By on June 6, 2016

1985 Buick Riviera in Colorado Junkyard, LH front view - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

In 1979, the Riviera moved onto the front-wheel-drive Toronado/Eldorado platform, continuing the tradition of rococo Riviera personal luxury coupes that started back in 1963. This version of the Riviera was built through the 1985 model year, so we’re looking at the very last year of the V8 Riviera in this weathered Denver car.

1985 Buick Riviera in Colorado Junkyard, speedometer - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

While the Evil Empire was being vanquished by a combination of crashing oil prices, idiotic decisions made by cheap thugs and vodka-soaked gerontocrats, and rebellion on its fringes, the abolition of the 85 mph speedometer requirement ranked as one of the Reagan Administration’s major accomplishments in the fight for freedom. General Motors, however, had stockpiled millions of these speedometers and had to use them up in cars like this before they went back to the 120 mph speedos preferred by the Founding Fathers.

1985 Buick Riviera in Colorado Junkyard, HVAC controls - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

The Buick Division got a lot more futuristic later in the decade, with octogenarian-confusing touchscreen displays and such, but we see some foreshadowing of this stuff with the microwave-oven-control-style Electronic Touch Climate Control HVAC unit in this car.

1985 Buick Riviera in Colorado Junkyard, RH landau roof - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

The landau roof and opera lights on this car have suffered much from decades in the harsh Colorado sun.

1985 Buick Riviera in Colorado Junkyard, RH engine - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

Under the hood, the 150-horsepower Oldsmobile 307-cubic-inch V8. This engine went into cars made by every GM division at the time.

1985 Buick Riviera in Colorado Junkyard, interior light - ©2016 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

This chintzy interior light features plastic “chrome” and fake woodgrain and seems more appropriate on a low-end camping trailer than a $16,710 luxury coupe (at a time when a new BMW 3-Series coupe could be had for $16,430).

1985 Buick Riviera Brochure

Still, these cars were pretty comfortable when they were new.

[Images: © 2016 Murilee Martin/The Truth About Cars]

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92 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1985 Buick Riviera...”


  • avatar
    bryanska

    My neighbor had one of these since new for about 10 years, and she babied it. I’d rather spend time in that car than any mid 80s BMW. So plush. So rococo indeed.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      This is why choice is a good thing.

      My best friends mom had an ’85 325i. That car was a revelation. At the time I drove a VW Dasher and my friend had an old Oldsmobile. Compared to my slow car and my friend’s faster but much more ponderous one, the 325 was a delight. It was quick, had responsive steering, and just felt good to drive.

      We had a blast the few times that he could finagle a spin in that car. So, for me, there’s a whole slew of BMWs I’d take over this Riviera.

      Here’s a few; the 325 previously mentioned, a 733i with the five speed manual, an e28 533i/535i/M5, and an e24 M6.

      The Riviera, and its cousins, would be far, far, down on my list.

      Again, having choices is a very good thing.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Having choices can lead to crack pipe smoking decisions like buying a 1980’s ‘american’ luxury car with a M21 diesel in it.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Almost nobody made that decision though. BMW powered MKVIIs and Continentals were few and far between. Wikipedia says 2,300 MKVIIs and 1,500 Continental Sedans were sold over two years. That still sounds high to me. The diesel only gave up 35 hp to the V8, but that 35 hp represented a large percentage of either engine’s output. I wonder how many 524tds were sold in the US?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Tresmonos made that decision though.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Oh.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            that car brought more joy to me than MDMA or coke ever could.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            A few thousand 524TDs. My favorite use of that motor is in the back of the Vixen motorhomes. A futuristic looking 21′ motorhome with a pop-top and a stickshift!

            You have to look at it in the context of the times. Gas was expensive then, diesel was cheaper. The V8s were slow and thirsty, the diesel was only a little slower and a lot less thirsty. And it sounded like a Mercedes…

    • 0 avatar

      My parent’s next-door neighbor had one of these, in blue. She garaged it and rarely drove it. Unfortunately, about 10 years ago, on one of the rare occasions she did drive it, she got into an accident with it and totaled it.

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    Nothing starts off a Monday morning right like seeing one of those hideous, baroque boats headed towards the crusher.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Still a sales success for GM. 47 miles seems a bit low. I assume this is the 4-speed THM with o/d shown on the shifter?

    Must have been good traction in the snowbelt with that heavy motor over the front drive.

