By on August 17, 2015

08 - 2000 Lincoln LS Down On the Junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

When I walk the rows of a big self-service yard with rapid inventory turnover, my eye is tuned to catch old and/or weird stuff, which means that newer interesting stuff tends to get overlooked. I’ve been trying to shoot more 21st-century Junkyard Finds lately, since our current century started quite a long time ago, but it was hearing that our own Crab Spirits had scored a cheap Lincoln LS with perfect interior and bad motor (he’s going to swap in a Toyota 1UZ engine, which strikes me as a fine idea) that got me looking for junked LSs. It turns out that finding such a car is extremely easy, so here’s one I saw in California recently.
11 - 2000 Lincoln LS Down On the Junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

By the few accounts I’ve heard about the LS and its Jaguar S-type cousin, this was a very pleasant car to drive. Perhaps it wasn’t the Mercedes-killer that Lincoln (and Cadillac and Chrysler) had been seeking for decades, but it was a lot more advanced (and perhaps more appealing to car buyers too young to remember the Great Depression) than the Panther-based Town Car. It’s too bad that Ford opted for the only possible name for a luxury sedan more boring than the one Toyota slapped on its acronymic LS series: the letters LS not followed by some signifier of engine displacement. I wonder if Ford still owned the rights to the Utopian Turtletop name back in 2000?

13 - 2000 Lincoln LS Down On the Junkyard - photo by Murilee Martin

The LS has got to be one of the best bang-for-the-buck, super cheap, used-car deals out there right now; perhaps even better than the Hyundai XG. A big cushy sedan with independent rear suspension, leather, smooth Jaguar engine, and (if you get the V6) even a manual transmission option. Junkyard parts availability is excellent, and “traditional” cheapskate Lincoln buyers think it’s suspiciously foreign and keep prices down (they’ll drive ’93 Town Cars to the Golden Corral with the hazards on as you blow by in your cherry $1,200 LS).

Here we see a ponderous, special-effects-laden piece showing the sort of Nietzsche’d-up Übermenschen who might have purchased an A8 or 7-series or S-Class in the pre-LS era, but were compelled by the obvious superiority of the LS to toss all those inferior German cars onto the ash heap of history (I like to use Trotskyisms immediately after mentioning Nietszche, for obvious reasons). OK, fine, so it didn’t work out that way for Lincoln.

This in spite of the fact that the ’03 LS totally left the ’03 BMW 540i in the dust. Dust! Get it?

There are those who travel, and those who travel well. This traveler swamping those hipster kayakers with the shock wave from his LS appears to be about one-third the age of your typical Lincoln buyer in 2000.

Sadly, the LS’s place in popular culture isn’t quite so exalted now.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

95 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 2000 Lincoln LS...”


  • avatar
    Land Ark

    After reading through some of the comments from the La Hop Stick post last week I came away feeling like these were worth the price of admission. As long as you stay away from the 2000-2002 models you can get a good deal on a decent car. Not early 1990s Camry reliable, but not going to Audi you to death. Anyone here care to correct me?

    It’s always been on my list of random searches just because they are so cheap and good looking in the right colors. Quite an eyebrow raising design for an American luxury car in 2000.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Stay away. It’s not worth it. Just buy an S-Type instead.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        XJ > S-type.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Well of course. But if someone really wants a DEW-platform vehicle from the mid-00s, the S-type is the way to go.

          Well then they should really just buy a Mustang instead.

          • 0 avatar
            clem151

            It is a common misconception that the 2005 S197 Mustang was D/EW98 based.
            Of course, the original plan was to use the D/EW98 platform for the Mustang, but then it was decided that the rear suspension setup was too costly. So they scrapped it and redid the rear end of the car. The front end of the car also had no D/EW98 content. As I recall there were only a couple pieces in the body structure that were remotely similar.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Oh I know they aren’t related. The D2C Mustang was originally supposed to be a cheap version of DEW98. They kept some components, like floor pans, portions of the transmission tunnel, the front frame rails, and basic fuel tank design.

