By on November 20, 2015

2002 Lexus IS300

Car enthusiasts, to outsiders, are an odd bunch. We refer to cars by their model codes or platform names. We take photos of random, interesting cars just because. We argue on forums about the relative merits of various brands of oil. However, we are useful to those outsiders when it comes to advice. Family, friends and co-workers all come to us for recommendations on cars, tires and service. At times, the volume of requests can be overwhelming, but otherwise we appreciate being appreciated.

For example years ago, a good friend once asked me to help him choose between two late-model used cars, a Lexus IS and a BMW 3-series (E46, I think). He’s a car guy, so the advice differed than that I’d give to a non-enthusiast. Simply because he was a BMW fanatic, I told him to get the 3 over the Lexus, because he’d regret not having the roundel years down the road.

Had it been my money, I’d have picked up the Lexus without thinking twice. Late-model BMWs seem to have so many funky and pricey maintenance needs that even paying Lexus dealer prices might be preferable to DIYing a 3er.

This 2002 Lexus IS300 looks to be a fine example, and a somewhat unusual one with a manual transmission and limited-slip differential. The Carfax is clean, though careful inspection is warranted due to the Wisconsin location. The photo may be decieving, too, as the front right fender looks a bit discolored compared to the rest of the car. Its 112,000 miles on the odometer isn’t too bad, considering the reliability record of the wonderfully smooth Toyota 2JZ straight-six.

An oddity I’ve seen while shopping for the IS is the tendency to call the automatic transmission a manual — or occasionally, an manuel. The gated shifter for the slushbox may be throwing some dealership personnel for a loop. Its asking price of $12,000 might be a bit high for this, as the market seems to be in the $8,000-$11,000 range, but there should be room to negotiate.

Funny enough, my BMW-nut friend messaged me tonight as I was writing this. We are now headed to Indiana this weekend to buy a Lexus.

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103 Comments on “Digestible Collectible: 2002 Lexus IS300...”


  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    Pfft, a bad Carfax means a lot, a clean Carfax means nothing. I worked in a big collision center for several years, and people would self-pay for repairs, even a couple over $20k, to avoid notifying their insurance company, and avoid Carfax finding out. I’m not really clear on who gives Carfax information, but the place where I worked did not.

    • 0 avatar
      mchan1

      “…a bad Carfax means a lot, a clean Carfax means nothing.”

      ^
      THIS!

      Years ago, I bought a relatively used car (FYI… if the used car includes any warranty, a used car becomes a ‘CPO’).

      It was about ~1-2 years later, I took it in for rear bumper replacement and the auto technician said the car was previously involved in an auto accident, a rear end damage accident as he showed me the trunk with the damage.

      The dealership bought the car from an Enterprising auto rental car place which left its business card in the glove compartment where I found it after purchasing the car.

      Another hint was some cable found in the trunk when I purchased the car. I had suspected as much about the car’s prior condition and the auto tech confirmed my suspension.

      That accident did not show up in the Carfax report I received because I suspected that the auto rental place paid for the repairs directly instead of going through the insurance company.

      Be wary of what’s NOT reported on a Carfax report and of buying ‘used’ cars.

      At least I got my money’s worth as it lasted 10+ years before I traded it in for a newer car ;)

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I read the fine print in the Enterprise agreement two years ago for a rental. Essentially the insurance you “buy” from them covers minor repairs and in the event of serious injury they can hit your insurance no matter what as Enterprise is “self insured”. Its a great scam, pay 25.99/day for dings or pay for the greater than golf ball size dings at the body shop rate *they* quote you. I’m not sure if they operate body shops for their stores or if they just have preferential deals with local shops, but the fact it didn’t show on Carfax does not surprise me in the least. FWIW the body shop I deal with will not report to Carfax either.

    • 0 avatar

      IIRC, the CARFAX service/collision reporting program costs the facility to sign up. That’s why most franchise dealers report while non-franchise and independent shops do not.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I was thinking I wonder of if there is a cost. I do not see how this business model is supposed to work if I am a body shop. So I have to pay to submit data which is of no benefit to me?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    If there were EVER a Lexus model in history which should not have gold badges applied, it’s this one. If there’s any color where gold badges are NOT okay, it’s Millennium Silver Metallic.

