By on August 18, 2015

2016 Honda Pilot Exterior

2016 Honda Pilot Elite AWD

3.5-liter i-VTEC SOHC V-6, direct injection, cylinder deactivation, CVVT (280 horsepower @ 6,000 rpm,
262 lbs-ft @ 4,700 rpm)

9-Speed ZF 9HP automatic

19 city/26 highway/22 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

21.6 mpg (Observed, MPG)

Tested Options: Elite Trim

Base Price:
$30,875*
As Tested:

$46,420*
* Prices include $880 destination charge.

My sister-in-law announced that she and her husband were having child number four. As a result of this announcement, they decided it was finally time to sell the five-seat sedan and buy another crossover. Since she is constantly flooded with a parade of visiting family members, she asked what sounded like a simple question: What’s the best 8-passenger crossover with a comfortable third row and room for cargo. My answer: Buy a minivan. No, seriously, just buy a minivan. Think you need AWD? Get some winter tires. Really, really need AWD? Get a Sienna.

I’m sure you can guess what she said: “I am not driving a minivan.”

The problem is, aside from minivans, there are few 8-passenger options that aren’t expensive, full size, body-on-frame SUVs. Those options are: the Honda Pilot, Toyota Highlander and GM’s identical triplets — the Chevy Traverse, GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave. That’s it. If you need more room, be prepared to shell out for a Suburban, Escalade, Navigator or a few other spendy options.

Today we look at the freshest entry in this phonebooth-sized segment, the all-new 2016 Honda Pilot.

Exterior
Back when the crossover segment started, shoppers were drawn to truck-like proportions and boxy shapes. The last-generation Pilot wore some of the same questionable styling cues you see on body-on-frame SUVs like the Nissan Armada where the third-row window line doesn’t jibe with the rest. Perhaps because the crossover segment is maturing, or perhaps because everyone is finally admitting that the 3-row crossover is the modern-day minivan, Honda’s designers penned a body that looks the CR-V and Odyssey mashed together. The overall look is sleeker and more modern, but certainly less like a traditional SUV.

Base models get halogen headlamps while Elite trims like ours receive Honda’s new LED low beams. Although the Acura MDX is a close relative, Honda did their best to differentiate the products. Aside from the general dimensions, the DNA is well hidden. As we’ve seen from other crossovers, ground clearance drops from an SUV-like 8 inches to 7.3; still more than your average minivan but less than the truck-based people carriers. The decrease in ride height and addition of sleek lines help hide the three inch stretch Honda gives the Pilot for 2016.

2016 Honda Pilot Interior-002

Interior
The biggest change for 2016 is inside where Honda ditched the discordant faux-truck theme of the last Pilot for a more elegant and restrained look. In the center of the dash is a single 8-inch LCD, which surprised me since the Accord uses Honda’s 2-screen system. If the CR-V is the “‘Civic Crossover” then surely the Pilot is the “Accord Crossover”, so you’d think it would sport the same infotainment setup. The most logical reason for this change is that Honda didn’t want the Pilot to look like a bargain MDX on the inside. Whatever the reason, the infotainment system looks more like the Civic than the Accord. In another twist, Honda didn’t use a variant of the Accord’s instrument cluster like we see in the CR-V, instead opting for three dials and a digital speedometer in all models — again, rather like the Civic.

Front seat comfort proved excellent in our Elite tester, but I actually found the cloth EX model to be a hair more comfortable. Like other Honda products, front seats have generous lumbar support and a soft bottom cushion designed for hours of comfortable highway cruising. On the down side, even our top-of-the-line Elite model gives the front passenger electric adjustability in just four directions.

2016 Honda Pilot Interior-005

The second row in LX through Touring models ia a comfortable three-across 60/40 folding bench, but our Elite model swaps in captain’s chairs reducing the seat count to seven. The three-across third row surprises with more headroom and legroom than you find in most large SUVs but only a hair more width than the tight Highlander. This is thanks to the Pilot’s minivan-like profile and by the engineers cramming the seat bottom cushion as low as possible. The obvious downside to seats that are so low is the lack of thigh support for adults. Kids should be fine and Honda shows their love for LATCH anchors by giving you four sets in most Pilots — three for the middle row and one on the right side of the third.

Why bother with the three-across third row? It does have a practical application. It is possible to jam two skinny folks in the way-back and fold the row’s 40% side down. Those two would need to be skinny, friendly, or my mother in law. If you can make it work, you can put cargo on that 40% side and squeeze in 7 people and more cargo than large 7-seat crossovers like the Pathfinder.

Although the Pilot has grown for 2016, it is still among the smaller 8-passenger vehicles on sale. This lack of length is primarily a problem with it comes to cargo hauling where the Acadia/Traverse/Enclave have considerably more room behind the third row (the Pilot will haul more widgets than the Highlander however). Honda says that four carry-on sized roller bags will fit behind the third row in the vertical position, but it is a tight fit.

2016 Honda Pilot Interior-022

Infotainment
2016 brings Honda’s latest Android-based touchscreen infotainment OS. Using an 8-inch capacitive LCD, the new system is similar in appearance to what we see in the Honda Civic with some important differences. The system now runs Android OS and uses a new processor making the user interface snappier. The graphics have also been tweaked for the higher-resolution screen and Garmin now provides the optional navigation software. Like Chrysler’s uConnect system, the nav interface looks very much like someone jammed an aftermarket windshield-mount nav unit into the dash. Operation is easy and intuitive and familiar to anyone using Garmin products.

Perhaps the biggest change between this system and the similar looking one in the Civic is that the Pilot does not support smartphone-based navigation integration. With the Civic you can buy a $60 app and the car’s touchscreen LCD displays the interface while your phone does the processing. Also absent is Android Auto or Apple Car Play support which we see in the new Accord. Honda has yet to comment officially on the lack of smartphone love, but since the system in the Accord is related, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it in 2017.

2016 Honda Pilot Engine-001

Drivetrain
All Pilot trims get the same 3.5-liter V-6 we see in a variety of Honda products, from the lowly Accord to the upper-end Acura MDX. As usual, the engine is tuned differently from Honda’s other applications. Versus the Acura, power drops to 280 horsepower primarily because the Pilot is tuned to run on regular and the MDX is tuned for premium.

Power is routed to the front wheels via a Honda 6-speed automatic in LX through EX-L trims, or a ZF-sourced 9-speed in Touring and Elite. The $1,800 AWD system is optional on all trims, except the Elite where it’s standard. Pilots with the “i-VTM4” AWD are the first Honda branded vehicles in America with a torque vectoring rear axle.

The AWD system is functionally similar to the latest SH-AWD system used in the 2016 MDX, but the software is programmed very differently. In addition, the Pilot appears to lack the “overdrive” unit that spins the rear wheels 2.7-percent faster than the fronts under certain conditions. Regardless of which transmission you get, towing ratings are 3,500 pounds in front-wheel-drive models and 5,000 pounds in AWD trims.

2016 Honda Pilot Interior-030

Drive
Offering the 9-speed in top-end trims is an interesting alternative to offering an engine re-tune that might step on Acura’s toes. Adding 10 or 15 horsepower to a top-end trim would have a negligible impact on your acceleration times, but adding three extra gears to the Pilot makes it go from 0-60 a half second faster.

How is that possible? It’s all about gearing. The 9HP transmission not only has more gears, it also has an extremely broad ratio spread. Honda chose to use this ratio spread differently than Fiat Chrysler did in their Jeep Cherokee. The Jeep engineers wanted high-speed fuel economy improvements for the European market. In the V-6 Jeep, 9th doesn’t engage until over 85 mph and the low ratio is a fairly average 15.3:1. Honda doesn’t sell the Pilot in Europe and only Texas has speed limits that high in the U.S., so they took a different approach and tuned the final drive for acceleration. The result is an incredibly low 20:1 stating ratio vs a 14:1 ratio with the same engine and the 6-speed auto. That means that in normal driving, the Elite is done with first gear by 10 mph. By the time you’ve hit 40, you’ve used more gears than the LX possesses. On the flip side, the deep first gear and closely spaced 2nd have an enormous impact on the Pilot’s 0-30 time. Of course, if you skip the AWD system entirely, you’ll get plenty of torque steer and one-wheel peel.

Remember how I said the AWD system wasn’t exactly the same as the MDX’s SH-AWD system? You’ll notice this on the road if you drive them back-to-back. SH-AWD employs a few tricks to make the MDX dance like an X5 alternative. The two most important being the aggressive side-to-side torque vectoring and the overdriving of the rear axle. By making the rear differential spin slightly faster than the front and then shunting all the power to one side, the MDX can feel more like a RWD-biased AWD car under power. The torque vectoring function on the Pilot appears to be much less aggressive, although it does feel more nimble than most of the mass-market competition. If you’re after the best driving dynamics in this segment, you’ll have to give up a few seats and get the RWD Dodge Durango.

2016 Honda Pilot Exterior-005

When it comes to dynamics, the Pilot feels large and moderately soft. The suspension is tuned firmer than GM’s Lambda triplets or Nissan’s Pathfinder, but a little softer than some versions of the Highlander. The steering is light — as numb as you’d expect from electric power steering — but more accurate than the Buick Enclave. Elite trims get 20-inch alloy wheels and suspension tuning tweaked to be a little softer than the Touring model. The result is an entirely competent crossover sitting near the top of the pack.

