By on August 17, 2016

Chevy Suburban profile

Sometimes a manufacturer churns out a base trim that is — all things considered — the primo choice for that particular model. Here’s an example.

A couple of weeks ago, Tim spelled it out for us: Americans finally bought more SUVs than cars.

Now, a good many of these weren’t real SUVs: Rouges, RAVs, and RDXs are pathetic shadows of the segment’s forebears. The Suburban, however, has been unabashedly truck based since 1935. The current model is powered by a 355-horsepower V8 engine fuelled by ground up Priuses and oiled with the tears of David Attenborough. Cargo space is measured in acres instead of square feet.

The LS trim, with durable cloth seats and an available front bench seat like Alfred Sloan intended, won’t make drivers feel bad if they gouge the rear door with the hitch from a boat trailer or knock a mirror off at a McDonald’s drive-thru en route to an early morning trip to the lake. It’s not like this ‘Burban is a leather-lined LTZ or (god forbid!) a Yukon SLT Premium.

Name another vehicle into which you can stuff nine people and a weekend’s luggage while hauling an 8000-pound trailer. I can think of several — two, right now, in my driveway — that can achieve these feats, but not at the same time. In the base model LS, tri-zone climate control assures comfort of your ankle-biters and built-in 4G LTE wi-fi allows them to play Pokémon Go on the go. It is only on the LS that GM allows one to choose that La-Z-Boy front bench — a cloth-covered, overstuffed, outstretched middle finger to the timid crossover — making this, the base model, the greatest of all Suburbans.

GM will actually give $250 to Suburban LS buyers who opt for a front bench seat, making this one of the few occasions when a manufacturer will pay buyers to make their vehicles more useful. This is the polar opposite of the Porsche approach.

Looking like a tank in its $0 Black finish, other drivers will think you’re with the Secret Service, scattering like rice at a wedding as you fill their rearview mirrors with nine yards of chrome grille. Painted red, the Suburban suggests one is with the fire department, but Siren Red Tintcoat is, sadly, a $495 option.

To top it off, the Suburban has a bladder busting thirty-one gallon capacity fuel tank and gets mid-20s on the highway, meaning you can drive out of the assembly plant in Arlington, TX and make it to the outskirts of Atlanta before you run out fuel. Good news: you and your eight friends will have plenty of room for snacks.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown in American dollars with American options and trim — apple pie and bald eagles not included. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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110 Comments on “Ace of Base: Chevrolet Suburban LS...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Cars in general are just so good these days, it’s kind of hard to go wrong.

    Another one that seems to get it right from the ground floor… maybe not a fair choice… but I would be happy with a completely base 911 Carrera. Quick enough with the new turbo engine and plenty luxurious and quick.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I completely agree on the 911.

      I’m a little confused by this article. Aren’t there really a handful of cars that are very good as a base model? Especially these days? A Boxster, an Accord, FR-S, Tacoma, Pilot, on and on.

      Granted I have never ever had a need to carry anywhere close to 9 people, but in the end, isn’t it really about personal preference here?

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “Looking like a tank in its $0 Black finish, other drivers will think you’re with the Secret Service… ”

    Better opt for the red tintcoat then. For $495 extra, it may save your life from a case of mistaken identity by some terrorist or other very bad guy. I wouldn’t have a black vehicle of any kind for all the tea in China, because although they look nice when clean, they are impossible to keep that way.

    BTW, GM made the Suburban and Yukon the finest-looking SUVs ever. Bright window reveal FTW.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      That black Suburban also looks like a hearse.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe Btfsplk

        All you need is a nicely printed “Coroner” card to put on your dash and your parking problems will be solved.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          In some states like California that’s not enough. It must have a license plate with an “E” in a diamond to ID it as a government vehicle. Even then, there’s no telling what a meter maid will do.

          I knew a homicide detective in San Diego when there was a scandal involving fixed tickets. He was on the scene of a homicide when a meter maid ticketed his black and white and all the other police cars, and was even writing up the coroner’s van. When he confronted her, she said, “They told me to ticket everybody.”

