By on February 3, 2016

2015 Dodge Charger V6 AWD Rallye (3 of 13)

More than half a million 2011 through 2016 Dodge Chargers are being recalled because they can’t stay up.

Jack points on the Chargers may become deformed, causing the cars to slip off their jacks when owners are changing a flat.

Three minor injuries have been attributed to the issue, said Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. One minor headline joke can also be attributed to Dodge’s problem of keeping it up. There’s no word on whether Dodge will be asking sister-brand Fiat for blue pills to rectify the issue.

According to FCA, owners will be provided with wheel chocks so affected vehicles can be safely jacked.

The recall mostly targets vehicles in the United States, which accounts for 442,000 Charger sales for the affected model years.

[Source: AP via Driving.ca]

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66 Comments on “Dodge Recalls Jack-off Chargers...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    So they’re going to pass out some plastic chocks, rather than fix the problem where the frame is so weak at points that it bends?

    #greatsuccesss

  • avatar
    ajla

    Only dipsh*ts would own one of these anyway.

    Ease of jacking is one of those things that older vehicles seem to have up on the modern ones.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Doesn’t this same problem pretty much affect every car on the road where the factory jack straddles a pinch-weld?

    Speaking for myself, I always carry a 1′ square of sturdy plywood to keep the thing from sinking into the muck, and a couple of crude chocks cut from 4×4’s to keep the car from going anywhere.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    Don’t you always chock the opposite corner anyway? This is user error.

    Manufacturers probably should supply a chock (BMW did in their pre-runflat days), but I doubt FCA is alone in not supplying one.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I know a number of Japanese brands supplied one as far back as the mid 70’s and they were in a couple of my 00’s Fords.

      I’d say it is not user error if the failed to supply a chock and it is not in their jacking instructions. Fact is that flats are no where near as common as they were decades ago and there are people who haven’t changed a flat before.

      One thing that was nice about the driver’s ed class offered by my kid’s school was that they were required to change a tire. Of course they didn’t do it in class time they were sent home with a paper that the parents sign to confirm that they have done it. Now how many parents actually took them out to their car and made sure their child actually did it is another story.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Yeeesh. I’ve only ever once had to to use the included jack, way back in high school when the Grand Am picked up a nail… (Holy, I’ve had really good luck with tires on the road!)

    When working at home, I always use my floor jack, and go to the frame/suspension connection points to lift the car. The manufacturer indicated jacking points are ONLY for the manufacturers included jack, which is ONLY to be used in an absolute emergency.

    A few people I know have suggested “just use the jack from the trunk” or “just jack at the rocker” when working at home. No chance, no way.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Dont these still use an ancient Mercedes platform?

    Would this effect them too or just recent models?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Yes, but that doesn’t mean FCA is using the same type/strength of build quality underneath necessarily. What’s the bet it’s lower?

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Dont these still use an ancient Mercedes platform?”

      no and it never did. the LX architecture is still descended from the LH. It was heavily re-worked to incorporate a Mercedes rear suspension design.

      oh speaking of Mercedes, I wonder how they’ve never had to recall those widowmakers they call jacks.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I hate German scissor jack things. The VW ones are death traps too. God help you if you have to change a VW tire on a stretch of road that *may* have ice.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          No way you’d catch me changing a tire on the side of any road, especially an icy one. I’ll keep driving until I’m somewhere safe, if that means trashing the vehicle so be it. I can fix/replace that.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yeah, someone who knows that the LX is just a warmed over LH that Mercedes forced their components on after the design was ready to send to tooling.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        The Mercedes Jacks are OK if you know where to place them. They also have an excellent roadside assistance program, so that the guy that shouldn’t be changing his own tire doesn’t. The jack in my old 210 wagon is excellent however, it is a screw jack.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        So they’re a hybrid of an even older Chrysler (who got took inspiration from Renault), with an ancient Mercedes rear half?

        Kinda weird that only now that concept would screw up, given hiw long tbe platforms been used.

        Fyi my Volvos had scizzor jacks, despite their age they work pretty well for me, but I always e brake and chock.