  • avatar

    During the mid-80’s I worked for a company that had a small fleet of office cars execs could check out and drive on company business. One of those cars was an ’85 Riviera. It was very heavy feeling and rode very nice on the interstate but was extremely under powered. I enjoyed driving it but hated it at the same time. I once had to drive it on a 1800 mile round trip. I cursed it a lot on that trip because it spent much of the trip in passing gear. And so it went on that trip until I got caught in a freak late April snowstorm on the back roads of West Virginia. That day the Riviera, because of it’s front-end weight, low power and, in this case, a brand new set of Michelins, became my all-time #1 best car the get caught in a freak blizzard in. Best driving car with street tires in heavy snow I’ve ever driven.

    • 0 avatar
      Joss

      The underpower may have been the six.

      • 0 avatar

        Nah. It was the 305ci V8. Lotta car to pull itself around mountain highways. Being a little underpowered made it invincible in snow though. I don’t think there was any choice of powertrains back then. All got the same as I recall.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          There were always at least two engine choices on the sixth-gen Riviera in any given model year, and four choices from 1980-1984.

          350 ci (5.7 L) Oldsmobile V8 — 1979-1980
          350 ci (5.7 L) Oldsmobile diesel V8 — 1980-1984
          307 ci (5.0 L) Oldsmobile V8 — 1980-1985
          252 ci (4.1 L) Buick V6 — 1981-1984
          231 ci (3.8 L) Buick turbocharged V6 — 1979-1985

        • 0 avatar
          ponchoman49

          The majority of these had the 140-150 HP 307 Olds from 1981-85. A few here and there were ordered with the 3.8 turbo which featured SFI in 1984-85 and that would have made this car much quicker.

          If the 307 is in proper tune it provides adequate power in these but hills slow there progress some.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    In my neck of the woods when I was a kid, this car, along with the Toronado and El Dorado of the same vintage were the official winter cars of Harley Davidson enthusiasts (bikers).

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    My grandmother had one of these, an ’85 as well. It was probably that same shade of brown, too. But it had leather.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Under the hood, the 150-horsepower Oldsmobile 307-cubic-inch V8. This engine went into cars made by every GM division at the time.”

    I twitch every time someone brings this up. I’ve not-so-fond memories of repeated arguments with parts jobbers that the engine in this ’88 Caprice wagon is a 307, not a 305. Yes, I know the VIN code says it’s a “5.0 liter,” a 307 is 5 liters. No, I swear it’s a 307. Look, I can see the goddamned oil fill neck, Chevy small blocks don’t have those. Look, just gimme the damn part.

    Of course, it was for a 305 and didn’t fit.

  • avatar

    we see some foreshadowing of this stuff with the microwave-oven-control-style Electronic Touch Climate Control HVAC unit in this car.

    Well, GM did own Fridgidare until 1979. Maybe they helped with the design.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    That’s not a directable air vent next to the light, is it? It looks like a chromed version of what you’d find above your head in a charter bus.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The Eldorado looked better (stainless roof!), but was saddled with 4.1 most of the run, or the awful 5.7 diesel. So the 307 don’t sound too bad.

    Seems like almost all the Eldorados you see from this gen have the 4.1. Wiki sez the 4.5 was also available in here, but I’m not sure I’ve ever seen one with it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That 5.7-liter Olds diesel was almost singlehandedly responsible for souring Americans’ opinions of diesel engines as a whole. Now Volkswagen has gone and tried to resurrect that reputation.

      Like I said, we had an ’85 equipped similarly to this one—but with leather—however I never liked that steering wheel. The 3-spoke seen on the Turbo/T-type and some of the cabriolet units looked cooler.

      http://assets.hemmings.com/story_image/391181-1000-0.jpg?rev=2

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      The Cadillac 4.5 replaced the HT 4100 in 1988. Sadly the heavier E-body Eldorado from the 1979-85 generation was 3 years out getting the 4.5 which would have made that car much better with 155 horses compared to 125-135 from the 4.1.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        They feel plenty slow with 200hp, so really the 135 would have been almost intolerable. Though I guess expectations were a lot lower back then.

        And I think the wiki page is wrong, then RE: 4.5.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        the 4.5 and 4.9 weren’t new engines, they were the HT4100 with a bit more displacement and some of the more egregious flaws fixed.