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Difficult to tell them apart from the side too. The new Honda Pilot has a similar, clean look, sans broken 9-speed auto transmission.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    “GM will actually give $250 to Suburban LS buyers who opt for a front bench seat, making this one of the few occasions when a manufacturer will pay buyers to make their vehicles more useful. This is the polar opposite of the Porsche approach.”

    You know, there are options from Porsche that make it more useful. The definition of “useful” being the key word here. You didn’t say practical.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Porsche charges you to remove things in an effort to add lightness to your track toy.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        And you could argue that makes it more useful :) Although for some of these it is a no-cost option to add it back in. I shopped a Cayman R at one point. You get the privilege of paying more to have the door handles, radio, and A/C removed. Although you also see a couple hundred pound weight reduction.

        Again, it’s all definition. My only point is that ‘useful’ is ambiguous. You can option a roof rack on a 911 if you want. You can also option a rear wiper on a 911. I would call those useful.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Try finding street parking for this stupid, fat American.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      The people buying this thing don’t ever, ever ask that question.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      This is one vehicle where a rear camera is really, really not a frill.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        If you’re less than 6 feet tall I’d go for cameras all around tbh. I’m even thinking it should be mandatory whenever the grille or window openings of a car is taller than an 8 year old.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “This is one vehicle where a rear camera is really, really not a frill.”

        Yep, and if your towing something heavy enough to require tandem axles having that camera to hook it up is priceless. If your not using one of these to tow something fairly heavy, should have got a minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      @Joss,

      Most of the areas where the Suburban roams have driveways and garages. Besides I find street parking just fine for my full-size pickup and its nearly a foot longer than the Suburban

    • 0 avatar
      Erikstrawn

      “Try finding street parking for this stupid, fat American.”

      I used to think that way, too. I drove a first gen RX-7 on streets crowded with soccer moms driving new Suburbans with cell phones glued to their ears. Too many people who didn’t need them bought them in the ’90s.

      Now I have a trailer and a large family. The Suburban makes sense – if you need it. I prefer small cars, but when I need to tow the trailer, the Suburban makes perfect sense. I would love to sell my ’99 and buy one of these – the gas mileage increase alone would nearly justify it.

    • 0 avatar
      matthewjoneill

      I’ve got a 2016 LTZ in black. I live in downtown Nashville, I street park it everyday. I felt kinda stupid street parking a $65k suv, but then a guy the next block over started street parking his 911. Neighborhoods are changing quick here.

    • 0 avatar
      ellomdian

      I took my ’96 to an auto-x… twice. If you know what you are doing, they are really fun to drive aggressively. There’s a reason the govt-acronym-agencies use them.

      Hell, any real metro area outside of automotive-parking wastelands like New York or San Fran has to be able to handle the ‘Burban, since they are the default choice for so many high-end livery companies. They’re not even bad to parallel, since the wheels are so far out on all 4 corners. You can actually SEE the end of the rear-box in mirrors, and backup cameras in everything now make it largely trivial.

      But you’re clearly trolling, so, GFY?

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Most street parking spaces I see have painted lines that define the space and dimensions to fit a full size pickup truck. A Suburban is no bigger.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Not a SUV I will ever need ,thank the lord, but it seems GM does these really well as well as the pickups, sad they can not make as good of a car on a regular basis.

  • avatar
    garuda

    Am I the only one who wants one now?

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Nope. I have a Black LT, 08′ though.

      Don’t let the haters get to you. Easy to park if you have back up camera. GM leaves the camera on after you shift from R to D for a few seconds, so when you are parking in a lot and want to line up with the white line behind you back up and the pull forward to get it exact. Quite handy.

      The black is a bear to keep clean, especially if you are a neat freak like myself. I have driven the new ones and they drive very nice, nicer than the previous generation I just don’t care for the fold down third row, uses up too much space for my taste. I like the option of removing the third row altogether, I totally understand that for some that is not feasible as the seats are heavy.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I always wondered why cameras stayed on like that. Both of my Volkswagens that have been equipped with the rear camera would keep the camera feed on for about five seconds after reverse had been disengaged.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You’ve just got a gear selection sensor going bad, Kyree. :P

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          Bug or feature? You decide.

