By on April 12, 2016

2015 Ford F-150

The folks in Dearborn are right chuffed about the F-150’s latest crash results — so much so that they sent out embargo materials to a number of outlets, including us (thank you!), to make sure we get the story straight.

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the F-150 SuperCab — in addition to the SuperCrew tested last year — is now a Top Safety Pick, when equipped with optional forward collision alert. Ford is the only brand awarded as such in the segment.

The latest round of tests comes after Ford was caught with its pants down last year. Those tests found that not all F-150s were created equal when it came to withstanding the dreaded small overlap frontal crash test.

This year, it’s more of the same — but the trucks behaving badly aren’t Fords.

According to IIHS, the latest round of testing included extended and crew cab trucks. Of the seven trucks tested, only three trucks — Ford F-150 SuperCab, Chevrolet Silverado 1500 (GMC Sierra) Double Cab, and Toyota Tundra Double Cab — earned “acceptable” or higher ratings in the small overlap front crash test.

F-150 SuperCab Small Offset Front Crash Test, Image: Captured from IIHS Video

A-pillars started going pear-shaped when IIHS supersized the test subjects. Both the Silverado 1500 Crew Cab and Tundra Crew Max received “marginal” scores in the small overlap front crash test.

“Both models had considerable intrusion into the occupant compartment that compromised survival space for the driver,” IIHS stated in an embargoed release.

Chevrolet Silverado Small Offset Front Crash Test, Image: Captured from IIHS Video

Ram, which introduced its 1500-series truck just before IIHS announced the small overlap front crash test, received a “poor” structure and “marginal” overall rating in the small overlap test, regardless of cab size.

“The force of the crash pushed the door-hinge pillar, instrument panel and steering column back toward the driver dummy. In the Ram Crew Cab test, the dummy’s head contacted the front airbag but rolled around the left side as the steering column moved to the right, allowing the head to approach the intruding windshield pillar,” the IIHS release stated.

Ram 1500 Small Overlap Front Crash Test, Image: Captured from IIHS Video

All trucks tested — save the F-150 — were rated “poor” by IIHS for lower leg and foot protection in a small offset front crash.

To date, regular cab trucks remain uncrashed. However, Ford’s truck spokesperson Mike Levine explained that the automaker included similar countermeasures in regular cab versions of its 2016 F-150.

It has wheel blockers, nylon hinge pillar reinforcement and rocker panel reinforcements,” said Levine in an email with TTAC. He later detailed, “There are slight differences but generally the same countermeasures are now across all cabs so we expect similar performance in small overlap testing for SuperCrew, SuperCab and Regular Cab.”

Toyota representative Nate Martinez stated his employer is looking at the test results as a learning opportunity.

We are evaluating the test results with the goal of finding new ways to continuously improve the performance of Toyota trucks and to further enhance the safety of our vehicles,” Martinez said over email. “Importantly, the Toyota trucks tested continue to meet or exceed all federally required motor vehicle safety standards.”

And Ram says it meets federally mandated safety requirements as well.

Every FCA US vehicle meets or exceeds all applicable federal motor-vehicle safety standards. However, we continually evaluate the performance of our vehicles,” explained Ram spokesperson Nick Cappa over email.

Considering Ram’s 1500-series truck is one of the oldest full-size trucks available, FCA could eschew further development of the current platform to focus on the next-generation pickup’s safety performance. The same train of thought can be applied to the even older second-generation Tundra, which Toyota debuted in 2007 and refreshed for the 2014 model year.

A representative for GM declined to comment on the results.

As for Ford, it can now unequivocally state it has the safest truck according to IIHS tests, and IIHS can claim it forced an OEM’s hand to build a safer truck. Everyone wins — except for those who bought regular and extended cab 2015 F-150s.

[Image: Ford; Video: IIHS]

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88 Comments on “Ford F-150 SuperCab Earns ‘Top Safety Pick’ One Year After Crashgate, Wheel Blocks Competition...”