    • 0 avatar
      Hydromatic

      The 1979 Eldo had the Seville’s 350 V8. In 1980, the 350 disappeared and the 368 showed up with throttle body fuel injection. In 1981, the 368 got the 4/6/8 cylinder deactivation deal. The HT4100 showed up in 1982

      The 4.5 was only available on the shrunken post-1985 Eldo.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    That sort of chintzy lighting, paneling and switches lasted in conversion vans well into the late ’90s.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I think it’s actually quite appropriate for these 80s PLCs, less so for a conversion van. The PLCs looked especially chintzy compared to the demure contemporary options from Europe, but that was their appeal.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Oh I agree. It’s what American luxury was all about. And I know you secretly want a conversion van example, so I got one for ya.

        http://www.2040-cars.com/Chevrolet/Express/chevrolet-1500-gladiator-conversion-van-florida-garaged-and-in-top-shape–550260/

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Only in Florida…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            But it’s in Boston! I dunno why the link says Florida, that’s a weird site. Hard to find listings with good interior photos all of the same vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Well, I’m sure it’s a Florida retiree’s transplant. There goes the neighborhood, I mean city.

          • 0 avatar
            Roberto Esponja

            With conversion vans, it also depended on which conversion company did the converting. I worked at a NC dealership in the 1990’s that sold a lot of Dodge conversion vans. Our most economical vans were the Mark III’s, followed by another brand I cannot remember (Primetime, maybe?), and the top-of-the-ladder one was the Elk van. Elk conversions were very nice, definitely of superior quality compared to the other two.

            Indiana’s economy must have collapsed after conversion vans fell out of favor, ’cause I could swear all conversion van companies were located in that state…

  • avatar
    s_a_p

    Those chintzy lights seem to be par for the course on damn near everything of that era. Growing up in that era it seems that everything(including home appliances and fixtures) were made with that cheap chrome plastic crap. When I think of the late 70s, I think brown masonite paneling and cheap plastic all the things.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      If you think home appliances and fixtures were chintzy back then you must not deal with what they have been making the past 10-15 years. Talk about made in China throw away crap. Our repair shop gets in appliances including vacuum cleaners, small items like toaster, mixers etc and many types of lamps and lighting fixtures on a daily basis. We most always end up putting in older sockets/parts and wiring because the crap today is really bad in most cases, especially the washers and dryers and vacuums.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Those old appliances sometimes looked chintzy, but they are tanks that were/are worth being repaired.

        Now, we have washing machines and fridges that are connected to WiFi and have touch screen panels. Why on earth would I need my dryer connected to the cloud? My washer and dryer have manual dials, clean and dry clothes well, and were made in America. That’s all I care about.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          When I was shopping water heaters, I’d come across reviews with things like “Cons: Water heater doesn’t have Wi-Fi connection.”

          WTF, it’s warm water. On/Off, temp, vacation setting. That’s it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            There is now a juicer that you must connect to the internet for it to work. You also have to purchase their “juice packs”. And it costs $700.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That is absurd. Is it something German?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            No. Think Silicon Valley tech hipsters.

          • 0 avatar

            I’d be pissed if someone hacked and DDOS’ed my hot water heater.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ah! You’re from the Midwest.

            “Hot water heater.” That’s very regional.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I wouldn’t mind a wifi connected washer and dryer, just to tell me when the cycle is done. Why not, costs like $.25 to add that functionality these days. What I really want is one of the combined washer/dryers like the Europeans often have. No need to swap clothes.

            I could see a connected waterheater being good in that it could be learning like Nest thermostat, and alert you if it springs a leak.

            Not sure I need a fridge with a camera inside though. Then again, my kitchen is largely decorative – the roommate and I very much lead the bachelor existence.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “What I really want is one of the combined washer/dryers like the Europeans often have.”

            Had one in Korea. It’s really REALLY crap at drying the clothes. All the humidity is too much for the dryer to cope, at least in the example I had. I’d dry them for an hour or two, they’d come out damp, and I’d hang them on the line in my apartment.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Home Depot sells those washer/dryer single units. $800-$2000.

            Wifi in my washer or dryer notifying me that the cycle is done fixes a problem that I don’t have. Sometimes I hear the buzzer go off, sometimes I just check. I don’t want to download some washing machine app on my phone and I don’t want a “smart home”.

            Instead of a notification to your phone for a leaky water heater, it’s better to spend $100-$200 on a leak detector/auto shut off. If I’m not at home, a notification pushed to my phone is going to do dick.

            Also, Nest sucks. It’s a novelty that doesn’t offer any benefits over regular thermostats. I don’t even have a programmable thermostat anymore. My furnance/AC is more efficient staying at one temp if we are going to be in the house that day. The Nest Smoke Detector even worse. $100 for a smoke detector?!?!? Go [email protected] yourself Google.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I know, too spendy for my cheap self.

            At this point, adding the connectedness is so cheap there really is no reason not to. If you don’t want to use it, don’t.