When comparing crossovers, keep in mind that the Santa Fe and CX-9 are both more engaging, but neither seats eight. Nissan’s Pathfinder is more comfortable and delivers a superb highway ride, but again, no eighth seat. Toyota’s Highlander feels more nimble in the four-cylinder version, but considerably less refined. The Acadia, Traverse and Enclave are all quite heavy for this segment with top-end Buick trims nearly hitting 5,000 pounds. There’s just no denying physics; although the GM crossovers ride well, the handling, performance and braking all take a toll. Toss in aging styling and lacklustre fuel economy, and the only thing they have going for them are two inches of legroom and about 30-percent more cargo space.

2016 Honda Pilot Interior-025

Honda priced their new people hauler aggressively for 2016. The ladder starts at $29,995 for a base front wheel drive model, which is about $3,000 less than a base GMC Acadia or the base V6 trim of the Highlander. (The $29,765 Highlander has a 2.7-liter four cylinder.) Pricing is also in line with the $30,700 Explorer or the $30,150 Santa Fe — again, those two don’t offer an eighth seat. I was initially worried that the $46,420 Elite represented a decent value compared to a full-loaded Buick Enclave at $50,340. The Enclave gets a softer suspension but the Elite brings a 9-speed transmission, newer infotainment systems, a torque vectoring AWD system and LED headlamps to the party. After sitting in an Enclave, Pilot Elite and MDX back-to-back, the Elite model made more sense. This is perhaps more direct competition with the Buick than the Acura.

2016 Honda Pilot Exterior-011

Thanks to some steep discounts on GM crossovers, you can expect the Traverse to be the bargain entry in this segment. However, the Plain Jane Traverse is probably my least favorite 3-row crossover. It’s large, thirsty and lacks the modicum of design given to its GMC and Buick siblings. Of course, the real problem here is that none of the three row crossovers really excel at carrying a family of 6 or 7 and their luggage in comfort, something that is supposed to be the role of a large family vehicle. The modern three-row CUV has taken the place of the minivan for modern families. Unfortunately, it trades style and perceived capability for capacity.

This is where Honda’s Odyssey comes in and blows the Pilot out of the water. The Odyssey is 8-inches longer and all of the additional length goes straight to the cargo area and third row. Because the Odyssey isn’t pretending to be an SUV, the shape is optimized for interior room and you get a whopping 13-inches more combined legroom, more than double the cargo room behind the third row (38.4 cubic feet) and nearly twice the cargo room if all rows of seats are folded. That’s before you consider the practicality gained by removing the seats, something not allowed in a crossover. Although the Odyssey can be a hair more expensive than the Pilot, lacks AWD and Honda detuned the engine a hair, they drive more alike than crossover shoppers want to hear. And the minivan has a vacuum. Because: kids.

Although the Pilot is hands down the best 8-passenger crossover available in the USA and one of the best three-row crossovers on sale, the best vehicle for my sister-in-law is the Odyssey. Sorry Rachelle.

Honda provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 2.7 Seconds

0-60: 6.7 Seconds

1/4 Mile: 14.85 Seconds @ 94 MPH

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208 Comments on “2016 Honda Pilot Review – The Sensible 8-Hauler...”


  • avatar

    No Thanks…Dodge Durango.

    Better-looking, Uconnect, V6 with AWD or HEMI option.

    Less-expensive as well.

    This doesn’t seat “8”This seats SEVEN.

    That tiny little Fetus-seat in the rear center is a joke.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      It’s better looking in a racetrack and Budweiser NASCAR sponsor sort of way. It’ll also have worse reliability and resale value – especially when the Durango model dies in a year or two to make way for the GW.

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        The Durango is better looking in every sort of way. I passed a new Pilot the other day, and it was ungainly as hell—easily the worst styling in the segment. Shame, because the first generation was understated and handsome and has aged well. Second generation was pretty bad, but this new one might just be worse.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          >>worst styling in the segment<<

          Nissan Pathfinder owns ugly.
          https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Nissan_Pathfinder_3.5_Advance_4WD_2014_%2814566663230%29.jpg/1024px-Nissan_Pathfinder_3.5_Advance_4WD_2014_%2814566663230%29.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The Durango’s image is too far gone for Rachelle to even consider it.

      If FCA wants to sell her a three-row CUV it will need to badge one as a Jeep.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      No thanks – the Durango can’t hold a candle to Honda’s CR and TrueDelta reliability and resale ratings. I’d like to protect my investment please.

      On the other hand, if it was a company car I’d consider the Durango.

      The new Pilot’s interior is a huge improvement. If only they pushed the exterior more towards the original Pilot – nice classic shape without getting all swoopy….

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        You are technically cutting your losses, as the Honda is not a rare car and will not appreciate, ever.

        But I agree, if resale value is important to you the Honda is the way to go. If only the exterior weren’t so depressingly dull. It looks like it has just given up.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Huh, I actually agree with you here. If you are going to deny the more practical minivan for no better reason than “I don’t want a minivan”, don’t go for the minivan wearing CUV clothing (and ending up a worse minivan in the process). At least go for something with a V8. Something you absolutely can’t get in a minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The 2014 and forward Durango (where the interior was markedly upgraded and the 8 speed trans became standard) is THE BEST 8 PASSENGER vehicle for under 70k, even in mid-tier trim levels that price out closer to 40k (or slightly less).

      I rented one with the captain chairs for an extensive trip and was blown away at how good it is.

      It was so good that I steered a relative into one, and after 20 months of ownership, she and her husband love it, far more than the Traverse that it replaced, and they have the V6 Pentastar which has better throttle response, fuel economy (I got 30 plus highway at 80mph), a much better ride (very solid yet supple), much better fit/finish, better cargo and passenger room, better switchgear, and better everything (literally).

      It’s my top pick and as refined as vehicles costing far, far more. Consumer Reports has it as their top pick in its segment and I agree with them.

      The bonus is that it has a very robust drivetrain and very rigid chassis which makes for a master of crumbling roads (it muted even large potholes and expansion joints).

      It shouldn’t have shocked me as it’s very closely related to the very good Mercedes that costs 40% more.

      Awesome, awesome vehicle, and if I were shopping that segment, it would be my no reservation choice, even over far more expensive vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      > That tiny little Fetus-seat in the rear center is a joke.

      This. It may have an extra seat-belt in the back, but it looks to have identical ass-space as the 3rd row in our Santa Fe. I guess you can technically fit 2 elementary-school age kids in a pinch, but based on current NHSTA guidelines, kids essentially are supposed to be in booster seats until they’re 12.

      Let’s be real – It’s a seven passenger with a vestigial seatbelt, or 6 if you got the captain chairs.

    • 0 avatar
      JDM_CU4

      Uconnnect? LMAO, so any hacker or coder can hack my car? no thanks

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Interesting.

    Kudos to Honda for making the V6 standard, I’ve never understood the available 4 cyl engines in some of these porkers.

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    Buy a minivan. No, seriously, just buy a minivan. Think you need AWD? Get some winter tires. Really, really need AWD? Get a Sienna.
    I’m sure you can guess what she said: “I am not driving a minivan.”

    Sometimes I think about what the world would be like if people had more common sense than fashion sense. No disposable clothing that’s in fashion this week, no McMansions for a family of 4, and of particular interest to me, a choice of reasonably priced station wagons from the major mfrs.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      “Sometimes I think about what the world would be like if people had more common sense than fashion sense.”

      Think about what your 401k would look like in your fantasy world, then get back to us…

      • 0 avatar
        ClutchCarGo

        I see no reason why my 401K would be any worse off. People would still need food, clothing, shelter, etc. They would just be making more appropriate choices, and the companies that provided those choices would thrive over those offering frivolous and inappropriate choices, e.g. Land’s End over H&M.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          There is a lot of sanctimonious bullshit in this thread.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          H&M is great because the clothes are cheap and fall apart roughly the same time they go out of style. You look in style for relatively little money spent.

          As much as I like dressing in Connecticut casual, not everyone wants to look like a Land’s End blue blood. When I do find something like that though, it’s at J. Crew, Land’s End doesn’t seem to sell shirts that come in anything but fat-man cut.

          • 0 avatar
            BuzzDog

            “Land’s End doesn’t seem to sell shirts that come in anything but fat-man cut.”

            Just curious: Have you shopped Lands’ End recently?

            Their pinpoint and poplin dress shirts are an integral part of my “office uniform,” and the “tailored fit” is an option on most of their dress shirts…and the reason I buy a half dozen or so, year after year.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed on most points, but I’m just not a fan of station wagons.

      Also, a 1-year-old used minivan costs half of what this beast costs, and comes with more utility.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        True, but dealers like to shove it up your ugly a** on pricing (see link below) even though actual depreciation is pretty steep on all minivans (inc Sienna and Oddy). I remember having an argument last year where a shady Dodge dealer well known to be a friend of subprime was advertising an MY12 (or maybe 13) low trim Sienna FWD/40K for high 26 (31ish new msrp) and I found a Sienna of that color and miles at our local Manheim for 18,8. What these scumbags like to do is advertise they pay big for crap trades, then tell you your trade is crap but they’ll give you 1-2K out of pity, and then put you in at this case at 24ish and 8%+ because your credit is m’eh to terrible. You’re not educated enough about this to know how you’re being screwed and with minivans its assumed you’ve already got X amount of said children so they know they’ve got you in their sights because you have to have a “family” hauler. Dealers got to make money but it goes from we made money to we made 80% of our profit on you real quick. Heaven forbid there be a sedan large enough for those gigantic car seats they sell now.

        youtube.com/watch?v=SBs455jwb8w

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      The Odyssey has almost 4″ more 3rd row hip and shoulder room over the Pilot. There’s a penalty for fashion, all right.