    Beyond that – the OEM shift knob isn’t there, the interior isn’t pristine, and indeed that fender has been repainted badly. The fender isn’t aligned with the bumper properly either, the gap is too big there near the light. Per Carfax it’s had FIVE owners. Five!

    $12,000? I sold my very very tidy 01 silver over grey GS430 with 109k miles two years ago for $8,600. And it had a V8 and actually a nice interior and stuff.

    $6800 MAX, and I’m being generous. Unless they’re willing to fix that fender paint issue.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Corey, how is the cushy ride factor in the best Lexus you’ve ever driven vis your Caddy?

      • 0 avatar
        DeeDub

        You aren’t going to beat the LS430’s cush with a mere Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          Waftable Torque

          I’ll heartily disagree. The best riding car I’ve ever rode was a 1996 Cadillac Sedan deVille d’Elegance. It drove like a bendy 70’s full-size sedan, and could soak up potholes and asphalt patches with aplomb. My air suspension LS430 on softer-riding winter tires can barely replicate that experience.

          • 0 avatar
            DeeDub

            What size wheels do you have on your 430? If you’re spinning 18’s (or worse), that’s the reason.

          • 0 avatar
            Waftable Torque

            Stock 225/55R17’s. My all-seasons are v-rated, and I accept that they detract from the ride compared to it’s H-rated predecessors, but my Michelin X-Ice’s are one of the few tires Consumer Reports rates as “Excellent” for ride quality. Even then, it’s not quite the lush ride that the 70’s-series shod Cadillac had.

            I’ve heard the latest S-Class is tops for ride quality, not just today but compared to all cars ever made, though I haven’t tried one lately.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Depends what you mean by “cush.” There are two different types: floaty (but more prone to wallow and other extraneous motion) and controlled (but feeling bumps a bit more immediately). If you like floaty cush, the old-school Cadillac will beat any Lexus ever made. If you like controlled cush, the LS wins hands-down, and in fact is the car that really should define the idea.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The only Lexus I have been in was my GS430, which had a more harsh ride than the 300, due to the stiffer springs required to hold up all the weight of the V8. The ride was decent, but still stiff.

        The Deville and it’s air suspension is really quite smooth. I drive over a big quad storm grate in the parking lot at work, and I really can’t feel it. My M makes a big bump out of it.

        Tall, soft sidewalls, soft suspension, and very cushy soft seats.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          Wow, I didn’t think there was anything post-1980 you *hadn’t* driven!

          BTW, thanks again for the GIF-Kill.

          Now that gomer’s not EVEN here!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            My first-hand driving knowledge is definitely on the lower end for domestic models in general, and especially smaller cars.

            Oh and I did ride in a 2015 model ES350. Just found the interior rather lacking and the ride neither sporting or cushy, just numb.

            Smelled nice in there though, and it was airy due to the glass roof.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The IS has tuner cred, while the GS is a semi-luxo-barge. GS gets some minor interest from the VIP crowd, but they generally go for ’80s JDM or full LS. Everyone who buys a manual IS has dreams of doing a GTE swap and boosting it to 600 hp on pump gas.

      • 0 avatar
        Lightspeed

        I drive a GS400 and would love an IS like this. But, I live in winter-world and the wife wants FWD or AWD. The IS has big aftermarket support, FIGs Engineering in particular has some cool suspension goodies for this and the GS. I am biased, but I think these late 90s early 2000s Lexus are some of the best cars ever made for the mass-market and an absolute tremendous value. I’d be happy to drive an IS, GS, LS from this era for the rest of my life.