      • 0 avatar
        seanx37

        Probably because most MB owners would never consider changing their own tires. They have road service for that.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Ha, it just occured to me that if FCA would get into the modern times and stop offering spare tires and just go with a compressor and bottle of goop, this wouldn’t be a problem!

    Except that eliminating spares is stupid!

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      You just said yourself you haven’t changed a flat in years, and only once at that. Why does it follow that cars still need to carry around spare tires all of the time? Flat tires are a really, really rare thing nowadays.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Spare tires are an insurance policy — you carry them to mitigate the severity of the consequences on those occasions that you might need them, not because they are needed frequently.

        Go get a flat when you’re in the middle of nowhere, and you’ll understand why it’s good to carry one. If conditions are bad enough, you might even want to carry two of them.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        You should see the potholes I’m dodging every day. It looks like the road once served as an artillery range. I already lost one tire this year.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    Q. Why do automakers supply a $1 jack with a $50,000 car?

    A. Ran out of 50¢ ones.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      What to OEMs look for in a tire?

      Black, round, and cheap – not necessarily in that order.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I’d say that a lot of them don’t care if they are round based on the brands of tires that they use.

        To make sure that they are as cheap as possible Toyota and Chrysler love to spec out only 8/32″ of tread on their OE tires, that come with 10, 11 or event 13/32″ of tread on the same model tire when purchased in the aftermarket or as supplied to other brands. There is a reason when you go to tirerack they will sometimes have 2 or 3 versions of the same size and model of tire and they will be noted as “brand X OE”

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Really, I’m surprised every automaker hasn’t switched over to the compressor/goop “spare”.

    While in theory a spare tire is superior in every way (except fuel economy and weight), in practice they are a lot less useful. The problems:

    – Idiot mechanics locking down the lugs too tight so the tiny lug wrench that will fit in the tool kit can’t get them off.
    – Folks that never check the pressure in the spare
    – Folks driving cars with a 15-yr-old invisibly dry-rotted spare
    – Trying to change the tire on a soft shoulder
    – Folks having no idea how to seat the jack against the car so you don’t die

    Really, except for the tiny minority of people that rotate their own tires, check the pressure in the spare (or carry a 12V pump), remember to change the spare after 12-15 years, know how to use the jack properly, and keep chocks and a “base plate” in their car are MUCH better served by the goop ‘n pump (and a Roadside assistance membership should you kill the sidewall.)

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      If you get a hole in the sidewall with a compressor/goop, you are [email protected]

    • 0 avatar
      See 7 up

      Run flats + spare should be the standard
      Run flats for safety on where/when you change as well a blowout prevention.
      A spare in case you’re in the middle of nowhere and your tire catastrophically fails.

      Run flats should really be seen as a safety improvement. Not an ability to remove spare (at least in the US – Europe or dense metro – no spare needed)

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Given what people know about their cars even goop plus a compressor is asking a lot. Best to just call AAA.

      Personally I am a big fan of having a spare on board, but I also know how to do a brake job so changing a tire is not a challenge. However I’m really surprised that factory jacks don’t come with some kind of pin system to lock them in place. The “place here” notches in the seam welds don’t inspire confidence.

      As far as floor jacks go: the recommended location on the front of my Z (per the shop manual) can only be accessed if the car is on a ramp which is all kinds of silly. The rear is not a problem thanks to the pumpkin/rear diff.

      • 0 avatar
        cbrworm

        That’s interesting. I’m familiar with the front center lift point. The rear diff in these cars is only connected to the rear subframe with two bolts through ears at the very front of the diff and a single horizontal stud mounted to the aluminum diff cover through a fluid filled bushing. I don’t know that it is a bad idea to lift from the diff in that car, but having taken a couple of them apart, I would be leary. Seems like a lot of weight hanging off a single stud.

        It’s not like lifting a car with a solid rear axle by the differential.

    • 0 avatar
      SELECTIVE_KNOWLEDGE_MAN

      “Idiot mechanics locking down the lugs too tight so the tiny lug wrench that will fit in the tool kit can’t get them off.”

