By on June 16, 2015

I don’t mind being preached to. Or being preached at. I mean, I’ve played guitar in a few church bands, and not all of the churches in question would let me sleep in my car during the sermon. Once in a while, I’d toss a couple of bucks in the collection plate, as well. So you could even argue that I’m okay with paying for the privilege of being preached at.

Insofar as I have an Internet connection and the ability to use it, I knew prior to walking into the new “Mad Max” film that I’d be effectively paying to be preached at, and the sermon would be the American-media orthodoxy of 2015: Women are just like men, only smarter, braver, and tougher. Old white men are the source of all the world’s evil and they are always trying to “own” babies, er, fetuses, er, tissue, that should be the property of women. Only by becoming a “feminist ally” can a man have any worth in society.

I knew all of this before the first digital frame of this movie appeared on the screen, and I was prepared to live with it. What I was not prepared for was this: Mad Max: Fury Road just plain sucks.


Have you seen the original Mad Max? If you haven’t, you’ll be surprised at the fact that it’s not The Road Warrior. It’s not dystopian, really, and it doesn’t take place after the wholesale collapse of society. It does, however, feature a scene in which Max’s wife and child are killed by gang members. This fact – the death of Max’s family – is alluded to again and again during Fury Road, but it’s never explained. It’s just the subject of endless flashbacks that become more and more intrusive. The tiresome trope of “the hero is overcome by his visions in the middle of the action” occurs again and again.

FRD-DS-00694rv2

Max is captured by the minions of a local warlord in a scene taken nearly shot-by-shot from The Postman. The warlord practices hydraulic diplomacy in the region, literally, and has power over a variety of intricate and complicated steampunk-style machinery. It becomes critical to send a “war wagon” to “Gastown”. Although Gastown is visible from the warlord’s “Citadel”, it’s still necessary to invest this run with an astounding amount of ceremony. The best driver of the war wagons is Charlize Theron, who doubles down on her identity politics by also being short an arm. Predictably, she and Max end up on the same side.

That much you can get from the trailers, and I won’t spoil any further details if I can help it, other than to say that the movie is essentially a cross between the previously-referenced The Postman and the even-more-reviled Kevin Costner vehicle, Waterworld. I’d so far as to say that Fury Road is essentially “Waterworld on dirt”, with all the ridiculous plot holes, over-the-top acting, massively expensive set-piece battles, immortal primary characters, and inadvertent tedium associated with that film. If only Tom Hardy could manage to express even the minor range of emotion displayed by Kevin Costner in those box-office disasters.

FRD-DS-00072

Tedium: that is Fury Road‘s worst sin. It’s the same battle repeated a dozen ways, each action utterly predictable and each moment less interesting than the one before. I’m more than willing to suspend disbelief (where do the desert people get their food? Why are all the machines in perfect repair? Is there a motorcycle-parts superstore somewhere over the next dune?) if the action is exciting enough. Unfortunately, that isn’t the case here.

There is one bright spot, and that is the spectacular menagerie of over one hundred and fifty custom-built post-apocalyptic vehicles that swerve and explode and just plain preen across the desert wasteland. The double-decker cars-on-tractor-trailers are the literal stars of the show, in particular a W123 “Lang” that pulls two trailers’ worth of chaos. The aftermarket-nose 1973 Ford Falcon appears at the very beginning and periodically afterwards. You can read a very complimentary recap of the major “star cars” here. There’s even a C3 Corvette!

FRD-DS-00253

(Bloomberg’s article has a hilarious correction: “Correction: A previous version of this article described Nux’s car as a five-door coupe. It actually has five windows—and two doors, as is the traditional definition of a coupe.”)

The last time I walked out of a theater during a film was twenty-four long years ago, about ten minutes into Highlander 2. I wasn’t alone in my distaste: the film’s own director walked out on the premiere. Everybody agrees that Highlander 2: The Quickening was a terrible film. Mad Max: Fury Road, on the other hand, has a coveted “98% Fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes and has been the subject of universal praise everywhere movies are discussed – yet, the only thing that kept me from walking out was the fact I’d paid for the large soda and wanted my free refill. What did I miss?

Perhaps I didn’t miss anything. It’s possible this quasi-reboot of a picture is popular for the same reason that Thomas Bowdler’s revisions of Shakespeare were well-liked. As a film, Mad Max: Fury Road is utterly without merit. It is simultaneously boring and overwhelming, slow-paced yet carelessly plotted, predictable and joyless. It’s remarkably like the so-called “Christian rock” of the Eighties that attempted to paste a “message” onto an incompetent pastiche of the cues and styles used by secular bands. In this case, The Road Warrior is Led Zeppelin and this is Stryper, and it sucks just like Stryper does. But it sends the right messages, again and again, so the media wants you to see it for the same reason that many of my headbanger friends were given Christian-rock records as gifts by their well-meaning but clueless parents.

The problem in this is that the message, in this case, is so fundamentally incompatible with reality that it strains belief even when it’s part of a movie where people are driven through the desert at 100 mph while swinging back and forth on giant pivoting poles with engine blocks on the other end. At one point in this film, we’re treated to a fistfight between a buffed-out twenty-year-old man and a sixty-year-old woman – and the old woman wins. Then there’s another fight like that.

The same goes for Charlize Theron’s character, who proves herself effectively capable of fighting Tom Hardy to a standstill despite, you know, missing an arm. This would make more sense if we didn’t then see Hardy indifferently dispose of a dozen buffed-out, combat-trained “warboys”. Come on. I’ve dated a woman who was pretty good at fighting men on even terms, but she was six feet tall and 180 pounds of muscle that included two functioning arms. I suppose it’s business as usual for a generation of “men” who are obsessed with pornography, video games, and Japanese comics, and who dream of the day a strong feminist woman will come rescue them from their mothers’ basements.

Is it possible to dislike a film where dirt bikes jump over trucks and their riders drop grenades into the sunroofs of those trucks? I’d have said “no”, but now I know differently. The stunts are brilliant, but in the end, Fury Road says nothing worth hearing, and nothing you haven’t already heard before.

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250 Comments on “TTAC At The Movies: “Mad Max: Fury Road”...”