      Yeah, minvan driver here.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Why would we have station wagons when minivans work so much better for carrying people and stuff? If people had an outbreak of relentless practicality the minivan segment would boom.

      • 0 avatar
        ClutchCarGo

        While minivans are a little better than wagons at hauling, I prefer the lower center of gravity and better driving dynamics of my wagon, and I’m not hauling around kids with their attendant gear so I don’t need sliding doors. But, yes, if you need the second row access to car seats, minivans are superior. And either a wagon or minivan makes more sense that the oh-so fashionable CUV.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          If people cared about CoG and driving dynamics in meaningful numbers, we’d already have wagons.

          I find the better-packaged of today’s CUVs to be superior to today’s wagons for practical tasks, because wagons now are mostly shaped so as to have tiny cargo holds.

          • 0 avatar
            ClutchCarGo

            But that’s my point, people over-value what is fashionable and under-value what practically affects their lives. The shift from BoF SUVs to car-based CUVs is the result of drivers choosing more car-like handling, but they’re still hung up on the image of wagons being “old-fashioned”, just like they’re hung up on the notion that a minivan is a “mommy-mobile”. Between image-consciousness and the disparate treatment under CAFE of wagons vs. CUVs, mfrs just don’t have much reason to offer us the decent wagons that are popular in Europe. I’d be thrilled to have the option of a Mondeo estate, but then I’m also wearing a pair of khaki slacks that I bought a couple of years ago, so I’m not much of a market.

          • 0 avatar
            Don Mynack

            Honda Odyssey and Honda Pilot have almost identical pricing at similar trim levels. I think they see what we are doing here…

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      No. MPVs are ugly. SUVs look better. I buy what I want.

      Translation: I’m about to have my first child. My wife wants a 7-seater because the in-laws “might visit once a year.” Since she claims to know a little about cars, we need AWD because she thinks it’s good in the rain. I actually don’t make the decision on my car, but at least it isn’t a VAN.

      So I will blow $45+k on my Honda Pilot, then whine to my coworker who is rich enough to have a Camry for his kid AND a BRZ sports car. What? He spent the same money I did and has two cars? Well, at least I have enough room when my in-laws might visit this year. Maybe.

      ‘Murica, land of buying what I don’t need or want, and then complaining about not buying what I wanted. Because I had no……choice……yeah. Probably.

      • 0 avatar
        ClutchCarGo

        “My wife wants a 7-seater because the in-laws “might visit once a year.” Since she claims to know a little about cars, we need AWD because she thinks it’s good in the rain.”

        If I may be so presumptuous, translation:
        My wife wants a 7-seater with AWD because the other mommies have them, and she doesn’t want to have lesser status when attending Baby and Me.

        ‘Murica, land of buying things we don’t need with money we don’t have to impress people we don’t like.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          … And then let the government hand the bill to those few who didn’t overspend on nonsense, because they ar3e few and we are many and the only word I learned to spell in 16 years of “schooling” was “demooocracy”

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        We have 2 kids and we still drive a sedan and an Outback. Both cars have inaccessible back seats as they both have 2 car seats.

        When grandparents visit, they drive their own car. When we all go out somewhere, they drive themselves, or we take out both our cars. Works just fine for us.

        We’re about the consider our next vehicle, and it’s still going to be a 2-row.

        • 0 avatar
          Chan

          I’ve never understood the desire to fit every single not-gonna-happen occasion into one huge car. Carting around 4+ kids is a different story, but that is a minority in most developed societies.

          Make sure everyone knows how to get to the destination so you don’t have drivers chasing each other.

          And if it’s a long drive or a once-in-a-year reunion, rent the damn 9-passenger Suburba-lade instead of buying one to commute with for the other 364 days.

    • 0 avatar
      cimarron typeR

      Sienna awd in limited trim is worlds better than the GM triplets.Coming from a enclave the Sienna provides true 7 passenger comfort and most of their luggage, with about 3mpg better mixed gas mileage.The Durango, while likely a more dynamic choice really isn’t full size and doesn’t offer an important option for city dwellers-power folding mirrors.
      For those who don’t see the light,the fight between this pilot and the highlander for top sales in this class will be interesting.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    The SAAB 95.

    Seats 7 in a much smaller footprint.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    My wife has had an Odyssey for over 9 years and has always wanted a Mini so I’ll likely need to get some sort of family vehicle soon. I, like many don’t want a minivan as my daily driver I’d much prefer a nice wagon and just use a cargo carrier but wagon options are very limited (finding a CTS-V wagon with a manual for a reasonable price is impossible). I wish Dodge had kept the Magnum.

    In looking at the various family vehicles from 2 row and 3 row (we are just a family of 4 but we often carry other people or things) CUV/SUV’s are just less functional mini-vans that usually get less MPG and cost more. The Pilot Elite is $2k more than the Odyssey Elite. If you don’t need off road capability and you do need people moving 3 row capacity just buy a minivan. If you are already going to drive something with poor dynamics and average acceleration why pay more for it for less capability?

    Try the new Sedona, it looks less mini-van-ish but still has the functionality.

    • 0 avatar
      Sky_Render

      Why do you “need” a van or wagon? Many modern mid- and full-size cars have quite large trunks.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve_S

        You can’t fit furniture in a Sedan. You can’t hauls a weeks worth of beach gear and food (special diet) for 4 or 5 in a sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          hubcap

          You can’t haul that stuff in a CTS-V wagon either.

          I’m guessin’ that furniture will be a no go for just about any sedan but if your kids aren’t in car seats take a look at an Accord.
          Plenty of back seat space and a large trunk.

          If that doesn’t float your boat, might I suggest a Toyota Tundra CrewMax.

  • avatar
    Toad

    “the best vehicle for my sister-in-law is the Odyssey”

    No, it’s not. Rachel hates minivans and has no interest in owning one. Telling people what they should want or what is really best for them is sanctimonious and boorish.

    If a buyer is spending 5 figures of their own money they have earned the right to buy something they actually like. If we are going to dismiss personal preferences then we might as well be assigned a very practical Nissan Cube by the Ministry of Transport.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Her name is Rachelle. She’s fancy, get with it.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      She’d better get with reality because its kicking in the door waving the 44 like Biggy Smalls. Alex is right, somebody who has four fricking children at around the same time is resigned to either the minivan or the Econoline from a transportation standpoint. She lost her choice of “style” when she went past two at once. Thanks for playing our game, but its time to have a big people life where parents do what makes the most sense and stop caring about what people think of them – including themselves. The reason these stupid seven passenger fake SUV sedan things exist is because ya’ll let your women out of effective control. Stand up be men and regulate. I guarantee when you get out of line she will be there to bring you back into reality that’s her job – but its your job to return the favor.

      youtube.com/watch?v=aNwvHEme_JE

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        Told it like it is.

        Thank goodness my wife has no interest in large cars. No matter how much our parents tell us we need a bigger car (or a car with a luxury badge because we “made it”), we just don’t see the need to punish ourselves 364 days a year with something that might be useful on that one day.

        That and we decided not to have 4 kids.

      • 0 avatar
        cimarron typeR

        Plus 1

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      But she is buying a minivan – same bones, same powertrain, same production facility, same in general except for a lot less room and more AWD options. Ain’t marketing great?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “No, it’s not. Rachel (Rachelle) hates minivans and has no interest in owning one. Telling people what they should want or what is really best for them is sanctimonious and boorish.”

      @Toad: No it isn’t, not when they ask for the advice. Rachelle asked a question whose answer she didn’t want to hear.

      • 0 avatar
        mchan1

        +1 several times over!

        If people don’t want any “opinions”, then they should Not ask for it, esp. on an online forum!

        What people “want” to hear =/= what people “Need” to hear.

  • avatar
    Rday

    I am always amazed by idiots that refuse to drive minivans which are by far the best way to haul people. Most of the cuv’s/suv’s never need awd or fwd so it must be a ‘status symbol’ to show which people are really posers or narcissists.

  • avatar
    ant

    I don’t care for the digital speedometer. I also see that Honda has done away with the volume knob for the radio, same as on many other Hondas. I suppose that I could just use the steering wheel controls, so not really a big deal, but I prefer to adjust volume with a round knob. These are my nit picks.

    The all wheel drive system sounds like it would be a good selling point for this car.

    I also think that it looks like it will age well over time.

  • avatar
    ctg

    I can appreciate that people care about style. I would much rather pull up in a Range Rover than a Grand Caravan. But these are not stylish. The new Pilot (and the Highlander, Pathfinder, etc) are all so much sadder looking than a minivan, to my eyes.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I agree. I don’t see the style in this segment. To me, they all look just as much like mommy-mobiles as minivans. But my wife, who is more in tune with the automotive tastes of the common man, disagrees vehemently. She likes crossovers (although finds the three-row ones too big for her preference) and hates minivans with a passion.

