By on October 27, 2015

2016 Nissan Altima SR

Nissan announced Tuesday that its refreshed Altima would start at $23,325 (including $825 destination) when that car goes on sale later next month (you read it here first!) and outlined pricing for its seven different trims.

The newly introduced SR trim, with smoked headlights, rear spoiler (probably adds 10 percent fast or so), 18-inch wheels and other unique features, will start at $25,295 for the 2.5-liter four, or $28,215 for the 3.6-liter six-cylinder engine.

The base S trim is $200 more than the current model; the top-trimmed 2016 3.6 SL is priced $260 lower than the 2015 model.

The base 2016 Altima comes in at $400 more than the base 2016 Honda Accord and $240 more than a base 2016 Ford Fusion and $1,010 less than an entry Mazda6. Compared to the 2016 Toyota Camry, the Altima rings up $580 less. It’s closest competitor in terms of price is the Chevrolet Malibu, where the Nissan rings in $45 cheaper.

If you’re cross-shopping the rest of the world, here’s a shotgun spray of comparative pricing:

• The 2016 Altima costs $335 more than the base 2015 Chrysler 200;
• A base 2015 Volkswagen Passat costs $1,165 less than the Altima;
• A base 2016 Buick Regal costs $5,060 more than a 2016 Altima;
• A base 2016 Kia Optima runs $365 less than the 2016 Altima;
• The 2016 Altima is $740 more than a base 2016 Hyundai Sonata.

According to Nissan, the volume models — which will likely be the S or SV trims when the car goes on sale — will cost $23,725 and $26,285.

The higher trims of the Altima will run from $29,395 for the 2.5 SL, $28,215 for the 3.5 SR and $32,915 for the 3.5 SL.

(All prices include destination and delivery because who doesn’t have to pay that?)

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25 Comments on “Nissan Confirms $23,325 Price For Altima; We Can Be Right – Once...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I think you meant the 2.5L or 3.5L engines – the same ones which have powered Nissans since dinosaurs ruled the earth.

    There is no 3.6L Nissan that I’m aware of.

    • 0 avatar
      SomeGuy

      Swooped in here to say the same thing. Nissan will ride with that 3.5 motor until they are forced to switch to something else.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      And the VQ family is rock solid. To put this into perspective, LS/LT series has been running 2 years longer. It’s not like the 3.5 VQ from your 1998 Altima is identical to the current one. It’s been refined, shrunk, enlarged, and just about everything under the sun.

      • 0 avatar

        ’98 Altima was 4-pot only. ’02 was the first year for this engine in the Altima, a year after it was launched in the QX4/Pathfinder.

        /thatguy

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Haha beat me to it! 98-01 Altima had a KA24DE, the same one that’s in the Nissan Frontier, Xterra, and US spec 240SX. I have a soft spot for that generation Altima in GXE guise, except for their incredible propensity to rust.

          • 0 avatar
            dolorean

            Wasn’t the original concept for the Altima was to be the “affordable luxury car” as per the Maxima was the “four door sports car”?

            I remember these took the place of the Stanza, which was to be honest, a rather nice ride and had six or seven different configurations.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Unfortunately they sound horrendous when you give them sporty exhausts, okay engine otherwise if old at this point.

  • avatar

    America, this is what your airport long-term garages, theme park parking lots, seasonal highway onramps, Santander auction lanes, Hialeah apartment complexes, and that-aunt-who-has-like-a-540-FICO-and-somehow-got-your-grandpa-to-cosign’s driveway are going to be filled with.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Well, the Altima isn’t the prettiest thing ever, but it’s relatively-inexpensive and is reliable. Also, I’ve observed highway fuel economy ratings of over 40 MPG, and that’s with a 2.5-liter, and not an overworked turbo or expensive hybrid.

      I’d say the 200 is the fleet, low-credit-score queen. Chrysler will just finance anyone.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I expect to see many of these in various grades of Grey, ditto the Sentra and Juke.

    Does the new Altima ride on the same platform as the previous model?

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      New refers to the Qashqai, oops, Rogue, oops every other boring Nissan, front grille.

      I see that grille and visions of sugar-plum fairies and relentless high quality and incredible reliability fill my brain.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I call that grille the “Energetic Flow Speedo”, to me it just says “Yea our car might be cheaply made and have questionable reliability, but it has floating seats and energetic styling!”.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Now Nissan just needs to build some luxury versions of the Altima and get rid of the metrosexual Infiniti brand.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      VW16v,
      I agree with you regarding the Infinity brand.

      Here is a link to a review on last year Altima in Australia.

      The high end Ti starts at around AUD $40 000 or around USD $28 000.

      The review is rather uninspiring toward the Altima. I believe since Renault became involved with Nissan, Nissan’s vehicles have gone backward in many cases.

      http://www.carsguide.com.au/car-reviews/2014-nissan-altima-review-ti-s-27834

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I had one of the first-generation Altimas, a ’95 first sold in ’94 that I bought in ’97 with 17k on it, for $12,300. I saw the paperwork and the original MSRP was $19,400 and sold for $17,900. Those prices are over $30k and just under $28k in today’s dollars, and what I paid is about $18k today, for what was a compact car. The stated MSRP for what today is a mid-sized car makes me wonder: HOW?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m not sure what Camry is really selling for as I keep seeing ads for 19,x or 20,500 or its real base msrp of 23, but either it or Accord are worth a look over Altima in my book. Maybe Nissan is going to play the same incentive games the other two play and base ATP will be a little more realistic.

    This list makes me laugh as I see the Sonata as the only serious [new] choice displayed.

    • The 2016 Altima costs $335 more than the base 2015 Chrysler 200;
    • A base 2015 Volkswagen Passat costs $1,165 less than the Altima;
    • A base 2016 Buick Regal costs $5,060 more than a 2016 Altima;
    • A base 2016 Kia Optima runs $365 less than the 2016 Altima;
    • The 2016 Altima is $740 more than a base 2016 Hyundai Sonata.

  • avatar
    banerjba

    Wow a lot of hate for this car.

    Flybrian, not sure what country you live in but in Canada these cars are very popular and reliable, especially given our climate swings from winter to summer. This is not a poverty level car here. I live in a wealthy suburb of Toronto where most people have at least 3 cars Most of us have at least one premium branded German or Japanese car as well as daily drivers. We are a Toyota/MB family but lot of Nissans around and this one in high spec but 4 cyl model (gas is a lot more money here) is very popular.

    This car is very comfortable, has best in class fuel econ and looks pleasant. Certainly a better choice than any of the US branded competitors. And it is made in the US not Mexico.

    With the recent diesel fiasco, this car should be on more shopping lists. We rented one on a recent trip from LV to LA; 1,000 km round trip. 36-40 US mpg, mid size comfort and regular gas.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      banerjba, I don’t disagree with your assessment. I believe Flybrian is lamenting that this is the new ‘cockroach’ much like the MY97-04 Grand Am was for eons.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I can see where people are coming from as far as the car being finance-fodder here in the US, I’d say it is becoming what the Mitsubishi Galant was in the early 2000s: a perfectly good car (great, actually) marred by peoples’ perceptions of the owners.

      I agree in full that it is an excellent mix of midsize room and comfort, fantastic fuel economy, reliability*, and tempting real world pricing.

      *My only hesitation would be buying one in a mountainous/hilly region. In the flatlands the CVTs give long and reliable service, but it seems the added heat from constant hilly driving does do them in sooner or later.

      Within the compact class, the Sentra offers the same mix of room/economy/value, an under-appreciated choice IMO.

  • avatar
    banerjba

    Good point about the Sentra. Canadians buy a lot of compact cars and I regularly see high spec luxury trim versions of it here. The fit and finish are very good, although the baby-Altima styling does not look as graceful on the small car. It makes the car look a bit stocky.

    Nissan needs to get the Sentra back to the awesome poor man’s BMW/driver’s car that the late 1980s and early 1990s Sentra used to be. Those boxy under powered cars were a blast to drive, bullet proof reliability wise and affordable to operate.

    I suppose the awesome new Micra fills that spot now. They are selling very well here and for good reason. A base model Micra costs like tax on an E class here.

    Nissan is on a bit of a roll with their product mix up here in Canada. Rogues are seriously putting a dent in RAV4/CRV sales, lots of Altimas (versus the very strange looking Camry) and the re-designed Pathfinder is doing really well, especially in the Platinum trim level.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I just returned from another business trip to Mexico, the old B13 body sentras make up the majority of the taxi fleet here, and you can still buy a new one at the dealer. It shares showroom space together with the new body style Versa, the Tiida, and the current body style Sentra. The cabbies’ unanimous opinion was that the “Tsuru” (B13) was the best thing since sliced bread. I was told “Very strong, economic car,” and “the best.” I rode in one with 400k kilometers of busted up cobblestone roads under its belt, and aside from a totally dead suspension (good cab companies replace shocks about every 9 months) it was rattle free and solid. The cars are beyond durable, parts to fix them when they do break are everywhere and they are cheap. Any little shanty garage in any village will know how to work on it if you yourself can’t. I absolutely love how honest, simple, and handsome those Tsurus are.

  • avatar

    Once again, Nissan has styled the Altima so it looks like a Maxima, and will in all likelihood hurt the Maxima’s sales. Again, why would anyone buy a Maxima with leather and a V6, when you can get the same thing in an Altima for significantly less money?

    As a former Maxima fanboi, I don’t get it.

    • 0 avatar
      Speedygreg7

      The Seats. The seats in the Maxima are so much better than those in the Altima it almost justifies the price difference. The Altima comes with seats more comfortable than typical Japanese mid market sedan seats, but the Maxima gives you European style sports seats with adjustable bottom cushion length and much more lateral support. Makes a world of difference.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    I love how these new “mid size” cars are now more like large cars. I swear the new Altima is the size of the last Buick LeSabre. I think the 98-01 is more correct…or even the much changed ’02. The new Sentra is now the size of the Altima..pretty sad. I’m all for “more room” but the new Altima IS really a large car. IMO.

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