By on March 31, 2016

2017 Nissan GT-R Grille, Image: Nissan USA

Last fall, we had a typical-for-TTAC slap fight between Bark and Mark, centered around Nissan. I’ve been ruminating on this argument for months, but my conversation last week with NISMO chief Hiroshi Tamura — and seeing what Nissan chose to feature in New York — finally pushed me over the edge.

As I walked through the glass doors in the Jacob Javits Center last Wednesday morning, preparing for my first auto show as a member of the press, the automaker that’s defined much of my motoring life was front and center.

Somewhat inexplicably, Nissan had rented possibly the best, highest-traffic space in the entire hall and filled it with a tribute to a six-figure supercar, complete with a bunch of old cars the U.S. never saw when new.

In speaking with Tamura-san, I recognized his passion for the GT-R all too clearly. I share a similar passion for the other Nissan sportscar: the Z.

While I didn’t expect a glittery booth with barely dressed models draped over a bunch of Versas, I did anticipate a representative sample of Nissan’s current lineup. A new Maxima, a Rogue, perhaps the new non-XD Titan?

Maybe a Z?

1990 Nissan 300ZX

No, the rest of the lineup was down in the forgotten basement, among the trucks and some tuner cars. I actually had to look at my show program to recall Nissan had another space beyond the GT-R exhibit.

1974 Datsun 260Z

Let’s briefly pause to state the obvious. I’m a Z fanatic, quite literally from birth. I came home from the hospital as nine pounds of newborn ballast in my dad’s 1974 260Z. I’m a bit ashamed by the wire wheels, but dad had recently moved on from British sports cars and I’m guessing these helped him with the transition. A long string of Z cars, of every pre-2000 generation, followed.

1973 Datsun 240Z

In my teen years, my father and I restored this tennis-ball-yellow 1973 240Z. Upon turning 16, he offered it to me. My pragmatic side unexpectedly surfaced, and I refused for the sake of the rust-free steel, knowing well the damage caused by the combination of a young driver and an Ohio winter can inflict. Assuming I’d simply get a job and walk to work until I could afford a beater, dad instead sold the Z and bought me an old Maxima. Though I loved the old shoebox Max, I’m still kicking myself.

1985 Nissan Maxima

Moreover, Nissan built cars that people wanted. The original Z was a lightweight, inexpensive (before additional dealer profit) sportscar that competed with and beat the contemporaries from Great Britain. Later years brought Brougham-tastic features to the increasingly heavy Z, but they kept selling. They met the desires of the buyers. And I’ll use any excuse to link to the legendary “Black Gold” commercial. So here it is.

Whether the “Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday” mantra is anecdotal or fact, Nissan/Datsun connected with current and potential owners through motorsports. I spent many summer weekends with my parents, facing backward in the hatch of whatever Z dad owned then, headed north to Mid-Ohio. I sat right against the catch fence, watching my Nissan-driving heroes speed by. Later in the afternoon, we’d grill burgers on a camp stove with dozens of dad’s Z-driving friends gathered near the one flushing toilet in the infield spectator area.

Datsun 280ZX Turbo Paul Newman Bob Sharp

Back to the GT-R. As mentioned frequently last week, Nissan turned 1105 of these last year, compared to 7391 370Zs, according to GoodCarBadCar.net. Looking at the chart and discounting the pony cars and Corvette, affordable, sporty cars do sell well. The WRX/STi duo accounted for 33,734 units, and Volkswagen moved 23,669 examples of the Golf R, and another 4,141 GTIs. Even the Toyobaru twins sold 15,803 combined cars, just shy of the Z (7,391) and the Miata (8,591) combined.

GoodCarBadCar Sporty Car Sales 2015

Looking at the top sellers, it’s quite clear that practical hatchbacks with plenty of power are what people want. The Z, Miata, FR-S/BRZ combo are either underpowered or storage space-limited. Automakers are building cars that enthusiasts say they want but that no one is buying.

It’s been rumored that the Z, having been killed off once before, will be reanimated as a “sporty” CUV. While I’m not going to argue that this will sell well, I plead with Nissan to keep the Z badge for an appropriate sports car.