            I actually agree with you on the Nest for the most part. I think it CAN save money with some heating systems, but I suspect the payback time is measured in eons at the current outrageous pricing. I just keep my house cold all winter, and wear a sweater. I do have a programmable thermostat that simply sets the place back to 50F from 11pm-10am.

            What I do plan to buy is a wifi-enabled IR transmitter for the window A/C unit in my bedroom. Then my lazy @ss can turn it on before I go up to bed to cool the place off. They are relatively cheap. One of my geek buddies actually made a Lego robot to push the button on the remote to do the same thing! But his kid has ALL the Lego.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The only thing a Nest is good for is ensuring you have a very expensive furnace, and for letting other visitors to your home -know- that you have a Nest. Unless you’ve got a 10,000 sq ft house where you really should close off a wing you’re not using, it’s pointless. Programmable is plenty.

            And what’s the big deal about missing the dryer being done anyway? So stuff sits there for a while – if it’s wrinkled, run it two more minutes.

            People are looking for solutions to fake problems in order to seem more high tech.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I get why they add connectedness. It’s cheap to add and people pay a premium for it.

            That is a cool idea for the window AC unit. I have a ductless system for my upstairs now, but I would have liked that before I spent the cash on the Mitsubishi system.

            The problem with adding too much technology to my house is that my wife gets furious if technology doesn’t work. She got Ford executive numbers when the MFT on her 2012 Focus flaked out for 6 months. She has zero patience for something tech working slower than the thing it replaced.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Hmm, so what are -good- quality washer/dryer vacuum brands in modern times?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          If you want an old school, durable, borderline commercial grade washer or dryer that is made in the US, there is always Speed Queen. They are expensive though.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That sounds very cool and ’50s. I will look them up. Have Whirlpool washer and dryer now (not H.E) but they came with the house. They work fine, when I moved in my dad just replaced the dog gears on the agitator since they were stripped in there. I think that was $8.

            The outside of the washer is rusting at places though, where the lip over the drum is.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            We have an Amana washer and dryer (made in Benton Harbor, MI by Whirlpool). The washer is not HE because my wife hates HE washers. When we went to the appliance store, we asked to see the cheapest washer and dryer made in the US. That’s what we ended up buying.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I don’t want HE either. Seems to be a pain, and I’m more concerned with clean clothes than I am saving an extra gallon of water and having to do some special HE procedures.

        • 0 avatar
          Jagboi

          Miele. Expensive, but works well. Very quiet, which I like.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Those seats make my back ache just looking at them. No support at all. And those acres of fake wood, so klassy!

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      My Deville gives me mid-backache after a while due to lack of support. It’s impossible to sit up straight in there.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Seats designed for shrunken old people with spinal curvature. It’s the only logical explanation. The seats in my folks Oldsmobarge 98 were just hilariously terrible. And a $20K+ car in 1984 that did not have the ability to adjust the angle of the passenger seat backrest was just sad.

  • avatar
    April S

    I guess one positive of having a 85 mph speedometer is you could brag on how you could peg it out.

  • avatar

    I’d drive this anyday over an ‘austere and sophisicated’ sled from across the pond. $16k for manual windows and rubber-cast bumpers? No thanks, BMW.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I don’t think you could still get manual windows in a BMW in the US in 1985, but you could get a manual sunroof in a 318i. The nice thing about the austere car from West Germany was that it wasn’t festooned with fake wire wheels, fake landau bars, a fake radiator shell, a fake wood dashboard, fake fender vents, fake gauges a’la Pontiac, pointless metal pleats on the tufted and badly stitched seats, or a fake convertible top. The hallmarks of the personal luxury car/brougham era rubbed those of us that didn’t like self-delusion the wrong way. Today it’s BMW that pipes fake engine noise into their gaudy passenger compartments. They’ve taken over the vast market that once bought Coupe DeVilles and assorted other pimpmobiles, but they’ve given up their authenticity to do so.

      The magazines treated this generation of big GM coupes pretty well. There was nothing fundamentally wrong with the suspension system. Apparently, the Eldorado Touring car had competent ride and handling, but by then Cadillac had killed off its only successful post-war engine design.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I drove a low mileage (62K) mint 1985 Rivera T-Type several years back when on the hunt for a lower priced 80’s collectable car to take to the shows. It was gray with the sport leather steering wheel, alloy wheels, suspension upgrade and leather interior.

