By on March 21, 2016

1989 Mercury Sable in Colorado junkyard, front view - © 2016 Murilee Martin / The Truth About Cars

The first-generation Mercury Sable, like its revolutionary Ford Taurus sibling, was a smash sales hit. Then, well, the plastic in those cool-looking “lightbar” grilles yellowed after a few years, sales of later Sables declined, and then the 1986-1991 Sables were just about all gone. I don’t see many first-gen Sables at U-Yank-It yards these days, though they were not uncommon just a few years ago.

Here is an appliance-white ’89 that I found in a Denver yard recently.

1989 Mercury Sable in Colorado junkyard, grille light - © 2016 Murilee Martin / The Truth About Cars

This lightbar doesn’t seem too bad. Perhaps I should have purchased it for our resident Mercury lover.

1989 Mercury Sable in Colorado junkyard, door lock keyboard - © 2016 Murilee Martin / The Truth About Cars

The Ford Keyless Entry keypad dates all the way back to the 1980 model year, and continues in use on 2016 Fords (though the hardware looks a bit different than it did in the 1980s).

1989 Mercury Sable in Colorado junkyard, Sable LS emblem - © 2016 Murilee Martin / The Truth About Cars

The LS was the top Sable trim level in 1989; the MSRP on this car was $15,095, versus $12,874 for a Taurus GL with V6 engine.

1989 Mercury Sable in Colorado junkyard, front seat - © 2016 Murilee Martin / The Truth About Cars

The interior is a symphony in hard beige plastic and tan velour.

It’s true, other car companies were copying the looks of the Taurus/Sable.

Mercury: it’s worth it. Which is something of a defensive-sounding slogan.

How about a full minute of Rod Stewart scmhaltzily pitching the Mercury line, with emphasis on the first-gen Sable?

Big-haired ’80s women prefer the Sable!

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90 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1989 Mercury Sable LS Sedan...”


  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I probably went 10 years in the 90s without seeing one of these with a fully functioning lighted grille. One of the bulbs was always out. I wonder how many people eventually yanked it and replaced it with a Taurus grille after failing multiple safety inspections because of them.

    Edit: I guess you’d have to change the headlights too… eh, forget it, I’ll just keep some extra bulbs in the car.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      They were completely cosmetic, though. Assuming all required lighting was in compliance, are there any states would possibly fail a car because of that? I’m all for safety inspections, but that seems over the top and very obnoxious if there are.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        My understanding is that Virginia law requires that if a car came with a light on the outside, it is required to be functioning in order to pass the state safety inspection.

        6. – INSPECT OTHER LIGHTS FOR:
        Approved type, proper bulbs, and condition of lenses, wiring and switch.
        Aim of fog and driving lamps.
        Illumination of all lamps and proper color of lenses.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          I got dinged for a broken foglight one year, so I took the foglights off and passed. Optional lights don’t have to be present, but they do have to work if they are.

          Did you get the green Figaro at Japanese Classics?

          • 0 avatar
            Land Ark

            Ok, how the heck did you remember that?

            As soon as I saw it on their site I raced up to tell my wife. She had the saddest look on her face when I pointed it out because she doesn’t have the necessary funds in place and we don’t have space for it at the moment. The saving grace was that she really wants a purple one.

            I told her it sold yesterday and she lamented about how someone in Virginia has one and it isn’t her. I said it might have gone to another state but that didn’t help.

    • 0 avatar
      tonyola

      The real headlight bulbs were located at the outer ends of the light bar – the bulbs in the middle were illuminated at a lower output for style only. They did not really contribute to the illumination of the road.

    • 0 avatar
      quasimondo

      My parents had two of them, an ’87 LS and a ’92 GS. Burned out bulbs on the light bar were never a problem. Burned out bulbs on the digital instrument cluster (on the ’87) were.

      I’ll always have a fond place in my heart for Sables, especially the ’87, which was loaded to the gills. They were as futuristic as a Knight Industries Two Thousand, even if they didn’t talk. Digital dash, climate control, premium stereo (which was boom box quality to my 1987 ears), and power Everything. Even the way the cooling fan sounded when you switched the engine off sounded futuristic, like a jet engine shutting down.