          Given how slow and buggy some of these infotainment systems are I though it was bug, after all its just a video feed, thus it should cut out immediate after switching gears just like your reverse lights. So maybe its a feature that allows you can double check your position as Morgan suggests.

        • 0 avatar
          Whatnext

          I always assumed VW did that so you could see if the body was still twitching before deciding whether to make a run for it.

          • 0 avatar
            Carzzi

            An obligatory option in China:

            http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/foreigners/2015/09/why_drivers_in_china_intentionally_kill_the_pedestrians_they_hit_china_s.html.

      • 0 avatar
        matthewjoneill

        I’m sorta annoyed the new ones don’t have a 360 degree view like the F150s, but the rear camera is good enough. Mine (2016) also can be set to tilt the passenger mirror down at the curb when you put it in reverse. Pretty handy.

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      I just rent one when I need to move many people over long distance. I recently took mine and my daughters family on a one day round trip to death valley, 750 miles. I rented a white suburban from Alamo at LAX for $100 and I was amazed at how well the big beast did its job. Great mpg, plenty of power and after 750 miles all seven of us felt great. I will never own one but I will definitely rent as needed.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      I fully agree with the Suburban LS being an Ace of Base. They come very well optioned even in base trim. The new Suburban powertrain is efficient and quiet, and the newest design is sleek and easy to manage.

      If it were me, I would go with the Tahoe LS, just to have something a bit more manageable.

      Parking these is not the issue that everyone makes it out to be. Mileage is better than expected as well – the last time I rented one, I managed 22mpg which is on par with some sedans. Dont let the haters hate, they are just jealous that the Suburban driver can see traffic and they cannot.

      I want one too.

  • avatar
    celebrity208

    “Name another vehicle into which you can stuff nine people and a weekend’s luggage while hauling an 8000-pound trailer”…
    Challenge accepted: Chevy Express 3500 regular wheelbase, BOOM!

    I should change my handle to 3500VanFan or something like that.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I had a black LT as a loaner for about 2 weeks while my SS was in the shop. I hated it at first but eventually grew to love it. With the 5.3 it got better gas mileage than my SS.

    • 0 avatar
      arun

      You have an SS? TELL ME MORE!

      I am considering buying it as my next car. The long term parts availability and the awful gas mileage are the only things giving me pause.

      What was it in the shop for? How is it as a daily driver? Manual or automatic? You should submit a review some time

      • 0 avatar
        pb35

        I traded my ’15 SRT 392 for an automatic black SS back in January (long story). I actually like the SS better than the Dodge, it feels much lighter (because it is) and it handles better as a result. The seats are better too. My only gripe is with the sound system. I had the upgraded 900w Harman Kardon system in the SRT and it was great. The Bose system in the SS doesn’t match up at all. It’s not terrible but it’s not great either.

        It was in the body shop for some cosmetic work. Something must have happened during shipping as the front fender was repainted and didn’t match the rest of the car. They blended it in and it looks great now. This would have bothered me 20 years ago but I don’t really care now.

        It was back in the shop last month because the A/C was leaking water onto the carpet. Luckily I just happened to pull the floor mat out to brush it off. It was a problem with a bushing for the drain tube. The dealer had to order parts and they estimated a week wait but I had it back in 4 days or so. I’m at almost 6,000 mi now and she’s tight as a drum. I love it as a commuter, it’s comfy, fun and fast. I also love the sleeper aspect. I think I surprised a guy at a light in his Boxster last week, he thought he was going to get the jump on me but he watched me disappear.

        I like it so much that I would like to trade it for a ’17 with the manual but my wife would scalp me.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      I second the requests from arun. How about a reader review??