2015 Mini Countryman green

Look at Mini. BMW acquired an iconic brand, and started building a small (though OG Mini-dwarfing) hatch. This was proper use of the badge. But the new models, such as the Countryman, are certainly not mini, and dilute the brand into a joke, no matter how good the cars are.

Nissan, please don’t make this mistake. Tamura-san, show some love for us fanatics. Save the Z, and save your soul.

[Images: Top, Nissan USA; Mini, Mini USA; Sales Chart, Tim Cain/GoodCarBadCar.net; Others, © 2016 Chris Tonn/The Truth About Cars]

Chris Tonn is a broke classic car enthusiast that writes about old cars, since he can’t afford to buy them. Commiserate with him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

57 Comments on “Nissan, Please...”


  • avatar

    Compared to the first 4 generations of Z car, Nissan has spent next to nothing on advertising the last two generations of the Z. Heck Nissan was still making advertisements with the 300ZX after they stopped importing them. I don’t ever recall seeing an ad on television for the 350Z or 370Z.

    I not sure if Nissan even knows what a Z car should be. At the ZCCA convention in July, Tamura-san was saying that the Z should be a graceful dance partner while the GT-R should be a beast. Does Nissan even have a platform to raid for parts & engineering to create a new graceful dance partner and keep the Z costs down? I don’t think so. Would people accept a small turbo-charged 4 cylinder Z? I have my doubts.

    I’ll just have to enjoy my two old Zs.

    • 0 avatar
      akatsuki

      The Z and Silvia platforms should just be merged. A nice small rwd platform powered by a good I4 and Nismo turbo option.

      • 0 avatar

        That is something that would definitely get me interested. The problem is getting people over not having a 6 cylinder in the Z. I remember when Nissan floated the concept Z with the 2.4 L four cylinder. There was an uproar online about the lack of a 6 cylinder, and Nissan went back to the drawing board. When the 350Z was coming out, there were still plenty of Z enthusiasts complaining that the 350Z wasn’t as powerful at the 300ZX twin turbo.

        Can Nissan change the perspective of what makes a Z car?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I think a turbo four Z car would be fine as long as there was a six-cylinder option, at least to start. Enthusiasts don’t tend to complain about volume models if there’s a halo model, even if expensive, that meets their expectations.

          I swear half of automotive product planning must be trying to calculate whether there’s a business case for building a low-volume model of a given car with a different type of engine, taking into account the value of that model for press coverage and online discussions in addition to direct sales. The answer increasingly seems to be “no,” which may pose a challenge for the Z.

    • 0 avatar
      DanyloS

      I do not like the reality that because of emissions regulations we will all soon only be driving turbo charged 4-cyl and 3-cyls soon :(

      I think V8’s will hold on for a while but naturally aspirated 6-cyl’s seem to be dropping off the face of the earth.

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    23,669 Golf R’s were sold in the US in 2015? Really?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Oh, Nissan – just give us the IDX concept already.

    Shut up and take my money!

  • avatar

    The GT-R is a $110,000 car so most enthusiasm for it is severely limited.

    Buying them pre-owned is a financial blunder. Extremely expensive repairs and maintenance.

    Nissan Z is simply too small. Ok for a college student who wants to impress girls but beyond that- entirely impractical.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed.

      Although I can’t imagine a college student driving a new Z, my sons tell me their fellow students are driving new Maseratis, funded by Dad in China.

      I drove Pintos.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      It’s what we refer to as a sports car. They usually come with smallness. To preempt- camaro and mustang -not sports car.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      When I was single and lived in a townhouse, I had a first gen RX-7, which was basically the same car. It was entirely practical for a single person who didn’t have a yard to maintain. My now brother in law had a second gen RX-7 when he lived in an apartment, and my wife had a ’93 Honda Prelude when I met her. It’s plenty of space for a single or a couple.