  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    And yet, you couldn’t be bothered to use a picture of a SuperCab model?

    At any rate, even a “marginal” 2015 is an improvement over the ’98 F-250 LD SuperCab I rode and drove in from 2001-12. Boy, am I glad I never saw the test video until after we traded that one off…

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Why? Were you actually PLANNING to be in a serious wreck?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s better to not know, in a way. Once you know how badly your daily driver performs in crashes, you kind of have to get rid of it. And or you’re thinking it’s better to center-punch a solid object you can’t avoid, or hit it head on. But that’s sort of true in most cars, most crash scenarios. Maybe all.

        • 0 avatar
          Higheriq

          I suppose that is true IF one goes through life assuming you’ll be in a serious wreck. As for me, I go through life assuming that I won’t be in a serious wreck. There are a great many other things with which to consume “worry time”.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            We plan for everything else that’ll probably never happen, but this one could really get you or your family killed or maimed. Not to turn every moment of driving time into worry time, just in the back of your mind at all times.

            And never getting too relaxed I guess, behind the wheel.

            But thinking of how best to *avoid* an accident can be similar to a video game. Every driving situation in medium to heavy traffic can be a crash situation with only one escape route. Or the safest/easiest crash.

            Maybe I am hyper aware of my surrounding most of my “driving time”, but it’s not a tense situation, just a game I play.

            Yes there’s a lot of things that make me cringe while driving that makes me slow down an let a bunch of cars pass, or miss my turn (left or right) for a safer turn a bit down the road.

    • 0 avatar
      zip89105

      Heavier F250’s always do better than F150’s in a wreck.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        This was an F-250 light duty, not a 99+ Super Duty. From the early/mid ’80s through 1996, there was always a difference between the light duty and heavy duty F-250, but it wasn’t until 1997 that these differences became more obvious.

        Up to 1996, light-duty F-250s were available with the 300 Six, 302, and 351, had (I think) an F-150 frame with light F-250 suspension, a semi-float rear axle, and were only available as a RCLB (4×2 or 4×4).

        Heavy-duty F-250s had the 300 Six, 351, 400 (early models), 460, or diesel, shared their frame and full-float rear axle with the F-350, and came in RCLB and SCLB (and after 1996, SCSB and CCSB). These models were only dubbed “F-250 Heavy Duty” after 1995.

        For 1997, the F-250 light duty took on the ’97 F-150’s body and 4.6 or 5.4 engine, with a thicker frame, axles, suspension, trans cooler, and unique 7-lug wheels. After 1999, this model was renamed “F-150 7700” after its GVWR, then “Heavy-Duty Payload Package” on the F-150 (GVWR 8200) up to today’s models. For 2015, it lost the 7-lug wheels.

        Occasionally, one may see a late-model 9th gen F-250 (light or heavy) or an early Super Duty with the aluminum 7-lug wheels off the E-Series vans. I have no idea what that’s about.

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    My 2013 f150 eco boost super cab was a good truck. I hate it compared to other brands that I drive daily. The ram driveability in city traffic is just superior. Even 2009 serries rams with 5speed is superior with a hemi. Just took a 2016 f150 5.0 back to back with a 13′ eco boost. The 5.0 got almost double the fuel economy on the same steep slow streets. Were talking 11 degrees at the steepest and no less than 6 to 7 degrees avg. It felt stronger, and more like a real truck should. I really liked the 2016 compared to the 2013. I own a 2016 silverado 8 speed 5.3 I prefer the 8 speed. The Ford 5.0 is very good truck and should be looked at as a better truck than an eco boost. Ford has made a mistake pushing the eco boost. People are overlooking a better truck because of it. F150 5.0 super cab 2016 is one bad a$$ f150. I would buy one over what I currently own if it had the 8 speed or 10 speed. I love the 5.3 and 8 speed combo. Very well connected tranny and it shifts strong… I like these v8 equipped pickups. In 2016 big upgrades!

