By on May 6, 2016

2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata

After Mazda reported dreadful first-quarter U.S. sales results, this article, which surveyed some of the potential reasons consumers would turn away from specific Mazda products, was read more often than any other TTAC article in April. Even as critics, myself included, endlessly point out the driver-centric ideology that makes Mazdas so fun, first-quarter sales plunged 17 percent, a loss of more than 13,000 sales for Mazda dealers.

Perhaps there’s a reverse TTAC bump. Maybe we were just practicing our latest reverse psychology techniques, attempting to lure buyers into Mazda showrooms. Like parents who tell their constipated toddlers, “You won’t like this bran muffin, no, not one bit,” to develop an inexplicable craving, we may have told you about road noise, odd ride height, poor equipment choices, and cramped rear quarters simply to stoke Mazda curiosity.

It worked. Sort of. “Mazda achieved its best April since 1995 with 26,195 vehicles sold,” the company said on Tuesday. Mazda’s market share climbed to a four-month high. Year-over-year, Mazda’s volume grew more than twice as fast as the industry average.

Even in a positive month, it’s abundantly clear that Mazda remains a mainstream auto brand with niche appeal. Fewer than 2 percent of the new vehicles sold in the United States in April 2016 were Mazdas. Ten individual nameplates from other companies — including three pickup trucks, two utility vehicles, and five cars — outsold the whole Mazda brand.

As U.S. sales of midsize cars fell 4 percent, largely due to the Chrysler 200’s massive losses, the Mazda6’s April sales slid 21 percent to its eighth consecutive sub-5,000-unit sales month.

The CX-3, despite being a new participant in one of the hottest segments in the industry, isn’t picking up any steam. CX-3 sales fell to a three-month low, the second-lowest total from the last five months. Most of the CX-3’s rivals outsold the Mazda by huge margins.

The 1.5-percent decline of Mazda’s (former) best seller, the CX-5, wouldn’t be noteworthy had America’s SUV/crossover sector not grown at an 8-percent clip.

(Note: There were 27 selling days in April 2016; 26 in April 2015. This means the daily selling rate at Mazda was up 4.6 percent, though volume grew 8.6 percent. Likewise, the U.S. auto industry’s 3.5-percent increase equalled no growth on a daily selling rate basis.)

Known as the best-selling roadster of all time, the highly regarded and recently relaunched MX-5 Miata was outsold by the Buick Cascada, albeit by only a handful of units. Rare though it continues to be, the MX-5 nevertheless played a role in Mazda’s April expansion, contributing an extra 702 sales last month, year-over-year.

2015 Mazda 3 5-door

There are factors working against Mazda growth in early 2016. The discontinued Mazda5 forced the loss of 382 April sales. The wait for the second-generation CX-9 flagship caused Mazda dealers to lose out on 1,250 sales, as well.

Thus, the model that historically sat at the core of the Mazda lineup was responsible for generating four in ten Mazda sales in April 2016. Sales of the Mazda3 sedan and hatchback jumped 34 percent to 10,772 units, seventh among compacts, up from tenth a year ago.

The Mazda3 was by no means the only compact to post big gains in April. Kia Forte sales shot up 36 percent. The Nissan Sentra, now America’s third-best-selling small car, recorded a 12-percent April increase. Honda Civic sales, meanwhile, jumped 35 percent to 35,331 units, good enough to dethrone the Toyota Camry (perhaps temporarily) as America’s top-selling car.

2016 Mazda CX-9

One month does not a back-on-track an automaker make. It’s not reasonable to assume Mazda can consistently grow sales of the Mazda3 at this rate. The CX-5 became Mazda USA’s best seller in 2015, but it’s now a four-year-old model in a highly competitive segment. Availability of the MX-5-based Fiat 124 Spider may, to a small degree, limit MX-5 growth.

But just as the CX-5 became what the CX-7 and Tribute never were, a genuinely high-volume small crossover, Mazda is hoping that the new CX-9 becomes a formidable challenger for the Toyota Highlander, Nissan Pathfinder, Honda Pilot, and Ford Explorer. The first CX-9 certainly wasn’t.

