By on October 15, 2015

 

Nearly 30 percent of buyers who purchase a Honda CR-V, Toyota RAV4 or Prius car will keep that car for more than 10 years, according to data from iSeeCars.com.

Data from 400,000 car purchases was analyzed for the poll, according to the study group. The industry average for owners keeping their cars 10 years or longer was 13.5 percent.

Of those top 15 vehicles whose buyers keep them longer than a decade, nine of them were Toyotas; 5 were made by Honda. The Honda CR-V was tops at 28.6 percent of buyers who kept that car for 10 years or more.

The group noted that the big three domestic pickup truck makers all scored below the industry average. Of its buyers, 13.1 percent of Chevrolet Silverado buyers reported keeping their trucks 10 years or longer, 11.7 percent for Ram 1500 buyers and 11.4 percent of Ford F-150 buyers.

The pickup buyers likely had a different reason for turning their trucks around quicker.

“One reason that may be is because these cars are often used as work vehicles, such as in construction. Work vehicles log many more miles than average, likely requiring them to be replaced sooner,” said iSeeCars CEO Phong Ly.

Rank Model % Original Owners Holding Car for 10 Years Compared to Average
1 Honda CR-V 28.6% 2.1x
2 Toyota Prius 28.5% 2.1x
3 Toyota RAV4 28.2% 2.1x
4 Toyota Highlander 26.5% 2.0x
5 Honda Odyssey 25.6% 1.9x
6 Toyota Sienna 25.4% 1.9x
7 Toyota Camry 24.4% 1.8x
8 Toyota Avalon 23.8% 1.8x
9 Honda Pilot 23.3% 1.7x
10 Honda Element 23.1% 1.7x
11 Subaru Forester 22.9% 1.7x
12 Toyota Matrix 22.6% 1.7x
13 Honda Accord 22.1% 1.6x
14 Toyota Corolla 21.5% 1.6x
15 Toyota 4Runner 21.1% 1.6x
Average of all cars 13.5%

The company reported that all of the cars in the top 15 were import brands, although only two of the top 15 are annual best-sellers in America: the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord. Many of the cars in the top 15 are SUVs and minivans.

“While it’s not surprising that many Toyotas and Hondas made the list as they have based their reputations on reliability, what is surprising is the makeup of the cars,” Phong said. “These vehicles tend to be largely family cars, so if people buy these cars when they are just starting their families, it stands to reason that these cars would suit them for many years,” said Ly.

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154 Comments on “Toyota, Honda Dominate List of Cars Kept for More Than 10 Years...”


  • avatar
    Wtdoor

    Nice to see the Forester there. My wife just replaced her 15 y/o Forester with a new model. Hopefully this next one will last just as long. My Murano just hit 11 y/o, and I hope to keep that for 4-5 more years.

    • 0 avatar
      EAF

      I would suspect that the cost of Forester ownership, over the course of 15 years, would be significantly greater than all others on this list.

      • 0 avatar
        wmba

        And I would expect that you like talking through your hat.

        • 0 avatar
          EAF

          For a short time, I serviced cars for a living. Although I never quoted prices, I have handled hundreds of invoices. It would be interesting to see a cost of ownership column.

      • 0 avatar
        Wtdoor

        That’s entirely possible; we’ve kept all the service records but have never done a full tally. One thing is for sure — it’s been less expensive to maintain than the Murano. My experience with the Nissan has had me thinking wishfully of the old Honda Civic I had before that — of course, I couldn’t fit two large German Shephards, luggage, and a couple of passengers in the Civic …

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        I’d expect the vans to be TCO loosers here; heavy load on the same transmission as lighter cars, bigger purchase price leading to more depreciation and more interior parts to break. You’re welcome to your own assumptions though.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      We had a 2005 Murano SL. We got rid of it in 2013, but it didn’t give us any trouble.

  • avatar
    bills79jeep

    On it’s face, makes total sense. Common opinion is that Toyota and Honda make reliable cars. However, I wonder if the data is skewed by the type of people who plan on keeping a car 10+ years gravitating towards these brands. Maybe if they had bought a Fusion instead of Camry they still be driving it instead. On the flip side, the person who just has to have a new car might not be as interested in an “appliance” type car.

    I’d like to see the data combined with the age of cars on the road, regardless of owner history. Who knows, might see a bunch of cockroach Chevy compacts on there.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      You make a good point. The people who buy Hondas and Toyotas are interested in appliances, and like most people do with appliances (refrigerators, washers, dryers, etc.) they replace their vehicles only when they wear out.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Sometimes they just pass down their vehicles to kids and grandkids.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          It’s always the people with unreliable cars who want to piss on people who buy reliable cars. Not what I would have expected from someone claiming a “higher IQ”

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        >>The people who buy Hondas and Toyotas are interested in appliances, and like most people do with appliances (refrigerators, washers, dryers, etc.) they replace their vehicles only when they wear out.<<

        Not a very astute comment since Hondas and Toyotas make a wide range of vehicles. It is safe to say that Honda and Toyota buyers have a preference for quality and durability.

        • 0 avatar
          fli317

          I believe the reference is to the Honda’s and Toyota’s on the list. That aside, everyone is interested in quality and durability. The question is, to what degree of weight do you place on the importance of quality and durability. If its your primary concern, then drive a corolla or accord or whatever other uninspiring appliance that is now available. They do last longer. But they are also driven differently.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            If the Accord is uninspiring where does that place all the other midsizers – the ones it regularly beats in comparison tests? Not just in design but also in speed and handling?

            And if “everyone is interested in quality and durability” what explains their purchases? Let’s face it, GM Ford and Chrysler have been selling cars for decades that have been both lacking in quality and inspiration.

            So your post makes no sense regarding the Accord but is it better reserved for cars that sell on price like the the bargain basement Altima? But no, it doesn’t appear on the list of long-lived cars.