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yup, V8 trucks are the only way to go. No replacement for displacement. The wannabe heavy-breathing squirrel engines are for sissies and rhinestone cowboys.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        I guess you had your real cowboy hat and boots on when you wrote that.

        All the people who chose the most popular powertrain in the most popular vehicle are poseurs and losers, according to TTAC’s personal coach and lifestyle consultant.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Don’t forget the chaps. A manly, hard pumping V8 and chaps go together naturally. They just won’t quit you.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “I guess you had your real cowboy hat and boots on when you wrote that.”

          Don’t wear any of that schit.

          But I do know what I like in trucks. Hell, even my former assistant and sub-contractor traded his Premium Eco-Bust for a 2016 F250 V8.

          And my son bought a left-over 2015 F350 DRW 4-door from Don Chalmers Ford in ABQ, for his cattle business.

          V8 is the only way to go in pickup trucks, gas or diesel, buyer’s choice.

          For HD work, Ford is the only truck on the planet. Ask anyone who tows or hauls. Nothing else even comes close.

          Personally, I prefer the finesse of a Tundra 5.7L V8, but I understand and respect the limitations of a 1/2-ton pickup truck.

          The reason I chose Tundra is because it is THE finest and most gentlemanly truck on the road. People will watch you coming and stare at you going, stunned and awed in jaw-dropping silence. It happened to me, at several gas stops in Ford country.

          Hey, I had the rest over my lifetime. Now I drive the best.

          And that’s no bull.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @HDC – When people stare and grab for their phone/camera, it’s not always a good thing.. It might be the “What the heck is that guy’s major malfunction??”

            They gotta figure there’s a good story behind the purchase of a Tundra and especially a Titan, vs the usual Ford/GM/Ram.

            But the closer I get to the west coast, the more Tundras I see. In Colorado, Tundra drivers all do the ‘wave’ to each other. Like “Hey, I’m all screwed up too..”

            Seriously though, there’s a truck for everyone, same women. Glad you found your’s:)

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DenverMike, yes, I know but my experience with the gawkers has been good.

            Ever so often a Ford or Chevy jockey will flip me the bird, and I return the salute.

            One day, while eating at Red Robin in Rio Rancho, several guys (and gals) came over to peek into my 2011 Tundra DC 2WD LB, and check it out.

            Now, the same is happening with my 2016 4-door SR5 4×4. Men see a Tundra 5.7 in Ford Country and their jaws drop, and you can see WTF? in their posture.

            Blows their mind.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “V8 is the only way to go in pickup trucks, gas or diesel, buyer’s choice.”

            *cough*Cummins*cough*

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            The desert cat sure is high today! “people will watch you coming and stare at you going, stunned and awed in jaw-dropping silence.”

            What kind of place are people reacting like that to a Toyota pickup? I could see maybe a Ferrari LaFerrari, or perhaps a Bugatti. But a Toyota pickup?

            I needed a good laugh today. Thanks, man!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “What kind of place are people reacting like that to a Toyota pickup?”

            Ford country: New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Oklahoma.

          • 0 avatar
            epsilonkore

            LOL @ 05lgt!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “people will watch you coming and stare at you going, stunned and awed in jaw-dropping silence.”

            @VoGo –

            Substitute Tundra for sexual orientation or visible minority and it all makes sense.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            You’re weird.

            Most mid to long distance, highway towers run Rams, because of the Cummins (and c’mon, V8, in a diesel??? For towing….??? :) ). Ford dominates vocational largely because their Live Drive (PTO) doesn’t suck. While GM is laser focused on intra (sub)urban, where “bigger than a Peterbilt” is more liability than asset. There’s overlap, but they all have their own semi protected niches where they’re the “default” choice.