      I realize it wouldn’t work for you, but most of us aren’t so tall.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Well they have the engine now: the new 400 HP twin turbo from the Infiniti Q50 (should be called G39?) Just take the Q50 coupe, put in on a diet (how?) slope the roof back into a hatchback and call it the 390Z. I love my 350Z but its not very powerful compared to a modern Pony car. A Vortex supercharger can fix that, but as is a VW Golf R (what brother owns) out runs a Z on track. Granted the R isn’t as fun but

    The Z gets ZERO attention from Nissan. I’d bet your average person doesn’t realize you can still buy one because of the lack of advertising. Almost every Nissan commercial ends with a line of cars shown at the bottom of the ad… the Z is missing. I can understand not showing the GT-R, its basically a super car few car afford. But the Z is affordable. Granted its not a smart buy when Mustang and Camaros give you so much more bang for you buck. The main problem is the Z occupies a weird space: too slow against the V8s – too heavy against the Miata, BRZ/FRS. Frankly I like this odd middle ground but not many people agree.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Affordable isn’t enough. For better or worse (better IMO) people want to get more for their money. I call it the “smartphone effect”. Z is like a DSLR. If you need the absolute best image quality and full capability of a standalone camera, a smartphone won’t do. Similar story with a sports car. Problem is most people don’t… they really just wanted the performance. Just like a bunch of people didn’t really need DSLRs- they just wanted a camera that wasn’t crap. Now smartphones have cameras that are decent enough for most people, so DSLR sales are in decline. Simiarly a GTI, at least according to C&D times, will match a Z in a straight line, while

      – getting 50% better gas mileage (!!!!!!!!)
      – being able to carry 3 more people
      – having way more cargo capacity
      – not driving you absolutely insane with road noise

      as well as being better equipped and nicer inside for less money lol.

      Z sales down to 8K units a year in the US…. no way they would recoup from any major new reinvestment. I would be happy if they just threw the new 3.0TT and updated the infotainment in the Z34 but honestly that probably won’t be enough. Death of the Z is symptomatic of a permanent shift in market taste.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        All true, but the GTI is not as satisfying to drive. Unfortunately the 1,000 people who care about that already bought a FRS/BRZ.

      • 0 avatar
        Macca

        @ sportyaccordy

        The DSLR analogy is really great – hope you don’t mind that I’m gonna steal that one. It really does capture (pun intended) the decline of the dedicated ‘sports car’.

        As a semi-pro bench racer and keeper of all things performance specs, I do have to call out a few parts of your comparison.

        1) RE: the GTI ‘matching a Z in a straight line’ especially according to C/D’s performance results. The average of three C/D tests of the 370Z has a 0-60 of 4.8 sec, qtr mi 13.4 sec @ 107 MPH, 0.93 RH, 165′ 70-0 braking. The average of two GTIs (one DSG, one 6spd manual) is 5.7 sec 0-60, 14.4 sec qtr @ 100 MPH, 0.91 RH, 161′ 70-0 braking. Granted, the GTI offers great performance, but at ~14.4 lbs/hp versus the Z’s 10.1, it’s clearly going to get wheezy at speed. Competitive and impressive, clearly, but matching it’s not.

        2) The Z is rated at 18/26 MPG, while the GTI is rated at 25/34. That represents a 39% gain in urban and a 31% gain in highway mileage. C/D’s observed 19 MPG in the Z versus 26 in the GTI is a 37% gain.

        3) Also not entirely sure about the ‘nicer inside’ bit (lol) – given the wilted condition of most of the aged VWs I’ve been in, it’s the ‘nicer’ part that I take exception with, but that’s purely subjective. For their part, Nissan did take the complaints with the 350Z’s plasti-Sentra interior to heart and delivered tons of soft touch materials and snazzy design elements. VW’s austerity isn’t everyone’s cup o’ tea. Given that a loaded GTI DSG can reach $35k (you have to get the Autobahn edition for navigation, should you so choose). You’re within $3k of the 370Z Touring (to get leather and nav). Not a huge cost disparity, but it’s there.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Macca one of my online homes is DPReview so I have honed the analogy both ways :)

          I was speaking about the Z33 as JMII and I own or have owned them. The 370Z is definitely another step beyond, but then with the $$$ saved from a GTI you can even that out really quickly. I just saw an MK7 GTI 6MT rip through the quarter mile in 13 flat spinning through 2nd with nothing but a tune and some bolt ons. Aside from kind of extreme mods like removing cats and the line the VQ is kind of a hard nut to crack (part of why I sold my Z).