      It was a rough car by the time it got passed down to me. The Vulcan V6 wasn’t so futuristic by then, and was downright sluggish just getting down the road. Those dashboard lights burned out constantly, and by the time my dad got tired of replacing them, you could only see half the dash and guesstimate within 10 MPH how fast you were going because only the left digit was visible. And that’s when the speedometer worked, because the drive gear for the speedo sensor was stripped and never registered your speed. But at least the stereo still rocked…or did until my friend brought his Mobb Deep tape over and we played “Survival of the Fittest” a tad bit too loud.

      But even with it’s faults (and those cars had many), I still loved that car. That was one fine ride that truly was ahead of its time.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      The light bar is not required to pass my state’s inspection. Good thing as the sockets tend to melt a bit. And the small bayonet base lamps have not been available in stores for quite a few years. As such my 92’s lightbar has been dark for six years.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Back in 2000, needing a cheap car I bought a ’90 Sable Wagon at an auction in Brooklyn. It was a maroon LS with a red velour interior. I paid $1200 for it with 125K miles on it. It had been well-maintained. All of the lights in the light bar worked. the only issue was an AC leak which I had fixed. We went on our honeymoon in in shortly thereafter. It served us well for another 20K miles of mostly weekend driving and the occasional road trip. It met its end when I ran over a deer one dark night. Try as I might, we couldn’t get rid of the smell. One evening we pulled into a WalMart parking lot right next to a hippie VW van complete with hippie couple. They commented on the smell. We gave the car away two weeks later. To this day, we have fond memories of it. It may the single most honest car I’ve ever owned.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    The old man had a ’91 (I think) back in the mid-90s, bought used to abuse as part of his 40k miles of year driving for his job.

    The few times I got to borrow it, I was actually impressed compared to the Japanese cars I was running at the time. The 3.8 V6 had good power/torque and the whole thing drove rather nicely. For a few years afterward I dipped my toes back into American cars, buying a MY97 Mountaineer for my wife to use.

    The Sable, however, never managed to rack up the miles that my dad put on his Nissan Stanzas. An air compressor went bad, taking out the serpentine belt… and then one of the front struts (or whatever part it was) collapsed, taking out the wheel in the process. He sold it and bought a MY99 Aurora instead, brand new. He still has that Oldsmobile!

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    This one is now dusty ancient looking junk but people forget just how modern these things were when they first came out. Totally changed the look of the sedan, which was a big segment at the time. Took a lot of guts for Ford to go in that direction.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Very good point. I remember reading about the comparison of the component parts count comparing the doors of the Taurus with the Fairmont. The window frame on the Fairmont door consisted of numerous parts that required assembly and some welding. The Taurus door eliminated this process completely as the window frame was integral to the door stamping. It improved quality and reduced manufacturing cost.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      And the light bar grille by Mercury was revolutionary at the time, although I don’t think anybody has copied it since then, either.

      • 0 avatar
        April S

        I’m pretty sure the only other car that did the light bar thingy was another Mercury. Early 90’s Topaz.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        The lightbar was a non-uncommon style in the late ’80s. Aside from the above, the S13 Nissan Silvia also had one.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The final Olds 98 could have had one, it would have worked.

          • 0 avatar
            Coopdeville

            My brain wants to tell me that the entire Mercury line added the bar at one point, but can’t back that up with pictures. The Tracer appears to have added it by 1992 but it doesn’t look like it lights up.

            http://www.oldcarbrochures.org/NA/Mercury/1992-Mercury/1992-Mercury-Full-Line-Brochure

            (I’m going get fired.)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            No get fired! For all day spent on Mercury brochure, or what?

          • 0 avatar
            Coopdeville

            …I could spend all day on that brochure site if I’m not careful.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ha, that’s how I know the Gold Package on Cadillacs actually had 25K gold plating.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            25k gold plating?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Indeed, all badging and emblems were plated.

            http://www.oldcarbrochures.org/NA/Cadillac/1992-Cadillac/1992-Cadillac-Full-Line-Prestige-Brochure/1992-Cadillac-Full-Line-Prestige-50

          • 0 avatar
            Coopdeville

            Looks like “23” to me. They just couldn’t get all the way up to 24?