      • 0 avatar
        ctg

        One of our friends recently bought a Highlander. My wife thought it WAS a minivan until she noticed it didn’t have sliding doors. I think that’s when she came around to the idea of a van (if we ever feel like we need 3 rows).

        Its hard to hide the low-floor, low-liftover, high-roof, slab-sided-ness that you need for space efficiency behind cladding and a nose job. Even the current BMW X5 looks a lot more “mommy” to me than the previous generation. Although there you at least get better driving dynamics.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Thank you, this is godawful, I would rather show up in every single minivan choice on the market than this ugly wanna be minivan. And the same goes for 90% of the crossovers on the market, they are awful.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I like it! Though the rear vampire daggers will take some getting used to, I like the rest of the car. You could easily swap out Acura badges and fool most people – something you couldn’t say before. This car has really matured, and the increased size can only help. Compare it to the ever-popular Highlander, and it looks more mature and much less derpy (IMO the fat chin on the current Highlander looks awful.)

    And while this IS a lot of money at Elite level, the lower trims and their better value is what will attract the most buyers. I am put off by the shiny black plastic trim on an Elite. It should have wood grain. Honda and Acura continue to disappoint me with their lack of wood use / real wood. As well, their excellent, clear gauge cluster puts me off with a digital speedo. This isn’t 1994, and I’m not buying a Fleetwood. Give me a needle.

    For what it’s worth, $46k will get you into Expedition 4×4 XLT.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Sweetie, by the fourth kid, you are a mom.It’s over. Stfu , tie your tubes, and get the g.d. minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      First kid: mom-esque
      Second kid: faux-mom
      Third kid: quasi-mom
      Fourth kid: mom
      Fifth kid: slightly unbalanced
      Sixth kid: bat$hit crazy

      • 0 avatar

        I live in an orthodox Jewish community and happen to know some large families. Three kids, like I have, is a smallish brood. I have friends who have as many as 12 kids. They’re all far more mentally stable than I am.

        You’d be surprised at how many people say rude things to parents with lots of kids.

        That being said, as I explained to my son, my only son, Moshe, whom I love, who just had, with his lovely wife Tova, their second child, a boy (won’t know the name till the bris next Sunday): Pregnant women are emotionally disturbed. Women who have just given birth are certifiably insane.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Something that always amazes me is how far a woman will go to not be pegged as a mommy, yet if you ask her what she’s most proud of she’ll say her kids.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ….huh, someone was talking about something called a “Pilot”?

  • avatar
    Reino

    How the hell can any crossover claim to be able to seat 3 people in the back row–between the wheel humps? There’s no way!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Great review, and you’re absolutely right on the Sienna.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Or the Odyssey…nine grand cheaper with leather and nav.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Low miles Sienna for me via the auction is a first choice based on price, build quality, and drivetrain. Followed by Chryco if I don’t feel like spending that much money (i.e. that 3K miles one for 18,2). Honda can keep its Oddy it costs the most, is uglier, and how many years did the tranny blow up? 5? Oh yeah, not impressed.

        MY13 Honda Oddy EX-L

        07/28/15 ORLANDO Regular $26,700 10,488 Avg BURGANDY 6G A Yes
        08/10/15 NJ Regular $28,200 11,561 Above Silver 6G A Yes
        08/06/15 PA Lease $23,400 13,668 Below MAROON 6G A No
        08/04/15 ORLANDO Regular $27,200 14,248 Avg GREY 6G A Yes
        08/14/15 PA Regular $28,500 15,205 Above TOPAZ 6G A Yes
        07/21/15 ORLANDO Regular $27,000 18,615 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
        07/22/15 NY Regular $27,000 18,830 Avg Gray 6CY A Yes
        07/21/15 ORLANDO Regular $26,900 18,847 Avg BLUE 6G A Yes
        07/24/15 PA Regular $27,500 19,387 Avg GRAPHITE 6G A Yes
        08/07/15 PA Regular $25,400 22,208 Avg GREY 6G A Yes
        07/24/15 FT LAUD Regular $27,000 24,299 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
        07/30/15 TAMPA Regular $27,400 24,848 Avg MAROON 6G A Yes
        07/30/15 SO CAL Lease $27,750 25,135 Avg BLUE 6G A Yes
        08/12/15 DALLAS Regular $27,800 26,141 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
        08/12/15 PITTSBGH Regular $27,600 27,048 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
        08/12/15 NJ Regular $24,900 27,249 Avg GRY 6G A Yes
        08/13/15 LOUISVLL Factory $27,750 29,261 Avg GREY 6G A Yes

        MY13 Toyota Sienna FWD XLE

        08/14/15 NEVADA Regular $27,000 13,486 Above GRAY 6G A Yes
        08/12/15 LAKELAND Regular $17,800 13,616 Below RED 6G A No
        07/31/15 PA Regular $24,300 15,217 Avg BLACK 6G P Yes
        07/31/15 PA Regular $23,750 16,623 Avg BLUE 6G P Yes
        08/10/15 BALTWASH Lease $22,000 18,251 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
        08/12/15 NASHVILL Regular $28,900 19,192 Above WHITE 6G A No
        08/13/15 TAMPA Regular $24,500 20,196 Avg Blue 6G A Yes
        08/10/15 BALTWASH Lease $23,200 21,213 Avg SILVER 6G A Yes
        08/07/15 PA Regular $22,000 23,293 Avg GREY 6G Yes
        08/07/15 PA Regular $26,000 23,957 Above GRAY 6G A Yes
        08/04/15 BALTWASH Regular $25,000 24,078 Avg GREY 6G A Yes
        08/10/15 OHIO Lease $18,600 24,417 Below SILVER 6G A No
        07/30/15 TX HOBBY Regular $25,600 24,647 Avg GREY 6G A Yes

        MY13 Chrysler T&C Touring

        08/17/15 ORLANDO $18,200 3,057 Above BLUE 6G O Yes
        08/13/15 FRDKBURG $18,200 4,236 Above BLACK 6G Yes
        08/12/15 NJ Lease $19,200 7,540 Above BLUE 6G A Yes
        08/05/15 NY Lease $17,900 8,728 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
        08/05/15 NY Lease $16,000 9,985 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
        08/06/15 LOUISVLL Lease $20,100 10,172 Above GRAY 6G A Yes
        08/14/15 PA Regular $19,800 10,334 Above BLACK 6G P Yes
        08/06/15 DETROIT Lease $20,500 10,811 Above CASHMERE 6G A Yes
        08/05/15 NY Lease $18,300 11,155 Above DEEP CHE 6G A Yes
        08/05/15 NY Lease $16,200 11,478 Avg GRAY 6G A Yes
        08/13/15 DETROIT Lease $17,000 12,620 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
        08/07/15 PA Regular $19,400 13,267 Above GREY 6G P Yes
        08/11/15 OHIO Lease $19,700 13,719 Above BLUE 6G A Yes
        08/13/15 ARENA IL $16,000 13,761 Avg BLUE 6G A Yes
        08/05/15 NY Lease $16,500 13,879 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
        08/05/15 NY Lease $15,500 14,450 Avg BLUE PEA 6G A Yes

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          As of MY13 I think I’d trust the Honda transmission more than the Chrysler one. Although if you’re willing to put up with their cheap looks outside the Chryslers’ price may be low enough to make up for that.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree with you, but it is a cost thing (esp the Honda being the priciest). If I buy at 18,2 run it for 50K and dump it for I dunno 12-13 I’ve tied up less money for that 50K than doing the same thing on a Sienna at 23 and selling it for 18. Makes more sense to spend the money on the Sienna all things being equal, but again it depends on the finances (I’d have to do projections on the Oddy but the depr math is probably the same, but again more upfront money).

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Agreed, although I don’t think I could get past the fact that every detail of the T&C’s styling makes it look like the last vehicle left at the Enterprise counter. Even the ugly Ody at least doesn’t look so cheap and proud of it.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Good point. I rented Enterprise T&C’s twice in the past two years. First time had one with 14K and performed exemplary. The second time, the first van with 30K shifted *hard* in reverse and I demanded another one. The next one had 20Kish and the A/C failed halfway through the trip down but otherwise drove well. The third one was actually a Caravan/28K and performed well the rest of the trip and on the way home. So if you’re buying one of these things, avoid rentals and spend the money to get one with low low low miles that hasn’t been abused yet.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    if this was my family and i was the hubby, i’d take one for the time and drive the Odyssey.

    No way do I want to deal with four kids and the stuff, ages what sound like 0 to probably 5/6, without sliding doors.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      It’s funny how minivans are more often driven by the dads. Men simply have less capacity to eat a shit sandwich every time they drive the family around, so they rather buy what simply works.

      Here’s a list of the things my wife has purchased because they were “cute”:
      – The colorful plastic clothes hangers that all broke in 1 year (I told her to buy wood)
      – The cute plastic file cabinet that droops so bad the drawers wont pull out (I offered to find a sturdy metal cabinet)
      – The Pinterest-inspired placemats that leak straight through and slide around
      – The uncomfortable, loud and bucky 2010 Tucson purchased new even though I begged, “wouldn’t you rather have a nice 3-year old Lexus RX?”