Perhaps we should share some of the reasons why the first CX-9 failed. Does the TTAC Reverse Psychology Bump work in the pre-owned market?

[Image Source: Mazda USA]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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65 Comments on “TTAC Reverse Bump: Mazda USA Rebounds In April After Dreadful First Quarter...”


  • avatar
    whynot

    Does Mazda even advertise the CX-3? I always forget it exists.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    “ven in a positive month, it’s abundantly clear that Mazda remains a mainstream auto brand with niche appeal.”

    I have no problem with this.
    I like the approach. I like having non-#1 in the world goals.

    Just keep it focused.

    And I am so looking forward to the Skyactiv turbo in the 9. Hopefully it will be enough and move on down the line…especially the 5 and 3.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    That new CX-9 cannot get here soon enough. Long term, Mazda needs to fix its dealership network in the US. But they’ve known that for 30 years, now.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Oh, my the drama…and the clicks…

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Mazda should just advertise the 3 and CX-3 together, they are almost completely indistinguishable to anyone that doesn’t stare at them for 20+ seconds. Why did Mazda make them look so similar, why look at the CX3 when the 3 is the same thing?

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I have two friends with Mazda CX-9s and they both speak highly of them, so I don’t know why it never took off. I always liked the model but then I’ve owned a few Mazdas and know the cars well.

    I don’t know if there is a specific reason Mazdas don’t sell, it’s more that as such a small brand that their message is simply drowned out in the market. So, the vast majority of shoppers don’t have them on their shortlist. Add a spotty dealer network to this mix and it feels like a buyer needs to go out of their way to buy one.

    I recently helped a friend shop for a small SUV. She wanted something that was relatively fuel efficient, pleasant to live with, and not too expensive. When I suggested the CX-5 she was completely unfamiliar with it. Before this she was only thinking about a Subaru but found the Outback too expensive and the Forester too “ugly.” After she went to the Mazda dealer and drove it she loved it. At the end of the day, though, she ended up with a CPO car from another make for budget reasons. She really wanted to find a used CX-5 but just couldn’t. My point being that the Mazda was a great choice for her but she didn’t even have it on her horizon.

    • 0 avatar

      The moment that you put a rear-facing car seat in the second row of the previous generation CX-9, you can’t get to the third row of seats because you have to slide the second so far back. This renders the third row useless. Storage behind the third row wasn’t great, either.

      This was the case at least on the 09′-12’s we looked at.

  • avatar
    incautious

    I really want to like the mazda6, but there is still too much noise and and harshness. 19″ wheels look nice but they are awful on anything not resembling glass road surfaces. No satellite radio on the sport model sluggish acceleration not helped by the backwards “tip tronic” set up. A better deal can be found on a Passat or Fusion.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I have found the ride and handling to be good on the 19 inch wheels. Also the acceleration is perfectly acceptable and power to weight ratio is certainly class competitive for the I4. But there will always be some not happy.

  • avatar
    JohnVeyron

    I’m looking forward to two new Mazda products: A refreshed 3 (that hopefully ditches the goofy single frame grille/beak for a slimmer one like their other models) and a 2.5 turbo powered 6. They said when the engine was first shown in the CX-9 that they planned to share it with other models, and that can’t come quickly enough. Hopefully that plus the new CX-9 can bump sales enough to keep them on the same track of producing excellent cars. I worry that by the time I can actually afford to buy a new Mazda, they’ll have been absorbed by some bigger automaker and relegated to shilling rebadged “sporty” versions of Camrys or Darts…

  • avatar
    blackEldo

    “…the highly regarded and recently relaunched MX-5 Miata was outsold by the Buick Cascada, albeit by only a handful of units.”

    This may be a positive for the MX-5; I’m sure a lot of those Cascada sales were to rental fleets.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    I like the Mazda 6 as well but the need speed 6 option with AWD and 300+hp.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I really wish Mazda would open up the color palette, especially with the Miata. What good is a convertible sports car that is only available in 4 shades of grey?