            I just think if someone is going to buy a cheap used Ford product from the early 2000s, it should be a truck or a Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      CarBuyerUSA

      The Lincoln LS is the biggest POS ever built by an american car company since the AMC Pacer. POS (parts only sale) has multiple meanings, but if you have a penchant for electrical and driveline bugs that cost you more than you shelled out for the car, buy one! they can be purchased for cents on the dollar – because that is what they are worth! We were sucked in by the exterior styling several times, having bought them assuming they were good automobiles to re-market at auction. Dealers won’t touch them….if anyone on this post wants one, I have one in stock with a birthday I can sell you. “As-is” of course.

      Buy a Camry or a Corolla instead, you will thank me later.

      [email protected]

    • 0 avatar
      MarqedMan

      The LS is total junk. Fairly expensive to repair and you repair them often. Might as well be a Dodge / Chrysler.

  • avatar
    sproc

    A friend had this exact model with the V8 for a few years mid-’00s as a low-mileage hand me down from his inlaws. While it was a pleasure to drive when it worked, reliability was poor and it was regularly in the shop for one expensive repair or another. Sounds like it might be a good choice now for an experienced shade tree type, but a couple of years off warranty back then ate him alive and he couldn’t wait to ditch it.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    “While it was a pleasure to drive when it worked, reliability was poor and it was regularly in the shop for one expensive repair or another.”

    So, it truly WAS a competitor to BMW.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I have a first year (04) SRX and spend a bit of time on their forums. As these complex, expensive (yet satisfying to drive) cars age out, unless you can repair them yourself, the economics of running them is a killer. I’d guess this Linc is quite similar.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    A Toyota to Lincoln engine swap sounds impressive. Anybody who can work out that electrical/electronics/software marriage would probably be able to make enough in the mechatronics industry to buy all the exotics cars he/she would ever want.

  • avatar
    Ion

    I have never seen one of these in a manual. The LS is the example as to why liconln doesn’t waste money on a RWD platform. RWD is also doing wonders for Cadillac. I
    . wonder what would happen if they tried launching a new name altogether instead of trying to resuscitate Lincoln and Cadillac

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      The problem was the usual PITA when it came to buying the dam car. This was ballyhooed as the first Lincoln since the mid-20th Century to offer a manual gear box and it was a GETRAG to boot! Yeah, but you could only get it with the 6 cylinder, not the 8. And it was the model without the coolness interior. And they were only going to be maybe 10% of the total volumne made with the manual. And good luck finding one at a dealership as they knew any Octogenarian wouldn’t want it.

      As usual, the one we really wanted wasn’t the one you’d find.

  • avatar
    nashraider

    Long time lurker, first time poster. Owned the first year 2000 LS Sport. Without a doubt, this was the best car that I have ever driven. The power, handling and ride were superb.

    When you sat down and put the key in the dash-mounted ignition switch, the driver’s seat slid forward and the steering wheel dropped into position, as if the car were saying “Drive me!”

    I kept it for one month shy of ten years, with almost 150,000 miles driven. The problem was that it was an American Jaguar, and the maintenance costs were always a minimum of $500. I just couldn’t afford to keep the car!

  • avatar
    omer333

    I saw one of these the other day with an aftermarket Landau top. Yes, that’s as bad as it sounds.

  • avatar

    Used car bargain? You’ve got to be kidding me. LSs are on par with Cateras in terms of electrical robustness, ease-of-maintenance, and parts availability.

    Also, any running example out there has likely already been through a 27.6% subprime loan or buy-here/pay-here lot. Consider that ownership history when evaluating a “cherry $1200” LS with cigarello-singed upholstery and a treadbare set of Good Rides up front and Triangles in the back.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Listen to this man. Run away from the LS. Do yourself a favor and buy a 2010+ MKZ instead.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Do you remember the first FWD V6 Contis which could be found stupid cheap with old people miles because they were junk?

      This is the successor.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Didn’t those Contis have troubley air suspensions and fragile transmissions? I can’t recall correctly – it was the suspension and _____ some other issue which put those Contis under.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The motor was junk too.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So the Intech was no good eh? They have regular issues in the Mark as well? IIRC that’s the only two applications of that engine, since the SHO of the time was still on Yamaha.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            No. It was the mod motor. V8 was the only option in the 95-02 Continental.