      Not only am I mystified how some women make decisions, I’m beginning to tip over into “lack of respect” for it. Careful…

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Gotta step in and regulate sometimes, brother.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        “Not only am I mystified how some women make decisions, I’m beginning to tip over into “lack of respect” for it. Careful…”

        They make decisions much the same way that we do, except without logic or accountability

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Ding, ding, ding, we have a winner.

        • 0 avatar
          Chan

          The man is the accountability for the woman, and vice versa.

          That’s why people marry. Not to “give up and let her make all the decisions.” That isn’t even what most women want.

          The Tucson, however, has a case against the Lexus. If it has Hyundai’s long warranty, you should expect a low TCO compared to the Lexus.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “If it has Hyundai’s long warranty, you should expect a low TCO compared to the Lexus.”

            In the TCO/reliability category I will take a clean CPO Lexus FWD over a new Hyundai Tuscon FWD all day long. Even if I am wrong and the Tuscon is the better of the two in TCO, Hyundai does not have the resale of Lexus so on trade you will pay the difference at such time.

      • 0 avatar
        markf

        +1 on the Dads driving the minivan. When my 2nd was born I suggested we look at getting a minivan. My wife, who before our first was born SWORE she would never drive a minivan just looked me and said “ok” sounds good. She realized the practicality of sliding doors, low floors and plenty of cargo space. Getting two infant carriers into and out of an Xterra was getting old and we quickly ran out of space for stuff and another adult.

        We bought a Sienna and it has been a great vehicle. I am currently living in Germany and parking is tight, tighter with an “American” size car but the sliding doors are life savers.

        Whenever I see SUV/CUV all I can think is the owner is someone who thinks they are “too cool for a minivan” Me, I think being a parent is way cooler than any car I could ever own…….

        • 0 avatar
          hubcap

          “Whenever I see SUV/CUV all I can think is the owner is someone who thinks they are “too cool for a minivan”…”

          Or perhaps someone who has different needs than you.

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        @bryanska
        Sorry, my previous commentary not directed to you and your wife. Aimed at whiners whose spouses make misinformed choices on major purchases (like a car) and don’t stop them from doing so. Both spouses live with the consequences. As I mentioned, the Tucson makes a good case for long-term ownership.

        @28-Cars-Later
        Good point, resale value does apply if you only intend to keep the car a few years and sell it for something in the five-digit range. For a family that keeps cars until Junkyard Day, it’s a wash.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree, Chan. I’m a keeper myself but between the fact things built now don’t always seem to be as reliable and also the fact children may/will destroy the van in a few years time, I may be looking to dump it after a few years in such a situation.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Don’t have much to add other than my sister has an Acadia and I have to say it seems really handy for hauling everyone or taking turns making event runs with other families etc. And that as far as minivans go, yeah, practically it makes more sense. But I wouldn’t be caught dead in one either. It’s the same reason many of us wouldn’t buy a camry… It might be the “best” choice, but it is a really boring one too. Same logic here in my eye.

    Bigger question to me… Why are nearly all 5pass midsizers 4cyl and 6 is only in the 7/8pass monsters? Unless I’m missing something (excluding luxury brands) is the Ford Edge the only 5pass 6 cylinder model?

    Crossovers I like but having to choose either a midsize body with a 4 or a monster with a 6 is a rather annoying choice.

    Honda will sell a boatload of these.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Coulda had a Durango

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      If you want less interior room and a redneck image, sure. (I like the Durango. But it’s got a real image problem thanks to the first two generations.)

      • 0 avatar
        319583076

        It’s funny that the Durango has been mentioned as an alternative twice – and derided for its “image” both times – while in the same breath Rachelle is being roundly derided for being an image-conscious consumer.

        B&B!

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Isn’t that the whole point? The reason Rachelle doesn’t already have a minivan is because she’s very image-conscious. If she won’t buy a minivan for that reason, she won’t buy a Durango either.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            What we know about Rachelle is that she doesn’t want the minivan image – what we know about you and Corey is that you both associate Durangos with “rednecks”, “Budweiser”, and “NASCAR” which are clearly undesirable in your lives, but perhaps acceptable or, heaven forbid, desirable in other lives.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            There are people who want to look like a redneck?

            No comprendo.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You might be a redneck…

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        She doesnt care about her image. She bought the most plain boring vanilla vehicle availabe. The pilot has no image. Its simply the vehicle purcchase that no one will question because no one will care.

        • 0 avatar
          bryanska

          These are the same women who have Facebook conversations like this:

          Rachelle Smith-Logan: Woo hoo! Car shopping today!! Hope to wrap this up by noon so we can take off on our road trip!

          Tina Swenson-Waite: Rachelle, ZOMG we have a Honda and LOVE IT!! Joliet Honda gave us a fantastic deal and has FREE POPCORN!

          Emily Olerud-Zinnser: Our minivan has been trouble free.

          Rachelle Smith-Logan: I am NOT buying a minivan, Emily, I’m not ready to give up just yet. >:P

          Amy Winters-Tollefson: Hubby and I love the Honda!

          Another woman: We LOVE (this consumer brand, regardless of suitability)!!

          Rachelle Smith-Logan: Thanks everyone!! We got the Honda!!! [This $40k decision] Only took two hours [to initiate, research and finalize]!!

          [picture of boring grey blob]

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Seriously you did pull that off of Facebutt, didn’t you?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yep, I knew people like this. And they’ll also give you a vigorous argument about whether velcro or tape tabs on diapers are better, whether Teletubbies are bad for your kid, or charter schools.

            Nothing but the best for little Kyla, Kaylee and Kyler.

            (Not kidding about this…)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @freedmike

            In my life I have literally been involved with five Ks: Korrin, Kayla, Kasey, Kendal, and Kim. I feel like Pat Sajack asked me if I wanted to buy a “K”.

            “Nothing but the best for little Kyla, Kaylee and Kyler.”

            Kyler, this is a real name?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Oh, yeah, where I live, the kid names beginning with K are definitely a thing.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            This planet really does deserve another major asteroid impact, doesn’t it?

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      “Coulda had a Durango”

      I’m sure we’ve all survived some near disasters.

  • avatar

    Great review. Just recently went through this myself. We just had twins and we will need a third row because when my family visits, they hate to drive and it’s just nice not having to take two cars if it is just her mom tagging along. Anyway, I wanted the minivan. Wife said hell no, so we shopped around. My only requirement was a backup camera and navigation. The 2016 Pilots are really amazing. They just drive great, but the trim we would want ex-l with nav or higher, puts us into the 40K range.

    We looked at the highlander and the Acadia as well. Highlander is really nice and has a great layout for the driver. Problem we had was that it was missing some features we normally like in a 40K vehicle, like memory seats for the driver and front passenger power seats (we were looking at XLE trim). Getting what we wanted tacked on another 5K.

    Saw 2014 Certified Acadia (SLT). Really love the size of the vehicle. Driving it after the Highlander, I think it was really nice. Awesome seats and we actually preferred captains chairs. The problem with the Acadia is some of the nit picky things. Carpets left the seat tracks exposed and my wife immediately thought of the all the cheerios that would live there. Backup camera was excellent, but Nav looked older than the 2003 TL I previously owned. Just not responsive and seemed low resolution.

    Ended up getting a certified 2014 Pilot Touring AWD. Somebody was trading it in on a new Pilot the day we looked at the 2016. 2014 doesn’t have as many of the modern features (lane departure, collision avoidance) but the Nav system was straight out of my 2012 TL and the Touring was the top trim model that year, so we are getting everything. Certified it was 35K, which was right at the top of what we were looking to spend before taxes, etc. Only 14K miles. Really good deal.

    Certified Pilots are hard to come by (we have been looking for a month) and I think if we hadn’t stumbled upon the one that we had it would have been the Acadia. I could live with the Nav system and there is just a great deal amount of room in them and they don’t drive as big as they are. But if I had another 8K to spend, I would have bought the 2016 Pilot. It really is that good.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I agree with many of the post above. Rachell needs to be made aware of the fact that once one has given birth four times, they are no longer in the cool kid club. Your life is about practicality, ease of use and time management.

    Explain to me, with four kids how one goes to airport with the double stroller and the requisite four to five roller bags plus personal bags. So you might say, we’ll wait till the kids are older. How does one fit four teenage kids and two of there friends in this thing for any measurable length of time?

    I get really tired of the mom cop out regarding the minivan. If you are going to breed like a rabbit, accept that your options are limited when it comes to hauling your brood around to Costco and soccer practice.

    • 0 avatar
      MattPete

      After we had twins a few years ago (we already had a 3-year-old), we bought a Honda Odyssey solely because it has (1) 3-across seating in the second row, and (2) sliding doors. The only advantage the Pilot has is that it has four-wheel-drive. Other than that, I see a pile of disadvantages compared to the Odyssey.

      It’s funny, because when I look at the Honda Pilot’s interior, the first thing I think is “Honda Odyssey, but it’s crippled…”. Sliding doors are a must, and with 3+ kids, plenty of cargo room is a must. The third row of the Odyssey is comfy (although with 2nd row 3-across seating occupied by car seats, that means that 3rd row passengers must crawl in through the hatch). Believe me, you’ll need all of that extra cargo room for double strollers, etc.