  • avatar
    Speed3

    Ok Jack the contrarian. You are the only person I have heard say anything bad about this film.

    Yes not everybody thinks it’s the best film ever made, but bad films don’t get a 98% rotten tomatoes score.

    In an age where Hollywood makes the same boring stuff, this is a welcome breath of fresh air (and yes it’s a reboot of a franchise, but really shares very little with the original film).

    Stick to reviewing cars.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I dunno, Spy has like a 96% on RT, and I really thought it was a pretty terrible movie.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “You are the only person I have heard say anything bad about this film.”

      Is in not possible that for whatever reason Jack didn’t like it and is he not entitled to his opinion?

      Have you ever known of something that was wildly popular yet also know people who could not understand its popularity but thought it wasn’t good?

      Here’s a few examples:

      Harry Potter- I know people who love Harry Potter. I also know people who just don’t get it.

      Tom Clancy novels- Some love ’em and read everything he’s written. Others think he’s a so so author who had early success with good a couple of good books but everything else is mediocre at best.

      James Patterson- Apparently a lot of people enjoy his novels. I’m not one of them. That’s OK, he made somewhere in the neighborhood of 90 million dollars last year. I really don’t think he cares.

      I say all this because opinions differ for any number of reasons. Have you ever seen, read, listened to something that most everyone thought was good and you thought meh?

      • 0 avatar
        Veee8

        “Have you ever known of something that was wildly popular yet also know people who could not understand its popularity but thought it wasn’t good?”

        Yes, like SUV’s, CUV’s…

      • 0 avatar
        toxicroach

        He’s entitled to his opinion. He’s just an asshole.

        I’m a bit surprised this website ran this thing though. The review has nothing to do with cars, which is the only connection between this website and the movie, and it’s just complaining that the message was too feminist. I thought the whole ‘meathead objects to film on grounds it’s too nice to women’ thing was a myth, but I guess not, but he admits before going in that he was heavily biased against the movie. And his big complaint is that a few women won a fistfight? Come on, that’s weak.

        I don’t know what kind of car website hates on a film all about weird cars doing crazy stuff, but, you know, to each his own.

        • 0 avatar
          jterran

          Looking forward to Baruth’s comments on the next car chase movie featuring men as protagonists … because, yeah, such movies are always SOOOO realistic.

          WHY is it only preaching when it isn’t your world view? But when it confirms your ancient view of men’s and women’s roles, then it’s not preaching?

          Looking forward to when your kind dies off–or maybe you should just move to a country where gender roles are more in your limited comfort zone and save us your existential angst.

    • 0 avatar
      Shinoda is my middle name

      Someone once said, “It is impossible to get someone to believe something when their livelihood depends on them not believing it.”

      Thanks, Jack. You have the balls to stand up in the middle of the crowd and say, “Hey, look! The emperor has no clothes!” to a clueless Hollywood and media machine which is trying to cram down our throats the message of how wonderful the emperor’s tailor is.

      Another article I wrote today said that these epic, comic-book movies are ruining movies as an art form. I couldn’t agree more.

      I know there will be the inevitable poster who writes, “what’s this all got to do with cars?” ….when the media masters ‘use’ our attraction to wheeled machines to lure our eyes so that they can attempt to fill our ears and minds with social engineering and political nonsense….that’s just plain wrong.

      Keep tellin’ it, brother.

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        >Keep tellin’ it, brother.

        I second the motion. Stick to your guns and ignore the PC-infused mangina fest permeating all things societal and all types of medium these days.

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        >Keep tellin’ it, brother.

        I second the motion. Stick to your guns and ignore the PC-infused mangina fest permeating all things societal and on all types of medium these days.

    • 0 avatar

      After seeing this film, I can’t help uttering the phrase:

      MEEEEEEEEEEDEEEEEEEOOOOOCUUUUUUUR

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Mediocre sums it up. From all of the hype, I expected it to be better. It was essentially one long car chase and the visual effects are good, but there is just too much of a lack of story.

        I did not really care for the original Mad Max movies, and I didn’t really like this one either.

        Keep in mind, I’m not some wacko liberal film critic either. I’m a normal guy. I like lots of explosions in movies.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          … you saw the original ones, and “not much story and lots of cars with effects” *surprised you*?

          I am baffled by Jack walking out on it.

          Not loving it, sure, whatever; de gustibus not est disputandem.

          I knew exactly what I was getting (“one long car chase and minimal plot”), and was very happy with, well, getting exactly what I was promised.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Maybe Jack was the only one paying attention.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoom

      Considering Jack also liked Panthers, I’m not sure I give much weight to his car reviews either.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Jack is right. This movie sucked. The original Mad Max was an incredible bit of film-making.

      It was nothing but post-apocalypse porn with no real substance whatsoever.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @CoreyDL
      I wonder if she took the role because it was in Nambia which used to be controlled by South Africa? She originally comes from South Africa

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Yes its true. These days, bad films get the high scores.

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Wait, there was a Highlander 2?

    Haven’t seen Fury Road but it is on my list so I can’t comment about the film. I will say that big Hollywood has a penchant to adding bling (usually in the form of explosions and/or outrageous characters) as opposed to other things such as plot and character development.

    If the trailer is any indication, the bling is present. Compare it to the original Mad Max and is seems to be over the top but when compared to it’s contemporaries, not so much.

    The same could be said for the Fast and Furious films. More over the top action that the director thinks will thrill the audience but it just become repetitive and predictable.

    That being said, I still watch them. There aren’t a lot of movies where cars play a central role so I pays my money and takes my chances.

  • avatar

    While I don’t think I could disagree more, it does take brass balls to admit you have seen Waterworld AND The Postman. Well done.

  • avatar
    bachewy

    I walked out of the theater saying, “Meh”. It was underwhelming. It was another Mad Max episode, but Max was only a sidenote. Mel Gibson’s version had just as many lines, but it was MEL GIBSON. We loved that character because of the way Mel exhibited him.

    The one thing I really, really hated about this movie was every fight scene. The film was sped up for each fight. WHY??? Was the stunt work so bad that only by making it go faster would it actually appear credible?

    • 0 avatar

      It wasn’t underwhelming.

      It was MEEEEEEEDIIIIIOOOOOCUUUUUUR

    • 0 avatar
      Brendon from Canada

      Yup, that about sums it up… Meh.