        • 0 avatar
          Waftable Torque

          I test drove a Model S P85D this summer and couldn’t help but think “2002 ES300”, albeit with triple the power, better soundproofing, and a big touchscreen.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The more I look at it the more I like it, although SC is a better choice IMO. I think though even 6 is more than I want to spend on this even if I wanted it. Oh and 8,6 for an MY01 GS even extra clean? I’d go car poor pretty quick at these prices.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Good SCs are very pricey because of the tuner cred.

        I have no particular love for these ISes. Sure, straight 6 is cool and all, and the low cowl is neat, but the interior isn’t up to Lexus standards and the back seat is basically unusable. I’d rather have, well, a few-years-older Legend.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          By quite a coincidence I think you do have one…

          I haven’t priced an SC in quite awhile, but I imagine its going to be expensive. But so is this in somewhat clean condition, apparently. SC me please.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I started it out at $8900 IIRC, haha. Silver over grey wasn’t a common color option at all, and it also had the nav and I’d done the t-belt and water pump at 100k.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Coincidence?

    Back in September I bought an IS300 SportCross that I had been eyeballing for 3 months. I bought it for a replacement car for my mother when she turns in her lease this spring. The car needed a lot of work and I have now crossed the $12k range with all the work I’ve done since with an OTD price of $8k.
    It has 67,000 miles and has exactly the service history you would want to see. But it lived in DC for 11 years and it took a beating.
    This was a car worth saving and despite the cost, I’m glad I did it.

    If interested, you can read my “restoration” thread here:
    http://my.is/forums/f102/land-arks-sportcross-restoration-thread-559265/

    I will very likely own an IS300 of my own in the not-so-distant future. These are great cars to work on.

    • 0 avatar
      DeeDub

      “But it lived in DC for 11 years and it took a beating.”

      If you literally mean DC and not the burbs, that rear bumper must have been shredded.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        It was registered to DC proper. And the rear bumper was more license plate bolt imprint than plastic when I got it.
        I believe at some point someone repainted the bumper cover without fixing any of the damage.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    IS300’s with the manual still fetch good money for their age. They were the last Lexus that paired a stick with a decent engine.

    I had considered pulling the trigger on one of those a few years back but the price to age ratio didn’t make sense for what would have been a daily driver.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Fancy Camry?

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    That’s one crazy ask for an old Lexus. They are half to a third that price in my area (at current exchange rates).

    Is there a Lexus cult operating out of Wisconsin, or is this dealer just fishing?

  • avatar

    Its offered by a Lexus dealer, which explains asking 3x market value. That overhead is a b*tch.

    Still. Bad paintwork and poor detail job. Unacceptable for my sled lot, much less a franchise dealer, much less a LEXUS franchise dealer. They should frankly be embarassed.

    MMR is $2,5-3,7. I wouldn’t put more than $3200 in it with that paintwork. Corey is right on the money – $6,995, take $5,900.

    P.S. I sold an ’02 SportCross a year and a half ago for $4500 with 122k miles and THAT was a much rarer car than this.

    P.P.S. Nevermind what I said. I didn’t see the $2100 ’07 2.2l VUE w/130k miles for $6,771. That IS is priced appropriately. And whoever does inventory control here sucks. This guy has the worst pre-owned of any Lexus dealer I’ve seen.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This car has had collision damage, I’m somewhat sure of.

    That aside, this era of vehicles LOOKS SO MUCH BETTER & CLEANER than the CURRENT OVER-STYLED, OVER-APPENDICIZED, OVER-HUMPED, OVER CHROME PLASTIC-DIPPED, OVER ANGRY-FACED, OVER-EVERYTHING hideous hodgepodge amalgams.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    As a E46 owner – a very base ’04 325i with a stickshift – I’ve only dumped in one window regulator, front bushings, lower intake, upper intake, and one DISA valve in 18 months of ownership. Okay, stop laughing!