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      You are soooo right.
      This is one of the likes of my 05 3…a very pretty orange sunset.

      Since then Mazda has gone all European with color choices.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The poor Spider is the same way. For a mainstream make, Fiat probably has the best color palette available in the US. But they couldn’t send a few buckets of paint to Japan for the Spider.

      And it sucks that there’s no blue on the Miata, unless you’re willing to spend Grand Touring money. Even the Abarth costs less than the GT Miata.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The manual/FWD/2.0 CX-5 Sport comes in black and two shades of gray. But Meteor Gray Mica doesn’t look all that bad in the wild. Kinda has a very slight bluish tint to it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lynchenstein

      Agreed. In Canada, you can’t even get red on the base model. You get white, black, silver and “ceramic”. What the hell, Mazda (Canada)??

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      VoGo,
      The colours would indicate Mazda are targeting the older types??

      What is the largest demographic for the Miata?

  • avatar

    Mazda’s do well with reviewers, auto pundits, gear heads, and are challenged with actual customers. Its been like that for a few years now.

    CX3 looks too much like a car, not enough like a “utility” and is cannibalizing sales from the 3.

    MX5 is for the “purist” that would have bought an MG or Triumph some decades ago.

    When Honda, Nissan, Toyota get aggressive to move iron Mazda takes a back seat.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Toyota has replaced the Yaris (Yaris sedan in Canada, Yaris iA in US) with a rebadged Mazda2, so maybe Toyota will move some iron for them.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      It’s not clear the CX-3 is cannibalizing sales from the Mazda3. From the article, sales of the CX-3 fell to a 3 month low. Meanwhile, the Mazda3 sedan and hatchback resumed its leading role, accounting for 4 out every 10 Mazda vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      “When Honda, Nissan, Toyota get aggressive to move iron Mazda takes a back seat.”

      This April, it looks like “compact awareness,” brought about by the new Civic, helped lift the Mazda 3 as well. Aside from the Miata, Mazda tends to fly completely under the radar of most mainstream buyers. And they’re too small for that to change anytime soon. “Noone” goes out to shop for a CX-5, but a certain number do stumble upon it, and prefer it enough to buy it, looking for either CR-Vs, RAV4s, Forresters and others. It’s the same story with most of Mazda’s output.

      They’re too small to launch a big awareness campaign on their own, so have to rely on being sufficiently different to come across as a “hidden gem” to the minority they resonate with.

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        >> They’re too small to launch a big awareness campaign on their own, so have to rely on being sufficiently different to come across as a “hidden gem”

        They are trying. Their “Drive For Good” program shows their charitable side. They participate in give-aways on day time talk shows which puts them in front of women. And they support racing at all levels which puts them in front of men.

        In contrast, Toyota and Honda don’t have to try, as their names are synonymous with “car” in the same way Xerox is synonymous with “make a copy.” Although it could go too far, as in one Top Gear bit, Clarkson walks by a row of Toyotas, but fails to notice the refrigerator mixed in the lineup.

        So yes, Mazda’s strength is being a “hidden gem,” but I hope not too hidden. Mazda’s best form of advertising would be to keep plugging away and to keep improving, until 10 year old Mazdas in good shape are a common sight on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          MasterJediG

          Hey @WheelMcCoy just pointing out- I drive a 16 year old 2000 Mazda 626, who’s 2.5 v6 still runs extremely well despite over 150k on the odo. I see quite a few old 626 in my area driving around as well.. Both The I4 and V6 variants. Got the car 2 years ago from my grandma and Haven’t had any issues besides regular maintenance intervals and some badly rusted sheet metal. The rust is an issue I’ve read about with older Mazdas driven in Salt States such as Iowa and Illinois. I’ve seen this same rust on the other 626s in the area. Aside from rusted out panels underneath the doors, and rust on the rear wheel wells, this has been a wonderful and fun to drive vehicle for a young enthusiast such as myself. Drove the car all the way down to Florida and back to Iowa without a hiccup. I couldn’t be more grateful to have owned an old Mazda as my first car!! She has been driven in 15+ Iowa/Ill winters and does not plan on stopping any time soon :)

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            It’s great your Mazda is a family heirloom! The oldest Mazda I’ve seen recently is probably the Mazda6 Wagon; it was doing hauling duty at a Home Depot.