      The original Mad Max was by far the best, but I enjoyed Road Warrior and Beyond Thunderdome as diversion.

      This one just left me unimpressed – though the visuals were interesting, the suspension of disbelief was a bit much. Oddly enough, it was the the “cleanliness” of the film that got to me; Jack mentions vehicles that are in top running form in the middle of the desert. I also noticed a few close ups of gripped hands (Theron was an obvious one), were the finger nails where clean and manicured. Found this really representative of the movie – it just wasn’t dirty and gritty enough for what it was supposed to portray.

      • 0 avatar
        Veee8

        Grit – yes, that is what is missing from so many films, they’re too highly produced and manicured…take the first Rocky, dirty, gritty, it feels real and almost believable. I rarely even watch movies anymore…,maybe one a year tops.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        The main thing I couldn’t take, from a suspension-of-disbelief aspect, was “truck with two engines where nothing much happens other than slowing down when one fails – oh, and you can just crawl underneath and fix it and no worries”.

        Which was pretty minor stuff; I mean, the *first one* invented the switch-controlled supercharger….

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      They changed a lot for “Fury Road” shot in Namibia, instead of Broken Hill, NSW, Australia like the originals. Noticed they used Australian cars /trucks of the 1960’s to 1980’s for the stunt vehicles
      Too much emphasis on car stunts almost as mind numbing as the silly CGI versions

  • avatar
    ajla

    Well, now I know Jack and I don’t have the same tastes in movies at all.

    And I think the “feminist” angle in this film is WAY overstated. Freaking Terminator 2 and Goldeneye were more feminist than this.

    *spoilers*

    -When Max fights Furiosa he’s chained to another man, he has carried said man across the desert, and he’s been held in a cage having blood drained from him for an unknown amount of time. He was just strapped to the front of a fast moving vehicle. Despite that he still eventually beats her and steals their truck.

    -Max takes out the Bullett Farmer’s posse off-screen completely on his own.

    -Nux and Max wench the truck out of the mud on their own.

    -Max is the one that comes up with the plan to return to the Citadel.

    -Nux sacrifices himself so that the group can escape.

    -Nux repairs the truck’s engines on his own during a fight.

    -Max knows how to help Furiosa when she can’t breathe.

    Other than marksmanship and knowledge of the land I can’t think of anything in this movie that the women were especially good at.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “And I think the “feminist” angle in this film is WAY overstated. Freaking Terminator 2 and Goldeneye were more feminist than this”

      Yes, but playing the anti-feminism card on TTAC is like whipping off a “It’s about ethics in videogame journalism, really” post on any one of a number of game sites.

      You’re basically throwing red meat to your commentariat base.

    • 0 avatar
      Synchromesh

      You know when feminism and PC were clearly over the top for me? When at the end of movie Max apologizes before helping Furiosa start breathing again. That was just so sad and pathetic. And so very Hollywood.

      And yes, the scenes with old ladies successfully fighting droves of younger buffer guys were also a killer.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Terminator 2 had a strong female character, but I can’t recall her performing any ridiculous feats.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        [vimeo 12078669 w=640 h=360]

        How is this scene any less ridiculous than anything Furiosa did in Fury Road?

        I’m also pretty sure she was heavily involved with the infiltration of Cyberdyne later on in the movie even though they had a freaking Terminator at their disposal.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          I haven’t seen Fury Road yet, so I wasn’t intending to criticize it. It’s possible that nothing about it would bother me. I’m merely saying that a strong female character is fine if she performs believable acts. Even occasional low probability situations are fine as long as the unlikelihood isn’t multiplied by happening continuously.

          Here’s my opinion of that T2 scene:

          1. She picks a couple of locks. – Maybe this is unlikely. I assumed there are people out there who are capable of such a thing, especially the simple one on the straps.

          2. She sneaks up behind an old, out-of-shape security guard and knocks him out with a broomstick before he can react. – Fine.

          3. She sneaks up and surprises a younger, fit security guard and hits him in the abdomen with a baton. – A good liver shot to temporarily disable him and leave him open for a disorienting head blow is conceivable in this situation. She might not win that fight every time, but it could happen a reasonable percentage of the time the way she did it.

          4. She injures the psychiatrists arm to prevent him from sounding the alarm and holds him hostage. – Some guys don’t immediately react to violence with violence, and this guy does come across as the sort of guy who would call or wait for help rather than confronting a dangerous person with a weapon who has proven they’re willing to use it.

          5. She uses her hostage to escape the ward. – Seems reasonable. The guards don’t want anyone to get hurt and she has all the power at this point.

          6. Security guard sneaks up and pulls out the needle. She palm strikes him in the face with her free hand while he’s focused on controlling the needle and he flies backwards. – Okay, this one has room for improvement. She wouldn’t be able to impart enough impact for the aerial maneuver to occur. It certainly could have stunned him enough to let go of her, especially if it caused a broken nose. If he wasn’t expecting it and had a relaxed jaw, it could even drop him if she hit him on the chin. But under no circumstances would he be launched through the air like that.

          7. She escapes and the Terminator arrives.

          It wasn’t bad enough to distract me from the storyline. I hope I can say the same about Fury Road when I do inevitably watch it!

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-Iron

            replace “she” with “he” does it make it any more realistic?

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Nope. She relied on stealth, technique, and knowledgeable use of weapons rather than strength and power. Even a strike from a strong man wouldn’t result in that one guard going airborne. That was just hamming on his part. A prime Tyson uppercut might do it, but he’d need to be wearing gloves to not shatter his hand.

            I suppose what you’re getting at is that men frequently perform impossible feats in movies as well, and that is true. I don’t tend to get into those movies either.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Men AND women were performing ridiculous feats in this movie, rpn. It’s an action movie. That’s what happens.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          Action and realism don’t have to be mutually exclusive. T2 keeps it reasonable enough. The most ridiculous feats I can recall are performed by vehicles: the bike and, especially, the truck launching off the overpass. I don’t mind the odd liberty.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    The Road Warrior rocks. I’ll just take your word for it that this one sucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoom

      Don’t take his word for it. His opinion is definitely contrarian.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I wouldn’t if I didn’t agree with his arguments for what constitutes a bad movie. Action sequences do absolutely nothing for me unless they’re engagingly realistic or I care about the characters involved. The latter requires character development within believable scenarios, and even fantasy can be believable. I’m not getting the impression that it’s that type of movie though.