          Fair point though.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        Back when the 240Z came out, a 0-60 time of 9 seconds was fast, and you had to buy something like a Z or one of the more performance oriented Detroit offerings to get it. Small cars came with skinny 6.15 x 13 bias ply, offering something like .62 lateral G’s. Now any economy car can do that, and it’s not like there are better opportunities to drive fast than there used to be.

  • avatar
    omer333

    There’s been a lot of Z’s in my family. I had a 280zx in high school (beautiful car, but not a good second car for a young punk rocker), my sister had a 280z, my parents had two different 280zx’s when I was a boy, and one of my uncle’s had a first-year Z32 300zx non-turbo.

    Deep down in my heart I want another Z. I want my daughters to fall in love with these cars like I did, but finding an older car that’s not destined for the crusher or been attacked by a NOPI catelog for a reasonable price is becoming impossible.

    That said, if Nissan sells a new Z to compete with the Toyobaru twins, and it’s priced right. I will be there.

    • 0 avatar
      Macca

      “…if Nissan sells a new Z to compete with the Toyobaru twins, and it’s priced right…”

      That would be a tough sell to many Z fanatics.

      A slow, decontented, gutless Z for $25k seems like a folly to me. That the current Z offers what it does for ~$30k entry cost is pretty amazing, yet all most journos can do is complain that it’s loud (not really) and heavy (exaggerated). The FR-S is much slower, louder, and has a lackluster power-to-weight ratio. I’m not looking for an underpowered dorifto machine.

      That sounds more like the successor to the Silvia/240SX.

      If there was a thriving market for the two-door coupe sports car format, I think the now-defunct IDx would be the natural response to the Toyobaru twins.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        IDK bro. My Civic has less road noise, and while the Z is pretty light for what it is, the controls are needlessly heavy. You get used to it, but it doesn’t add feedback or anything really positive to the experience.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Ah, the good old halo car fail. Yea, people will definitely buy the soggy Altima or Sentra over an Accord Sport or Civic Si because the former two happen to share a badge with a GT-R LOL.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The return of the Z helped to save Nissan from the brink of US failure. Halo cars can and do work.

      It would seem that the problem is now is that two-seat sports cars have become passe. If there is to a halo, then it needs at the very least to have a back seat. A CUV would probably be even better.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        The Z did not save anything. 3 things saved Nissan:

        – The 2002 Altima
        – The FM platform Infinitis
        – The VQ going from 3.0L to 3.5L

        I was in NYC at the time in college and when the 2002 Altima came out nearly all my close friends got them once they were affordable enough used. Why? They were dirt cheap, they were absolute beasts on the highway, and they could hold 2 dudes and 3-4 girls in comfort no problem. They looked really good too. Nobody gave a crap about the Z outside of it being another awesome sports car nobody in our crew could afford. The 3.0L Maximas hinted at it but the 3.5L Altimas/Maximas really ushered in a new era of practical, affordable performance. To get that kind of performance in a sedan before you had to get a 540i.

        Z helped no doubt- I think its sales peaked in 2003 but even then that was only 30K or so sales. All downhill from there. But yea as great as the Z was (I mostly enjoyed mine) it didn’t save anything. Nissan would have been fine without it. Nobody was going in to buy Zs and coming out with Altimas/Maximas, consumers just don’t work that way.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          The brand was ailing, and the Z-car make it less bland.

          Nissan went to the trouble of bringing back the Z because it had no choice. It was so eager to get it back that it even had a classic Z-car restoration program in an effort to appeal to its heritage and fill the gap while the new car was being developed.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Nobody who bought an Altima did so because of a Z and again the 2002+ Altima is the car that saved the Nissan brand. Z was a nice marketing gesture but it was mainly a consequence of the FM platform necessary for Infiniti’s survival. The Z “saved” Nissan like the EVO “saved” Mitsubishi.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Nissan did what I have recounted, and stated at the time that these were the reasons that they were doing it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Sportyaccordy, I disagree. Sure, no one thought “I’m buying an Altima because there’s a Z across the showroom.” But the Z helped make Nissan’s brand cool for a brief time. Without the Z, there would have been a lot less awareness of those Altimas among the uninformed general public.