            And I guess there’s no accounting for taste, and I personally like the Tundra, but refined???? Gentlemanly???? Compared to air ride Rams and the latest Fords and Chevys?? The thing rides and drives like a slightly down rated F250… Works like one, too, which is why I thought most owners liked it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            stuki – good points. The Cummins has its loyal following. That is for sure. Virtually all dually pickups with a box I see are recreational use. Ford and GM tend to dominate the fleet segment especially in the 1/2 ton ranks. Your point about PTO is valid since I rarely ever see a GM or Ram with PTO driven accessories.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I’m always amazed by the commentary of those whom allege to have driven both the EB 3.5 and 5.0. The EB 3.5 isn’t any better in mpg but is a much stronger engine. I find the best way to drive the EB 3.5 is to run it like a diesel powered truck. You don’t rely on rpm and downshifts to get things moving. The EB 3.5 has tons of torque down low. It feels faster if you smoothly apply throttle and keep it pulling in a gear taller than you would normally.
          In some respects the EB 3.5 can feel more “flat” off the line but to me it feels more like traction management than it does turbo lag. To me the EB 3.5 feels like the old 5.4 on steroids. Both engines seem to run better at lower rpm.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I’ll take a gas V8 just for the sound and historic history. I’ve never had one let me down, pop a head gasket or anything, despite major abuse and neglect. V8s are as good as engines ever got, and nothing I’ve seen yet, can replace them.

    • 0 avatar
      zip89105

      Ford was dumb to get rid of the 6.2 F150’s. But just the same, you wouldn’t buy it without an 8-speed, so it’s a moot point.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        GM owners are reporting similar economy on the 6.2l as the 5.3l. Unforunately the OHC design of the Ford engine just can’t be made to function as efficiently. Ford refuses to recognize how much of a disadvantage they’re putting themselves in by continuing to use the design.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Well they aren’t going to go and build a ground up push-rod V8 in 2016. That just isn’t feasible or prudent.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Not with arm chair businessmen in charge of the engineering department they certainly won’t. Just think if we could have a new OHV 4 cylinder designed with today’s technology, it would have no trouble pulling its own against the current crop of engines.

            Besides they already have a wing of the company designing pushrod engines for NASCAR, ditto Toyota.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Jim Holland isn’t an “arm chair businessman”.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            why on earth would anyone want an “OHV 4 cylinder” these days?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Because Hummer thinks that the Iron Duke has acceptable NVH qualities for 2016.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            hey bball and anyone else who was joining this discussion.

            Wanted to let y’all know we did some science on my brother’s Sierra. Warranty is done, bought a Superchips tuner, and just applied the 91 octane “performance” tune, which I’m assuming is just a bit more agressive with the timing. I can’t speak to extra power, but it also removes the Torque Management system and tightens up the shifts. It was like driving a totally different truck, in a good way.

            Summary?
            GM 5.3L Gen V. Good motor, bad tuning.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Science!

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Really bball, you know technology advances right? The iron duke was designed what 40 years ago?
            And if you want to use the iron duke as an example let’s look at all of the mail trucks the UPS still has in use, the iron duke seems to be outliving any other 4 cylinder from that period quite well.

            Besides why wouldn’t you want a OHV 4 cylinder? Lighter, more efficient, smaller, easier to apply modern fuel saving technology, where’s the downside?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Hummer-

            If an OHV 4-banger was better than the current 4-cylinder engines, someone would be putting them in cars. Even GM, the king of all things pushrod, doesn’t build a pushrod 4.

            Dave-

            I’m not surprised. For all intents and purposes, the 5.3L is just a 6.2L with less displacement and a few different parts. There is no reason why it should feel so terrible in a Sierra/Silverado. Stock, it feels like it has less displacement than the Coyote. I’m glad there is an aftermarket fix to a problem that never should have existed in the first place. :)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Even GM, the king of all things pushrod, doesn’t build a pushrod 4.”