            It’s just a 4-valve mod motor. Similar engines were used in the Mustang SVT Cobra.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Nope, D186 ran the Essex V6. Wonder why there are no more Winstars while there are still plenty of old crappy Chryco minivans on the road?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Because the Windbags had rust issues. Ford paid to have them removed from the road a few years ago.

            And the D186 Conti never had a V6.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Eighth Generation 1988-1994

            Body style 4-door sedan
            Layout FF layout
            Platform Ford D186 platform
            Related Ford Taurus
            Mercury Sable
            Ford Windstar”

            Where is your god now?

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Continental

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Lol, last night I was playing some Price is Right on Facebook (only game I play on there, it’s pretty enjoyable) and I got to the showcase where they offered me:

            A stainless ice cream maker
            A 6-night trip to Anchorage
            A Ford Freestar

            I’m like what is this, 2006? So I bid 24,995. Other person thinks the Freestar is fancy, and bids 33,700. Actual retail price, 26,549. I win!

            But that Freestar was about 20,000 overpriced for what it was. You never see those around at all.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Yeah, it was Taurus based. The D186 Conti still never had a V6.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The 1988-94 Continental did not feature a V8 because Ford had no transverse V8 at the time. When the Taurus/Sable went DN101 for MY96, the D186 was widened to accommodate a transverse V8.

            “The sole engine choice from 1988 to 1994 was a 3.8 L Essex V6. Horsepower grew from 140 in 1988, to 155 in 1991, and then to 160 in 1993.”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Continental

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Ah, I’m talking about the 95-02 version. I blocked out the existence of the 88-94 version. So much garbage.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Lol, the 88-94 had so much gingerbread garbage on it, even when new!

            http://www.history-of-cars.com/images/lincoln/1990-continental-4door-sedan-z11.jpg

            Also this. Found me some more readin.
            http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-american/curbside-classic-2000-lincoln-continental-time-doesnt-change-everything/

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah, my knowledge of obscure and worthless facts serves me well.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The two Windturds that my Grandparents had didn’t live long enough to rust… That is saying something in this climate. That V6 drivetrain was a nightmare.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Well the transmission was better then AXOD units. They still weren’t great. The good news was the 4.6L Intech was more reliable than the Northstar.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Correct the Intech 4.6 was decent but its tranny was junk while the Northstar was junk but the 4T80-E was decent. If only the Ford motor and GM transaxle could be combined you’d have one GOOD car.

          • 0 avatar
            dolorean

            “Correct the Intech 4.6 was decent but its tranny was junk while the Northstar was junk but the 4T80-E was decent. If only the Ford motor and GM transaxle could be combined you’d have one GOOD car”

            Quoting Family Guy, Noah finding the elephant and penguin have had a love child on the Ark, “Did you name it yet?! DID YOU NAME IT YET!!? Cause it’s GOING OVER THE SIDE!”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh and BTW, I really liked the look and styling of the 98-02 Conti interior. Looks very plush and comfortable, and the light wood was a nice choice. Were they well made, or is it typical sh-t in there with cheap materials?

            Also, I liked the later LS interior after it got the restyling with the better grille, and the interior got a Navigator type treatment. The early LS and S-Type interiors were pretty sh-t.

            Edit: I’m just recalling the Motor Week where they actually said bad things about the Conti because it was “too complicated for the typical Conti buyer” or something. John almost made me cry, being so mean.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Conti had nice seats but cheap materials.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Actually, with the right amount of hacking could a Ford Intech be dropped into a Northstar Cadillac? Could this be a thing?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I don’t think any Ford product had reasonable material quality until sometime in the late aughts.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The FWD V8 Conti has a better chance to survive than the LS. I know plenty of people with clean Contis. The most troublesome issues could be fixed cheaply. With the LS, no. They are almost all gone.

      • 0 avatar
        jacob_coulter

        I remember specifically reading an article in one of the larger car magazines and they did just a brief road test on the Continental (the later one with the 4.6 DOHC V8) and they couldn’t believe how many reliability issues the car had in just the short time they had it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I seek the unicorn.