            Also, even then, Nissan sold four or more four-cylinder Altimas for every V6 one. The styling of the 2002 model was a lot more important than the 3.5 VQ.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Just because Nissan brought the Z back to save the brand doesn’t mean that’s what the Z actually did. Again, what is your ballpark estimate of a percentage of folks who’s non Z purchase was brought on by the Z? Who said “I have 18K to spend, and the Civic is a better car but I’m going to get the Sentra because Z!” Walk me through the thought process.

            dal I agree that the styling (and size) of the Altima had more to do with Nissan’s reversal of fortune than the engine which is why I said the Altima itself helped save the company. But I remember the frenzy that came with that engine. More HP than a 3 series for less than half the price? A lot of folks were pretty excited. And I DO know people bought the 2.5 Altima, even though they wanted the 3.5 (and probably would have been better off in something else entirely). But I just don’t buy the idea that the Z was pulling anybody in to do anything but look at/buy Zs.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Branding doesn’t work in the manner that you think that it does.

        • 0 avatar
          bodayguy

          The Z brought Nissan a TON of publicity back in 2002-2003. It was the best performance bang-for-the-buck car available at the time and it had heritage design, cool colors, etc. If anyone saw “The Run” short they played before movies? Awesome.
          It was definitely a halo car that the brand needed. Biased because I bought one, though.

          I wish Nissan would pull its head out of its $^# and make a 400Z.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    The Corvette is kicking butt being as expensive as it is.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      But its owner demographics aren’t looking good. They’re keeping all the old guys in the fold but not attracting many younger buyers. Unless something big changes (and maybe the mid-engine Vette will be that change) Corvettes will stop selling within a couple decades because the customer base will die off.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Corvette owners I have observed are affluent, and the number of truly affluent people has been in decline for some time regardless of age. Concurrently the number of vehicle choices and categories for those who have remained affluent has significantly increased. However the fact Corvette sales rebounded with the introduction of the C7, on what is still an enhanced 1984 Y-body chassis, speaks to its resilience in a sea of choice and otherwise m’eh product from its parent, GM. Unless Corvette lays an egg with a new chassis/motor or something to this effect, I expect Corvette sales to remain strong into the next decade.

        2005 37,372 Sixth generation (C6) begins; New body is first with fixed headlamps since 1962; no Z06 model and a late convertible introduction.
        C6
        2006 34,021 Z06 debuts; 6-speed automatic with paddle shift available on non-Z06 models.
        2007 40,561 6-speed automatic paddle shift delays are reduced drastically compared to 2006.
        2008 35,310 Mild freshening, LS3 introduced, All leather interior added (4LT, LZ3).
        2009 16,956 ZR1 model added, new “Spyder” wheels for Z06.
        2010 12,194 Grand Sport Coupe and Convertible added; replaces the Z51 performance package, launch control standard on MN6 models.
        2011 13,596 Wheel choices are updated; Larger cross-drilled brake rotors (13.4″ front and 12.8″ rear) available on Coupe and Convertible, or included with (F55) Magnetic Selective Ride Control. Z07 Performance Package introduced for Z06.
        2012 11,647 Upgraded interior and new tires on the base model. Z06 acquires full-length rear spoiler and a carbon fiber hood as options. ZR1 gets adjusted gears for better fuel economy. ZR1 Performance Package introduced, Z07 Performance Package tweaked with new wheels.
        2013 13,466 Introduction of 427 Convertible model. 9 month production run.
        2014 37,288 Seventh generation (C7) begins; All new styling, chassis and drivetrain.
        C7
        2015 34,240 C7 Z06 debuts.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Corvette

        • 0 avatar

          Most vette guys, at least in my area, are older, bought the car after the kids got out of college (compared to college tuition, a vette is cheap !) and this is their toy.

          I’ve seen few folks without grey hair in vettes. Bonus points for your military or fire stickers-although retired cops stop at a small thin blue line sticker.

          Affluent working class and tradesman…I don’t see any in the parking lot of the medical buildings…

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Unless something changes we aren’t running out of “old guys” they’re still making them every day.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Today’s young guys won’t suddenly start liking Corvettes just because they get old.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The Mustang and Corvette are now being built for international sales because the US market isn’t large enough to support them.