            …anymore.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well yeah. They haven’t for awhile. The Iron Duke was the only one that made it to the 90s, right? Maybe the Opel 4 cylinder engine too?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            GM ran the LN2 in the J-body through MY02 and MY03 in the GMT325 (S-10).

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Motors_122_engine#LN2

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I had looked at a graph comparing torque of the 5.3 to the 6.2. They were virtually identical until you started getting into higher rpm. The 6.2 must be programmed to feel more lively.

            Pushrod V8’s make sense in low revving engines but variable valve timing tends to be more difficult to engineer. I suspect that GM’s cam in cam system is more complex in many ways than twin overhead cams.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Well they aren’t going to go and build a ground up push-rod V8 in 2016. That just isn’t feasible or prudent.”

            especially with the new buildings they’re going to have to pay for.

            I know a bunch of people who will not shed a tear for Buildings 1, 3, and 5.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            I’m with Hummer on this one. 5 liter OHV stroker I4 in a Colorado. Slow and grunty enough to slot right into the Duramax version’s driveline, ratios and all…

            Of course, I also want a 10-12 liter Atkinsony I6 gasser drop in, in front of the G56 in the bigger Rams……

      • 0 avatar
        balreadysaid

        After you drive them back to back they are just different and one might feel better than the other depending on what you like. I like the forceful shifts of the 8 speed. Really makes the truck push forward differently than the Ford. I like the feeling. Its just personal I think. The 5.0 feels really nice. Really good setup. Don’t hesitate on one with 3.73 gears. They move out the way a truck should.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It’s great to see the US take a more serious stance in relation to pickup truck safety.

    It appears to be a reactive and forced action by the US pickup “regulators”. In fact years behind many global counter parts.

    Why not? Most pickups are just a family wagon. Even now in Australia business demand 5 Star pickups.

    Many may not realise this, but Ford already has the world’s safest pickup, the global Ranger.

    It is safer than many EU prestige marques and had the best pedestrian safety for years.

    Aluminium has nothing to do with the F-150’s safety.

    Good work by the US.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    can someone find a scandal involving gates, so we can talk about “Gategate?”

  • avatar
    shedkept

    It’s a shame GMC can’t get their headlights squared away. 14’s and 15’s are terrible and the fix is “just a fix”, not a solution. I sold mine when it was apparent GM was going to sweep it under the rug using “NHTSA” regulations. NHTSA only looks at bulb output, not light spread or pattern. The GM headlights that use what they call “Projector” assemblies don’t have HID bulbs which is what they needed from the start to work properly.

    IIHS has completed a study and found only one car that was acceptable; a Toyota Prius V
    http://www.iihs.org/iihs/news/desktopnews/first-ever-iihs-headlight-ratings-show-most-need-improvement

    “There are government regulations dictating how much light comes out the bulb but not necessarily where it goes or whether or not it’s usable by the driver.” IIHS

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “A-pillars started going pear-shaped when IIHS supersized the test subjects.”

    Now I understand: small overlap front crash test for large overlap vehicle occupants.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    The company that saved itself is the one answering the call on improvement. Perhaps after eight years or so from their taxpayer bailout, the folks at Total Recall Motors could learn from Ford?

    The Silverdodo and the Ram are horrific in their lack of safety.

    No need to worry about Toyoduh or Nissan. They are third rate pretenders and they don’t build real trucks anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I can’t tell if this is sarcasm or not, certainly your not serious on giving the Ford the upper hand on pickups, their truck is a pile of cheap plastic compared to everyone else.

      Yep, got to be sarcasm.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Well, if you get into F250 and F350, especially the DRW HD series, there really is no equal among peers. Ford truly is the best pickup truck to haul and tow with.

        Among my Traveling Elks brethren there have been several who switched to Ford from their previous brand, when it came time.

        GM and RAM can pretend all they want but people who tow and know, choose Ford.