        I’m only saying I won’t make a specific effort to watch this one. I’m not opposed to giving it a shot. I probably will end up seeing it eventually when it’s on Netflix or something. In fact, with all this discussion, the idea of viewing it is starting to interest me more. Confirming once again that any publicity is good publicity. Floyd Mayweather thrives on the concept.

        I also can’t recall seeing a movie with a Rotten Tomato rating that high that I disliked, so that’s another good reason to check it out. Looking back at the annual “Top 100” lists, the highest rated movies I’ve disliked are Iron Man (94%), Dallas Buyers Club (93%), and Shaun of the Dead (92%). At 98%, this would shatter Iron Man’s record if I actually disliked it!

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I apologize for being so cynical. Blockbuster action movies have typically not been to my liking. This one may be from an entirely different mold. The R rating, the Rotten Tomatoes rating, and the comments here give me hope. I haven’t watched a really good new movie in a while.

      • 0 avatar
        Zoom

        The visuals and action are completely over the top. That’s why it was fun to me, especially on the big screen. Mad Max (the first) didn’t exactly have a deep story, so I’m not sure why some people were expecting something more from Fury Road.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        Mad Max was a little before my time and I never saw it growing up. I tried watching it a year or two ago and didn’t get very far. Too silly for me.

        The Road Warrior is still watchable though. I don’t know if that’s because it’s actually any good, or if I’m just influenced by fond memories of watching it at a friend’s childhood birthday party.

  • avatar
    RollaRider10

    The worst thing about the movie (which I felt was very average to say the least) was the fact that:
    a. Max’s Falcon is destroyed in Mad Max 2 &
    b. The film is set in Australia, yet all of the vehicles bar the Falcon are left hand drive, but in Australia, we have right hand drive.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      How is it actually set in Australia?

      I mean, it’s *never mentioned* in the film, and it was mostly *filmed* in Africa.

      I mean, Australia is the traditional setting, sure, and it’s a good explanation for the desert.

      But the setting is not specified in the film itself.

      (Note that this is a *reboot* of the series, not a “sequel to Beyond Thunderdome”, so that his car was destroyed in Road Warrior is irrelevant to continuity.)

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        No, it was first filmed in Broken Hill, New South Wales , Australia. Torrential rains made the desert go green, so shooting was moved to Namibia in Africa, it does not rain in that desert

  • avatar
    Curt in WPG

    I have not seen Fury Road. I did, however, see Highlander 2 in the theatre and have no wish to repeat the experience.

    I also was in high school in the 80’s and had several classmates pushing Stryper on me which was enjoyable in the same sense that some people enjoy a visit by people pushing the Watchtower magazine. The Yellow and Black Attack meant nothing next to Van Halen (with Dave!), Motley or Dio m/ m/

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I’m a generation younger than you, but also a metal fan. I’ve often wondered if actual people listened to Stryper and maybe even bought their albums. Astonishing.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Yes, Christians did.

        I know someone – a Buddhist, because Oregon is weird – who actually actively likes Christian Rock and Metal.

        I cannot explain it.

        (I was always a Slayer man, myself.)

        (And this reminds me of “You’re not making Christianity better, you’re just making rock-and-roll worse.”)

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          To be honest, I didn’t even know they were a Christian band until today. I just thought their music was awful.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          I know a lot of people who like terrible things–books, music, movies, etc.–specifically because they were made by a member of the “us” group. The smaller that “us” group, the better. The consumer judges the media not based on its merits, but on what they think it represents–maybe it’s that it “speaks to him” as a member of the the group, maybe it shares his perspectives/values, maybe it’s confirmation bias.

          The trend appears in lots of places, notably fandoms: bad Star Wars books, bad Pokemon memes, bad cat videos.

          Sometimes they simply can’t distinguish what’s good/bad. Sometimes they truly enjoy seeing ‘their’ message more than a quality complete package.

          I wasn’t interested in Fury Road when I saw the trailers. Then I heard positive reviews. Then I read a (long) ‘review’ by a friend on fb that contained nothing but references to grrl power. I didn’t know what to think about that. Was there nothing else to the film, no other reason to like it? Was he just trying to look ‘with it’ on social trends? Is grrl power what he genuinely likes in a movie? And then the feminist brouhaha hit. The whole experience reminded me how little other people’s opinions matter.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Well, I enjoyed it. But you wanted my click and view, so here is my pennance. I came away from this post having gained nothing.

    Hey everybody. Go see the movie yourself, and make up your own minds about it.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    I have to say, Jack, that I could not disagree more with your assessment. I feel like you’re being slightly too particular in your suspension of disbelief, but I’m not about to argue that you ought to feel entertained by something that didn’t entertain you.

    Thanks for the review.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    It’s hard to say that the flashbacks were alluding to his family. They showed a little girl he couldn’t save – but Max had a son. They were distracting though.

    And strong female characters have always been part of the series, and it’s escalated with every movie.

    Mad Max – an old woman holds off Toe-Cutter’s gang with a shotgun
    Road Warrior – the Warrior Woman is the most respected fighter in her tribe, #2 after Pappagallo.

    Thunderdome – Tina Turner. Nix, the female leader of the tribe of children.

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      Yeah, given the unrealistically favorable portrayal men get in 99.9% of Hollywood movies – the dorky/dumpy/old/unattractive guy always getting the gorgeous girl and so on- I find it very hard to be outraged over a possibly unrealistic portrayal of strong women in a movie.

      • 0 avatar
        chevron

        A tu quoque is not an argument. Also, I agree that a bulk of Hollywood movies portray men as “dorky/dumpy/old/unattractive”, but I fail to see how this is “unrealistically favorable”.

        • 0 avatar
          Sloomis

          Because no matter how unappealing they are in real world terms, they still somehow manage to get the gorgeous out-of-their-league girl, because men are just so innately, irresistibly wonderful, despite any physical unattractiveness and bad behavior. Or something. In the Hollywood alternative reality.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I have come to the conclusion that producers are making movies that appeal to the 5-7 year old in people. Boom YEAH, cool, awesome, did you see that move, what was it about again?