            I’m starting to see more and more first gen Mazda3 sedans. I’m doing my part driving a second gen Mazda3 and hope to pass it onto my son.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    CX-4 + new 2.5T = 1 new (potential) customer. I think the CX-5 is due for a refresh/update too. I don’t know what can save the 6…. again, maybe that 2.5T?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      CX-4?

      • 0 avatar
        jagat101

        “CX-4?”

        Spotted..a non-Mazda enthusiast driver.

        Btw, I LOVE my rare 6sp manual 2014 Mazda6 Touring.

        Truly, the Sky-Activ Mazda6 is the most sporty, fun-to-drive, best handling, midsize “family sedan” in the market. The Kodo style Mazda6 so entertaining to drive..that I always look forward to drive this stylish car daily, to and from work. You cannot just say that, to any of the cookie-cutter, see-yourself-at-each-corner, Japanese (and/or Korean) “appliance” cars..out there.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        The CX-4 officially debuted last month. It is for now a China-only model. It strikes me as a Mazda version of the Subaru Crosstrek.

        As for the 6, it can’t win the battle of appliances. Its style to attempt to stand out was a good strategy, but playing up handling & fun to drive won’t work in that segment. It needs an upgrade engine, but that will likely only improve sales 10%, but IMO, they need that bump. The diesel won’t show up any time soon, so dropping the new 2.5T from the CX-9 into the 6 seems like a no-brainer. It expands the use of new engine to help pay off development costs and expands the appeal of the 6. I believe it’s based on their reg 2.5L so all the hard points should line up making it easy to adapt. The 2.5T stats are similar to the diesel, so the 6 should already have proper tweaks to suit the engine.

        If the CX-4 is a reasonable hit, then I would suggest they attempt the same with the 6 wagon–lift it slightly, add an AWD option, and call it a CX-6. That vehicle would require almost no development investment while increasing their SUV portfolio.

        • 0 avatar
          RacerZ

          They tried to make the 2nd gen 6 more Accord like. Unfortunately Mazda started listening to publications, journalists, car reviewers,bloggers etc More like a appliance and tried to blend in more so, rather than differentiate themselves. This wound alienating the people who actually buy rather than just talk. The result was dismal sales. The 1st gen 6 was a relative success for Mazda. They went back to that drawing board with the 3rd gen. They did the same with the Protege. The 1st gen protege was a excellent compact, speedy and great handling. The 2nd gen was more Corolla like blander looking not as sportier. The Base Engine actually dropped in Horsepower rating and that car tried to be a appliance as well. If they go the appliance route like the Camry and to a lesser extent the Accord they wont appeal to those looking for alternatives. Its a tricky situation because those buyers are a niche group. So how do you appeal to that niche and also pull in some Main streamers in the process. Its a tricky tightrope.

          The problem i see in the near future for Mazdda . The Cx5 while still selling well its starting to get a little long in the tooth. Sedan sales are down and while this new 6 is doing ok it isnt quite selling enough and actually has been on a down slide. The Cx3 while a fine car seems to be a bit more oriented to European markets than a Us audience. Therefore they will have to rely on 3 sales to hold them up until a new Cx5 is revealed. There is no more 2 or Mazda 5 to pick up some slack. ( even though they were minor players). The Cx9 looks to be fantastic but wont be a huge mover for Mazda like the Cx5. Although Moro says he wont drop that turbo in the 6 i think they might but it wont make much of a impact for them. I have mixed feelings if the Cx4 will make a large impact for them in this Market. However at least they have that option available to them.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    My girlfriend and I shopped a CX-9 when looking at a used car for her a few months ago. The in-dash tech prior to the ’13 refresh was absolutely horrendous, it made old Subaru and Volvo systems seem like iDrive by comparison. Mid level Touring trims which seem to have made up the vast majority of sales based on the used models available on lots had a postage stamp sized display which made the backup camera all but useless, and there were no Parktronic sensors from what I recall, so that was it. Touring models also had a cheesy manual dimming rearview mirror – inexcusable in a $30K+ car.