      This is why I now check tire pressure and redo the lug nuts when I get my car back. I have become a tiny bit paranoid after getting my car back once with a stud that broke in half a couple of miles later. That, and it really only takes a couple of minutes.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Idiot mechanics locking down the lugs too tight so the tiny lug wrench that will fit in the tool kit can’t get them off.”

        That happened to me once with a Ford Ranger I had. The brakes were serviced at a reputable shop and when i went to rotate to winter tires I could not get the front wheel off. The shop had to replace several lugs.

        I’ve also known a few other people who have had that problem. Lazy service technicians just grab the closest impact gun and voila, permanently attached wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        hybridkiller

        “This is why I now check tire pressure and redo the lug nuts when I get my car back.

        Yep, I always loosen and re-torque to spec with a torque wrench myself after I having tires mounted or rotated.

        • 0 avatar

          I’ve seen them so tight my 200 plus frame on a breaker bar can’t move them. Forget any of the women in the family….call AAA

          I love my torque wrench, and you’d be surprised how “not tight” proper torque is.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      This is ridiculous, people are dumb for buying vehicles without full size spares, I don’t care if that includes you or your grandma. Buying a car without a full size spare included is like buying a car with only 5 out of 6 of the lug nut studs on each corner. While it will theoretically work, you’ve basically said screw common sense, just blow $20k+ on an incomplete car that odds are over its lifetime will require something every quality vehicle on the road has free of charge.

      Goop rarely works in practice, and when it does it’s usually not needed as the tire is losing air slowly enough to reach a business or garage to correct the issue correctly.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        I dont disagree with Hummer but just look at the size of wheels these days. 19-20-21″ isnt uncommon.

        I would suggest a space saver spare is neccessary not a full size since I dont want the trunk space gone due to the full size spare.

      • 0 avatar
        hybridkiller

        “This is ridiculous, people are dumb for buying vehicles without full size spares”

        I do feel better having a “real” spare, but truthfully I haven’t needed to actually use one on any of my vehicles in over 20 years. And I drive at least 20K miles a year. Slow leaks caused by nails and screws sure, but in those events I can usually plug the tire without having to take it off the car.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Agree. In the last 2 decades, tires have not kept me from my destination. Alternators twice and coil packs once.

          Logic suggests I roll with a spare alternator and associated tools, rather than a spare tire.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You should carry a spare for the same reason that you wear a seat belt, even if you’ve never crashed.

            For what it’s worth, I’ve lost five tires in the last fifteen years, including three flats, one blowout and one with a defective sidewall. None of them were reparable, so tire goop would not have helped. But even if I hadn’t lost any tires at all, it would have still been wise to carry a spare.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @PCH101

            Get a grip. If you aren’t wearing your seatbelt and crash, you might very well die. If I get a flat on one of my BMWs that the goop compressor can’t fix, I am at worst stuck somewhere while I have a tire overnighted to me from The Tire Rack. Not even remotely comparable. One flat in 25 years and a CRAPLOAD of miles, I am not concerned about it at all.

            If you are driving in some environment where not having a spare could risk your life, you probably should have more than one spare with you. And a lot of other spare parts too. But like most Americans, I am rarely if ever out of AAA towing distance of a tire shop. For 90% of my driving, I would just have the thing towed home and put one of the alternate season tires on temporarily.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I felt the same way for about 10 years, then over a 2 year period I needed to employ a spare tire 4 times (two different cars.) in 3 of the 4 cases they were sidewall punctures and goop + compressor wouldn’t have helped.

          • 0 avatar
            hybridkiller

            “You should carry a spare for the same reason that you wear a seat belt, even if you’ve never crashed.”

            Just to be clear, I wasn’t suggesting going without a spare (and I would not), but I certainly don’t agree with Hummer’s remark that “people are dumb for buying vehicles without full size spares”.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “I wasn’t suggesting going without a spare…”

            I was replying to VoGo. (I realize that this is difficult to tell.)

            The point is to assess risk based upon how bad it can be if you aren’t prepared, even if the odds of something going awry aren’t that high. Assuming that help is always readily available or that a bad tire can be fixed or temporarily patched with a can of goo is a big mistake.