  • avatar
    319583076

    The older, wiser, stronger woman assisting the hero on his journey is an integral part of the monomyth. In a visual medium, she is invariably beautiful as well.

    “I suppose it’s business as usual for a generation of “men” who are obsessed with pornography, video games, and Japanese comics, and who dream of the day a strong feminist woman will come rescue them from their mothers’ basements.”

    This is also a generation (in many cases, generations) of “men” who have been raised by women because it has become culturally acceptable for men to abandon their families. The cultural response has been to diminish the role of the father – even when he is present – eliminating the boy’s ritualized initiation into manhood and it’s attendant responsibilities. Which, of course, further obviates the male presence and role. Welcome to bastard nation.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Where I live, dad goes to jail for letting his kids walk to the park alone. The days of raising kids to be independent or make decisions for themselves are over, by government mandate.

      • 0 avatar
        Bad Bart

        Damn, where is this?

        • 0 avatar
          Corporate Person

          The Internet

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            Not sure if that’s supposed to be sarcasm. It’s turning into a big issue where I live:

            http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crime/montgomery-county-free-range-children-taken-into-custody-again/2015/04/12/39987b08-e188-11e4-905f-cc896d379a32_story.html

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          Montgomery Country, MD.

          Of course there are worse stories. Felony neglect for letting your kid play outside for 90 minutes? Happened in Florida recently. Both boys placed in foster care:

          http://insider.foxnews.com/2015/06/14/florida-parents-charged-felony-neglect-after-11-year-old-son-plays-backyard-90-minutes

          • 0 avatar
            Bad Bart

            No, I was serious, thank you. Things are getting very weird.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            No worries, Bart, I knew you were serious. It’s the other guy who was being ambiguously dismissive because I read it on the Internet. Where else do people get their news?

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      This is also a generation (in many cases, generations) of “men” who have been raised by women because it has become culturally acceptable for men to abandon their families. The cultural response has been to diminish the role of the father – even when he is present – eliminating the boy’s ritualized initiation into manhood and it’s attendant responsibilities. Which, of course, further obviates the male presence and role. Welcome to bastard nation.

      And therein lies the problem. The media and academia want to place the strong, independent single mother on a pedestal. When instead they should tell her that rather than settling for being a baby mama, she should require fidelity and long term commitment from her partner. Of course good ole J.B. may not like that.

      Our society now ridicules faithful, child rearing fathers as incompetent, boring morons (see Homer Simpson or Al Bundy) rather than the tragic, heroes that they are.

      The last time we may have seen a male in the mainstream cinema as a nurturing, role model for younger males was Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        Now, a lot of us sniffed this out 30 years ago and refrained from reproducing. We’ve saved you all Beeeelions in state services!

        • 0 avatar
          chevron

          By definition, the people in the next generation will be descended from those who didn’t take away the same message that you did. Blame Darwin.

          To the rest of the thread, yes, there are too many fatherless children. I disagree that it’s culturally accepted for fathers to abandon their kids. Note: we have a term for ‘deadbeat dad’ but no contrasting word for ‘mother who divorces father and files court orders to minimize his contact with his children’, the latter situation seeming to be the main driver behind the increase in fatherlessness.

          Also, we have a new term, ‘slut shaming’ which serves to bolster (by silencing the critics of) the promiscuous behavior that creates unwed mothers, and I think we can all agree that you can’t be said to have abandoned a kid you didn’t even know about.

          edit: Also, the underclass mothers who have the highest rate of illegitimacy are financially incentivized to not be married. I don’t care who you are, that’s perverse.

      • 0 avatar
        Shinoda is my middle name

        Careful, Arthur….you’re making sense.

        I tried to make the same argument on this site about a month ago with respect to people making foolish ill-informed choices about buying used cars. From the reaction in these parts, you’da thunk I was insulting everyone’s mama.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Arthur Dailey – correct in your assessment. Too often men are portrayed as misogynistic playboys or bumbling idiots. Rarely ever is there a “good” father figure. An accurate portrayal of most men/fathers would be too boring for “prime time attention span of a goldfish” audiences.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Most of the studies I’ve heard of indicate that the success of children is more sensitive to to the presence of a father in the home than a mother. Those results are not intuitive, but I’ve seen it from a wide enough variety of sources that I believe it.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Are there *any* decent hollywood retread/reboots?

  • avatar

    My wife hated it…I liked it but then again, I saw it because of the Hot Wheels-on-steroids desert spectacle.

    The Cars Are The Stars.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    I didn’t mind Petra. Granted, the genre got off to a rather stumbling start.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    Jack pretty much walked in ready to hate it, and big surprise he did. Apparently suspension of disbelief at the movies only counts if it involves men being superhuman – if a woman somehow does anything that puts her ahead of a man, well forget it.

    And of course, in the original Mad Max movies, Max was most often just a cypher anyway, with other characters driving the agenda.

    • 0 avatar
      Louis XVI

      Well said. I suppose it’s Jack’s loss, as well as anyone unfortunate enough to skip the movie based on Jack’s review. It’s a really great movie, with probably the best action I’ve seen in decades; anybody who doesn’t go out of fear of potentially being exposed to politics they disagree with is just missing out.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    “You’re not making Christianity better, you’re making rock and roll worse.”

    Hank Hill

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Jack: “Insofar as I have an Internet connection… Only by becoming a “feminist ally” can a man have any worth in society.”

    Really? You’re going to the wrong movies. I get none of that vibe from anything I’ve seen recently.

    • 0 avatar
      Corporate Person

      I didn’t finish reading the review when it went full Mantrum. Did I miss anything?

      • 0 avatar

        Nothing like a trendy misandrist portmanteau to demonstrate your tribal bone fides.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        That’s the thing about Jack Baruth; you really should read the whole piece or none of it. Much like the review of the Can-Am trike, you can’t be sure where it’s going.

        The mantrum faded away. I read the piece, it was worth my time and I think his reaction is similar to what mine would be, which is useful info. As a result I’m not going to waste $1.60 and 2 hours by renting the movie.