    Grand Touring models were overpriced because there were so few of them on the ground, and even that only got you the NAV system from the second generation Mazda6 which was still garbage, but at least the screen was bigger. It was decent enough to drive, but as typical with Mazda road noise was high, the seat bottom cushions were too short, and the steeply raked windshield made it difficult for her to get in without hitting her head – and she’s not taller than average, so the CX-9 was out of contention.

    In the last year or two Mazda added BSM and Parktronic with cross traffic alert, but we weren’t interested in a ’14 or ’15, and I suspect those features came so late in the cycle that potential buyers never even noticed.

    The current Mazda6 was also written off because of the NVAH problems and because the 5.8″ TomTom based NAV system was also a complete piece of trash. The MazdaConnect system in the 2016 car seems at least class competitive which is the first time I’ve ever been able to say that about a Mazda, but she wasn’t shopping for a new car, and despite Mazda’s claim of “up to a 25%” reduction in road noise, from what I’ve read it’s closer to maybe 5% in reality, not good enough.

    I think the biggest problem that the Mazda6 has though is the Accord and Fusion. The Camry and Altima may be mind numbingly awful to drive, but the Accord and Fusion aren’t, at least by the standards of mainstream sedans. The 2.0T Ecoboost is slow as hell for its rated power, but it’s still faster than the NA four in the Mazda6, and an Accord V6 will blow its doors off. The 6 may handle a bit better than those two, but not enough to make up for the power deficit, and if somebody is really looking for handling, they’re more likely to be looking for a CPO BMW than a FWD Mazda.

    I am curious how the new CX-9 will do as Mazda tries to push it up market. Since there’s no direct Lincoln equivalent of the Explorer, Ford is free to charge A LOT for the highest trim levels of that car, while Honda and Toyota would rather move you to an Acura or Lexus (though the Highlander and RX aren’t really in the same product category anymore). I’m *amazed* that Lexus still has no 3-row option that isn’t a truck with a Battlestar face grafted on and some nicer leather inside, when even Infiniti has had one for years.

    About the most you could spend on the original CX-9 was $39K for a loaded GT, and that was already much higher than anything else in the Mazda stable. Can they get people to pay $40+ for a Mazda?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I was shocked at prices on the CX-5, I couldn’t get over the 28k+ price tags I kept seeing. I mean you have to have a severe affliction to hand over that kind of cash for the products on that lot. For that much money there is no reason to be stuck in a crossover or a tiny 4 cylinder car.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Wow, you really are full of insights. Of course tghe V6 Accord will blow the doors off the I4 Mazda 6. Hardly a revelation. However lets actually compare the mainstream sellers of the Fusion, Accord and 6 – where the 6 has competitive weight, power and torque.

      Again you are correct that their tech offerings from 2013 and so were bad. They have now improved that to be class competitive. Just like their fuel economy used to be bad (along with their styling) but are now class leading. They fix issues rather than let them linger (CRZ, ATS etc).

      They now have a North American factory which should help them on price, although they will never be able to compete when Honda and Toyota can put $4000 on the hood of their mainstream cars. I am sure they know some of their dealerships need work. But they seem like the sort of company that actually takes feedback and try and improve.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      TomTom?

      I thought Mazda is aligned to Bosch? My 2012 Mazda has a Bosch GPS system.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      Why are you about to spend $30,000 on a 2013 Mazda CX-9 touring. When you can find them everywhere about 25 or less. So unless you live in Canada or don’t know what you’re doing there’s no way he’s found a touring model CX-9 2013 for $30,000..