            My favorite…going into late 70’s early 80’s domestic manufs and making fun of the colors and the people.

            But the seats…have you ever seen something this comfortable in your life? http://www.oldcarbrochures.org/NA/Plymouth/1976-Plymouth/1976_Chrysler-Plymouth_Brochure/1976-Chrysler-Plymouth-14

            But then…omg my eyes, it burns: http://www.oldcarbrochures.org/NA/Plymouth/1976-Plymouth/1976_Chrysler-Plymouth_Brochure/1976-Chrysler-Plymouth-16

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            LOL, ohhh I didn’t even notice the joke 28 did. Too early still. Jewelry terms aren’t my forte generally, I just ignore jewelry.

            I agree, it does say 23. How odd. Could’ve got it up to 24 by pouring Goldschlager on it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Coopdeville

            I think it was 23k and other than GM beancounting the only other thing I can come up with is 24k was somehow too soft vs 23k.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Yes ~ these looked very modern when new if bland to my eye .

    I remember they sold boat loads at first and folks seemed to like then very much .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Light bar!

    I remember seeing them with burned out parts, as mentioned up above. I also recall how bad they looked when the plastic lens across the front would yellow, and end up a different color than the headlamps.

    But still, light bar. And the straight rear wheel arch always made the Sable more appealing to me as well (as a child). But no, my parents had to get the Dynasty instead.

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      We had a 1989 New Yorker. I absolutely loved that car- it rode like a dream, had good fuel mileage, and was a major step up from our previous crapwagon- a 1993 Escort. That car was beautiful!

      And, then Ultradrive happened. We were not going to have a third transmission put in that car. It died at 268k miles.

      I love the way Dodge products of that era looked, but between that New Yorker and my 1986 D250, it’s easy to see that they just weren’t that good. The Ultradrive was terrible, and the truck just isn’t screwed together very well. The doors are paper thin.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Ours had that awesome Mitsubishi engine in it (3.3?) which was losing compression, having vapor lock, and doing huge blue smoke before 80k miles.

        The K-car platform was outdated by then, and not suited for those “luxury” rides. And sure as hell not for the New Yorker nameplate. It deserved better.

        My grandpa had a grey on grey New Yorker like you mention as well. All I can recall from that one is that it leaked oil on the new driveway which made him angry, and soon after it was replaced with an 86 Fifth Avenue that had something like 30k miles on it. Red over red velour! Loved it, learned to drive in it.

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          Ours had the 3.0, which had the same reputation- junk. Ours was good, though. It was owned by a retired WYDOT maintenance mechanic, though. Compared to an Escort, it was Heaven. To a Lincoln, though, nope. It was more like a Buick.

          I would have loved to have experienced an M-Body. Our New Yorker was a beautiful car, though not in the same league as a Lincoln/Cadillac. But, reliability wise, it wasn’t there.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Even at age 13-15, I noticed the M-Body had a feeling of intense solidity. As far as I can recall, the switch panels and switches in that car were made of actual, solid metal.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          Though they should have been introduced a few years earlier but Chrysler stretched all it could out of the K-car platform the 94-97 LH New Yorker and LHS were quite worthy of the nameplate.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            I looked at a 1996 LHS before I bought my LeSabre. Beautiful cars, but I wasn’t willing to have a second run-in with Ultradrive.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          Back in the mid-80’s my grandfather, a life long Mopar owner bought a new Dodge Diplomat in Salon trim because he thought the K-car was just not up to par. He enjoyed it until he passed away then us family members who inherited the car had to deal with the balky Lean Burn issue.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    Dad had two 3.0L Sable LS wagons – a 1986 and a 1990. Both were good reliable cars that drove quite decently for the time. I’ve always liked the styling of these Sables. My daily driver was a Honda but I was impressed with the smoothness and handling of the Mercurys. Dad and Mom took some cross country trips in the cars and he said that they were in many ways better highway cars than the chain of big Mercurys that he owned previously.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Haha, the commercial. “Ugh I suck and violin, AND I have to drive a Topaz! What’s wrong with my life?!”