    The T-type was sure the way to go if you wanted a firmer suspension and more power under the hood. It’s a shame that Buick didn’t keep the 79-81 bucket seats however which were more supportive and comfortable than the 55/45 split bench units that most of these had. It did have power recliners and 6-way adjustments on both sides which did help some though.

    The owner wouldn’t budge on the 6600 asking price so I walked.

  • avatar
    Shiv91

    Whyyyyyyy did I have to miss out on the personal luxury coupe era?? I’ll never live it down (half-joking…)

    I do remember when these were common demolition derby cars in the mid to late 1990s and yet at the same time you’d occasionally see one in mint condition owned by a little old lady/man.

  • avatar
    06V66speed

    My sister had numerous malaise-era cars when she and her first husband moved out of my mom’s and “grew their wings”, so to speak. A Riviera like this being one of such, but rusty and rough with faded paint.

    It was a comfy ride, lol. That’s… about it.

    I will venture so far as to say that the convertible Rivy’s of this generation were somewhat attractive. But I much prefer the next generation Riviera with its impressive digital gauges (not to mention a 3800…).

    307? Nah… lol Not for me. Then again, my gramps used to have an early 80’s Delta 88 which had the same motor. I remember how badly it squeaked and rattled going down the road, but that wheezy ol’ 307 would always roar to life after some blips of the throttle just prior to start up.

  • avatar
    don1967

    What a difference latitude (or possibly altitude?) makes in the way a car rusts. Living in Canada one rarely sees them rusting from the top down like this; usually the rockers are Swiss Cheese before the hood even loses its gloss.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I always think of the red/white convertible model driven Arnold in “Raw Deal”. A quick look in Hemmings has the conv model priced mid teens to 20k now

  • avatar
    Johnster

    Strangely enough, these (1979-85 Rivieras) were the most popular of all Buick Rivieras. The 1985 model year (the last year for this design) saw sales top out at 65,000.

    Go figure.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    It’s a shame so many left the factory with that idiotic little vinyl landau roof. It ruins the tension between the formal roofline and the flowing fenders. A friend’s dad had one and I still can recall the awesome triple note horn!

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I was born in ’76 and my mother and my aunt were both teachers, and of course I myself was in school at the time these cars first lived, and the Riviera, along with its Old’s Toronado platform mate were suprisingly popular among Midwestern educators of that time, both male and female.

    Now of course, every school parking lot is chockablock with Camcords and Odysseys.

  • avatar
    tlccar

    Wow, lots of hate for these cars on here. Not fair actually. They handled well for their size and rode beautifully. My Mom had a 1979 with the Buick 350 V-8. It was quick enough, and equipped with the Firm Ride and Handling suspension it was a great driver. Those “lights” in the backseat were an option. Rear Courtesy and Reading Lamps, to be exact. They were somewhat rarely ordered and really did add a nice luxury touch by lighting up the back seat area. We had one of the first ’79 Rivieras and were asked constantly what kind of car it was. Sadly with only 30k on the odometer in 1985 my Mom was hit in the rear quarter and our Riv was totaled. It was a sad day indeed. I have great memories of that car. And for its day it was truly a fine automobile.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Every time someone on here says that something like this “handles well and rides nicely”, it makes me think that either they have never actually been in a decent car, or they live somewhere such that they have never gone faster than 35mph in one. On perfectly smooth roads with no curves in them.

      I mean, I guess they handle well and ride nicely compared to a small oil tanker in heavy seas?

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        “Handling” in the Detroit sense meant the car didn’t quite scrape the ground turning into the owner’s suburban driveway, and didn’t oscillate on Midwestern highways where the only curves were vertical. Corner carving is the pinnacle of handling these days, but back in Detroit’s salad years curvy roads meant the highway department hadn’t straightened them out yet.

        • 0 avatar
          Shiv91

          Lol. Although to be fair, Detroit’s not the only culprit, Hyundais have ridiculous body roll too (or at least used to). Heck, my ’07 Lacrosse corners better than my ’01 Sonata.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          When I moved to the middle of a corn field in Northern Illinois to go to law school, the design of the typical American land barge suddenly made a lot more sense to me. The abilities of my ’84 Jetta GLI were very much underutilized in that corn-filled wasteland.

          There are some areas of the Midwest with nice driving roads, but they are separated by endless miles of flat and straight.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    That steering wheel… good gawd.

  • avatar

    The 1987 model looked far more modern. These things are so dated they look like they are from a different planet.

    • 0 avatar
      Shiv91

      It is incredible how this and the ’95 Riv are only a decade apart. Technically a little less, as the ’95 Riv was introduced in Mid-1994 for the ’95 model year.

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