      Yes, I’m a Dad. I preferred the Town & Country (drove like a BMW compared the Odyssey, which drove like a Buick), but the 3-across seating won my wife over. Once my kids are off to kindergarten and we are no longer paying for daycare, I’ll probably trade in my [by then] 14-year-old 3-series for an awd 3-series wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      This. I mean, I have a few 8-seater Chevy Traverses at work. They’re frequently sent out for ~45 minute trips with all 8 seats full. I’m a little shocked this hasn’t gotten us written up for a workplace health and safety violation. Four teenagers (once this brood gets there) would likely never admit it, but they’ll appreciate the extra room over the Pilot (I assume the level of teenaged embarrassment between a Pilot and Odyssey is negligible).

      Maybe Rachelle will come around by the time the Pilot’s due to be traded in.

  • avatar
    Undefinition

    Yes, it’s our fourth kid, but our egos won’t let us get a minivan. We need to pretend like we’re still youthful and adventurous. We’re not going to be boring parents. We’ll be the cool parents, who are “on fleek”… that’s what the cool kids say, right?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You’re probably not youthful but you can still be adventurous as spontaneity knows no age. Maybe its just my analytical side, but “cool” parent’s aren’t really cool because they are trying to project a false persona to the world and themselves. People who are who they are and wear it well, are far “cooler” in my book.

      The three most important phrases I have learned are:

      Because I can.

      F*** it [optional: I’m doing it].

      F*** ya’ll (and do what it is you want when you encounter disagreements from others).

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      Important in life: Make your choices and rock them instead of hiding behind them.

      A lot of people will be hiding behind this new Pilot, because they couldn’t stomach driving a lower-priced van with real sliding doors for all the kids, or buy two smaller cars to save some fun for themselves.

      Large CUVs are the new “minivan” in marketing.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I suspect half these comments are just going to be people whining about the alleged superiority of minivans.

    • 0 avatar
      JCK

      Half? Try like 80%.

      And not just whining. Don’t forget about the insults and generally patronizing tone as well.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      when you’re regularly hauling no less than 6 peeps in a tin can, you want the most practical tin can.

      no one around you cares about the image of a family of 6 when you’re at Costco. or your local Six Flags. Or on the highway during a Thanksgiving weekend road trip.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “alleged superiority”

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      Until a Pilot hauls more than an Odyssey, the Odyssey is a superior hauling tool in all objective measures.

      So people buy these large CUVs for image reasons, and then proceed to whine about how cars are so expensive.

      Whining goes both ways.

  • avatar
    RetroGrouch

    A friend and his wife said the same thing when they were car shopping after two kids. They didn’t listen and are now miserable stuffing a 3rd kid into their POS 3 row SUV. He finally admitted they should have purchased the dreaded soccer mom-mobile.

    Tell the sister-in-law to round file the ego and buy a minivan. Nothing moves massive numbers of offspring around like a minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      For 3 kids, the best tool is something with sliding doors and 2nd row captain’s chairs.

      Anything else is a personal choice. Something your friend clearly regrets.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Why is the SUV a POS simply because the couple is sick and tired of inserting and extracting their kid from the third row?

      It’s a tool. If you choose the wrong one for the job you’ll have sub-optimal results. It’s not the tool’s fault. It’s the person’s who chose it.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    I am going to be annoying and join the chorus. For all the grief crossovers and SUV get i can understand the ease of access and the commanding view aspect so OK, give up some space and handling vs a wagon but you get other benefits.

    Once we go past 5 seats though, that’s where it gets utterly, utterly stupid. 6+ seater SUV are absolutely stupid, anyone buying them is monumentally stupid. They are not attractive vehicles, in any way, so what’s the difference between driving one and driving a minivan that is so, so, so much better to live with???

    I do not get it. At all.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Agreed. I just can’t see how a Pilot has any more cool cred than a van, which will drive better, be easier to park, and carry more. There does seem to be some sort of suburban SUV club, and god forbid that one deviate from the herd. I’d spend half the money on a lightly used Pentastar T&C and laugh all the way to the bank, but then I’m just a cranky middle-aged curmudgeon.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      ” 6+ seater SUV are absolutely stupid, anyone buying them is monumentally stupid.”

      The only exception to this that I can think of, and I am really reaching here, is my uncle. When I was little in the late 80’s/early 90’s, he drove a Chevrolet Suburban. An honest-to-God 9 passenger, 3 bench Suburban. 9 real seats that reasonable adults could fit in. But why not get a minivan? Simple reason, he had a camper trailer that he liked to tow at least 3 or 4 times a year. Not happening in a minivan.

      Of course that was the 80’s and this is now, and my uncle is now an empty nester so he just drives a Silverado the last I met him. But I suspect that if you used a time machine and moved his child rearing years to today, he probably would still buy a Suburban.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      ” 6+ seater SUV are absolutely stupid, anyone buying them is monumentally stupid.”

      “The only exception to this that I can think of…”

      Really?

      There are plenty of reasons to buy a 6+ pax SUV. Chief among them is simply having the means and desire. Families are at varying stages of development and have different needs.

      For me, If I had four small kids I’d get the van. But when the kids are out of the seats I might expand my search for something Suburbanesque. And if I needed something to pull a camper or a boat then a mini-van wouldn’t cut the mustard.

      And DevilsRotary… everyone who doesn’t choose a mini-van is stupid… excluding your uncle, natch! .

      I don’t know why you feel the need to call those who don’t agree with you stupid without knowing their circumstance but it is what it is.

      Ask around on the forums, I’m sure you’ll find people who are getting along just fine with 6+ pax SUVs.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I get not wanting a minivan for image reasons.

    What I don’t get is buying a Pilot/Higlander/Acadia instead because a three-row CUV from a non-luxury brand is just as lame as any minivan out there. It is like moving to Minnesota because it is too cold in Canada.

    Maybe I’ll understand when I’m over 40.

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      This. baffles me.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      It’s because you’re basing this off of how you feel. To certain people, a mini-van has an image they don’t want to be associated with. A CUV, simply by not being a van, doesn’t have that image.

      You may see them as interchangeable. Others do not. I can understand you thinking of both being so similar that really no difference exists but I don’t understand how you can’t see it from the other side.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “but I don’t understand how you can’t see it from the other side.”

        I’ll admit I completely lack empathy when it comes to the idea that a Sorento or Pilot has a younger or cooler image than a Grand Caravan or Odyssey.

        I get it’s a feeling that exists for some, but I have zero understanding of it.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    My parents just got a 2016 MDX with the Advance package. The Pilot Elite offers 95% of what the MDX Advance offers, for $10k less. In my eyes, the only reasons to get an MDX are for the slightly better AWD system, increased refinement that comes with the Acura badge and possibly the ELS sound system.

    The MDX does come with a “oh WOW!” Acura-designed dual screen infotainment system, but in my opinion it was confusing at times and exhibited unacceptable lag when entering basic information such as addresses. I feel like the Pilot’s CarPlay/Android Auto head unit would be much easier to use.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      ” In my eyes, the only reasons to get an MDX are for the slightly better AWD system, increased refinement that comes with the Acura badge and possibly the ELS sound system.”

      Your parents purchased the vehicle they wanted. I’m assuming (correct me if I’m wrong) that they’re not carting around child seats, strollers, and pack and plays.

      Even if they are. It’s their decision.

      In my experience, just about everyone, at one time or another, buys more car than they need.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    Oh and no knob for radio volume? Really? Fuck off already then, i ain’t buying. Christ on a bike.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Transit van + sweet paint job is the right answer. You’re welcome.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      The Transit 150 XLT, short wheelbase, low roof is a true 8 passenger and I find it quite fetching in Race Red. Although if you are willing to pay Ford extra for paint the color pallet is extensive.

      And it can be had for under $40,000.

      Given the few sold to civilians it shouldn’t be hard to find in a parking lot either.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        http://mt.bp3.ford.com/2016-Ford-TransitVanWagon?type=comm#/MakeItYours/Config%5B|Ford|Transit VanWagon|2016|1|1.|302A.K1C..H5…X3L.CS2.VW.~YZKAA.89K.MLR.COM.LEA.99G.446.WAR.20F.XLT.92E.43R.584.]

        That’s how I want mine.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Yes. Or the Mercedes equivalent. The rear seats in that vehicle are actually adult sized.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      +1 for the Transit. Make mine blue.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I had a weird moment when I realized a Transit Ecoboost can be had for less than a Flex Ecoboost (or at least here in Canada – seems it only comes on the higher level Flexes). I strongly doubt I’ll ever create my own little soccer team and need one, but the want is strong.

  • avatar

    When the kids’ car seats are installed in the middle row, how to people get into the third row? Do you have to remove one or more of the seats to flip the seatbacks forward to allow passage, then reinstall them? Do the third row passengers just crawl over the top? What’s the method?

    The captain’s chairs, which the Highlander also offers as an option, create a pass-through to the third row, but as mentioned reduces seat count to seven.

    Yeah. Get the minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “The second row in LX through Touring models ia a comfortable three-across 60/40 folding bench, but our Elite model swaps in captain’s chairs reducing the seat count to seven.”

      Reading helps.

      • 0 avatar

        I don’t get your complaint.