    “only 2331 were manual V6s”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_LS

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I’ve driven two. I think all 2000 were sprinkled around the Detroit area. It was a nice powertrain to drive. Too bad the whole car just starts to come apart in 00s euro car fashion.

      I actually know someone that has an LS and 300M that both have over 150K miles. He’s been winning the automotive version of roulette for over a decade.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        I reside in the NYC area and have a neighbor with a V6 manual LS in black. It looks quite nice though I have never spoken to him about the reliability.

        Another Motor Trend Car of the Year gone awry.

        From Wikipedia: The LS was named Motor Trend’s Car of the Year for 2000, and was nominated for the North American Car of the Year award, as well.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Agreed. So wanted one of those when they first got out. Was heart-broken of the engine option but was heartened by news of a crate 302 Cobra V8 a friend had that could be potentially be swapped into it.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      I look out for them often. I’ve found 4 for sale and 1 in the junkyard in the past 3 years. Typical price is $2000 or less. It’s quite a fun, if slightly underpowered, drive. Fortunately, with the V6, you avoid the grenade that is the AJ V8. These cars do love to eat parts, however.

      The one I’m helping build will have a sorted 1UZT/Z33 6spd swap. This throws away most of the problematic garbage under the hood.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Mira!

      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lincoln-LS-Base-Sedan-4-Door-/281731757885?forcerrptr=true&hash=item419885773d&item=281731757885

  • avatar
    bryanska

    The true sleeper-luxury Lincoln is the old MKZ. They made ‘em forever, and towards the end they were nearly as loaded as the new ones.

    For a while this was the most reliable American car (well, the Fusion was, but this is the same platform)

    Perforated Bridge of Weir leather, THX sound, etc etc. But the nav system is so tightly integrated it’s difficult to swap in an AVIC.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    These were great cars when they worked. American Jaguars indeed and since Jaguar wasn’t doing too great at the time, this was a disaster waiting to happen.

    BUT, people bought them! And they even got better over the years. Hell, the XF rides on a modified version of the same platform and look at how Jaguar has evolved the XF into the awesome car it is today. Lincoln could have made the LS work, especially if Mulally had gotten onboard at Ford a few years earlier because if there was a case to be made to save a car, this was it.

    My dream garage of American sedans would have a first generation Olds Aurora, Lincoln LS, Chrysler 300M and a Chrysler LHS. Had those cars evolved and been invested in, could you imagine what those cars would be like today?

    :( This post makes me sad.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    That couple in the LS ad does not look realistic. She’s far too stylish and upscale for him. Her name is probably Sandrine, and his is Jeff.

    Lol at the kayak ad. “Lincoln – I WILL DROWN YOU!”

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Gerard just liked it.

    Gerard locked the front door of his townhouse, and went in the garage to tend to the Lincoln. He rolled up the sleeves on his white collared shirt, and then hesitated before picking up the jug of coolant. “Perhaps I should take my shirt off?”, he pondered. He decided against it, grabbing the Zerex pre-mixed antifreeze. After all, he had done this many times, and knew how to be clean about it. He popped the hood, which had an air of precision as it slowly raised on it’s pressurized struts. Access to the recovery tank was hampered by it’s peculiar placement. He braced his shoulder against the underside of the hood while glugging the coolant into the opening. The seal of the jug, where Gerard had punctured with his finger, then flipped into the stream. The direction of flow was directed from the tank to the top of the engine. “Oh god DAMMIT!”, said Gerard, checking his clothes for splattered antifreeze. After topping off the reservoir, he placed the jug in the trunk for later.

    Gerard slipped into the driver’s seat, charmed by it’s soft, smooth leather. The Jaguar AJ V8 growled from it’s slumber, and after completing a brief self-test, the airbag module illuminated it’s warning light yet again. The shifter’s action was isolated, and imparted an expensive feel to Gerard’s hand as reverse was engaged. He hit the button on the Homelink to close up the garage, and set course for I-5. That’s when Gerard noticed the thick black smudge on his shoulder. The Lincoln squealed it’s tires in the fervent u-turn, and screamed to a frustrated halt in the driveway.