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    A friend bought a Taurus of this vintage for a $1,000 back 20 years ago.
    It only had one problem, part of the oil pan gasket had squirted out from between the block and pan. The fix was to drain the pan, clean the area well, and dab some ATV (via your finger) and let it dry. Otherwise, you had to partially yank the motor to fix it. Either way, the ATV goop fix lasted as long as he had it. After that, he put over 225K miles on it (with next to nothing in maint/repairs) and ultimately gave it away.
    These cars were def ahead of their time and set new standards. I think they still look good inside and out.

  • avatar

    We had an ’87 Mercury Sable in the family fleet for many, many years, purchased in ’87 and RIP totaled out by my daughter with only 79K on the odometer in 2003. The car was awesome to drive. I made a spirited run up I-44 between Tulsa and St.Louis not long after we purchased it where I rarely saw the backside of the max 85 mark on the odo. I remember looking at myself in the rear view mirror a couple of times and I was grinning. This was a very competent car in its day.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      They were a revelation for an American car when they debuted. Shame they had so many bits that were kind of crap. Compared to the Fairmont it replaced, it might as well have been a spaceship.

    • 0 avatar
      jacob_coulter

      “We had an ’87 Mercury Sable in the family fleet for many, many years, purchased in ’87 and RIP totaled out by my daughter with only 79K on the odometer in 2003.”

      16 years of ownership and only 79k miles? Those are the types of used cars I dream about.

      • 0 avatar

        You might like my 2003 Town Car with 54K on the odometer. Maybe even my 1999 4Runner with 122k on the clock. My philosophy is to own lots of cars and don’t drive just one of them daily.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        …16 years of ownership and only 79k miles? Those are the types of used cars I dream about….

        Not if it got used almost every day for super short trips….that high cycle, low mileage use eats up cars…

  • avatar
    seth1065

    had 6 or 7 of the Taurus of this vintage, they were company cars driven to about 75k and sold off , usually to family member son the cheap, they were good cars for the time, really few problems, IIRC, one steering issue was in everyone, The Sable must have been nicer because the managers had them, I think they had a moonroof which the GL did not, these cars got a lot of folks back in American cars.

  • avatar
    gasser

    We had an ’87 Sable wagon, bought new. It was the LS with the 3.0 (3.8 wasn’t available until ’88). Here in L.A., everyone on my block thought it was some kind of new Audi and were floored to find out it was an American car. I loved the front light bar and inside it has a great digital speedometer and a “computer” which, with the press of a button, would calculate some rudimentary driving info like “miles to empty”.
    Reliability stunk. Head gasket went at about 30,000 miles, followed, in 10,000 mile sequences by 2 transmissions. Never has a man been more grateful for a 6 year, 60,000 mile extended Ford Warranty! For a car driven only by my wife and me (we were in our 30’s then) it was barely above “lemon” standards. We traded it for a Windstar van the first year that they came out.

    • 0 avatar
      greaseyknight

      Which itself was based on a Taurus…..was it any more reliable then your Taurus?

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      My ’87 Taurus (3.0, AXOD) was acceptable but not great in the reliability department. It was my first car and got abused like a first car. It lost an alternator, had continuous starter solenoid issues (thanks to getting on the China Reman Train), and by the end (about 155,000 miles) had a badly slipping transmission, a shot catalytic converter, and chronic misfire issues that weren’t resolved by new plugs or ignition module.

      My ’89 SHO, bought after the decent experience with the ’87, was a horror show.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Wow – you went from that to a Windstar? Talk about out of the frying pan and into the fire!

      My folks had one of the very first Windstars in fully loaded form, and it was the biggest automotive turd I have ever experienced. Literally everything leaked, fell off, broke, otherwise caused a problem. But they liked it so much they bought another one after six years. Which was just as bad if not worse.

      • 0 avatar
        gasser

        The Windstar was pretty good until about 7 years and 70,000 ish miles. No engine or transmission problems, even thought transmission issues on the first Windstars are the stuff of legends. It had the best 2 zone AC I have ever experienced. Even in 100+F temps it would be like a meat locker in the interior. At the end it was nickel and dime-ing me , so it went out for a Lexus RX 300

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    My mom’s old boyfriend had a silver Sable wagon of this vintage with a dark red interior, me and my sis loved the rear facing seat in the cargo area.