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      A friend of mine rented a Sub to move his daughter, and by the time the week was up, he was in love too. He’s too cheap to buy one, at least a new one. But he’s down in Houston now dogsitting for her and looking for a cheap, well for him, used one. A Tahoe or Yukon will do if he can’t find a Sub, but I doubt he can pull the trigger on a decent one, they still cost more than anything he’s ever bought. He currently owns the most stripped Caravan I’ve ever seen. It’s got A/C and that’s about it. No CD, no Stow and Go seats, the Ace of Bases? No way.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Look at those tire sidewalls! The ride must be incredibly comfortable. The higher trims most likely punish the buyer with larger wheels so the LS is the one I’d get too.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      I was driving a relative’s pickup a few weeks ago, and I realized the ride was smoother than any car or CUV I’ve driven in the past ten years or more. As far as I’m concerned, P265/75R15 tires with an on-road tread patter are great.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I drove a Tahoe LTZ rental with…20s, I think? and it was quite comfortable, but the small sidewalls did make themselves known on more than one occasion. I should think the 18s on the LS and LT models, along with the longer WB on the Suburban, would make the ride even better.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Suburban. Do want.

    But I’ve got to have 4×4 and honestly I’d rather have the fleet model with carpet delete.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Rouges”

    Sigh.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    “gets mid-20s on the highway”

    When I hear “mid-20s”, I think 24-26mpg. The base 2WD Suburban is rated at 22mpg highway. Slightly less in the real world where people generally don’t cruise at the speed limit.

    22mpg should be considered “low-20s”

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Congrats to Mat Guy on a catchy, well written article. Nice turn of phrase. And he convinced me. I now want one of these. Of course I could never afford one.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    And the base price is…?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      An easy $49,700.

      • 0 avatar
        mountainman

        Dang. It’ll be half that on the used market in a few years. I’ll wait until then.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          And when you’re going used GMT vehicle, you may as well get one with more equipment at that point. The $8,000 the original owner spent on extras only costs you $750.

        • 0 avatar
          spreadsheet monkey

          Suburbans hold their value pretty well, don’t they?

        • 0 avatar
          Frylock350

          @mountainman,

          Unlikely, Suburbans hold their value well. Also there’s just not much out there used that’s not up there in mileage.

          • 0 avatar

            Used pricing on Subs seems to be a crap shoot. I was helping a relative looking for a tow vehicle a couple of yeas ago and we looked at 3-4 year old subs most were priced in the low 30’s but we found one trade in at a toyota dealer for $25k with 60k miles and very clean. But it took some looking since their not that common on used lots. The relative ended up with a smaller suv and marina for the boat but still I think there are deals out there.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      The base price is high enough to where a $250 price cut for bench seats or a $500 premium for the special red paint are irrelevant, if they aren’t already smothered by all the cash on the hood.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    How many people really need a nine-passenger personal vehicle?
    How many people really need a personal vehicle so large it takes a four-lane highway to make a U-turn? Plus shoulders.

    Hey, if they want to give away their money to the rich, that’s fine with me. I’d rather keep as much of it as I can while getting a vehicle that meets my needs… and my ego.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      We know. Everyone should only buy a Fiat 500 because it’s best car. Nobody needs any other car. Anyone who buys anything else is purchasing too much car and is overcompensating. Anybody who criticizes a FCA product is obviously lying.

    • 0 avatar
      arun

      Your lack of knowledge of other cultures in the USA is showing. As an Indian, I already have a 3 member family (soon to be 5). Plus our parents live with us – we don’t send them to old age homes/assisted living facilities. So that’s 7 right there.
      Add in the occasional guest or the more permanent pet and you have 8-9 right there.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      How many? Enough to justify selling the vehicle at a decent profit.

      After all, it’s up to *them* to decide what they “need”.

      FWIW, my needs (and wants) don’t run that way. I have a Cruze Eco because I was driving 650 miles per week at the time I bought it. Right now I could really use a pickup. I might need a Suburban-like vehicle in the future when I retire and decide to tow a camper across the country.

    • 0 avatar

      It’s the Bill of Rights. Not the Bill of Needs.