    With a fresh shirt, Gerard joined the rest of the rat race on the way to Anaheim. An ’81 Corolla rolled past, it’s driver enjoying the luxury of being able to roll down his windows without the likelihood of them dislocating themselves. Fortunately, this particular LS was equipped with a fresh DCCV, and Gerard could enjoy the comfort of air conditioning yet again. Traffic slowed, and he glanced at the cheap-looking temp gauge again. “Not overheating yet. So I have that going for me.”, he said to himself. He turned up the sports talk using the radio’s panel instead of the abandoned wheel controls, and then leaned back into the leather. He was swaddled in luxury, totally isolated from the chaos happening all around his Lincoln. Loose suspension clicked away, tires ended themselves, the driveline clunked sloppily, and a misfire in cylinder six came and went with it’s ignition coil’s morale. The lathered LS finally gasped to itself in the Cheesecake Factory parking lot.

    Gerard’s clothing off-gassed garlic and cheese when he returned to the car at the end of another tiring day of breaking in the new servers. He turned his headlights on, and was bathed in a green glow of Ford. Gerard accelerated briskly up the onramp. As soon as he lifted his foot, the engine fell on it’s face. There was a soft bang, that ran through the chassis into his backside. Then, there was nothing. The Lincoln coasted off to the shoulder. Gerard cranked the engine repeatedly, but there was no life. He popped the hood to remind himself that there was nothing to look at, as it was all hidden by a sea of black plastic covers and tubes. Not that he knew what to look for in the first place. He leaned against the concrete wall for the tow truck, noting it’s abrasiveness against his skin. The LS was towed to Gerard’s favorite repair shop. “Hopefully, they can get her going again quickly in the morning. Probably another sensor or coils again.”, he thought. Gerard wrote “Engine just stopped. Won’t start.” on the envelope, and placed the keys in the drop box.

    News came quickly the following morning at 7:15AM. “Hey Gerard, I have some rather bad news on your Lincoln…” Indeed. Gerard was not pleased to learn about timing chain tensioners so early in the morning. The comment by the service writer of “Yeah, this happens all the time with these engines unfortunately” sure as hell didn’t provide him with any solace. He ended the call, and whipped the iPhone into the couch. “Fuck!!!”

    The LS spent several months on Craigslist as a “Mechanic’s Special” at $1000, then $800, and finally $500 before the junkyard was called. Gerard watched his car climb lifelessly onto the flatbed for the last time. The tow guy adjusted the steering, and remarked “Oh wow, the interior is actually pretty nice.” Gerard responded with a disillusioned “Yeah.” He was done. Done with BMW’s, Done with the three brands associated with this car. Done with luxury cars of any sort entirely. He folded his check into his pocket, and then stepped into his new Chevy Cruze.

    “Meh, this seat sucks.”, Gerard said to himself before starting the car with a shrug.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I know someone like this, who works at said restaurant. The beater (LeSabre) was replaced with new Soul instead.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I like it.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      “The seal of the jug, where Gerard had punctured with his finger, then flipped into the stream. The direction of flow was directed from the tank to the top of the engine. “Oh god DAMMIT!”, said Gerard, checking his clothes for splattered antifreeze.”

      THIS is why you’re the King!

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Jaeger

      Crabby has an amazing talent for capturing the essence of the ownership experience of the last few years of life of these vehicles.

      That takes both an encyclopedic knowledge of the common issues of all of these old cars and an amazing writing talent to bring it to life. All I can say is bravo.

      And I can’t count how many times I’ve come close to buying one of these. I know all about their common issues, but like Gerrard, I just like them.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Could be the best one yet.

      Keep ’em coming!

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    I really liked this car. I ended up getting a 03 Passat instead, mostly because it got better gas mileage, and it was cheaper. A couple years ago, I was in the market for a used car, but all that I saw had been blinged out, ridden hard and put away wet. Lincoln should have stuck with this car worked out the bugs and made it the basis of a resurgence instead of going all whalemouthed and irrelevant.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Woo-wee, dayum!”

    “They ain’t that bad. C’mon now.”

    “Fool I ate three of em. You ain’t know.”