    Then he replaced it with an (to a 7 year old anyway) green mid 90s Olds 88. Put my mom’s friend’s Intrepid to shame!

    Ah…memories.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    Great looking, but rusted quickly in the rustbelt. I never owned one, but a friend of mine had a Taurus of the same vintage, very poor quality. Between the rust and the quality, I’m glad I never purchased one.

  • avatar
    Duaney

    Nobody mentioned the TRANSMISSION? I’ve had years of experience with either the Ford Taurus or Mercury Sable. The transmissions were always bad or failing, at the time I wondered if Ford could survive this calamity, but it didn’t seem to make a dent. I had a friend who purchased Taurus’s new, he’d have the transmission repaired under warranty, then when it would go out again, he’d trade it in on a new one. He then tried a Sable, and within a couple of months that brand new car’s trans was failing, so he traded it in on a Buick, end of his transmission woes. I talked to a professional transmission rebuilder, and there is a permanent fix. The problem was a very low quality part, or group of parts, Ford never improved this during production.

    • 0 avatar
      jacob_coulter

      LOTS of problems with the transmissions, and they basically ran the same thing for around 12 years.

      I really don’t understand why modern car makers have struggled with transmissions, it seems to be the only major part of the car that almost every automaker has bungled one time or another. And it’s not a minor inconvenience, it’s a major expense that puts a lot of cars in the salvage yard well before their time.

      You would think after this many decades, they would have been figured out. In the early days of 3 speed autos, they were bulletproof and lasted forever. None of the Big 3 had transmission problems.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        GM for a time since the FWD switch, had decent transaxles. Today well, I can’t be so sure. Come to think about it the only major US or Japanese mfg in the last twenty five years which seems to have a handle on the FWD transaxle is Toyota. Nissan sold a blowup CVT and Honda its glass transmission for a time. New GM’s seem to have tranny issues, Ford sold AXOD, and Chrysler’s LH tranny was problematic just off the top of my head. Not sure on Hyundai as I have little familiarity with them.

      • 0 avatar
        guy922

        Amen. I have not encountered a brand yet that didn’t have this issue at one time or another. The much celebrated Camry has struggled with this as well. My 1992 Had a trans replaced at 163k. A friend had the transmission go out in her 1997 LE. Grandmother had to replace it in her babied 1999 model. I have actually had better luck with my Taurus Transmissions. Out of 5, only one needed a rebuild. Camry, it seems that the reverse gear likes to stop working first, and then the whole unit goes kaput shortly after. At one point, I was parking in pull thru only spots to avoid the Barney Rubble foot push. I think I would like a stick next time. Hardly the same failure rates as with the automatics.

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      My uncle was a traveling salesman during this time. His company bought Tauruses for them. He always said the transmissions were weak. They had problems with them, prematurely it seems.

      I had to have transmissions repaired during this time on an ’88 Aerostar, ’91 Explorer, and a ’98 Expedition. The Explorer and the Expedition were just barely out of warranty when the transmission went, but Ford did help some on the repair costs.

      The Aerostar’s torque converter shattered at 16,000 miles. It was under warranty.

      All those three were defective from the factory.

      I had also bought a ’91 Escort and later a ’98 Mustang GT. The Mustang was the best of the bunch, but I sold it at 26,000 miles because we didn’t drive it much. I still have the Expedition.

      All of these were bought new. I have not bought a new or used Ford since the Expedition. With the exception of a new or newish F-150, I don’t think I would to this day.

      I have spent a lot of my own money fixing Ford’s factory defects, most of which didn’t show up until after the warranty expired.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      From the Wikipedia article on the Ford AXOD transmission:

      “Earlier AXOD and AXOD-E models have a poor reliability record due to internal lubrication problems. These were mostly remedied by 1995. These transaxles require fluid and filter changes every 30,000 miles to maximize service life.

      Intermediate clutch failures resulting in poor 1–2 shifts or slipping are common on all AX family members.

      Failure of the “Neutral to Drive Accumulator” causes hard shifts into a drive gear (R, OD, D, 1) from “N” or “P”. This can become quite violent. Reasons for this part’s failure: Piston stuck, or seals or springs damaged or missing. Correction for this problem: Check these parts for damage. Replace as required (located inside the transaxle, recommended that a transmission shop do the repair, but a full rebuild of the transaxle is NOT required). In general, however, difficulty shifting from neutral to overdrive, OD to N, N to R, and R to N is most likely caused by a stretched shifter cable.”