        “The captain’s chairs, which the Highlander <> offers as an option, create a pass-through to the third row, but as mentioned reduces seat count to seven.”

        Yes – the Pilot offers the captains chairs, as well as the Highlander. In both cases seating is reduced to 7, thus negating the “seating for 8” stipulation.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You asked the method of entering the rear seat area with captains chairs in the Pilot, which would be the same way you do it in the Highlander.

          If you know there’s a pass-through then your question was unnecessary. “Do the third row passengers just crawl over the top? What’s the method?”

          • 0 avatar

            And obviously I meant if you didn’t opt for the Elite model and retained the second row bench, thus keeping with the requirements of 8-person seating.

            Scratch the captain’s chairs – how do people access the third row with bulky car seats installed? That’s my question.

    • 0 avatar
      ctg

      I think a few of the 3-row CUV’s address this for forward-facing car seats (they can tilt and slide with the seat in place). But yeah, if you have 2 kids in rear-facing seats and actually need the third row, that’s going to be a massive pain.

      • 0 avatar

        I know the Highlanders second row seats will slide forward, but generally the gap isn’t more than a few inches. Once they’re in booster seats it’s easier to flip seatbacks forward, but even front-facing seats render the flip-forward a no-go.

        Does the Durango’s middle row hinge at the base, so the entire seat will tilt forward?

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Here’s what happens:

      You visit the annoying CUV in-laws. They have kid’s seats in the 2nd row. You realize you and your wife are banished to the awful 3rd row.

      You volunteer to drive separately. You get yelled at for ruining the happy little illusion of family harmony.

      You tumble into the 3rd row, and freeze because the vents are tiny. You get whipped around and get carsick. You don’t wear a seatbelt because the buckle is weird because the seat is so freaking tiny.

      You emerge at the restaurant carsick, frozen and 100% sick of your in-law’s shit.

  • avatar
    doublechili

    A lot of guys here complain that soccer moms should be more concerned with comfort and utility than appearances. And then they surf over to a website to look at pix of women wearing spike high heels and thongs. ;)

    We’re waiting on delivery of a new Pilot (to replace an ’06 Pilot) for my wife. She simply does not want a minivan. Fine. A Toyota Avalon would make a lot of sense for me, but I don’t want one of those either. The VAST majority of the time she’s driving she doesn’t need the third row or massive cargo space. For the relatively rare carpooling, etc., the 3rd row is fine. It’s a useful contingency. How did parents function before minivans and 3 row SUVs? She was telling the other moms on the sideline this weekend about it, and they all LOVE the new Pilot.

    When someone here asks “why aren’t there more manual transmission cars?”, the reply is always that people don’t buy enough of them. Well, this is just another consumer preference situation, and utility is just part of the purchase decision equation. I’m thinking the Pilots are going to sell like hotcakes.

    • 0 avatar
      JCK

      “How did parents function before minivans and 3 row SUVs?”

      Look up “Buick Electra Wagon”

      That’s what we had in the late 1980s/early 1990s.

      Seats 8.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        And then modern car seats happened.

      • 0 avatar
        doublechili

        Yup – it was more of an ironic question. I actually go back that far too (further, actually). To the rear-facing, metal-trimmed station wagon death seats. And to when some kids used to lay down on the ledge behind the rear seats in sedans. But nowadays, a 7-8 passenger SUV with ample additional storage space and a passenger compartment lined with airbags is apparently somehow impractical.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      You (or your wife) made a choice, so keep it and be proud of your Pilot.

      What irks me is people who choose CUVs, then complain about their shortcomings (chiefly high price and 3rd row accessibility). These people bought something that they didn’t want, but attempt to blame society and/or their wives for choosing it.

      • 0 avatar
        doublechili

        Oh, absolutely. Conversely though, there seem to be some posters here who chose minivans and have an issue with other people who didn’t. Who cares. Buy what you like and serves your circumstances best.

        As far as cost goes, the Odyssey and Pilot have the same starting MSRP. You pay for AWD further up the Pilot model lineup, but for some that’s a necessary cost.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      3 row SUVs have been around since at least the 50s, that and 2 row pickups.
      I’m sure you can find something with 3 rows from the 40s, before that they probably just hung onto the car as it went down the road if there weren’t enough seats.

    • 0 avatar
      mchan1

      “How did parents function before minivans and 3 row SUVs?”

      Station wagons.

  • avatar
    Willyam

    Didn’t know where to drop this reply, as good arguments abound on both sides, so new post. Ahem.

    We wanted a three-row SUV that we a) could afford and b) drove really great. The answer was Mazda CX-9. Man, I still love them. The salesman accidentally lit the front tires and exclaimed “Man, what’s IN this thing?” Sigh.

    We also have four minions, but didn’t breed like rabbits (though that sounds fun). Blended family, and we added a bambina. The end for the CX-9 came with the kind of baby seat that looks like it should eject from fighter aircraft. Ingress and egress from the third row became impossible, and our son was rapidly getting too big to fit next to the stroller/luggage in half the row. Also, the wife couldn’t open the rear doors wide enough to get the baby enviro-pod in and out without dinging every car we parked next to (a super downside of egg-shaped vehicles that no one talks about: spear-shaped doors).

    So two years later, Odyssey it was. It’s about a foot or so lower than the other vans, and just drove the best. Best decision we ever made in a vehicle. We paid dearly for it, but it’s worth every penny.

    So for all the women out there who don’t want to be seen as a soccer mom while carting three kids to soccer in your Tahoe, let it go (as the song on your rear-seat DVD says). It’s ok, some of us think soccer moms are hot.

  • avatar
    Cole Trickle

    The real competition for this in my mind is a used mdx. I picked mine up this year for 40,500 with 15k on it. This was awd and tech package. Of course I’m in the south so awd made it harder to sell, it was sitting on a Toyota lot being cross shopped by highlanders, and it was purple, which is the color I wanted but nobody else does. They run 44k elsewhere, or they did when I was shopping. At the time the pilot was missing a lot of creature comforts I really wanted but now the two are much more similarly appointed depending on the packages.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    It’s nice that some manufacturers try to squeeze 8 seats in their 3-row crossovers but shoppers should know that very few people will take advantage of the 3 seats in the 3rd row. The 3rd row just isn’t wide enough. Not in the Pilot. Not in the Acadia. Not in any of these. Most likely that third row will be occupied by kids and following the law (or at least the safety guidelines) those kids are going to be in car seats or boosters. There is no way to get 3 car seats or or boosters in the 3rd row of any of these CUVs. (There is also no way you’re going to get 2 car seats or boosters on the 60% side so you’re going to be looking for 2 mother-in-laws to put back there.) The good news is that I don’t think too many people look to seat 8 in these vehicles, particularly given how many customers are ready to sacrifice a seat for the 2nd row captains chairs which, to me, is one of the dumber “upgrades” across the market. My advice: if you need to sit 7, make sure you get the bench seat in the 2nd row and if you need to sit 8, get a minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Many years back a girlfriend had three children and a MY99 Grand Caravan but pined for a 3 row SUV. After we stopped speaking I learned she ended up with an MY07 Suzuki XL7 (GM Theta like Equinox). Based on something I saw at the Krown shop last December I think she’s somehow acquired herself a new pickup truck but we haven’t spoken in nine years.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      “if you need to sit 7, make sure you get the bench seat in the 2nd row and if you need to sit 8, get a minivan”

      I’d add if you ever have to sit 6 adults, get a minivan. We’ve done a couple of weekend road trips with two other couples (kids all at respective grandparents) in my friend’s Sienna. Comfy as a four wheeled living room.

  • avatar
    See 7 up

    Do people that buy these over minivans think their vehicle looks like anything other than a minivan with a slightly longer nose (and even that is decreasing)

    It’s not like this pulls up to soccer practice and people question whether the driver just crossed the gobi. Or does someone see one of these and NOT think it is used as a family car to cart the kids around? Do people think they are loosing the “family image” image by buying a car driven only by families?

    As an experiment, I’d like to see a manufacturer just start calling their minivan an SUV. Put some cladding on it and people will proclaim is the world’s greatest vehicle, trading in their minivans in droves.
    But whatever, the spawn of these people will eventually see SUV’s like these people see minivans

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      GM already tried that with the Pontiac Montana. It didn’t work. But then again it was a sucky minivan.

      GM tried again with the Lambdas, but without the sliding doors. They are proportioned more like minivans than like other three-row CUVs, and have almost minivan-like interior space

  • avatar
    Sky_Render

    Good Lord, that thing is ugly as sin. If these things are marketed to parents who refuse to buy a minivan, why the heck did Honda MAKE IT LOOK LIKE A MINIVAN?!

    • 0 avatar
      See 7 up

      Honestly I think a lot of people get hung up on the sliding doors.
      Me? I think everything bigger than a Q5 should have sliding doors. If I ever have 2 kifs, anything I buy related to their transport will have sliding doors
      Heck, you can even pit the door handle in the back so people don’t realize it at first.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I don’t get the three row hate at all.

    If you’re actually driving 6+ people around on a regular basis, of course this is too small and the correct answer is minivan.

    For a family of four or five with occasional third row use these don’t give up much practicality at all. There’s plenty of cargo room with the third row down. It’s 8″ shorter than the Odyssey for easy parking and garaging. It has AWD and reasonable ground clearance for ski trips and camping.