  • avatar
    MrKiwi

    I really wish I could justify a new (or lightly used) car right now; my 2011 Ford Fusion is perfectly serviceable, but, well, it’s just not that fun any more. With hindsight being 20/20, I wish I’d bought a manual transmission hatchback.

    “Fun” is the key word. Dreaming for a moment, a Mazda 3 with a manual transmission would make my 60-minute-each-way daily commute between home and office through the streets of suburbia eminently more enjoyable. A Focus hatchback seems like it’d be too small and cramped, and they’re kind of outdated now anyway. VW Golf? Sure, except if the company buckles under the strain of the current financial disaster. Any other small hatchback just seems like it’d be painful to drive, based on the comments in these hallowed e-pages (Versa? Honda Fit? I think not…)

    From all accounts, the Mazda 3 seems like it’d be easily the most fun to drive. Shame I don’t need a new car…

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Those Dr. Ben Carson headlights on the Miata are hilarious.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    The Mazda6 is such a good-looking car. But I would never buy one when the Fusion Sport exists for only $3,000 more than a 6 GT.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    The CX-5 is getting decently long in the tooth; one of the problems with Mazda being a smallish company is that they can’t do wholesale updates year after year, and they don’t have the volume to throw $6k on the hood like your local Nissan dealer.

    “Known as the best-selling roadster of all time, the highly regarded and recently relaunched MX-5 Miata was outsold by the Buick Cascada.”

    Come, friendly bombs.

  • avatar
    vwgolf420

    I paid off my Golf in September and love the extra $300 I have each month, and I love VW but my next car will be a 3 or 6. I adored my 2003 Protégé5 and my 1997 Protégé was a solid, reliable ride. Between myself, my father, my mother, and my step dad we’ve had 12 Mazdas. Every single one of them has been bullet proof and a joy. I’d be happy to just go back and forth between Volkswagen and Mazda without considering much else.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    I *love* my Mazda 6GT with the tech package. It feels like I’m in a cockpit. The drive is wonderful, and while I thought I’d miss the RX8 in the power curve, that actually hasn’t happened. It also looks beautiful.

    Perhaps the only thing I’d complain about is the issue I have with nearly every car I’ve tried. While the actual infotainment package is great, the nav portion feels 5 years out of date. My phone in a windshield cradle is better.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Maybe the Fiat 124 will actually help the Miata. I remember when the Japanese sports cars had gotten too fat, powerful, boulevard bound, and expensive leading to a sales dive in the ’90s. People were writing off sports cars for all the usual reasons. Then, the Germans launched their ‘affordable’ two seaters in rapid succession. The Z3, Boxster, SLK and TT made two seaters seem socially acceptable again, and there was something of a sales revival for sports cars. Maybe a Fiat advertising blitz combined with 124s in eye-catching multi-tone paint and stripe configurations parked outside a few trendy restaurants will lead to people revisiting their old ambitions to own roadsters, and the Miata will be a beneficiary. Maybe not.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      The Fiat 124 could possibly double the sales of the Miata. That bulbous front end and Ben Carson headlights I see being updated with in two years on the Miata.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Mazda seem to be travelling quite well here in Australia as it has the second and sometimes largest selling vehicle in the 3.

    I do like Mazda. I own one (or a Ford). My experience with Mazda itself has been very good.

    Mazda will move forward in the US, just give it time. It’s a pity you don’t get the new BT50, as this would sell in large enough numbers to warrant importing them.

    • 0 avatar
      Funky

      Yes, it would be nice if Mazda offered their mid-sized truck here in the USA. I recently bought a new truck. And, being a Mazda fan, I would have, for sure, given first consideration to their truck if they offered one here. It really is a shame we don’t have access to their BT50 (what I discovered about it on Google sounded very interesting).

      • 0 avatar
        RacerZ

        The import tariff on import trucks to the USa is high. It would have to built here. They do still own part owner ship of the previous Ford plant. However, the BT been a Ford im not sure Ford would allow this.