      Still have the original transmission in my ’95 Taurus; had the fluid and filter changed at last at 150,000 miles, and it is up to 203,000 miles. It does shift hard at times though, mainly into drive from park.

      The AXOD/AXON transmission, and the PVC bumpers that became brittle and cracked as the aged were the major weak spots for FWD Fords of the 1980s-1990s. Someone was careful with this one; both bumpers are still intact and look good.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “These transaxles require fluid and filter changes every 30,000 miles to maximize service life.”

        The bitter irony is, that’s recommended service on every domestic transaxle.

        • 0 avatar
          jacob_coulter

          Yea, I just don’t buy that the problem with all of these transmissions is owner negligence, but I’m sure that card is played all the time by the manufacturers.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The AXOD in my experiences seems to have been especially fragile at one time but Ford seems to have taken some sort of step to strengthen it at some point. I don’t seem them doing 200K without religious fluid changes (or perhaps at all) but I saw my fair share of DN101s and gen 2 D186s with working transaxles around 100K. The earlier ones would frequently crap out under 100. Dog help you with the V8 Conti.

  • avatar
    Balto

    I currently drive a 95 taurus GL wagon, the final year of production for this body style. It was a 1 owner garage queen, bought by an uncle in 2013 with a little over 60k miles. I inherited it at 108k and have since brought it to 115k, trouble free. It’s a great car, and a survivor at this point! I’ve always thought it’d be good as one of steve lang’s movie cars, it’s a perfect period parking lot car.

  • avatar
    plee

    I have had a 1990 Taurus, 1997 Sable, 2000 Sable and a 2004 Taurus. Always changed the trans fluid every 30K as per the owners manual, never had a transmission problem. I guess I was a lucky owner. Currently enjoying a 2011 Taurus Limited with all options, this is the best of all of them.

    • 0 avatar
      jacob_coulter

      Were they bought new? The age seems like you got a new one every 3-4 years.

      A new car not having a transmission problem in the first 3-4 years seems to me to be a bare minimum in the quality department.

      There’s no question these models had widespread failures and Ford did very little to correct the problem.

  • avatar
    plee

    The 90 was purchased with 50K when it was 4 years old, sold it privately at 92K. The 97 was purchased new, traded with 60K on the 2000 which was one year old used with 24K, sold with 125K on it. The 04 was purchased with 24K used and sold privately with 100K. I am pretty sure that the 04 models were much less prone to fail than the earlier ones.

  • avatar
    guy922

    My parents had a 1986 Sable LS Wagon, fully loaded sans the sunroof. We got the car in 1994 and It was a good car at first but it had sat in a barn for a few years before being bought by my folks. Beige with tan leather and basketweave wheels, the car looked great but had many electrical gremlins. Wipers would come on at random, radio would work when it wanted too, died on my mom a few times. We finally sold it in 1997 and it apparently caught fire after the sale because the guy my dad sold it to, called with complaints. Gremlins aside though, that car holds many of my fondest memories as a child. And it looked great when compared to the 1983 and 88 caprice wagons we had owned before. When I got my license, my first car was a 1992 Taurus GL sedan and then we had another 1993 GL Wagon. A 1997 GL sedan and my mom still using her 2004 SES. We have had a few Tauruses and always loved them. They are much better cars than they get credit for. We still have a 1992 Camry and that is a great car still in a lot of ways but I always liked the six passenger seating of the Taurus and the first two generations of style were great. I can think of no car that was as quintessential in the 1990’s as the Taurus and the Sable.

  • avatar
    hifi

    When this came out, it looked like the future. Prior to this, most non-german mainstream cars looked and felt very pieced-together. The Taurus/Sable was a unified and clean design… relative to what else was on the market back in the 80s. And I love cars that have keypads. My Maxima had something similar, and I was able to leave the keys and everything locked in the car when I went to the beach or biking. Today it’s not as necessary as long as you have a car where you can unlock the doors with your phone.


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