        Tundra and Titan are not in the same class as the 3/4-ton pickup trucks. They are 1/2-ton trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Maybe the older trucks felt better, but the current generation of F150 is a steamer in several regards, the door handles have more play in them than a wet napkin, the lock cylinder doesn’t even sit flush with the hole in the handle, the cab and several body panels are made of composite. Ford uses a different frame for trucks with the tow package, the 2.7L is more agricultural in NVH than the 345 in my IH scout, the general design of the stop/start system is sloppy and must be pressed every time the truck is cranked, the engine is unsatisfactory in drivability but that is personal preference, and the price is ridiculous when compared to the competition.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Hummer, your observation is ever so accurate. I agree with you on all points. Pricing too. Outrageous! Agreed.

            However, compared to the rest of the SD/HD field in equal trim and equipment, the Ford trucks are head and shoulders above GM and RAM. (This is not just my observation, but is reflected in annual sales numbers based on real-world buyers).

            What I was trying to convey was that more people who actually use trucks for what they are designed and intended for, will choose a Ford over anything else in the 3/4-ton and 1-ton class.

            This in spite of the fact that the old trucks felt a lot more solid and substantial than the cheapened feel of the current trucks.

            Hell, if I NEEDED a 3/4-ton pickup truck, I’d choose a Ford because Tundra doesn’t make a 3/4-ton truck (even though Hino makes them all the way up to 1.5-ton).

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “the cab and several body panels are made of composite.”

            you don’t need to make stuff up.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I challenge you to go to a dealer; my frame of reference is a 2015 extended cab. Look right below the doors and knock on the rocker panel, it will clearly sound and feel like plastic, follow it all the way around to the roof where you will see it is one continuous piece.

            I believe (I don’t have the truck at my side right now) that the front fenders are also plastic. The bed, doors, and hood are the only parts I believe are noticeably aluminum.

            I certainly don’t need to make anything up, stands to reason there’s an 2015-2016 F150 within 15-25 miles of your person. Go check it out.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Hummer – it makes sense to use a different frame if you want a heavier tow or haul package.
            Ram has a one frame fits all policy and their trucks suck in relation to tow/haul especially as you move up the luxury trim ladder.
            GM’s max tow pickups aren’t quiet the same as the other 1500’s.

            Please post evidence of Ford using composites in body panels and one last thing, how is that a bad thing?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            One frame fits all means your not getting a crap product that doesn’t stand up to what’s being advertised. What’s wrong with Rams strategy, the frames aren’t the limiting factor it’s the suspension.

            Just go look at a new F150, jeez what do you want a patent?

            If you knock a hole into the panel they can’t just pull out a ding or weld in new metal or bond a new section. They must replace a very large single section. Not to mention it reeks of being cheap and makes the truck look poorly designed.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I believe (I don’t have the truck at my side right now) that the front fenders are also plastic. The bed, doors, and hood are the only parts I believe are noticeably aluminum.”

            you are absolutely, 100% full of it.

            “I certainly don’t need to make anything up, stands to reason there’s an 2015-2016 F150 within 15-25 miles of your person. Go check it out.”

            there are probably several hundred F-150s within that distance from me.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Really? Thats what your going to come back to me with?

            Go Check It.

            It’s literally the easiest thing you can do, go find a new extended cab F150 and you can clearly feel the rockers and the cab section going around the doors is a plastic.

            Be sure to let me know when you confirm what I’m saying.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            nope. composite body panels are typically on the order of 2-3mm thick. Aluminum- 1.5mm or so. Steel- 0.7-0.8mm. there’s no 2-3mm thick body panels on the F-150. And this article:

            http://articles.sae.org/13693/

            says you’re wrong.

            Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Your extraordinary claim is that Ford is lying to the Society of Automotive Engineers and the world about what the F-150 is made from. You’d best have extraordinary evidence to prove that.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Maybe the plastic covers an aluminum structure or maybe those pictures are pre-production. But I stand by my words and will be reconfirming my findings as soon as I get the chance.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            or maybe you just don’t know what the f*** you’re talking about. But I don’t expect you to ever admit that.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Yet you refuse to even consider it as a possibility?
            I freely admit when I’m wrong, and have admitted to being incorrect on several occasions on this site.
            I would hope you would freely be able to similarly admit mistakes, but I’m not sure your open minded enough to consider the possibility that maybe you could be incorrect.