    If you do it yourself, which I did minus the bushings, the maintenance costs have only been ~$550. I haven’t been stranded yet. Given the horror stories I’ve read about BMW, I was expecting a lot worse.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Why would anyone be laughing? In 40 days you have a 12 year old car. They need some work. Either way, I would say $550 in 18 months is quite reasonable, if not a gift from the car gods.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “If you do it yourself”

      That’s the big thing right there. If you’re the hands on sort of enthusiast/owner that looks up the sources of affordable and usable parts, finds the DIY walk-throughs and farms out the really hard stuff to a competent indy guy, etc. there’s nothing that crazy/scary about owning an older European car. But for the “typical” case of someone that sees a fancy badge for a low price on craigslist and just wings it, things rarely end well.

      • 0 avatar
        clivesl

        I just introduced the wife to this concept. We are finally replacing the Sienna and she was looking at the X1, I’m more inclined to a Venza or Crosstour (cause I’m sick like that).

        I used to wrench a little, but life intrudes and now it is pretty much all done by someone else. So I went to a repair estimator and plugged in oil changes for an X1 and a Venza. The price range of BMW oil changes starts above the top of the range for the Venza.

        Plus we’re already keeping a 338i out of warranty. So yeah, no X1 for us.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I love the juxtaposition of a “CLEAN CARFAX!” seal of approval sticker with that poorly matched fender respray sticking out like a sore thumb.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    I would like to see the interior pics. Wonder if the painting dash has melted off and has a tacky feel like every other is300.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    I worked with a guy that owned one of these. While we were at work, someone stole all four wheels/tires and cut his exhaust off. Didn’t even have the courtesy to leave it on blocks. I don’t miss working in the $hitty parts of Detroit.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Someone did that a few months ago to my cousin’s new Lincoln. Not sure which one he has, one of the sedans. And it was right in his own driveway. Ugh, Detroit.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I live in an affluent inner ring Detroit suburb. My house is about 2.5 miles from Detroit. We have a good police presence in our city, crime is low, but wheel thefts still happen a few times a year. Motion sensing exterior lighting and wheel locks are key. Neither will outright stop a wheel thief, but they usually move on to easier targets. I park in my garage, and have proper exterior lighting. My neighbors will get their wheels stolen before me since they have so much $hit in their garage that they can’t park in there.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Never thought I’d here “affluent” and “Detroit” in the same sentence.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well, I used the word suburb in that sentence too. Oakland County, which starts north of 8 Mile, is one of the wealthiest counties in the country.

            Detroit has 4-5 wealthy neighborhoods within the city. I’d love to live in one, but it isn’t worth it.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Every built up area has at least one enclave of the wealthy. They own the things where all the disadvantaged people work/eat/shop.

            In Dayton, all the wealthy live just south of town, or outside of town (further south) in Kettering.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            True, as there is money in the general Detroit area. I just found it amusing. Most think of Detroit and they think of something like Fallujah or more recently Aleppo.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            “Never thought I’d here “affluent” and “Detroit” in the same sentence.”

            All those mid-level managers at the domestics have to live somewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well Detroit is the last US city occupied by the United States Army (non-National Guard). People actually did battle with the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            28, you’d be surprised.

            The metro Detroit area has a wildly varying wealth spectrum, far more severe than any other metro area I’ve ever experienced.

            In my sickeningly yuppyish quarter section of Rochester/Troy/Oakland Township, things are booming like back in 1998 through 2005, and even the Welsh soccer coach of our progeny has to explain to his friends back in the U.K. that this is a REALLY wealthy area despite being 18 miles from Detroit.

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            “People actually did battle with the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.”

            Wow.. I wikkied the ’67 riots and found that LBJ sent those divisions in. Never knew that.

            Hell, that’s more awesome than Hizzoner Da Mayor and “shoot to kill or maim” in Chicago!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            DWs right. He lives with all the right wing yuppies and I live with all the left wing yuppies. I think they all grew up together and are right or left wing depending on where they went to college.

            And DW:

            If your kid has a Welsh soccer coach, you might be a yuppie. Says the guy who is going to a black tie charity auction this weekend. :)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I never imagine DW as parent, in my made up thing of “What people are like IRL,” around here.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            DW is a parent? My what an interesting turn of events.