    A 190″ minivan would be more practical still for a lot of people, but such a thing does not exist.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Good point.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I’d love to have one of these, particularly an EX-L. Nobody talks about minivans when Grand Cherokees get discussed, and they have the packaging efficiency of Vegas.

    • 0 avatar
      See 7 up

      It only has 0.7in more clearance than an awd sienna. Now this is not insignificant, but I’d wager that anywhere someone takes this dub equipped crossover, a minivan will follow.
      Length is a good point however with back up cams and the publics horrid parallel parking capabikity, not sure it really matters. If someone can place this in a tight spot but not a minivan, I’d be inpressed

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        Brochure clearance is nearly meaningless, they’re measured from the lowest point which is typically a mechanical hard point like the diff cover or control arm. Short of portal axles you can’t really move those points and measuring there drastically understates the difference between models. A Wrangler or Tacoma with everything fragile tucked up safe inside the frame and 12-14″ of clearance everywhere is all of an inch or two better on the brochure than the cute ute class because that’s how far a diff hangs down.

        The clearance that counts as far as ease of breaking things on rough roads (or on the curbs on smooth roads that you couldn’t see for the snow on them) is space under the chin, approach, departure angles. Modern cars and minivans are abysmal in those regards.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    Its the same with trucks, people spend $50k on one and I just don’t get it. Its a truck! That means you haul stuff with it, get it dirty, tow things. I’d want a practical, reliable and inexpensive truck if I decided to get one. Some creature comforts sure but its a tool like a hammer or a drill, you don’t get a gold plated hammer you just get a hammer.

    If your life situation means you have a family of 6 then get the best tool for the job a mini-van.

    The only reason I’d suggest something else is if you do some deep woods camping or tow a large boat/horse trailer, then it would be a Suburban or similar.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “Its the same with trucks, people spend $50k on one and I just don’t get it. Its a truck!”

      Arguments similar to this can be made for just about any vehicle that veers away from basic transportation. At base level, every vehicle is a tool. The most basic function being getting you from point A to B.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      In America, there are plenty affluent blue-collar dudes. And I guess, they didn’t grow up as kids with an M3 or Porsche 911 poster in the bedroom.

  • avatar

    “I’m sure you can guess what she said: “I am not driving a minivan.””

    Yet people will persist in making cliched jokes about men “compensating” by driving a sports car / SUV / pickup truck / whatever.

    The psychological and status display needs of women consumers has been a major factor in the move from station wagons to minivans to SUVs to crossovers.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      True, and has any of that really made any sense?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “Yet people will persist in making cliched jokes about men “compensating” by driving a sports car / SUV / pickup truck / whatever.”

      Well yes. Just because women deny motherhood doesn’t mean men aren’t compensating.

      The two aren’t mutually exclusive, nor is anyone arguing that they are.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      To be fair, the husband was more vocal about not wanting a minivan but it’s going to be her vehicle so he’s going to go with her choice.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      Both genders have people who buy cars for image.

      The man in the 460-hp Corvette, because you really use that much power for legal speeds.

      The woman in a Land Rover, because sitting higher makes her look taller.

      The family with one child in a Tahoe, because “kids just need a lot of stuff.”

      As long as both husband and wife accept that there is some element of vanity in their choice of $40k+ 8-passenger CUV (as opposed to a base model Sienna, Odyssey, T&C, etc. which are in the $20s), nobody should be complaining.

  • avatar
    Minnesota Nice

    Honda, stop with the head units without volume knobs. Seriously. Stop trying to make it happen.

    I know there are steering wheel controls for it, but for some reason, it drives me nuts. I had a 2014 Civic EX-L sedan as a rental and found it outrageously distracting (and the UI was awful). If you’re not going to do something right, don’t do it. I was happy to get back in my 2013 Civic with the regular head-unit and knobs.

    The new HR-V has ‘touch’ for everything on the dash – including HVAC.

    I cannot be the only one who finds this maddening. It seems so small, but it just doesn’t work for me.

  • avatar

    Wow, not sure where all the anger comes from in the comments when CUV’s vs minivan comes up, plus all the somewhat negative comments on women critical thinking seems a bit much. I always thought the B and B was open to people picking the car they wanted. Anyways I have 3 kids we have an SUV and a wagon works fine for us and one more kid wouldn’t really change things. When I was growing up one of our neighbors had 7 kids and a reg cab pickup and a honda coupe. People need to decide for themselves thru experience they can review information given to them but telling them they are being silly for not buying a minivan will likely have the opposite result. If you happy buying a tahoe buy a tahoe if your happy buying a RAV 4 buy a RAV4.

    One more thought this thread seems to have every automtovie internet stereo type buried in it. It would actually make a good case study for automtoive intenet geekdom.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    To summarize ~200 comments:

    Buying cars is an emotional process, not a logical one. News at 11.

  • avatar
    KeithD

    Dunno if I missed it but I believe the Pilot had the direct injection version of the 3.5, the only Honda that does. Though on the Pilot’s case this has resulted in paper with more HP than torque. Just a few hps less than the MDX due to regular gas tolerance. Mystified by the lack of a volume rotary and digital speedometer, especially as the Civic is about to lose its. Low rent folding arm rests are a throw back too. CRV just ditched them. CRV also added a hard volume control feature due to complaints about the touch operated one in the Civic. Some design decisions really are baffling. Get so much right but these basic things wrong.

  • avatar
    slance66

    A Pilot would fit in my garage, an Odyssey would not. A Pilot is easier to park and back up in grocery store parking lots. It has AWD, which I (with a steep driveway in MA, need).

    Once upon a time, the early Dodge Caravan was a minivan. I think some of you harping on the “get a minivan” point fail to acknowledge that they are bloated battleships, bigger than those Tahoes you are complaining about soccer moms driving. Yes, if the ability to carry the maximum number of people and their stuff is your sole criteria, then “mini”vans are the choice. Once you counter-weight that single need with other requirements, they often fail. It’s not just image.

    The Pilot is a nice family vehicle that will work well for many people.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Another reason to buy a minivan is that it’s actually easier to get into than SUV. I have grand parents with arthritis and they refuse to get into our last generation Pilot any more. Seat too high.

  • avatar
    lot9

    One mans beauty is another mans beast.

    Does this website ever write a negative review on a company provided auto?

    I have driven the ’15 Pilot and the new one. Not what I would buy. The durango, I like better. Plus you can get an 8 speed in it with a nice V6. Honda too cheap to put an 8 speed in the lower trims. Heck, Honda still use a broom stick like rod to support the hood, in some models.

    Honda navigation system can not be operated when the vehicle is in motion………even by a passenger.

    The tranny is a little different than the past years. And the engine horse power was boosted but still behind others in its class.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I don’t see the rod as a sign of cheapness, necessarily–I just see it as the best solution to a certain set of conditions. My car has a rod, and it works just fine for holding up the hood. If anything, it’s a little better because I don’t have to worry about the cylinders failing. To call it broomstick-like is overly critical and inaccurate–it’s much lighter and is designed to interlock with the hood.

      • 0 avatar
        lot9

        When I work on an engine, I need to have all the open space and less obstructions as possible. A hood raised by hood structs, I have an open space.
        I have a rod in my face that I can not remove, I have to work around it, gee. Who designed that obstruction?
        How much would it cost Honda to have struts instead of rods. They buy millions of them, so it would be a few dollars. That is one of the ways Honda is cheap, but not cheap to buy.
        They have no nice features on they trim lines unless you buy the top trims. Heck, you can not get a day/nite mirror on some of the 13-14 years models.
        Cheap, noisy.
        Cheap plastic interiors.
        It may tell you that a tire is low, good luck in figuring it out. You have to check all of them. Some makes show you all 4 tires and pressure.
        You buy a Korean make and it has features, quiet, and most likely less. They are eating Honda and Toyota Lunch. Owned one and had no problems with it.
        And the newer ones are even better.
        Heck the Detroit big 2.5 atuo makers are even better, today.
        Honda has to regain its reliability and good standing with consumers because they have discovered better models and makes.

  • avatar
    koshchei

    Thanks Alex – Great review!

  • avatar
    wsn

    We have two small ones in our family and we drive two midsize sedans. Each car has one baby seat installed.

    But I do wish my Camry have sliding doors sometimes.

  • avatar
    mchan1

    Nice review :)

    My 2 cents on the subject matter & comments…

    People can buy whatever they want with their own money to suit their practical needs or to fulfill their egotistical/vanity issues.

    The rest of us/society don’t want to hear them complaining about it afterwards (i.e. it wasn’t the right choice as we should’ve bought […..] instead. That […..] had the room, seat, whatever, blah, blah… that we needed).

    Cripes, you made the damn decision so Live with it!
    If you plan on having more than 1 kid, then consider a more practical vehicle that suits your expected needs instead of buying something because of your damn image!

    You’re married and you have kids!
    What type of an image do you think that gives off to others?!

    Are you that egotistical/narcissistic about your “image”?
    Oh, Yeah!!
    Considering that you bought an overprice vehicle that doesn’t meet your practical needs… We don’t want to hear about it!

    /rant

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    I will drive a minivan provided it has a thousand-watt subwoofer and can do the quarter in 12.

    And I’m pushing 40.


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