            You are completely disregarding the possibility that it could be plastic and acting like I’m trying to convince you your name is banana. It’s baffling that anyone could be so sure of something they clearly haven’t had experience with.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Yet you refuse to even consider it as a possibility?”

            yes, I refuse. I also refuse to go to a dealer and “find out for myself,” since I work less than a mile away from the assembly plant where the bulk of F-150s are built.

            Please consider what I’m actually saying here.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Jeez, what does being near them mean? It doesn’t change the materials.
            I feel pretty confident since I showed it to 2 other people in person and they both had a similar reaction when they compared the doors to the rockers and the bed to the fenders.

            What the material is on the king Ranch 4 door, I don’t know, but the XLT-XL extended cab – I’m confident of material.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            What’s strange is that in that IIHS test picture it shows a split in the rocker at the point where the two doors meets, no such crease exists on the 2015 extended cab.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            “Really? Thats what your going to come back to me with?

            Go Check It.”

            I did…on the one in my driveway. It is aluminum just like the rest of the truck. If you want “composites” you have to go to a Toyota dealer.

            By the way, 8200 miles, 22 mpg average. Mixed driving mostly in the suburbs to include the occasional jaunts with the 5100 pound travel trailer behind it. Mine is the 2.7 XLT. I guess I’m a poser because you know, posers always buy the smallest motor available. BTW my Frontier averaged 18mpg. They are doing something right. They really are great trucks. It is plenty quick but should you drive it like a granny it will reward you.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Is yours the extended cab?
            At this moment I still have plenty of reason to believe it is plastic and will be rechecking as soon as I have to go use it again.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s not plastic. The body is aluminum. I’ve seen them unpainted. You can take the Rouge Factory Tour if you have doubts. Ford will show you trucks their being built.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I guess it really wouldn’t matter if I took a file to it in an inconspicuous area under the rockers and recovered with touch up, will report results regardless if I’m wrong this weekend.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You can go to the parts counter and ask for a fender. They probably have one.

            And what part of the F150 in this article’s photo are you saying is plastic:

            http://www.kansascity.com/news/business/article22884096.html

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Mine is a crew cab. Doubt they’d use a different material on the extended cab.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Well, I was wrong, the rockers are a thin metal, the cab corners and the trim above the bumper however are plastic.

  • avatar
    celebrity208

    Warning, pure speculation follows:
    I suspect (from only looking at the pictures) that the intrusion that the IIHS noticed in the Ram and Chevy were the wheels distorting the footwell of the driver. Notice they stayed parallel to the direction of travel. On the Ford (and again as seen in the picture in this article) the wheel turned perpendicular to the direction of travel. Was this the differentiator between getting and not getting a “Top Pick” award the level of footwell intrusion? Was this intrusion caused by the wheel? Were the wheel sizes the same in all three vehicles? Did the Ford’s wheel turn 90deg as a result of a crash specific suspension design or just happenstance? Personally, I treat the IIHS’s tests as anecdotal evidence… not a deal breaker but something to at least be considered. It’s not like they do a statistically significant number of crash tests. They do five different crash tests. I don’t blame them though, considering the cost of these vehicles.

  • avatar
    shedkept

    Went for a test drive in a new ’16 F150XLT. Nice ride, quiet and very capable. It was a V8 because I still don’t trust the EcoBoost 6’s. Teething problems when they were new and the fact that 2 turbos adds more complications down the road. If you dump a vehicle when it reaches warranty it’s probably a fine choice.
    The V8 sounds great and will actually get close to the claimed mileage. I’ve never met anyone who was happy with EcoBoost mileage.

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