      • 0 avatar
        LuciferV8

        “I didn’t finish reading the review when it went full Mantrum. Did I miss anything?”

        Yes:
        1. The obligatory “Wow, just wow.”
        2. Some exasperated bleating about how this “isn’t the 50’s”

        Also, you could have thrown in a “here’s why that’s a problem” and a few admonitions for us to check our privilege.

        I know this isn’t Tumblr, but you’re really slipping here.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    I liked the movie for what it was, which was a chase scene.

    I did not like the complete and utter lack of a plot or background. I did not like the suspension of disbelief that this post-society cult has access to machine shops, blood type testing, infrastructure design, water, electricity, flame shooting electric guitars and apparently prosthetic and life support design more advanced than currently available.
    but they don’t have radios, aircraft, or munitions larger than small arms. All of which would have made this movie about 100 minutes shorter. There was also (apparently) some level of plot not given or considered. Really, the closest thing I can compare it to is a Michael Bay Transformers movie, and those don’t get a lot of regard for the same reasons.

    I didn’t get the feminist vibe from the movie, but then I don’t surround myself with overly passive women, so that’s probably why it didn’t jump out at me.

  • avatar
    nitroxide

    I liked Mad Max and Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior, but I wasn’t ask that excited by Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome. I literally watched the original trilogy last week in anticipation of seeing Fury Road. But now I’m thinking I’ll wait for the Blu-Ray. I’m not a fan of unsutble liberal dogma shoved down my throat and paying $20 for the privilege. Thanks, Jack, for warning me and saving me the money. When it’s in Red Box in about two weeks, I’ll rent it…eventually.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoom

      This is precisely the movie to see in the theater. It’s spectacular on a big screen.

      There is no “liberal dogma” in the film, whatever that is. The whole “feminist movie” angle comes from people trying to be smarter than they are. The movie is no more femenist than any other action movie with a strong female character.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    You must not watch a lot of action movies. I don’t see that the movie was preaching “Women are just like men, only smarter, braver, and tougher. [More feminist caricature tropes snipped here. Not saying there aren’t feminists with those views, but they are hardly mainstream.]”

    Yes, Furiosa was an unbelievable badass. But unlikely badasses are pretty common in action movies. You got your blind octogenarian Kung-Fu masters, your non-descript teenagers suddenly being acrobatic masters when in mortal peril, somebody who’s never fired a gun in their life pulling off gunshots that would be tough for an expert, etc. Furiosa happened to be a one-armed woman badass; I don’t see that as any more outlandish than other (utterly routine) action-movie tropes.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Not to mention, she wouldn’t have risen to that rank if she wasn’t a badass. The only woman in the movie to do so, when the rest of the fighters were all male.

      Anyone ever play Fallout 3? A game heavily influenced by the Mad Max films. The woman raiders are just as likely to cut your head off as the men. It’s a world where only the strong survive and thrive. Nothing to get all worked up about.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    But, fire guitar…

  • avatar
    Jason

    Your obvious discomfort at a woman being a primary badass in a work of fiction says quite a bit about you.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      :-D

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Yeah, it says I live in a reality-based world where women don’t win a lot of fistfights.

      • 0 avatar
        bachewy

        Well, unless she’s Ronda Rousey :)

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          Point taken, and she’s someone who is spiritually and mentally tough as well. But I think any high school senior in Golden Gloves could probably drop her in three rounds.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Always bet on people that fight with fewer rules. Take Hope Solo for example…

          • 0 avatar
            brenschluss

            I would say, a 132lb Golden Gloves champion might never box again if he faced Ronda Rousey at 135 in any given ring, with UFC rules or no rules.

            If you wanted that take.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Ronda is all about the grappling. Her stand up is quite weak; chin in the air, throwing girl punches. It’s good enough for the level of competition she faces though and primarily used as a setup to get the clinch. If she got to that point, she’d probably eventually be able to take out most men with the armbar.

            Now Joanna Jedrzejczyk; there’s a girl who knows how to throw. She’s defending the straw weight title this Saturday. Still, at 125 pounds there isn’t a lot of weight behind the strikes, so any reasonably competent male could walk right through the punches and get a hold of her.

          • 0 avatar

            Ive watched a few umm white trash back woods girls take out some big dudes in barfights. I know of a family of them in Northern Maine who would regularly start stuff with Rugby players in New Brunswick bars and win and the girls (3 sisters all under 150 lbs 5’8″ to 5’10”) regularly out drank them as well. There may be an element of surprise when a reasonably attractive girl for the area punches you but in two years of going out to drink with them I never saw them come close to losing a fight.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Either their competition is terrible, or they need to get in on that Rousey money!

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        If you are looking for “reality” you are watching the wrong genre of movie. Action movies aren’t exactly known for fidelity to what is plausible.

        Just about every “heavy” action movie out there utterly ignores the laws of physics, and usually by the end of the movie, the protagonist should have died 10-20 times, been missing all his teeth, had some smashed internal organs, have few bones intact, been burnt to a crisp, concussed all to hell, etc.

        If you want to confine it to “who can beat who” in a fight, I guess you don’t watch karate movies, where a routine trope is some blind 80-yr old man routinely kicking the ass of young punks. Or movies where Random Joe Blow somehow pulls off incredible acrobatic feats when his life is put in severe peril. I think a one-armed Charlize Theron being a badass is about the least implausible thing…

        So yeah, you picking on that one thing to open your review, (along with rants about feminism, the media, etc..) does say more about you than the movie.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          Successful storytelling isn’t so much about being plausible as being consistent to the internal rules they create. People don’t have a problem believing unbelievable things, but they do have a mental need to be consistent in their beliefs. That’s why so much fantasy, magic, & scifi fail–they invent/establish certain things but then either ignore of flat-out contradict them.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I watched Road Warrior several times as a kid (Jack and I are both 1971 alumni)… I went in to Fury Road seeing it as a spiritual nod to the Road Warrior, and in my mind Thunderdome never happened.

    Ironically I don’t think I had read any of the “feminist agenda” rants until after I had seen the movie, and it didn’t change my opinion (or love) of the flick. I’d see it again, but summer is a nonstop barrage of action movies, so we struggle to get them all in anyway.