            That puts the Corvette in a tough spot. It has to up its game in order to compete with the 911 and other foreign sports car, but doing so requires higher prices, which ensures that the demand is limited, and so on.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Chevrolet and Ford badging don’t help, unless in other markets branding is already being switched around.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      For the money for ‘Vette is a bargain! The C7 interior is big improvement over the previous GM hack jobs.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The C7 is fantastic, I’m actually considering a purchase depending on what the next job pays (or possibly an extra clean C6 which trade in the 30s).

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I love that Anniversary 280ZX, the sheer amount of brougham luxury is great. It’s nearly an Oldsmobile.

    And IMO the 300ZX is one of the most lovely designs to come out of the entire 1990’s.

    Now though, meh. 370 does no feels for me. Were they showing off the new Patrol-Armada there?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Your powers of Brougham have leveled up since the acquisition of a C-body Cadillac, even one lacking the prerequisite Carriage Roof, Continental Package, and E&G Classics Grille.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        They were always there! Remember a long time ago, when I was doing Ebay Finds on Junkyard articles, and that minty 10th Anniversary 280 I linked on there?

        You said something like “I don’t like the Z really, but even I like this one!”

        Always a soft spot for luxury cruiser coupes from Japan. Black/gold/lace wheels/gold badges – I’ll stop now or Dal will get seasick.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Anything old enough to have factory lace wheels is a bit less offensive with a gold package. Unfortunately the peak of their popularity was about eight years after the cars on which they work best.

          I love Brougham style. I just wish it came together with a ride that, well, doesn’t make me seasick. A 1992 Brougham that rode with the control of a LS or S550 would be flat awesome.

  • avatar
    carguy

    As a former 240Z owner, there is simply nothing in the current Nissan lineup that even remotely interests me. The 350Z is no match for the Mustang and Camaro and the GT-R is sandwiched between much more affordable Corvettes and way more exciting alternatives such as Audi R8 and Porsche GT3.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      IIRC the original Z was no match for the Mustangs & Camaros of its day either

      The 370Z is pretty serious and also a good ~500-600lb lighter than the ponycars that can beat it in a straight line.

    • 0 avatar
      Macca

      @carguy

      Yeah, I’m going to keep beating that drum. The 370Z actually is of superior performance for roughly the same cost as the V6 Mustang and V6 Camaro (also, the 350Z ended production 8 years ago).

      Not only that, but the 370Z also has the capability to achieve not-too-distant numbers as compared to the new Mustang GT (best 370Z times coming in at the same 0-60 and 2 MPH less quarter trap speed). For that matter, the new GT is hardly a match for the new Camaro SS.

      The Z might be ancient and compromised, but the specs have held up really well for a 7.5 year old car.

  • avatar
    dwford

    That’s the one big problem with the Jacob Javitts center for the autoshow – all the automakers end up having a 2 separate displays, one on each level. And for some reason GM has decided recently to hide in a totally separate hall away from all the other automakers.

    I’m skipping it this year. The crush of humanity makes it very hard to see the cars.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I think Nissan should come up with a rear wheel drive Altima and make a more affordable GTR version. This is doable.

    Drop the V8 from the new Titan in it and it do believe with the suspension set up correctly it will trounce the Mustang and Camaro.

    Also, what ever happened to the retro “1600” concept from a couple of years ago?

    An interesting video.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Halo cars do nothing for building the brand or boosting sales of everyday, bread-n-butter cars. They’re a huge waste and all about ego. The typical Altima buyer hasn’t a clue what a GT-R is. If a fanboy drools over the GT-R, it ends there. They’ll buy the ’99 slammed Acura.

    Ford laid out the perfect ‘pony car’ business plan for Nissan and others to follow, but they think they know better.

  • avatar

    The chart omits NISMO Juke.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Superdessucke: This makes me realise how much I miss the hot hatch. We have the ancient GTI which is pretty much...
  • -Nate: Oy, vey . -Nate
  • EBFlex: “They finally get the styling right and we can’t have it. Sonofasnitch.” Ford would rather you...
  • Hummer: This is why Acura will never be more than a Honda+. 290HP in a V6 is about 10 years behind the competition....
  • Hummer: This, eventually (theoretically) battery cost will settle at a affordable price for acceptable range. At that...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States