      • 0 avatar
        salmon8ter

        People that keep their cars more than ten years don’t buy Ford Fusions. They simply don’t last.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The Fusion only came out for MY06, I doubt all of the ’06s are gone. I still see DN101 Tauruses with regularity and Fusion employed the same Duratec 3.0 when equipped. While Fusion had a lot of other stupid problems (as an ex of mine had with her 09) but its hardly a horrible choice, esp used vs Toyonda.

        • 0 avatar
          jeoff

          I keep my cars more than 10 years. Expect the same for my 2012 fusion–no problems so far and good ratings in Consumer Reports. Previous hold cars 2000 Protege (sold in 2012–some problems—nothing major, 2004 Quest-current-tons of minor problems—trim falling apart–power doors-lcd gauges etc. –but engine-trans-AC all good. Before that did used cars with few problems –mostly Toyotas–but had a Saturn that was Ok–seats were awful though.

        • 0 avatar
          ponchoman49

          That is a load of bull! There are a crap load of high mileage Fusions all over the place including auctions with 200-300K miles! Same with W-body Impalas, old body style Taurus/Sables and even several Chrysler products. We even often have 200-250K mile Cavalier’s with there original drivetrains that still run as new at our dealership that we aren’t afraid one bit of selling. People need to start getting out into the real world, going online, Ebay and Craigslist etc to see just how many of these cars are still plugging along strong and pay a bit less attention to fictitious yahoo articles drawn up by West Coasters!

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Easy, friend. There is no need to be upset.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Apparently we on the West Coast don’t actually drive any cars?

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            Agreed, I’m still not convinced that Toyondas are the superior choice in todays market.

            Whats this “durability” everyone speaks of on Toyondas? Paint thats cratches easily? Bodys that dent at the slightest touch?

            They are reliable though, I’ll give them that.

          • 0 avatar
            wagonsonly

            The link to the study above isn’t working, but I found this quote on cars.com:

            “Cars kept by the original owners for a decade tend to be well-cared-for, in terms of actual maintenance and repairs as well as overall cleanliness,” iSeeCars CEO Phong Ly said in a statement. “So a car shopper is likely to find more value than in a car that has been through multiple owners and with a history that may not be so straightforward.”

            One thing the article doesn’t mention specifically is that these are new-vehicle purchases, and that the original owners are being tracked. So a smart consumer who wants an Accord is going to buy a new one (due to high residuals and low fleet sales) whereas that same smart consumer who wants a Fusion will pick up a year-old ex-program car, or a short-term lease return, due to low residuals and a higher than average availability for the model. Thus, the 12-year-old Accord in my next-door neighbor’s driveway is counted, but the twelve-year-old Impala in my other neighbor’s garage isn’t, even though they’ve both been there for a decade, because one was purchased as a year-old used car. It would be interesting to see a study that incorporates the buy-used-and-hold methodology as well.

            (Since I drive 30-40K a year and work in a lousy area, I tend to buy once every 1-3 years, pile on the miles onto a fully-depreciated car, wash, rinse, repeat. This works for me. My wife has a far shorter commute and has the newer, nicer, buy-and-hold cars.)

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      There may be some selection bias, but as the owner of an 07 Honda and 05 Pontiac, I can say they Honda has passed 100K miles with zero issues. Sold the Pontiac at 60K , I could write a short novel about its problems. None of them too terrible, mind you, but it’s just not in Honda’s league.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      bills79, I think you make an excellent point that the type of customer who’s already inclined to keep their car will select the car that suits their preference.

      I think there’s also another factor at work: The quality of the parts the car is made of.

      I remember multiple annual surveys of U.S. auto industry suppliers. Suppliers graded Japanese US operations as the most trusted companies with whom they had the best working relationships and the most mutual trust, and GM & Ford lined the bottom of the bird cage. Some suppliers went so far as to say that given the choice, if they were asked to provide the same part, they would deliver the Japanese makers the better part — and these were US suppliers.

      You see a lot of cars from companies other than Honda and Toyota now that rate highly in INITIAL quality. I seriously doubt that a lot of them, on average, hold up as well over time. Steven Lang recently wrote on this site that Korean cars aren’t wearing as well as Toyondas as they age. I’d love to hear him weigh in on this question.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    “These vehicles tend to be largely family cars, so if people buy these cars when they are just starting their families, it stands to reason that these cars would suit them for many years”

    Also, these cars are likely bought more for utility than fashion, so their owners may be inclined to keep them as long as they are working well, rather than replace them because they want the latest and greatest thing.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Still sounds like a miserable way to approach car ownership. I guess people have different priorities. I couldn’t imagine driving an automatic CR-V LX for 10 years. Sounds like a prison sentence.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Depends on priorities…my son, a C-17 pilot in the Air Force, still drives his 1997 Tercel that we bought used back in 2007. It has over 200k miles on it now, but he has zero interest in getting rid of it. Sure, it’s an appliance. But it is paid for, gets around 40 MPG, hasn’t had a major repair ever and is still on the original clutch, trans and engine. Prison sentence? For my son, a prison sentence would be the car payment that would come with cars more along the lines of what his fellow pilots drive. He knows what he has in his car and couldn’t care less about what anybody else thinks.

        • 0 avatar
          cbrworm

          I think if you can truthfully put a bumper sticker on your car that says, “My other ride is a C-17”, you would probably not mind the light little tercel and not be looking for too many thrills on the ground.

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            Amen. Yeah, fighters are duly awesome but I’ve always been entranced by Aluminum Overcasts since C-141s!

          • 0 avatar
            threeer

            CBRWORM…I want a bumper sticker that says “My son commutes in a C-17…” I can’t tell you how proud I am of him. His car is a family treasure and both I and his aunt (my sister) are fighting for who gets the Tercel when (if?) he ever decides to part with it. With a MAACO paint job and new bumper covers, she’d likely go another 10 years. While she’s a basic whip, I cannot stress how dead-reliable it has been. Hands down, the most trouble-free car the family has ever owned.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Threeer, Exactly!

          We gave our 18-yo grand daughter our 2008 Highlander with tons of miles on it but we expect that it will last her through college.

          It has been trouble-free for the past seven years.

        • 0 avatar
          DeeDub

          Zactly. I commute to work on a motorcycle 95% of the time, so for those 5% that are just too crappy for a bike, I very much enjoy being cocooned inside my LS400.

        • 0 avatar
          wristtwist

          I’m a huge car guy, and I miss my 89 Civic SI (hatch) weekly. The only reason I still dont have it is because a tree crushed it.

          Had 375xxx miles before dying. I could beat on it all day and it was fun to drive, and return 38mpg.

          Hoping a 2017 ND will serve me just as well.

      • 0 avatar
        EAF

        Sporty, there is nothing wrong with a 10 year CRV ownership! If it sounds like a prison sentence, it does so for lack of imagination!

        Buy some terrain tires and have some fun at the local mud-hole or off-road trail.

        Stop by the local bait & tackle and have some fun driving ON the beach with some friends.

        Throw a weekends worth of food and camping gear in the hatch and treat your girl and dogs to a camping trip.

        There are plenty of ways to take advantage of utility and add character to your CRV. Sure a Wrangler is more capable but its Pentastar will require a new driver’s side head by year’s end!

  • avatar
    RHD

    The Prius is #2 on the list. So those who are so quick to predict a horribly expensive battery replacement in just a few years were, of course, entirely wrong. (These are the same ones who claim that affordable solar power is still years away.)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Because if battery replacement is required, it’s -mandatory- that the owner dumps the car.

      False correlation drawn.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        In my area, the heat takes its toll on all things battery, but Prius owners continue to drive their little old jewels on the gas engine. I know several members of my church who drive very old Prii.

        So they have to gas up more often. No big deal. Beats a new car payment.

        • 0 avatar
          ghillie

          “Prius owners continue to drive their little old jewels on the gas engine”

          I’m pretty sure you can’t do that in a Prius. The battery needs to be functioning for the HSD transmission to work. Honda’s IMA hybrid system lets you drive on the gas engine alone.

          I think the members of your church that you are referring to are pulling your leg.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You are correct, the Toyota and Ford hybrids cannot run without the traction battery. They can be working at a much lower capacity than new though.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ghillie, I’m sure the battery is not totally dead. Maybe their battery range has been reduced before the firmware decides to start the gas engine.

            I see these people every Sunday so I know they’re not pulling my leg.

          • 0 avatar
            tubacity

            Compared to Prius, the battery on the Honda Civic hybrid rapidly loses ability to take a charge, the engine does run more and more which significantly reduces fuel mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      Besides, you’d just buy the battery pack out of a totaled Prius, just like you’d buy a rebuilt old transmission if you needed one of those for a different car.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “These are the same ones who claim that affordable solar power is still years away.”

      I’ve been hearing that one half my adult life.

      It keeps still not happening, so I’m not sanguine about it.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Actually, solar is cheaper than coal in about one-third of US states. At current pace, two-thirds of states by 2018.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          If this is the case the number of solar farms should be increasing.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          Cheaper how? Cheaper because the costs of solar panels have actually been driven down below the cost of seven years of their power output, or cheaper because of solar subsidies and expenses being artificially added to the cost of coal power?

        • 0 avatar
          redmondjp

          This solar-is-cheaper news is pure, unmitigated propaganda (as well as the same news trotted out in the media over the past week about wind energy being cheaper as well).

          Coal is fuel for baseload power plants that run 24/7. We need baseload plants in order to have a reliably functioning power grid.

          Solar, and wind, are not and never will be baseload power sources, as they cannot be commanded on and off, and other power plants must make up the difference when their power output drops.

          I’m all for alternative energy, but you MUST add the cost of operating and maintaining the baseload power plants TO the cost of the alternative energy to get the true cost. Just looking at $/kwh does not tell you the whole picture.

          Oh, one other thing – is dumping millions of gallons of toxic waste into the Chinese countryside and rivers to make those solar panels worth it? So we are trashing the environment in third-world countries so we can claim to be ‘green’? That doesn’t work for me either.

          • 0 avatar

            Well I agree in absolute terms coal is still cheaper then solar. But your delivered pricing varies by state. Here in CT we have been paying over $.20 per delivered KW for over a year now (it actually just dropped a little a few months back) They makes solar very attractive at current pricing. Our grid here is a mix of Nuke and NG and a little coal.
            I agree baseloading has and will be a problem with alternative energy for a while. We would need better energy storage systems to really make it work. In the mean time Nuke and NG (as well as existing hydro) can make for a much cleaner baseload then coal with out much added expense (this should be a slow transition to avoid even worse economics in coal states in the short term).
            As for solar yes it is getting cheaper and has been for decades. On my boats when I bought a set of panels in 2001 they were about $5.50 a watt. in 2005 I bought some panels for my inlaws RV about $3.00 a watt. Now it looks like we are under $1.00 a watt. that’s some large price drops there.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            @mopar4wd, stop bringing data to an argument about religion. In other words, thank you.

  • avatar
    readallover

    It begs the question: Which vehicles (non-lease) are kept for the shortest period of time?

  • avatar
    CB1000R

    Love that the Avalon is on here. Because 1) I want one, 2) I want to be buried in it.

  • avatar
    Richard Chen

    Lots of overlap between this list and Consumer Reports’ top 10 cars making it to 200K miles:

    Toyota Prius
    Toyota Camry
    Honda Odyssey
    Honda Pilot
    Toyota Corolla
    Honda Accord sedan (4-cyl.)
    Honda CR-V
    Toyota Sienna
    Toyota Highlander (V6)
    Honda Civic (non-hybrid)

    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2015/03/ten-for-the-long-haul/index.htm

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      I suppose, if your car is breaking down often, you have no choice but to trade in for Camry. You may lose your job, if you are late too many times.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      This list sounds exactly like what it is, an ad for Toyota and Honda. I regularly see far more GM, Ford and Chrysler vehicles still driving around and running well from the 90’s than all Asian makes combined. In fact I saw far far more GM A-body Ciera’s and Buick Century’s driving around in 3 major cities in PA than Camry’s, Accords and Altimas combined.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        “My personal experience in one region of the country produces data other than what’s shown here, therefore this list is wrong.”

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        At poncho:

        Out in the city I see more RWD Volvos than early Camcords thanks to better durability, in the suburbs the GM A-Body is surprisingly common, including a VERY rare Oldsmobile “ASS” model!

  • avatar

    I drive a 12 year old Camry. It has been very reliable.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Earlier this year I bought a 1989 Camry LE V6 from my best friend for $100. It is still a blast to drive. Perky. Quiet. Smooth. If I go somewhere by myself, I usually take this Camry instead of either of our other two larger vehicles.

      My best friend was going to part this Camry out and have the remainder crushed in return for $25 for the metal remains.

      It seemed such a waste of a good car that still runs very well and still has the original spark plugs in it at 180K+ miles on the clock. Doesn’t burn oil. Still has the original hoses and radiator too.

      He had bought a 2015 Avalon Limited to replace this Camry he had initially bought for his wife until he bought her 2011 a Grand Cherokee.

      It then served as his grand daughter’s daily ride to/from HS school and college until she graduated. So I know its history.

      I’d say it has been very reliable, for him. But if it dies I’m not going to put more money into it. Just have it hauled off to be recycled.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        Umm, change the plugs.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Why? They’re NGK Platinum and still give decent gas mileage, and no misfires.

          If I did choose to change the plugs it would have to be a major endeavor since my hands are too large to get to the 3 back plugs.

          The car is too old to put any money in it. As long as it serves me as a grocery-getter, I’ll keep putting gas in it.

          Besides, I could part it out and make some serious cash on its parts. A lot of this model still running around in my area.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I could say the same about our 16 year old mountaineer or our 15 year old mystique. Both rock solid (nothing more than maintenance on the mystique).

      Neither made the list.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      I drive a 20 year old Chevy caprice that despite having well over 100K has been bullet proof reliable, with ice cold A/C and literally every single thing on the car works even all the light bulbs! My best friend owns the same year Caprice with 189K miles and his car runs and drives just as well as mine all on the original drivetrain. Anything can last if you take care of it!

  • avatar
    06V66speed

    Looks at Toyota AND Honda:

    “That’ll do, pig. That’ll do.”

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    What this tells me that at most only 21-29% of new car owners are interested in long term equity in their ownership experience and 2/3rds are more frequent traders/sellers.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Well, I suspect some of them are interested in that, but make a bad decision [faulty info? bad judgement? bad luck?] as to what to get.

      And, of course, even someone interested in equity may have a life change that necessitates [or merely justifies] a new car.

      I mean, “I might start a family sometime in the next ten years, better buy a minivan/medium SUV NOW” is … a little unreasonable?

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Toyota and Honda give you the best odds of buying a reliable, low maintenance vehicle you can keep for a long time.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Amen!

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Buying a new Honda or Toyota limits your future earning potential. You will never again be able to afford a new car!

      My tech thinks that, above and beyond their inherent reliability and OEM parts availability, Honda and Toyota owners overlook basic wear and tear. They use cars like others do old jeans: rips and all. Your typical Mercedes owner will obsess badly about every scratch and dent, but Honda owners don’t even notice.

      They also don’t notice if their steering wheel is 90 degrees out of true, their brakes are shaking like an unbalanced load, there’s a huge oil stain where they park, and every bump is accompanied by a loud CLUNK! They have renounced all material luxuries and are thus much closer to Nirvana than the rest of us.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        “Buying a new Honda or Toyota limits your future earning potential. You will never again be able to afford a new car!”

        LOL, no.

        What driving an aging Toyota or Honda does is make buying a new Mercedes (or even a new Toyota) look foolish.

        If you’re someone who judges other people’s income by their spending, then you’ll think I’m poor because I drive around in a 10 year old minivan. That van hides my rapidly increasing six figure income quite nicely.

        Why don’t I run out and lease a 5 series or whatever Mercedes makes in that price range? Basically, the van is a better kid and household hauler than anything BMW or Mercedes makes (at any price), and I find satisfaction in using the right tool for the right job. When it comes to replacing my van with a new Sienna/Oddysey, the question of whether a small marginal improvement in utility is worth $30k-$40k in marginal cost. The answer to that is currently “no”.

        I also have no interest in impressing people with how much I spend. You get rich by earning money, and you get poor by spending it. Accordingly, the game of telling people how rich you are by spending money is pretty self defeating (and the novelty wears off in hours). I’d much rather impress people with the quality of my work.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Huh?

        Anecdotal evidence: two of the wealthiest people I’ve met (a top neurosurgeon in NE Indiana and a director of engineering at a fortune 500 company) both owned first gen Highlanders (an ’05 Limited and a 06-ish Hybrid) as daily drivers from new up until a year ago. The ’05 went up to 170k before being traded in. Both were kept in perfectly good shape by their local Toyota dealer. Their other cars? A Prius for the engineer, a Fusion Hybrid for the neurosurgeon.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          My comment about “future earning potential” was a joke.

          The part about Honda and Toyota owners putting-up with worn-out cars isn’t. It’s an accurate description of most of the long-term owners I’ve met. Techs basically have to show them that they can put their thumbs through the frame before they will admit that their car is done.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I’d argue this is absolutely the norm for any “average” us car owner with an older vehicle, regardless of make. Let the issues keep piling up until the sum of repairs makes a new vehicle a more appealing proposition. I live in a pretty low income area where the the vehicles are predominantly turn of the century domestics (tauri, w-body, n-body, chrysler LH) and these things are kept running on a prayer. Half the car is caved in from a t-bone accident? No problem as long as it can still move under its own power. Misfiring on 2 of 6 cylinders? We can handle that.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            I agree with you that what I described is standard practice for the last owner. I was talking about people who bought their cars new and stick with them the point where they should be junked.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I agree, time has told tales of Toyonda owners who forget simple things like “oil”, and I cant tell you how many Civic-Cords I see with heavily damaged body panels, mis-colored bits, rust, messy interiors.

        But boy oh boy, do they love talking about that number on their odometer! Even though Honda admitted their odometers were slightly fast.

        Then gain this isnt just limited to Toyondas, I see many beat up A-Bodys, smelly ticky Saturns, smokey GM B-bodies, and even quite gruesome Volvos.

    • 0 avatar
      tubacity

      Bad Honda experience. Have one of those 10 yr cars, Honda Odyssey. Lots more breakdowns for more dough than my older cars. Ford, Toyota, others all better track records.
      Let me count the ways.
      Transmission, usual Honda fatal transmission disease. Crap. Serviced up the wazoo and still failed.
      Timing belt tensioner x2. Original and dealer installed replacement both leaked oil.
      Egr valve. Fail emission test. Cannot register until fix.
      Iac valve.
      Engine mounts Transmission mounts all. Yes, all. Clunk Clunk Clunk. Clunker.
      Heater water control valve.
      Heater fan resistor.
      Power steering hose leak. Interesting sounds with air in PS and oil drip near engine.
      Brake rotors every few thousand miles. Could have changed them twice as often but let them go until they feel really bad.
      At least I got both driver and passenger airbags fixed on recall. The root cause of air bag problem not known. Maybe after 10+ yrs of heat, the replacement inflators will become shrapnel killers again.

      Crap. Only keep it to avoid a car payment. Newer ones list easily $40k near to $50k with added dealer markup. No thanks.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        Funny being in the car business I have heard so many horror stories on these junk vans than any other competitor, enough where we avoid them at auctions, lease turn in and behind the dealership trade ins. But the sheep keep buying them up in droves and keep bitching and moaning every time something goes wrong!

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          ponchoman the shtick gets old. Odyssey transmission issues are overshadowed many-a-times over by Chrysler van issues. The transmission problems were isolated to the 2nd generation 98-04 Odyssey whereas Chryslers seem to continue the proud UltraDrive tradition of crapping out randomly and at will (ask our own Thomas Kreutzer about low mile failure). Throw in baffling electrical issues caused by the PCM on the 08+ cars (there’s a class action lawsuit), weak front ends, a propensity to rust much more than an equal year Odyssey and it isn’t a pretty picture.

          To deny, deny, deny all of the hard data (resale, this article, consumer reports) is just dogma at this point.

          • 0 avatar

            While I would say that in General the pentastar vans are not as reliable as the Honda. In mainstream opinion the mopars got a worse rap then they deserved and the Honda got a better one then the deserve. I actually know more high mileage mopar van owners without a tranny change then odyssey owners. But certainly the ultradrive failures in the 90’s were epic. Here is the true delta data on powertrains for the two yes Honda comes out better than Chrysler. But in many years they are surprisingly close.
            http://www.truedelta.com/Honda-Odyssey/powertrain-reliability-113/vs-Town-Country-71

  • avatar
    stevejac

    Just a chauvinistic comment: while they’re all foreign brands, a whole lot of those cars were built by Americans.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Next up, cars most likely to have 10 owners in 10 years.

    Chrysler 300
    Dodge Magnum
    Dodge Charger
    Chrysler Sebring
    Chrysler 200
    Chrysler PT Cruiser
    Dodge Journey
    Mitsubishi Galant
    Mitsubishi Eclipse
    Mitsubishi Diamante
    Mitsubishi Montero Sport
    Mitsubishi Montero Limited
    Chevrolet TrailBlazer
    Cadillac DeVille
    Cadillac DTS
    Cadillac Seville

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I shed a tear for every once-majestic Montero Limited I see in the ghetto. There’s one that’s been in the gas station parking lot by my house for over a month with a flat rear tire. I almost want to take it home with me and nurse it back to health :(

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        There is a mid-late 90’s Montero SR with black over silvery metallic two-tone and leather at this closed down service station place off Kenwood Road here, which was afterward a tool shop, or just served as some junk collector’s place. One of those places with the windows full to the ceiling of old crap, closed down for years.

        Anyway it’s the only car there, and it hasn’t moved in two weeks. I can’t see any rust, and there are no flat tires or a FOR SALE sign. I have driven by it at least five times. And as I see it’s rear seats pulled up high against the window, I am sad and wonder its story.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Those 2nd gen monteros are awesome and fantastically durable/capable trucks. It’s like a LandCruiser 80 that gets 50% better fuel economy at less than 1/2 the purchase price. Is it as insanely overbuilt? No, but it will still withstand WAY more abuse than most people buying them for ‘overland’ use will put them through. As a bonus, they’re better on-road and on higher speed dirt road sections where the Land Cruiser’s solid front axle is more of a hindrance.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    The proof continues to be in the pudding.

    My family owned a 1990 Civic Wagon from 1995 (bought for $6000 with 60k miles) and sold it in 2007 with 167k miles for $1400. Talk about low TCO! We actually did have a head gasket let go early on when we bought it, but the dealer replaced it at minimal cost to us because it was found to be a factory defect. My folks are now into year 8 of their 2007 Fit, no issues to report aside from an exhaust heat shield that started to make noise as it is rusting off its mounts (no visible rust on the body yet).

    We’ve also actually had a ’89 Mazda MPV in the family since 1997 (bought with 90k miles for $5000) through to this day with 235k miles. She’s a rusty old workhorse that got a reman head at 175k miles, but is on the original transmission and even balljoints(!). Our ’98 MPV owned since 2001 and 33k miles now has 170k, also no serious issues mostly wear/rust/age related niggling things. I really don’t think Mazda makes cars/trucks as sturdy or as well as they used to. The FWD based MPVs after ours really kind of fell apart in short order, and rusted quicker surprisingly enough.

    I’ve got a 3 year old Civic and 19 year old 4Runner in the fleet now and as a car guy my hands keep itching to swap for something else but these two have treated me very well and fit my needs nicely. A nice wash/wax last night made me fall in love with my Civic all over again, I’m tempted to keep it into the 200k mile range just as a real test of will. I’d love to pass the 4Runner onto my first born child as a first car. As long as I keep the rust monster away, this doesn’t seem far fetched at all.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    I would like to see how many of these people owned prior Toyotas and Hondas. I know I did. My 2006 Sienna has been trouble free, as was the Solara prior to that and the Tercel prior to that. It certainly influenced my decision in buying my 2015 Avalon. I would think ancedotal evidence plays a big role in auto purchases.

    But, I plan on buying a Dodge Challenger RT 6 speed next year, so what the hell do I know. A man can’t eat bland food all the time; sometimes you need a little spice.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I never owned anything other than Big Three until 2008, the year I bought a 2008 Highlander, our first-ever Toyota product.

      Now we’re an all-Toyota all-the-time family, and own three Toyotas.

      Can’t see ever going back to Ford or GM.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        My boss just traded in her Rav 4 on a 2015 Ford Explorer. The Rav 4 was a 2012 and she couldn’t stand the thing. The rock hard seats, truck like demeanor going down the road in the Winter months, the load asthmatic gutless 4 cylinder engine, the peeling paint on the wheels and the constant issues with the exhaust system prompted the change. Oh what a feeling. She loves her Explorer btw!

        For every story on how somebody bought a big 3 car for years and switched over to a Toyota I can come up 10 stories on how a Toyota buyer didn’t like there vehicles and switched over to another brand. Same goes for Honda, Mitsubishi, Mazda, ford, Lincoln, Cadillac, Mercedes, BMW, VW, Audi etc. Being in the car business for over 30 years has taught me a great deal.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          The RAV4 and the Explorer are not comparable vehicles. With that said, there’s nothing really wrong with either one within their segments.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I had a 2002 Impreza wagon, but I traded it in on a CTS4 wagon instead. I like it much better.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Dude, my 2015 Mustang is way better than my 1997 Honda Del Sol. It’s like the Mustang has 300 more horsepower and is a bigger car. Maybe I’m just crazy.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          “For every story on how somebody bought a big 3 car for years and switched over to a Toyota I can come up 10 stories on how a Toyota buyer didn’t like there vehicles and switched over to another brand. ”

          Your experience seems to contradict the reality of what happened in the 70s,80s,90s in the American car market as more and more consumers left the big 3 and didn’t look back. Like I said in the comment above, you’ve reached a zealot level of fervor and delusion.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      My history supports the thesis here. It goes something like this:

      1987 Taurus: bought used, owned 5 years/90k miles, acceptable but not outstanding repair history given first-car abuse
      1989 Taurus SHO: bought used, owned 5 years/80k miles, horrendous reliability, money sink
      1988 Accord: bought used from family, owned 5 years/40k miles, outstanding after initial pricey bill to clean up previous owner’s neglect
      2009 G8 GXP: bought new, owned 6 years/40k miles, multiple minor issues
      Four other cars (two Hondas, a Subaru, and a Lexus) not owned long enough to come to solid conclusions, but all totally trouble-free except for an initial repair bill on purchase of the used Lexus.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Pickup trucks being used as work vehicles? Ha! I’ve read that a very small percentage of them are really used for anything except hauling groceries, kids and fat Americans.

  • avatar
    yakapo

    My last car was a ’99 J spec accord coupe. The leather interior was still in excellent condition when I traded it in. It had about 230k miles and all it needed was a new fuel pump. I ended up using the cash for clunkers program in Texas to get $3k for it. I traded it for a ’09 Acura TSX 6MT. I know my experiences are outdated, but domestics in the 80’s and 90’s weren’t up to the same standards as the j spec imports.

    However, I really am not stuck in Honda / Toyota anymore. I really like the new mustang… I also like the new mx5. When I have enough cash to buy a weekend car, it will probably be one of those.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      It seems like the Acura’s and Honda’s have, for the most part, very durable interiors. Maybe V.W. could, at the very least, dispatch a few (or all) of their interior gurus to Honda for an internship in interior durability.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        That’s true for everything except the leather, which wasn’t very good for a long time.

        I’ve been playing with the idea of buying a Gen 2 Legend as a nostalgic toy car and it’s startling how many of them are out there that look great except for trashed leather. Hondas (the few of them from that era that had leather) are even worse.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        The last 3 Toyota interiors I witnessed on rental cars were not at all durable. The 2014.5 Camry SE 2.5 saw it’s dash vents pop right out onto my lap going over a harsh railroad track. The gear indicator was worn. Worse the passenger side A-pilar trim was already coming sway from it’s clip holes due to fatigued plastic clips. The 2012 Prius saw worn away indicators on switches, worn paint on the glove box door and numerous interior rattles. The Tundra pickup of 2013 vintage was a disaster. The stitching on the driver’s seat was already starting to fray. There were various misaligned dash bits. The power outlet worked intermittently on my Garmin. It works perfectly in my Chevy! Most every magazine has noticed this too and dinged Toyota on sub par interior on it’s newer offerings so I’m not surprised.

  • avatar
    STS_Endeavour

    Interesting… I would have expected to see Panthers on that list. I’ve rolled 121,000 miles on my 17 year old Yankee-built Panther in Maui, and 261,000 trouble-free miles on my Canadian-built Panther in California, and reached the 10 year mark last August. A fine driving appliance to be sure.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I suspect a lot of Panther buyers died before their car got to 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Did you get them both new? This list is just for people who bought new and kept their cars a long time.

      • 0 avatar
        STS_Endeavour

        hh – Okay, thank you. Got ya. I needed reminding. One was bought new, an early ’99 (purchased in ’98) TC Cartier that has needed some acceptable levels of TLC over the years. The other, an ’05 GM LS was bought used (oddly, still within the year 2005) with 16,800 on the clock. I admit it was the more reliable of the two.

        vg – you’re probably correct. Most Panthers these days are owned by someone whose email address ends in dot-gov.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      There are so many more Panthers driving around than CamCords combined. I still see 1980’s and early 1990’s examples in good condition all the time!

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    I’d love to know what people who keep cars this long think of their models’ newest iterations. Maybe they’re holding onto the last of a good thing for as long as they possibly can.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I am waiting for Toyota toce up an being “edgy” and “aggressive”.

      They sell so f’ing many cars that, no matter what they do, it becames bland by the time the 5th one rolls in to the office park.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I didn’t see any Acura’s or Lexus vehicles. I’m thinking we (I own a Acura) want to keep our luxury image up to date and we can afford to buy new more often if we want.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Fred, I agree that the absence of Lexus and Acura from this list is conspicuous.

      Recently I read a post on another site (adultery, I know). It was written by a new employee of Lexus in America. You’d think it would be meaningless cheerleading, but instead he seemed sincerely impressed by the extraordinary, even obsessive, effort to build better quality into Lexus products then even into Toyotas.

      He swore they’re even going to the length of importing every…single…part from Japan on the Camry-based ES now that it will be built for the first time in North America. He also said he’d done a side-by-side examination of an Avalon vs. an ES, and that contrary to many published assessments, he sincerely believed the ES came up superior in many small secondary parts and workmanship details.

      I know my own Acura has higher-quality parts in lots of visible places than Hondas do. My suspicion is partly that you’re right about luxury-car owners disposing of their cars earlier than necessary because they can, and partly that a lot of them lease.

      This also highlights the limitations of this kind of data. It measures one specific behavior – tendency to keep the car 10 years – and that behavior doesn’t necessarily correlate exactly with defect rates, which are only one factor in the decision to sell.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      This is exactly what makes these types of lists so bogus. I thought Lexus and Acura were made to so much higher standards than there cheaper cousins. Wouldn’t that make people want to keep them 10 years or longer if they are so damn good. Please!

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    Bought an S-10 in 95 and it’s about to turn 400k. Glad I didn’t have to spend that time in a civic.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I own one of the cars on this list. A Honda Pilot. My other car is a 911. I hate the pilot. It is a boring, slow, appliance car. If it wasn’t paid for long ago, I would have sold it years ago. It sucks the life out of me when I drive it. It’s basically relegated to a dog car and a road trip car. If this is what I get as a 10 year car, I don’t wait anything to do with it. I realize that isn’t every car on the list, but I equate many on that list to a boring appliance. No thanks.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    -I own one of the cars on this list. A Honda Pilot. My other car is a 911.-

    I suspect that after eating some fiery hot vindaloo curry, that a green salad may appear bland and boring too.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    There is something to be said for boring appliance like vehicles that keep running for over 10 years. Unless you like working for your creditors it is better to pay yourself first. My 99 S-10 doesn’t have as many miles as yours but it is still a good vehicle and I like it.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      According to the brain trusts here I am supposed to be afraid to drive this and should plunge into debt or blow a wad of cash. On accounta I might break down and lose my job. meanwhile the 4.3 just continues to rack up miles while people in civics brag about making it to 200k.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I had my previous car, a 2002 Focus, for 12 years. For the first 10 years, other than wear items, I had to replace two plastic cooling system pieces, a window regulator, a clutch master cylinder, and a valve cover gasket. After that, I had an alternator and a fuel pump fail, and had to replace those same two cooling system pieces and that same clutch master cylinder. I finally replaced it because I realized I was not saving all that much money versus getting a new car, and because some of the plastic pieces in the interior were getting brittle and breaking, and the car was starting to get some rattles. It was just less satisfying to drive.

    Previous to that I had an Aerostar minivan that I used to tow a racecar. I kept it for a little more than 10 years with nothing major needing to be done. The steering rack needed to be replaced as I was living in a salty area and it got corroded, and I had to have most of the O rings in air conditioning system replaced, but never anything in the drivetrain.

    When you keep a car for a long time, one of the things that keeps you in that old car is that since you’re going to keep the next one a long time as well, you want to make sure you get something you’ll be happy with. That was the deal with the Focus, I didn’t see anything in my price range that I really liked. I had planned on replacing it at the 10 year mark, but didn’t see anything I wanted. There is a big difference between a new car an an older one, this was confirmed when I went to lunch with a coworker in his 12 year old Corolla, it was just as rattly as my old Focus had gotten.

    If you’re buying modestly priced cars and have to pay retail for repairs, there’s not much saving to be had in keeping a car for more than 10 years. I could, and did much of the maintenance and some of the repairs, but even then, I didn’t see enough saving to be worth driving the old car.

    I was 56 when I bought my current car, and plan on keeping it for 10 years. If I keep the next one for 10 years as well, one more ought to do me until I stop driving, one way or the other.

  • avatar
    Ion

    We have a 1st gen Matrix at home. Recalls aside the last decade has not been kind to it. I find it odd the Matrix is kept longer than a Corolla. Of note is the lack of the pontiac vibe trailing the Matrix. That suggests the data is skewed by production number hence the lack of Exotics on the list.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    After two new domestic POSs in 3 years, I went Japanese in ’81 and have never looked back. My Toyota, Nissan and Isuzu all easily got to 200k before they were relegated to back-up/vacation status. I expect the same on my current Subaru.

    Then I take the 7-8 years of payments I’ve saved and get a well maintained used play car. My next move is to semi-retire and buy and fix up houses. Hopefully with a 911 Cabriolet.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      I remember watching dumbstruck as so many upwardly mobile, middle-American, patriotic and utterly acculturated friends and relatives went Japanese in the ’80s. Then I did, too.

      I’ve read and re-read The Machine That Changed The World and every shorter work on lean production I’ve stumbled across in the ensuing decades but nothing will ever fully explain to me just how Detroit could have let itself be so thoroughly rejected by people whose generation inherited the default first response of visiting a Big 3 store.

      I not only understand but have lived the quality epiphany that produced this result for so many millions of Americans. It just still astonishes me that Detroit ever let it happen when it had thousands of very smart people who knew exactly how Japan was creating an entire new and superior species of motor vehicle.

      TLDR: F*ck! Detroit got all Stephen Hawking; vast knowledge and intelligence trapped inside an immobilized culture, I guess.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Stephen Hawking – great analogy for Detroit malaise.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        In Japan, workers and management were not at war.

      • 0 avatar
        tomLU86

        My family and I have owned mostly GM, some Ford, 3 old Beetles, 2 water-cooled VWs, 1 BMW, 1 Honda. The worst cars were the Honda and a “Ford” Probe (Mazda), both bought used. BMW, also used, had a leaking head gasket and differential, fixed under warranty, sold it 1 yr and 10k later.

        We’ve always been more partial to “domestics”–if the US car was/is comparable, we’ll get it. If better, no brainer. If worst–well, you saw the other makes above.

        In the past, American cars were US or Canadian made, US designed & engineered.

        Maybe because my dad & brother are USAF vets. We served in the US military–and our airplanes and bases were obtained with tax money paid by US corporation and US workers. It was a symbiotic relationship.

        How come no one asks, how much does Toyota or Honda or VW (both of mine were made in PA), the corporations, pay in US income taxes?

        Yes, GM and Chrysler were bailed out. But in the good years, they paid billions.

        Of course, now that so many ‘good’ (not easy, but not mentally challenging, and well-paying) jobs have left the US, it is, and will be interesting to see how we fare as a society, compared to 1945-1975.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Unlike many of you, my family and I have limited experience with Japanese cars. My dad didn’t go for Japanese cars in genera and foreign cars in particular, because we were American (and he was 1st gen American), though he made an one BIG exception for VW Beetles–he had three in the 50s and 60s, and the last one I remember as child.

    I’ve had cars for about 30 years. The only two I’ve owned for over 10 years were my first new car, an 86 VW Golf GTI, that I sold in 1999 with 146k. I missed it, so I got a another, used, 86 GTI in 2000 with 71k (it now has 101k) as a toy car.

    I’d say my first VW was a pretty good. The first “failure” was the radiator at about 6 yrs and 95k. The next was water pump at 9 years and 125k. After that about 1 fix a year for the last 4 years I had it–shift linkage rebuilt, some fuel pump issue, A/C stopped working (didn’t fix-but it was ICE cold before). It was starting to get light rust at the bottom of the door hems. I sold it to a kid for $3k. As he chirped the wheels leaving my house, I didn’t think the car would last under his heavy foot. In 2009, I CarFaxed it for grins–still registered to the same “kid”.

    For some one to keep a car 10 years, IMO, the car has to be pretty reliable AND the owner must really like it (as it gets older).

    Against my brother’s advice, I replaced GTI #1 with a 94 Probe GT he had bought new and sold to me for trade-in value. During the winter of 2000, the water pump failed, and the brake lite continued to go on an off, and the dealer could not fix. I was glad to sell it for what I paid for it.

    I got a used Saturn in 1995 with 4k miles on it. Put 30k miles on it over the next 20 months. It had ZERO problems, but I didn’t like it, so I was happy to sell it for $1800 less than I paid.

    My brother bought the above Probe new. It replaced his first car, a used 89 Honda Prelude (Gen 3) he got in 1991 with 30k miles on it. At 40k, the CV joints went. He had rough running issues. He said he would never buy a Honda again.

    I currently drive an 2011 Malibu with 89k. I’ve changed the oil, on it’s 2nd air filter, wipers, and 1 set tires. That’s it. Last month the check engine light went on–it was a camshaft position sensor replaced under warranty. That’s the first thing to go wrong. So, in terms of reliability, this is the best car I’ve owned.

    I had a 91 BMW 3 for 2 years that I got used in 93. One month before the 4yr/50k warranty expired, I had an indep garage inspect it. Leaking differential and head gasket. Got it fixed under warranty. I remember thinking, “if this was a Cavalier or an Escort, I’d be ripping on this cheap American crap”.

    In general, except for my brother’s Honda (which I reminded him he did buy used, who knows what life it led) and his Probe (Mazda, which I figured I could fix cheaply) my family has had good experience with our (overwhelmingly GM and Ford) cars. We do service them regularly at the dealer or reputable independent after warranty.

    Just wanted to share another perspective. Didn’t realize how long I rambled…

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      My last 2 W-body Impalas have by far been the best car’s I have ever owned. Oil changes, tires, brake jobs, filters, a battery or two and one time an alternator with 120K miles is all I every did to them. My latest, a 2013 LT is nearing 40K miles and not one thing has gone wrong in 3 years ownership. My parents 2008 bought new has only needed a smog pump replaced due to corrosion by Ethanol fuel with the new part upgraded to better withstand that fuel’s corrosive qualities. It now is nearing 80k miles with the original battery, one set of tires and brake pads not rotors. They love it and will keep it well over 10 years. There previous car, a 2001 Bonneville was bulletproof reliable and they kept that car until last year or 13 years with 190K miles. That car has only needed one battery, a front wheel bearing and one rear window regulator which I changed out in less than an hour myself and that is it other than normal service. There VW’s, Fords and Honda’s owned previously were far less reliable and needed more repairs.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Demand and “resale” for used pickups increases after 10 years. That’s the newest pickups Mexico allows for import. Besides exporters, illegal aliens wait for the 10th year, then drive them home when the growing season ends. They’ll sell it in Mexico and make an absolute killing.

    There’s also the ‘lifestyle’ pressure to drive the latest truck offerings about the 10th year in. I’m facing that now with a 10+ year old pickup. Soooo tempting!

    I can’t imagine a brand spanking New RAV4 is much of thrill over an ’05 that’s paid for.

  • avatar
    415s30

    I just got a 2006 CRV for work and I plan to keep it as long as I can. I had a 1994 Accord for my DD but no A/C was getting old.

  • avatar
    JDM_CU4

    I love how as lot of people bashes the Honda/Toyota brand and saying GM/Ford are as good in reliability…but unfortunately statistics show otherwise, not only in this site, but any vehicle site you go to will tell you Honda/Toyota are indeed the most reliable and long lasting vehicles

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