    Movies as art aren’t dying. It’s just that most of them wind up as indie films, and don’t get the budget or exposure that gets afforded to boomtastic Hollywood flicks. I’ve seen some really great thrillers and horror movies from the indie scene. I’m convinced that Hollywood simply cannot make a good horror movie anymore. And even when they remake the foreign gems, they still screw it up. You’ll have to pry Netflix out of my cold dead hands!

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    This is a good movie for people that spend a lot of time playing video games.

  • avatar

    I liked the movie a lot, and this genre of movie is normally something I don’t enjoy. I’d watch it again in a heartbeat. The action was great, and Furiosa was awesome.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Haven’t seen it, unlikely to, and I’m habitually so far behind the life and times of the Hollywood movie and culture machine that I may as well live under a bridge. So I can’t comment on whether the movie sucked.

    However, taking a female action movie character’s illogical physical prowess and using that as a jumping off point for the author’s broader views on feminism and abortion rights seems intellectually lazy. But a great way to generate clicks and ignite a firestorm in the comments section.

    It’s not like male characters have ever been written with illogical physical prowess themselves in movies like this.

  • avatar

    The one truth of post-apocalyptic films is that WOMEN will ALWAYS be the first VICTIMS.

    Only Liberal feminist propaganda places women at the top of the totem pole. Men know better.

    The fact is that nature made men the strongest and most violent of the species in order to secure females for procreation and battle other males for dominance.

    Whether its bigger guns, better armor, sharper swords, or even a Supercharger on a V8 engine producing over seven hundred and seven horsepower… men will ALWAYS seek dominance over the other: “betas”.

    When it comes to a lawless society with no central government, WOMEN LOSE.

    Lets take a look around the globe and find a society without strong central government and democratic votes where women run things?

    OOPS – you can’t.

    Cause that’s not reality.

    There is NO WOMAN who could stand up to the onslaught of an equally sized male. Jodi Arias wouldn’t last 10 seconds against Mike Tyson.

    And FALLON FOX is NOT A WOMAN.

    Bruce GENDER isn’t either.

    STOP LYING TO ME.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Oh yeah, I totally missed that scene where it was revealed that IMMORTAN JOE was really IMMORTAN JOSEPHINE, ruling a desert wasteland with iron labia. And how basically every woman in that society weren’t really enslaved, they all just volunteered to make babies or milk.

      But, of course, if we portray too many women as victims, that’d still be branded feminist propaganda too, wouldn’t it? We’d just be best remaking Reservoir Dogs and Glengarry Glen Ross perpetually, just take the whole messy woman problem out of contention.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      BTSR with the typical loud truths.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The first victims, probably. But this wasn’t Mad Max, where you saw his wife running down the road with Max’s son in her arms. All the weak women are dead or enslaved. Those who can and will cut your balls off get to drive the war rigs.

    • 0 avatar
      IHateCars

      BTSR…it sounds like you’ve been dumped one too many times, it’s OK Buttercup…it’ll get better.

    • 0 avatar
      LuciferV8

      “STOP LYING TO ME”
      Agreed.

      BTSR speaking truth to power once again. [Slow clap]

      I think folks got the message on the feminist agenda behind this film and voted with their feet.

      According to the below article, Mad Max is likely not going to be a profit maker.
      http://deadline.com/2015/06/mad-max-fury-road-runs-over-300m-looks-to-international-box-office-to-carry-it-1201438807/

      The lefty true believers may be bitter about it, but regular men and women are waking up to complete insanity of the leftist occupied halls of power (in mainstream media, academia, and government bureaucracies) and saying no.

  • avatar
    carr1on

    Culture warrior got his feels hurt. Awwwww.

    I walked out of the movie feeling “meh” because Max’s character had the emotional range of a Daisy Air Rifle. You never really got to like Max, at least as much as Furiosa. What, one-armed chicks can’t fight well? News at 11.

    This movie was all about the cars. And to this laymen, they were really cool. and the stunts were cool, including those dudes on poles.

    It was a good movie, but not great. I did’t expect great going in.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Just walk away…

  • avatar
    sco

    I agree with Jack, it blew. You really cant think and enjoy this movie at the same time. Case in point: about one third of the way through I started thinking about where all the explosives and ammo came from when they couldn’t even get water or oil. And right then Max says to someone “How many bullets do we have left?”. Good question. And they take inventory, something like 29. Then they procede to use those and about a thousand more. That’s the movie makers saying you may have some questions, here’s an false answer, now stop asking so many questions. That’s some cynical moviemaking.

    • 0 avatar
      Wraith

      [spoilers] They counted the ammo shortly before Max took out the “Bullet Farmer”‘s vehicle, returning with a bag full of guns & ammo. So that specific question did have an answer, even if we don’t know exactly how post-apocalyptic society can keep making ammunition.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Meh, it’s fairly easy to reload your own cartriges if you can find the powder and can melt lead into bullet shapes.

        • 0 avatar
          Detroit-Iron

          Agree 100%. That is why Max always had plenty of working cartridges for his shotty in “The Road Warrior” and The Humongous could just blast away willy-nilly with the Model 29.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Orthodontia has sadly regressed in that world.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    This review pretty much sums every movie coming out of Suckwood. No plot, typical fight/battle scenes for shock and awe value, and the requisite bad acting that is the norm everywhere these days. And I have to agree with the feminine-power message mentioned here. I see it at work and in the news about women this, women that.. Yawn. Every female I know makes the same or more than me but hey, they are the downtrodden sex and we need movies like this to “remind” us how powerful they are (in case we had forgotten).

    The other thing about Suckwood, they constantly have to ruin good memories of movies we grew up with by turning out garbage like this. They simply cannot come up with something original and lasting on their own.

  • avatar
    AoLetsGo

    I was always a big fan of the Mad Max movies but to me the cars were always the stars. Well, I did like the dog also and now have my own “Mad Max” blue heeler (great dog by the way – IF you have lots of time and energy for it). I will eventually go see this when it gets to the cheaper theaters. Based on the trailer I already knew it was all about the cars,fights and it was over the top.

  • avatar
    harshciygar

    This post is more preachy than Mad Max: Fury Road.