    An eye roll, and the tin of SQYNTZ was dropped in the console space between the seats. Charles, or C-Money as he was known in the local rap game, put a finger squarely in the center of a faded gold crosshair, tatted wrist turning as the Amero-British hybrid V8 squealed into life once more. Another hand found the dial from a Montaineer, and sage green light greeted C-Money as it had since last week.

    He recalled his father’s gaze, slightly disapproving over his tortoise shell Ray-Ban reading glasses. “You know, employers are not going to take you seriously until you take YOURSELF seriously, Charles.” A sigh escaped him as C-Money attempted to prevent his eyes glazing over from yet another dad speech. “Pops, I tol’ you I ain’t interested in sum f-cken drag job where I gatta put on a tie an be at a desk writin’ on paper an’ answerin’ a phone. Rap game is where I’m at, legit. I’m makin’ money anyway, look.”

    A wad of mostly five and ten dollar bills plopped on the table, secured with a fake Gucci money clip. A couple of hundreds on the outer edges were staggered ever so carefully. “CASH. Rite there.” Charles Blakeley II cleared his throat, and lowered his WSJ a little lower, glancing at the money. “That’s not a life, not making anything, helping anybody, furthering a cause, building a business, or property…” he trailed off, leaning back against the thick mahogany wood behind him and looking up at the large ceiling fan spinning idly in the morning breakfast room. The blades on their infinite circle put him in mind of his discussions with his son.

    “I thought it might help you out,” he continued “if you had something reliable to get you to work.” Standing slowly, he stepped a few paces to a sideboard, looking out over the manicured lawn to the pool, and beyond that, the 9-foot brick wall surrounding the property. “You know, something to get you started.” But this wasn’t the first start – this was start six or seven. Bunny had been insistent this time, and their after dinner drinks would keep taking place in the same room until she was more satisfied with her son’s situation.

    C-Money sat up straight. “Sheet – you gon’ give me da SL?” Wincing, Charles turned and went over to the sideboard, taking up a well-worn pipe in one hand, and picking up the keys sitting on a Nambe platter in the other. He dropped them lightly down on the table in front of C-Money, who got a look at the old school remote and that faded set of crosshairs, once emblazoned so luxuriously in gold. “Uh, what is it?” “Your grandmother had an LS she didn’t use much, and your mother and I have decided to gift it to you.” He responded, his fingers fiddling with the unlit pipe, sitting back in the dining chair and crossing his legs, one of his Purple Label slippers visible as his foot rose and sank once more. He had returned to his typical mode, now that the morning’s familial deed was done. “It won’t cause any taxation on our part, because the value is within the Gift Tax allowance for…”

    C-Money was a bit miffed, and had already started tuning his father out as he looked at the key, his other hand scrolling for wheels for the LS on his Note. “I’ma have go to down to Whitey’s Wheelz an fix up dis’mofukka. Ain’t comin correct in mah new video wit’ some ol’ geeze ride.”

    “Oh, an yo rims is straight up tite.” Jerome said matter-of-factly, nodding at C-Money in approval. “Yea, you kno – dat OZ Ultralegerra. Kinna’ expensive but worth it.” He grinned, “You know Estancia gon’ like em. Been tryin’ta get dat fo’ a month.”

    Backing out of the Rite Pri$e liquor store lot, they held their twin bottles of Courvoisier in their laps, leaving the token gift bottle of DiSaronno for the ladies on the back seat. As C-Money rolled through stop signs on the increasingly-seedy side of town, the bottle slid around on the overly shined, overly tight parchment leather; passing street lamps would illuminate the golden heraldry on the square plastic lid.

    Seven hours later, C-Money staggered out of the aged apartment building, resting his palm against the rough concrete of the stoop. His eyes focused on the bottle of Courvoisier in his hand, which had been empty for approximately 35 minutes. “Mannh.” He hiccupped and tossed the bottle into the long grass nearby, fumbling in his pocket for the square Taurus remote. Hitting unlock, the hazy Euro-style lamps illuminated, and he could see the LS was sitting higher than normal. “Tha’fu—“ Upon his stumbled approach as the two-of-five working interior lights dimmed, his free set of bricks became apparent.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Maybe it’s just where I live but these and the Mistubishi look alike (diamante?) are two of the most ghetto-fied vehicles that you can find, always on the 3rd+ owner with broken plastic hanging off the front and rear bumpers and cheap Chinese chrome rims and usually a permanent space saver.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I can add to this list the S and X-Types, gen 1 Navigators/Exp, and gen 2 Escalades. I saw a 4.9 DeVille circa 94 model this morning, which was 3 different colors of red, sagging at the back, and had a trunk held closed with bungee cord.