            For one example, my blowout occurred on my beater car in the Australian outback. (The tires were crap, but I wasn’t going to spend money to replace all of them, given my limited intentions with the car.) No can of goop is going to fix a blowout.

            I had a mobile phone, but there was no signal at that location — phone service outside of towns was more miss than hit. Traffic is light, there are many unpaved roads (the major highways and roads in town are paved, but a lot of other roads in the national parks, etc. in the outback are not) and there aren’t many repair shops along the way. I’m sure that the cost of breakdown service would have been outrageous. Not having a spare would have been negligent.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I haven’t had a flat on the road in 25+ years, why on earth would I want to lug around a spare tire? I would bet that the spare in my Range Rover never mind the one in my Triumph is completely unsafe due to age at this point anyway. Neither BMW has one. If I get a flat that a goop compressor can’t deal with, I will call AAA and let them deal with it.

        BUT, that said, I don’t live in a place where I could be a hundred miles from help either. If I lived in East Bumblefunk New Mexico I would want a spare. But the majority of people live in pretty urban areas in this country. My Mom’s car has a spare, didn’t do her a bit of good this summer when she ran over a 10′ long 6×6 and destroyed all four wheels and tires on her Prius.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I’d add one more. How much does a 20″ wheel/tire on a typical CUV weigh? 60 pounds? A lot of people simply lack the strength to change such a tire.

  • avatar
    Rday

    Another reason to no buy FCA. the dealer couldn’t even show me how to remove my jack for the promaster. I couldn’t wait for a person that knew how so I guess i will have to call AAA. What a piss poor company fca really is.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    When a lazy moment turns into the right moment…will you be ready?

    Apparently not!

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Premature ejackulation?

  • avatar
    pb35

    Man, I’m sure glad I traded my SRT 392 this past weekend! That thing was a death trap.

  • avatar
    hawox

    jack points that deform…… oh my…. not even in the yugo korall!

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    Did anyone see the news article in Automotive news about this ? It’s got nothing to do with FCA. Users are improperly jacking the vehicles and causing the problem !!

    http://www.autonews.com/article/20160203/BLOG06/160209920/chock-this-out:-we-may-have-jumped-the-shark-on-recall-

  • avatar
    Shipwright

    I have a somewhat unique situation where I have an unique solution that no-one has yet mentioned. First off I own a 2008 GT500, the stock wheel/tire set-up are 255/45-18 front and 285/40-18 rear. While it is possible to fit a spare front tire/wheel combination in the trunk of my convertible all usable space would be taken up. Furthermore, the use of a compact spare tire is not possible as nobody makes one that will clear the front 14″ four piston Brembo brakes. that’s why I’m stuck with a OEM supplied can of “goop” and a compressor. The use of “goop” usually means a new tire and a lot of time cleaning the crap off the wheel and TPMS. My solution is to carry a simple tire repair kit to seal the hole without resorting to using “goop”, inflating the tire with the supplied compressor and carrying on my merry way to the nearest convenient tire repair shop for a professional repair.

  • avatar
    50merc

    Nothing worse than the old bumper jacks. Real widowmakers. Factory jacks and lug wrenches are crap. Do the sensible thing: keep in your car a good four-way lug wrench and a $30 small hydraulic jack.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      When you say “small hydraulic jack”, I hope you are talking about a trolley jack (which isn’t really small) and not a bottle jack – cuz that would be more dangerous than the one supplied with the car.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Chrysler guys all over will now be jacking their chocks.

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    It’s ok. Everyone does it. No shame.

    That is wish they could drive a 370+ hp, 8 speed V8 RWD sport sedan with every option checked for under $33k new with all the discounts and money on the hood. With a 5 year/500,000 powertrain warranty.

    No other car in its class even comes close to the value you get. All TRUE car enthusiasts should see the Charger as what it truly is, the second coming of the early 2000s BMW M5. But the haters will hate.

    I really would like to see what they drive that is so superior. I am sure that it has perfect reliability and is from a manufacturer that has never had recalls. :)

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