By on August 4, 2015

GM Truck Assembly Flint

General Motors will spend $877 million to upgrade its Flint, Michigan pickup plant, the automaker announced Tuesday.

The assembly plant, which is the oldest GM factory in North America, will get a new body shop as part of the investment along with general improvements.

The plant makes full-size trucks for GM, including heavy duty versions.

The $877 million improvement was the final plant improvement announcement for the automaker, who said in April that it was spending more than $5.4 billion at its facilities.

Last month, GM announced it would spend $1.4 billion at its Arlington, Texas SUV plant for a new body shop and paint shop. That plant makes full-size SUVs for several automakers including the Cadillac Escalade and Chevrolet Suburban.

In 2011, GM announced a $1 billion investment for the Flint plant, which included a new paint shop. According to GM, the Flint Truck Assembly plant is a destination for truck buyers who want to watch their trucks roll off the assembly line.

Construction is scheduled to begin on the new facility in 2016 and will be complete in 2018.

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13 Comments on “GM Investing $877M into Flint Pickup Plant...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    They need to spend some of that 5.4 Billion developing a new engine for these trucks, the 6.0 is dead reliable and the duramax is a very capable engine, but the gap between the two engines preformance, and the cost of bridging that gap has gotten out of hand. Bring back the big block at a $1,500-2,500 option, it’s needed worse now than ever before.

    Needs about 420 HP and 550 lb-ft torque.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Are there really that many use cases left for a gas big block in a pickup truck? The big mileage kingpin towers are going to buy the diesel anyway, and the 6.0 performance doesn’t really limit what you can tow with a class 5 hitch. And, for in bed hauling, the light weight of the small block is a boon for payload numbers.

      With mileage concerns looming, a less ridiculous diesel option, in the 3.5-4 liter, $3K upcharge range, would seem to hit the market better. e

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Are there really that many use cases left for a gas big block in a pickup truck? The big wight and/or big mileage kingpin towers are going to buy the diesel anyway, and the 6.0 performance doesn’t really limit what you can realistically tow with a class 5 hitch. And, for in bed hauling, the light weight of the small block is a boon for payload numbers.

      With mileage concerns looming, a less ridiculous diesel option, in the 3.5-4 liter, 20-25mpg, 20K GVWR, $3K upcharge range, would seem to hit an undeserved market better than a giant gasser. For class 5 and 6 I can see the utility of a big block, but GM is not in that market.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        20K GCWR…

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        The whole point of a Big block gasser is to avoid the costs of new diesels, for the cost of replacing the injectors you can have yourself a new engine for the gasser. The 8.1 never was much different in the MPG area anyway, and it certainly outdid the 6.0 when there was any weight in play. The domestic aren’t going to put a wimpy 3.5-4l lawnmower engine into what is basically the halo trucks of the lot, it’s downright embarrassing and to reach power figures needed to keep up with the current offerings said engines would be extremely unreliable. The big block is the only answer to this question that makes sense.

        Look at the take rate of the 6.4 vs the 5.7 over at Ram, you rarely even see the 5.7s on the lot anymore, people aren’t afraid to pay the costs because at the end of the day they won’t have to put up with diesel down time or diesel costs. The current diesels aren’t the Detroit diesels of the 90s, if these trucks doesn’t like the fuel you put into it, your in for loads of fun.

        I’ve pulled well over 10k with the current 6.0 and 6 speed, I remember on one of my trips with about 6k lbs on the 1,500lb trailer (not very aerodynamic mind you) I averaged 4.2 MPG. There is no way in hell a Big block couldn’t out do that with flying stars while also effortlessly keeping up with traffic.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          “..wimpy 3.5-4l lawnmower engine..”

          You guys must have some serious lawns there in Hummer land….

          With GM starting to sell rebranded NPRs to class 4 and 5 customers, why not stick either those 3 or 5.2 I4s in some HD pickups? If you got 4.2 (slow down, dude…) in the 6.0, you’re not likely to get more than 5 or 6 with any traditional gasser. The 6.0 ain’t that unusually bad. While you could have gotten 12-15 with one of the Isuzu diesel 4s.

          A very Atkinson’y, direct injection, huge and slow turning gasser is still something I’d like to see someone try. Say, a 10-12 liter I6. If for no other reason, then just to have it easily fit into traditional truck drivelines designed for medium duty diesels.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “You guys must have some serious lawns there in Hummer land…”

            I could claim that all the way up to a Steigers 12.9l inline 6 haha. But in all seriousness I’ve used kubota BX & B series for lawns.

            Those small engines work fine when you have a very specific use truck, but when your multi purposeing a traditional layout is worth gold. The 6.0 needs to rev which the Big block and diesels don’t, getting up in revs is where you lose all your efficiency, unless they find a way to add 100 lb-ft of torque to the 6.0, I don’t see it fit for continuous towing duties. Those diesel 4s may work for the half-tons or the midsizers but I don’t see them holding well pulling a camper through the mountains with any possibility of keeping up with fellow haulers. I’d enjoy a Big block inline 6, but if they implement cyclinder deactivation for a Big block V8, well there’s a lot to ponder from that.

            I really love the 6.0, it is without a doubt the most reliable engine GM makes today, and quite possibly in the top 3 most reliable auto engine produced in the world today, but it needs major power increases, or a sibling to bridge the gap to the diesel.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    So investment in truck facilities first in Arlington and now Flint? Great as there is apparently a future in those.

  • avatar
    RetroGrouch

    Sounds like they are tooling up for aluminum trucks.

  • avatar
    Zoom

    Flint is the oldest OPERATING GM assembly plant in North America. The oldest plant is in Janesville, Wisconsin, and technically on “stand-by”.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    Great news for the workers. And great news for buyers, because the amount of orange peel the current facilities put on the trucks at these price points is just sick.

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