  • avatar
    clem151

    I purchased a 2001 LS V-6 Manual sport package with 40,000 miles on it in 2005 for $14,000 or so. It was a phenomenal car for the money and was fun to drive. It was NOT fast, but if you revved up the Duratech V6 it would get out of its own way. It would also easily do 130 mph and could do it all day long since the car was designed for autobahn usage.

    I was always annoyed that you couldn’t get all the goodies with the V-6 manual…typical Ford.

    This car was a perfect example of Product Development at Ford making a good car and Marketing totally messing it up. They advertised the car for like a week and then wondered why nobody bought it.

    Also, IIRC, they originally were going to call it the LS6 and LS8 but Toyota threatened to sue them over the LS name. The compromise was to just call it the LS.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      I bought my 2000 MT LS in 2003 for $17400 with 38,000 miles. Currently has 185,000 miles and I should make it to 200,000 miles (with luck). Not the most reliable car but not the worst. I’ve handled all repairs myself. I’m on the original clutch and the original battery (which started the car last winter on a -25F morning).

      The main reason I still have it is I don’t see a good replacement at a reasonable cost. I want RWD, sedan, MT and good weight distribution to go in the snow. Wanted the ATS to work (too small in the rear seats), a used G35 might be OK (little light in the rear at 46%), don’t trust the Germans though have been looking at BMW (by default since they make what I’m looking for). Jaguar XE might work but it will take too long to reach the used market for me.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’m reaching here but don’t the ignition coils go out on Linc LS?

        • 0 avatar
          clem151

          The coils do go after 80,000 miles or so. If you do them yourself and you use non-OEM parts it is a cheap job and not hard on the V-6.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            A few years ago there were a pair of Linc LSes which were frequenting my buddys shop for a number of different reasons (one I do remember needed coil packs). Each time I saw one of them I would ask what the story was and it was always a frown and occasionally a nasty word or two as I suppose they were a pain to diagnose/deal with (this guy is an indy Volvo shop which also does other makes)

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatic

          Did one at ~70K; did them all at ~100K. Not hard but removing half the intake manifold may bother some people.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Holy crap on that battery. Here in Houston a battery lasts you 3 years tops. Heat and humidity.

  • avatar
    Panther Platform

    Yes I’m one of those guys who would rather have a less advanced 93 TC than an LS. After a six year run with a Mark VIII (which I loved when it was not in the shop)I’m not ready yet for an unreliable luxury car.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    The LS is everywhere on the parts of the internet that I frequent – as is the XG, btw. So I guess whatever odd taste you may have, you’re being catered to.

    I had never seen the ads above before though. The first one is almost dripping with low self-esteem while the kayak killer ad is just weird.

    Comments are interesting on this one. Isn’t there any way to create a “stripped down” LS, a sort of low budget car with only basic systems being maintained?

  • avatar

    Speaking of Cheap Luxury. I used to own a Buick Park Avenue (first generation, ’91-’96). It came with a bunch of options and was very comfortable and had good power (I thought so anyway). And if you get a ’95 or ’96 you get a 3800 Series II. Additionally, if you had the Ultra, it would be a Supercharged version (which came with even more available options).
    These can be had quite cheap now, and the parts availability is quite good; the 3800 series engine is in a lot of cars.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • theflyersfan: @SCE – that’s a big reason why I left Honda as well. They weren’t incompetent, but...
  • Inside Looking Out: I don’t believe. It is a fake news. Don’t believe everything you read on Internet....
  • theflyersfan: As I wrote in a previous thread, Corey should be glad that it was just a water issue around the...
  • Inside Looking Out: Cannot agree more. Tesla is much more dangerous. Because of panel gaps.
  • gasser: Meh, another month, another Ford recall…

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber