By on October 13, 2015

2013-volvo-v40. Photo courtesy Volvo

Automotive News Europe reported that Volvo will offer a new compact crossover, based on a new architecture, in 2018 that will likely be called the XC40.

The crossover will be built in Ghent, Belgium and possibly in China, using the same platform being developed for compact cars in Europe.

The crossover will get Volvo power plants that include a hybrid variant. It would also likely get some sort of semi-autonomous driving feature as the Swedish automaker further develops its technology.

“We will not be sourcing engines from other manufacturers. Instead, we will be offering three- and four-cylinder versions of our own new engine program,” Samuelsson said. “We will also offer a plug-in hybrid for the compact models. Autonomous driving will be an option we will offer in our cars as of 2020, also in the compact lineup.”

The potential compact crossover would share its platform with the automaker’s V40 and V40 Cross Country models, according to the report. Volvo will invest €200 million ($227 million) in its Ghent facility to prepare for the new platform.

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36 Comments on “Report: Volvo Will Enter Compact Crossover Market in 2018...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Amazes me. Pay more, get less.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      What would an affluent empty nest lady of a certain age need with a bigger vehicle?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Gloria should purchase a CR-V. Lower price, better car.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          I think we did a comparison of the Buick vs. the CRV and the CRV was literally twice as loud at 70. I bet the same would be true for the Volvo. The seats would also be vastly better in the Volvo.

          It looks like the CRV is 70.6 dB while the Buick is 63.7. That’s a huge difference.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Because they can. If you’re retired and have cash (say 50K+ this will cost) you can do MUCH better. This is simply charge more for something with less space and thus less useful but is painted more positively/exclusive by marketeers (since space is the primary attraction vs the cuckholded sedans). Newspeak thinking in action.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          Much better such as?

          “less space and thus less useful”

          She goes to Whole Foods and spin class – when is that extra space going to be utilized?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Lex RX starts at 40K, Acura MDS at 42 and Acura RDX at 35. BMW X3 for 50 at Rahal

            http://www.bobbyrahalbmw.com/new/BMW/2016-BMW-X3+2.8i-00e3eb610a0a00650044f51f95ba1081.htm

            or for CPO why not an Xdrive coupe for the old lady at 32

            http://www.bobbyrahalbmw.com/certified/BMW/2013-BMW-328i+xDrive+Coupe-8be9cd980a0e0a175a16d696217f58eb.htm

            “when is that extra space going to be utilized”

            Do women driving Escalades or G-class SUVs need or use their space? How many in pickups tow or use the bed for anything? Same goes for CUV owners now. You want space because that’s the point of those kind of vehicles. Why would someone want to pay to not have space? That’s kind of the point. The only classes of vehicle I would think you frequently use the space or don’t buy it at all would be the minivan and full size van. Volvo can do what it wants because I don’t know what the thinking is in Europe, but the thought of pay the same price or more for something smaller with less space than something of a medium size in the USDM (again something like the RX) is demonstrating stupidity in action. I was just in Las Vegas and saw what urban living is like. In a place like that, ride sharing and things like Uber make clear sense, not spending a whole heap of money on something specifically small because your parking space is too small etc.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “Do women driving Escalades or G-class SUVs need or use their space?”

            Can’t some people prefer something smaller? Why do you feel everyone should buy cars by the cubic foot? Can’t there be room in the market for both?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I could see that, but in a 16 million car market or thereabouts I’m not sure what the percentage is that simply prefers the smaller size in that class for even/close to even money with a larger CUV.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          My semi-retired, 62 year old, mother says listen to 28CL and buy a used MKZ instead of this abomination.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Well I can see where you get it from.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Haha. I think both of their current car purchases are good ones. My mom drives an MKZ that she got for a sweet price and my dad is leasing a Sentra for $110/month. Including taxes. Only first month’s payment and taxes/state fees at delivery.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Price estimate: $32,000 base cloth FWD, $44,000 loaded (in other words XC60 or XC70 money) because Volvo.

    This looks rather junky, and has a VERY strong Eau D’Impreza.

    • 0 avatar

      Two things:

      “in other words XC60 or XC70 money”

      Ha, only if you buy a fairly base model, yes. Add any options and its well above $50k in no time.

      “This looks rather junky, and has a VERY strong Eau D’Impreza”

      Okay, sure, whatever. Completely irrelevant to the topic, because this design is 5 years old and won’t be the one that comes to North America.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Guess the picture shouldn’t have been included, per EChid rules then. It’s not completely irrelevant, as it’s THE same car, even if we’ll get a newer version. Volvo is not known for style revelations, but slight remodels. We all know this.

        So how again was it irrelevant enough to cause such anger?

        • 0 avatar

          I think you misinterpreted the tone of my post. I’m not angry, just stating facts.

          The picture was fine, but your nitpicking of it wasn’t that helpful. The above model was created as a thrown-together response to a market that didn’t really exist when the original hatchback model came out. This is a situation akin to, for example, Volvo making the XC70 and then following that up that with the XC60, which is considerably more suited to market demands and competition. I’d say there is a good chance the next ‘mini-ute’ will be quite a bit different.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Zhen: “Make look Crosstrek but fewer greenhouse.”

    Sven: “Briljant, Chef!”

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The Voudleheuzens will be most please.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        And make nose come with length!

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Frend-;

          I can tell you make a joke of such a language, like a euphemasia for those who are of the foreign languages, and so-on.

          Even though I can tell one time is when you seek to show us a Chinese car for those driver’s in back of it, it’s still funny (so long, ha ha)!

          So, I come roundabout to say – hey, keep to your fun word language, even whether its’ China’s or of Sweden (like where it has been; not now its’ also inside China as well!) I know, funny coincidentally.

          Compatriot,

          -Grango Relago

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Grango I missed you!

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            I always expected my heroes to be older than I am. Guess not!

          • 0 avatar
            WhiskeyRiver

            I’m a helluva lucky guy. Really. I have a Swedish chef living right next door to me. I dropped by a bit ago to see if he shared my enthusiasm for crossovers and to see what he thought about Volvo crossovers specifically.

            I’ll attempt to quote him even though it’s hard to do.

            “Fulfu vill meke-a be-a a signiffeecuont pleyer in zee-a crussufer merket. Imegeene-a a crussufer yuou cuould drup unuzeer crussufer oun tup ouff vithuout uny demege-a! Zee-a thrill ouff zee-a thuought is megniffeecent! My zeeghs ire-a itvitter! Vhee-a! Bork Bork Bork!”

            The you have it. Swedo-Americans are thrilled. Indeed. Really.

  • avatar
    banker43

    Glad to see we’re getting the “you’d be better off with a Honda or Subaru” comments out of the way early.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Looks like the tail is wagon this dog.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    That’s a *little* guy in there!

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Volvo is trying to make a resurgence and I think they’ll be able to do it. I’m willing to bet their progress will be better than Lincoln because Volvo doesn’t have to worry about their vehicles being based on a “lower” tier platform, even if it’s good enough to be a luxury vehicle.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Seems like a lot of hate for a platform that isn’t in the USA and what will show up is 3 years away. I would be very interested in the V40. I’ll be in my 70s by the time it shows up and tired of the TSX so a comfortable seat and autonomous controls could just be the ticket for me. Add a handy hatch and I’m golden.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    Unfortunately, it is a little late to the party. However, I’m sure they’ll sell. Very good looking…and hopefully not over priced.

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