            Battle with the Army? What could possibly go wrong?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I wouldn’t mind the 82nd deploying to Indy’s near East side, we had one shooting and another instance of gunfire (with no injuries) in the past two weeks in my neighborhood. Thankfully it seems to just be drug dealers offing each other. Methinks I took a bridge too far in relocating into an affordable rental in what’s considered a ‘decent’ neighborhood closer to down town.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think the ghettos here are not quite as severe as they are elsewhere, but the dope slingers offing themselves theme is whats happening here as well (although from what I understand their aim is poor and the weapons/ammunition is also low quality so many targets survive unfortunately).

            Bringing in the Army is expensive but would initially help, but once they leave it will be back to business as usual. A long term solution would be to identify known gang members and quietly disappear them while sterilizing the other males.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            As someone who’s parents lived through it (my dad was 17 and my mom was 15), you don’t want that. My dad had 101st Airborne tanks/APCs roll down his street. My grandfather basically lived at the family owned bar for a week.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Indianapolis may get to 130 murders this year. Detroit had 43 killed in three days during the ’67 riots. Let’s keep thing in perspective. At it’s most violent, Detroit had 90 homicides per 100,000 people! There isn’t a third world country with numbers like that.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Why is living in a bar for a week, bad?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Mostly because my grandfather and uncle were there with shotguns and revolvers hoping that the looters wouldn’t make it another 10 blocks over.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I should have included the /s. I realize what was happening as something less severe occurred here. Then of course you had a well armed populace most of whom had recent experience in one three wars. Today, eh…

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Yeah, my grandfather was ready to shoot somebody with the gun he got off a, “[email protected] Nazi that tried to sneak up on me in the Ardens.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            K98?

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karabiner_98k

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            That’d be it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I kinda want one of those but 8mm Mauser is like 1.20/rd and at $1.xx/rd I think .308 is a better buy to have around. I suppose it depends on what you need of the ballistics.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      If your gonna go they all that effort why not steal the shoe car?

    • 0 avatar

      When I was in college, someone stole all 4 wheels and tires off my PT Cruiser. I’d had it for about 6 weeks when it happened. They put it on blocks, but only 3, so one them was under the body on one side and left a giant dent.

      I was in Baltimore, in the Mt. Washington neighborhood – which is pretty nice, but right around the corner from Pimlico, which isn’t. When I called Baltimore City police, they laughed at me and asked me if I knew who did it. And then took 3 months to send me the police report I needed for the insurance company to pay for it.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Somebody please tell me these get better than 25mpg!

    Otherwise I never paid much attention to these, and given the crowd they attract Ill probably avoid them.

    Down the road from my Dads I get to see a plack, carbon spoiled IS300 on a regular basis. Though I think its been swapped for an S2000 with a fart can and damaged fender.

    Edit: Yes these do get mid 20s mpg, so what we have is a compact car that gets SUV gas mileage and imitates some dated BMW (oh and its just a Toyota), and its quite pricey used to boot.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    My brother bought an Is300 new, it’s been a solid car reliability wise, the only issues he’s had were the factory stereo went out (common problem, something like a capacitor) and the AC blower motor resistor needed replacement. Not bad for nearly 12 years of ownership and 100k plus miles.

    The biggest downside to these cars though are they absolutely eat through tires, the way the factory specs on the alignment is really aggressive, they trade tire life for better handling. Also, for a small car, the fuel economy is pretty crappy. A late model Corvette probably beats it in fuel economy, only 23mpg on the highway according to the EPA.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    If they paid for that front clip repair and shoddy paint match out of pocket with no insurance claim, there would be a clean Carfax. Carfax will only know if there was a report from an insurance company about the claim.

    If the paint match is that bad in a picture (and no it isn’t the ambient light) it has to just beat you over the head (bad paint job, run for you life!)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Five owners says run to me. I’ve never owned a car that’s had that many owners.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      My first thought was that it was a replacement fender off another silver car, but it looks too shiny for that. Definitely looks like a respray, but the paint itself doesn’t look bad, silver is difficult to match but the quality looks ok otherwise.
      Before I totally wrote this off, I’d look at the headlights to make sure they are OEM and check the radiator support for signs that it’s been out. You could also check the airbag to make sure it matches the rest of the dash.

      After being a claims adjuster I’m much more forgiving of cosmetic damage repairs as long as you have a good service history. A mismatched fender isn’t going to leave you stranded at the side of the road. Especially when talking about 14 year old cars, I expect some battle scars.

      But I’m still not paying $12k for this.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        IS headlights of this gen do have a bad habit of yellowing. Given the rest of the condition of the car, I’d lean more towards “been replaced” than “carefully cared for and garaged.”

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    My mother bought an IS from the first-ever delivery of one white and two burnt orange ’02s to our local Lexus dealer. Her salesman had a turf war with a coworker over the white one while she was buying it; given the alternative color, I’m not surprised. Nice car, but the interior wouldn’t pass muster in a modern compact and the first couple model years didn’t have an armrest. The trendy chrome ball shifter was a hand-burner on hot days.

    Someone mentioned the tire wear; Lexus actually recalled the stock tires fitted to the ’02. This was a couple years later and many buyers got them right as their tires needed replacement anyway.

  • avatar
    CliffG

    These are pretty nice driving cars, although if you are over 6′ and 220lbs. you might want to move on. The initial build quality is fine, it is a Lexus, the hazard with these is the post first owner generation. Without wandering into ethnic stereotypes the likelihood of them being aggressively driven and shortchanging the service intervals is probable. A 100+k mileage and 5 owner car would be terrifying frankly. Like M3s look for the low mileage one owner (who is over 60) car. Unlike M3s, the possibility of finding an IS300 of that type is very low. Nice car once, but well past the sell date, alas.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    A part of me regrets never test driving an IS300 before I bought my e46, but I was on a performance/hp kick and the fact that the IS300 was slower than a 330i or G35 plus its less than stellar mpg for the performance bumped it off the list, plus I also knew it would be next to impossible to find a full leather one with a manual, which was the one I wanted, not to mention that gauge cluster was weird. I appreciate the car a lot more now though. It would have been harder to get rid of the Lexus than the BMW since the ownership cost concern would’ve only been gas, not maintenance as well.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    I had a w124 Mercedes 300E with a stick-shift. Probably about as rare as this car. If anything, I’d say the rareness of the manual transmission means prices should be lower, not higher. The problem: people looking for that nameplate don’t want a stick and people wanting a stick don’t know it can be had with that nameplate. In modern times, though, maybe the internet helps a lot with getting customers and buyers together. I bought my 1986 model year in 1992 from, interestingly enough, a Lexus dealer. Asking price was $17k. After the car sat on their lot for over a month (and had not moved once since my test drive) I drove away for $12.5.

  • avatar

    When these were new, the big trend was to put “altezza style” tail lights like the ones these came with from the factory on everything from Civics to Dodge Ram pickups.

    As a result of that, I’ve always wanted to buy one of these and then replace the actual altezza lights with normal ones.

  • avatar
    RRocket

    This is my wife’s year round daily driver. She opted for the 5 speed manual. A nice bonus is that it comes with an LSD with the manual. The car has been bullet proof. Over the years she’s added a few small upgrades to increase her enjoyment. Like a short shifter and an exhaust that sounds incredible! This is a fun car to drive!

    And it’s shockingly good in the winter when shod with X-Ice 3s .

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    How come S-class sells about 2.5 times more than LS? Aren’t they supposed to be kind of comparable? Or am I comparing cashews to peanuts?

  • avatar
    ANTItoyota

    This is an example of an ugly piece of TRASH toyota

  • avatar
    rjammy

    I bought a 2001 bmw 325. My wife bought a 2002 IS300. For many years, I was smug about my bmw, it was vastly better than the Lexus although I must say the Lexus had a sweet engine. But the bmw became a maintenance nightmare and it’s long gone. We still have the Lexus and I now admit it is the better car. It’s simply bulletproof and very cheap to run. Thinking about restoring it and continuing to keep it as a summer car.

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