment we have a similar amount on offer than pickups. Remember I’m talking SUV and not CUV, there is a huge difference between them.

        Even the Sorento is not a huge seller as such along with the Santa Fe. The Kluger (your Highlander) isn’t a big seller. People who buy vehicles of this size want 4 hi and lo. The odd thing is it is similar to the US pickup segment where most of these “proper” off road vehicles never off road here, just like the US pickup drives around empty making the owners feel proud and look pretty ………. our pickups are also becoming the same as the US pickup.

        I agree with RobertRyan on the Explorer, it was a failure due to it’s poor off road performance and unreliability issue, very similar to FCA and Jeep.

        The US manufacturers have shot themselves in the foot regarding attracting people to their vehicles. They have exported sh!t for years and now with FCA, Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge, etc in the news regarding their practices here and the reliability and poor customer service from them people will shy away again from US made vehicles.

        The only US made vehicles that sell are the ones that come from Toyota in the Kluger and the BMW SUVs/CUVs, but then most are not aware they are US made.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          They’ll just have to sell the Everest, Edge, and possibly the new Explorer. It’s making up 10K units or so.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Adam,
            Yes sell the Explorer, but call it a Territory. Have a 2.7 EcoThirst and a Lion diesel in it as well, along with hi and lo range. The diesel will sell.

            Hey, I should work for Ford as a consultant on what to sell!

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          Big Al,

          Does Ford need to cover that market niche in Australia anymore?

          They have transitioned from being one of the local “Big Two” to “just another importer.” They should only bring over stuff that has a reasonable chance of making money.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Does Australia even matter?

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Australia doesn’t matter anymore in isolation. I don’t think that Australians will ever again see new cars or trucks that are engineered for them. They will of course get sticker kits and ‘roo bars, but that’s a different thing.

            They do matter a bit, in aggregate with other countries that drive on the left side of the road, when manufacturers decide whether or not to build a RHD version of a specific car.
            Not an issue for Japanese, Indian and (nominally) British makes, but it’s a significant additional investment for everyone else.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            heavy handle,
            Interesting question regarding the influence of the Australian vehicle market and it’s influence.

            First up, we never really had a Big Two. GM and Ford are both US companies. We actually had the Big 3 if you counted Chrysler when Valiant existed here. Valiant died when Chrysler US should of died and we have Toyota as the largest producer in Australia in the recent past.

            Proportionally I think Toyota Australia exported two vehicles for every one sold in the market here. This is pretty darn good.

            As for our influence, proportionally I do believe Australia more than pulls it’s weight.

            I mean, the recent article of Australia influencing Hyundai to seriously consider a global pickup should highlight this. This is with a market that has over 12 pickup brands to choose from in a country with 24 million. The manufacturers balk at building any pickup in the US unless it can sell one hundred thousands because of the regulations, controls and tariffs in your market. This limits choice to the consumer and give the manufacturers those huge profits. Is this good?

            Don’t forget we even have your pickups, at a great expense, but we still have them. It would be nice if the US did the same and have a healthy grey market. Then you guys could experience an alternative …… at a price of course.

            The US (and Canuckistan) has a very limited choice in pickups with the four or five brands.

            Then add the Ranger and BT50 being designed here, plus the vehicles designed by Ford for the Chinese market.

            Australia’s influence in the large SUV sector is still large, especially in the chassis/suspension dynamics area. Remember the SUVs we are involved with are designed to do more than just look pretty driving the kids to school.

            The Hilux had considerable input by Australia.

            Australia has the largest influence with pickups globally. Even Thailand with the world’s second largest market doesn’t have our influence.

            So I would say on a global scale and not just a small singular region like the US, Australia has lots more influence proportionally than the US.

            As you have just highlighted, the US can not compete globally in markets or Australia would have this Explorer. Think about that.

            Out of the couple hundred countries that make up the world, I’d say the size of our market is quite large with a huge choice and huge influence.

            Every time you see a GM fitted with a new 3.6 engine, think Australia. Every time you see an EcoBoost remember where a lot of the effort came from.

            We had Ford “EcoBoost” engines long before the US, believe it or not. The four litre turbo Barra engine.

            So, I’m proud of Australia more than adequate input into the global vehicle market.

            You don’t need to manufacture vehicles to have input, you need design and engineering as a basis first with dreams. We have plenty of that, especially with 4x4s and pickups, more so than anywhere else.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    To compete with Audi and Volvo it would need to be a big improvement on the rental Edge I drove a few years ago. It’s ride had a big impact on me, feeling like a well damped, twenty year old Landcruiser. Forget all the pretty leather and chrome bits.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I hope the quality of the exterior is better on this Edge over the one tested on this site. Misfitting trim and loose door seals for a vehicle costing 50k. Hopefully that was not typical of the Edge.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    What’s a vignale?

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    Once again the One World Ford slips into oblivion.

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