  • avatar
    64andahalf

    Ughh…look at the inconsistent panel gap on that hood…

  • avatar
    RacerZ

    Well i did my small part. By kicking out the Hyundai/Kia dirty low down paid trolls that pop on reviews bashing Mazda. IS the lowest form a manuf can do is to have active paid trolls bashing another companies product. Im glad Mazda rebounded.

  • avatar
    RacerZ

    It took a bit before the Cx5 got off the ground. Im hoping the Cx3 does the same thing. Hopefully they can get it to the 3k mark a month. Its selling like hot cakes overseas.

  • avatar
    zoomzoomfan

    I posted this on the “Why no one is buying Mazdas” thread and it’s still quite relevant now.

    I had a 2008 Mazda3 S Touring hatchback from August 2009 to October 2015. Drove it 60,000 miles with no real issues. No rust, either (and yeah, I drove it all winter – it was fantastic in the snow). Replaced it this past October with a 2016 Mazda6 i Touring, which is a fantastic vehicle as well. Good looking, fun to drive, comfortable, spacious, economical, and affordable. I have ferried my friends around a lot and they all complimented the rear seat room (especially compared to my old 3). An infant car seat fits well, also (my friend just adopted a baby and he was quite content in the 6). It also has a huge trunk. I don’t regret my decision one bit.

    My wife has a 2013 Mazda CX-5 that we bought new in December 2012. It now has 34,000 miles and has literally never visited the dealer except for tire rotations and oil changes (and one PCM update due to a recall). My wife loves it and said if anything happened to it, she’d immediately want another one. The radio is a bit dated, but the Bluetooth connection is reliable and it streams music okay, which is all my wife wanted. It consistently delivers near 30 MPG, does fantastic in the snow even with just front-wheel-drive, and most importantly, didn’t cost that much compared to the Toyota RAV-4s and Honda CRVs we cross shopped.

    I don’t understand the number one complaint of road noise. I don’t notice any prevalent noise from either of our Mazdas. No more than other cars I have ridden in (including a CR-V and a Camry). Maybe we are just oblivious. My old 3 was really loud, but I had lowered it with Eibach springs and put a MazdaSpeed 3 exhaust on it, so the noise was 100% my fault.

    I love Mazda as a brand – obviously, since I’ve had 3 of them. They’re fun, good looking, reliable, affordable, safe cars. I think their #1 problem is brand recognition. They just don’t have the presence Toyota and Honda do. Everyone in the world has heard of the Camry and the Corolla, not so much the 6 and the 3. I still have people ask me what my car is on a near-daily basis.

    I don’t see Mazda pulling out of the U.S. market, though. If anything, they’ll pick up another partner like they had with Ford. And that new partner will most likely be Toyota (see the iA and the fact that it’s already outselling the Yaris and the rest of the Scion line – and was doing so before the announcement of the death of Scion). Mazda makes great cars and their turnaround on their own is nothing short of amazing.

    • 0 avatar
      RacerZ

      mazda had a banner year last year. They arent pulling out the market anytime soon. Some of these people are nitpicking ( or exaggerating) simply repeating what theyve “heard”. Some of them will never be happy and will always find something wrong. Lol Cant please everyone i suppose. Though i was kind of shocked to a extent that their sales dropped as such this first quarter. When i saw the numbers in Feb for Jan i assumed it was bad weather etc. Then Feb and March rolled around. Im glad they rebounded in April. I think mazada should of kept the Protege name. While not as popular as Corolla enough people knew what a Protege was by the 3rd gen. Though i understand they were trying to re-brand themselves. They need a marketing whiz to boot. Some of their commercials are Meh. They have to get their name out their more.

      Also when they had the mazda 2 here they shouldve imported the sedan to this market. Not the Hatch. I personally love hatchbacks and have owned 3 in my life. However, most Americans dont. Even if they made a small profit on them it was a way to introduce buyers to the brand. The Mada 5 was barely advertised especially once the 2nd gen hit. A newer Mazda 5 with the new Skyactive platform and a Awd option probably wouldve of been a good idea.

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