      My wife and I are at the point in our lives where large and in charge makes perfect sense. Comfortable, durable, more than enough power to get our of its own way – and everyone else’s – and excellent fuel economy for its size and weight to boot.

      And occasionally I haul stuff so the cargo area of my Tahoe is used. But even when it’s just me, I enjoy driving it.

      All that LS goodness, demonized by commenters because it’s still a pushrod design. Maybe they have a point. My BIL’s 2004 5.3 gave up the ghost last year. It only had 575,000 miles on it.

      Oh…EIGHT of the top 20 longest-lasting vehicles in the US…some variation of the Chevy/GMC full-size pickup/SUV. (To be fair, the next six are some variation of the Ford F-150/Super Duty)

      My employer leased a couple of these new ‘Burbs/Tahoes so stripped they don’t even have an “LS” callout on them. Floormats instead of carpeting. Yet they have rear HVAC, power windows and fully-adjustable power driver/passenger seats for starters. More standard equipment than was available in them 20 years ago.

      When it’s time to replace my Tahoe, I’ll definitely look at another.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Having just a wife and 3 cats in your life, sort of blurs your perspective, I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      Troggie42

      I don’t NEED a turbocharged station wagon and a oddly-engined sports car, and yet there they are, sitting in my driveway happily smiling at each others existence.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      @vulpine. Apparently you have not been to Utah. I lived there for 1.5 years and can assure you they call it the ‘Mormon Magic Five’ for good reason.

      Lots of people need an 8 passenger vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      They make a certain sense if one can afford to be a multi-vehicle owner. Take the Sub when you have nine people and need to tow. Take the compact/whatever to hit the grocery store, or when a parking garage is known to be necessary.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      @Vulpine

      How many people really need a tiny pickup?

      A Suburban LS is likely to be my next vehicle to replace my Silverado. I don’t NEED it but it sure makes life easier. I can’t count the number of times I’ve wished my Silverado had more seats or could fit materials enclosed. For how I live my life a Suburban would be supremely useful. Here’s a list of cool stuff it can do.

      – Haul building materials in a weather sealed compartment. 4×8 sheets of plywood, sheetrock, etc fit perfectly.
      – Tow realistically whatever you want
      – Instead of needing two vehicles for road trips; you just need one as the Suburban can haul people; luggage and the fishing boat all at once.
      – Non-sport suspension combined with BOF construction, big sidewalls and massive curb weight ensure a smooth comfortable highway ride without equal.
      – It lasts forever and is still worth something no matter how old or beaten up it is.
      – Far more pleasant to drive than FWD minivans

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      I don’t “need” a five passenger sedan with a V-6 engine. I guess I’ll sell it and ride my bicycle. Its only 25 miles to the grocery store, and I’ll have to make 18 trips to get everything I buy, but at least I can’t be accused of having something I don’t “need”.

      U-turns will certainly be easier.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      How many people really “need” anything more than a motorcycle, or maaaybe a Trabant?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I think the Suburban is losing the plot more and more with every iteration. Prices creep up (more than just inflation), utility goes down. GMT800 ‘burbs had 90 cu ft behind the second row, 138.4 cu ft behind the first row with all other seats folded. Those figures are now 76 and 121. Similar story with approach angle and ground clearance. Used to be 25 degrees approach, 8.4 inches of clearance (more like 9.5 on a Z71 I think). Now it’s 7.9 and a pathetic 15.5 degrees for approach. I think even the non-offroading suburbanites have started to notice, judging by how my neighbor’s wife has to gingerly inch her new Tahoe into their driveway off the road.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The cost of CAFE, yeah?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      When you consider that the first Suburbans were basically station wagons, this could be seen as a return to reasonableness.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Well if there was still a B-body wagon then the Suburban could have stayed far more truck-like.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          “Well if there was still a B-body wagon then the Suburban could have stayed far more truck-like.”

          True. And since the Traverse is basically the modern B-Body wagon I suppose it begs the question of why make the Suburban less truckish.

          Is the approach and clearance changes due to aerodynamic concerns?

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        psar I’ll take your idea and flip it on its head: take a look at a ’36 Suburban: I’d kill for such a utilitarian school of design today with a tall body, big windows, simple steel bumpers and short overhangs with what looks like an approach angle that would rival a Wrangler.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      You can fix that problem with 15 minutes of time and a socket/ratchet. That’s how long it took me to get the chin spoiler off my Silverado.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Not really, the aero lip may be the worst of it, but even with it removed, the new Silverados are lower than something like an un-touched Tundra, let alone the old school Titan.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Similar story with approach angle and ground clearance. Used to be 25 degrees approach, 8.4 inches of clearance (more like 9.5 on a Z71 I think). Now it’s 7.9 and a pathetic 15.5 degrees for approach.”

      I can only speak for what I see around here in MN. People that spend money on these new couldn’t give a crap about approach angles or anything to do with off-roading. The off-road vehicles are in/on a trailer hooked to the back while they haul a$$ down the interstate to their favorite destination in total comfort. No public lands to drive off-road vehicles in these parts anyways unless your talking about a snowmobile or ATV. And we are the land of 10,000 lakes so guess what else is pretty common to see behind a Burb.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        People might very well still drive through heavy and/or re-freezing snow piles, and that’s more than enough to rip off one of these spoilers (especially if going in reverse). The Suburbans of yore still pulled off the comfy interstate travel, but retained the capability to drive down an unimproved roads without second guesses. Like I said, on the new ones, even angled driveways are now suspect.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          I can tell you no clearance issues with my ’07 Tahoe. I’ve slammed it through more than one plowed snow bank without issue. Not ice mind you. Are the current one’s that much lower? True each iteration of the GM FS BOF SUV’s are becoming less truck like. The current gen doesn’t share a single body panel with the PU’s which is a first.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Does the Rouge include eye shadow, or is that an option?

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “Name another vehicle into which you can stuff nine people and a weekend’s luggage while hauling an 8000-pound trailer.”

    A Ford Transit or Chevy Express passenger van. And they’re a lot cheaper up front.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      As I said elsewhere: “The difference is that the Suburban is a consumer-oriented, brand-new vehicle while the Express is a cargo van from 1996.”

      Now, a Transit would be a step up from any Express or E-Series van, but it’s quite tall, which affects driveability in crosswinds on many interstates here in flyover country.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Name another vehicle into which you can stuff nine people ”

      Just add the word “comfortably” in there and that rules out the Chevy Express passenger van. Last time I rode in one of those I couldn’t believe what a total POS it was. Take a trip longer than 15 minutes from the hotel to the airport in one, no thanks!

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        You get what you pay for. Though, the 3rd row of a Suburban isn’t a comfortable place.

        If moving 9 people was a priority, the van would be the better choice.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “That black Suburban also looks like a hearse.”

    Which begs the question, why do Funeral Directors spend all of that money for a hearse conversion when this would work pretty well; seems dignified enough.

  • avatar
    86er

    Maybe living in benighted Canada affects my perspective, but how many LS Suburbans are out there in dealer-land?

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    still a 50k car. bout 55k after title tax license. getting th shorter sausage tahoe only saves about 3k

  • avatar
    AJ

    I think it’s great that people still buy these. I wish I had the reason…

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t really want one of these but I can understand why Suburbans sell. For what they are they are comfortable and the ride is limo quality. Also these are almost bullet proof and they will last a long long time. These are like an old Volvo wagon on steroids which is why they are popular. I will give GM credit for making a really bullet proof vehicle that can tow and haul.

    • 0 avatar
      200Series

      Rented LS for 10 days…

      Good:

      – Gas mileage/range
      – Comfortable seats
      – Decent power
      – Very good handling, particularly given the size

      Bad:

      – headlights are horrible
      – Bouncy ride in 3rd row and off road….really bad hop on washboard
      – Navigation/audio interface
      – Throttle tip-in makes it feel slow/sluggish…..3/4 pedal to go anywhere
      – Front air dam really low

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  • Superdessucke: This is most famous as the car John Travolta recorded crashing in the 1981 movie Blow Out.

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  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
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