  • avatar
    Fred

    If you think Bloomberg’s correction is funny, what about the 500 comments/posts they probably got pointing out the mistake. As an old guy, I can say there has been very few new ideas come out of Hollywood or the entertainment business in a long while.

  • avatar
    Robert

    For me, the original Mad Max was great because of Max’s transformation from caring family man and tough cop to monomaniacal revenge killer. It had character development and psychological tension (and a laughably small budget). Fury Road had none of those. Putting that aside, it was spectacle, and an enjoyable one for the amazing car builds and ridiculous stunts if nothing else.

    So I can’t say it was a good movie, but I thoroughly enjoyed watching it if that makes any sense…

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    Brand extension. Blockbuster movies aren’t movies. They’re marketing vehicles by which partner corporations launch toys, video games, wearables, accessories, with licensing fees being the major revenue generator for The Franchise producers.

    That’s what this movie is. That’s what all the “comic book” movies are. What Jurassic World is.

    Stop reviewing this genre as movies, start reviewing them as A Franchise; rate how well they lend themselves to selling soda pop, hamburgers, action figures…

    The “movie” part is merely the launch vehicle. (Or in this case the vehicle to an entire wall of toy vehicles at a Target location near you.)

    • 0 avatar

      As best that I can determine from a quick internet search, the film’s producers haven’t yet licensed any action figures or toys from the movie. Apparently, there has been interest from toy companies and fans have made petitions, but so far no Fury Road toys. It doesn’t look like there were any Thunderdome toys either. Might be problematic marketing the R rated film to kids.

      I’m tempted to say that a male action figure would sell better, but one based on Charlize Theron would probably sell well to toy collectors, both adult and younger (who are primarily male).

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “Might be problematic marketing the R rated film to kids.”

        Maybe today, but when I was a kid we definitely had Ellen Ripley action figures…hey wait a minute, it all makes sense now.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Now at Mcdonalds- the Fury Road happy meal! Featuring your choice of 4 action figures from the hit movie!

      1) the stillborn fetus!

      2) the toothless albino!

      3) the leprous guitarist!

      4) the one-armed blackface heroine!

      …um yeah, I can see the marketing tie-ins from a mile away.

  • avatar
    DougD

    Guess I’ll skip this reboot, the real question is: Is it now time to show my 14 year old son The Road Warrior?

    Me and the Epiphone Dot have been playing Church band for 15 years. I’m trying not to make rock n roll worse, but have found if you throw in a classic riff once in a while the people who recognize it appreciate it, and the rest are unaware.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “…it sucks just like Stryper does.”

    I haven’t seen the movie, but I can agree with this.

  • avatar
    Crosley

    It’s always about politics with these people. Same thing with Oscar awards, if a film pushes a certain agenda, expect it to get showered with awards and praise.

    I honestly have no problem with a female lead as a “hero”, I thought it worked great in a film like Alien(s), and I don’t really see that as a Left vs Right paradigm, but I do get tired of having politics shoved down my throat on a regular basis. It seems every modern movie tv show, book, even kids programming and I see a heavy handed attempt to influence politics at every level.

    Somehow years ago we were able to live in an era where every piece of media was not about influencing the next election.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      You maybe shouldn’t use an unforgettable (like The Smurfs were unforgettable) avatar to post your own umpteen political rants and then pop up one day on the neutralist’s high ground.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Same thing with Oscar awards, if a film pushes a certain agenda, expect it to get showered with awards and praise.”

      Or, in the case of “Selma,” it gets snubbed. Maybe it was the best picture of the year, maybe it wasn’t, but how did they justify snubbing the actor who played King? That was absolutely beyond me.

  • avatar
    KrohmDohm

    I can’t believe we are debating the logic in a movie where people fight for gasoline yet drive the most inefficient vehicles ever created by man. It made no more sense than The Road Warrior(Mad Max 2) and I enjoyed both.

    So having said that…..WITNESS ME!

    • 0 avatar
      Robert

      The War Boys are reviewing products on Amazon by the way:

      http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-710-5521-Silver-Color-Mist/dp/B005KTVG86/ref=sr_1_1?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1432695858&sr=1-1&keywords=wilton+silver+color+mist

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      KrohmDohm – a fleet of post apocalyptic Prii would not have the same visceral effect ;)

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      It’s just comforting to know that despite the apparent rout of humanity, gasoline will still exist.

      And thus, the reason for a review by a “car guy”.

      I’ll watch it on Blu Ray, ’cause I think Charlize is HAWT.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        She is definitely beautiful, and very versatile in the roles she can play. My mom always says, “I’ve never seen somebody who can change their appearance so much for movies!”

  • avatar
    AoLetsGo

    “I suppose it’s business as usual for a generation of “men” who are obsessed with pornography, video games, and Japanese comics, and who dream of the day a strong feminist woman will come rescue them from their mothers’ basements.”

    I used to think this was a crazy, exaggeration then I found out about our secretary’s son. He is a 32 year old gentle, beta-male who still lived at home collecting action figures and playing video games. His “career” highlight was a six month stint “working for Apple” (at the mall store). He recently got married to a hard driving, career woman and he will soon be a house dad.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      What! This is common? Absolute loser-ness?!

      How do they find wives? Who likes that sort of mushy do-nothing?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The poisoned food, environment, and lack of exercise create these weaklings.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I mean damn do some P90X. You don’t have to leave the basement for that.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          “The poisoned food, environment, and lack of exercise create these weaklings.”

          It’s difficult to eat good food. Even if you are eating “healthy”, a lot of it is filled with crap. It also tends to be expensive.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree, but nothing worth doing is ever easy or cheap. Heck nutrition is only part of it, you have to neutralize an much of the poisons in the environment as you can and also find time for exercise. I ran five and a half miles yesterday, I will run at least five tomorrow, and at least five on Friday. My cousin, who ran cross country all of his life, runs no less than four every day and typically does at least ten if his health/muscles are up to it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I typically run 20-30 miles a week plus some weight training. I got away from it for awhile, but I feel so much better now that I am back in a fitness routine.

            My wife has been on a healthy kick all of 2015 so far. She was sick of feeling like crap post baby. Now she’s in better shape than she was before getting pregnant. She also has me on some sort of regiment of vitamins and other pills currently. Trying to get rid of those free radicals or something.

            I am thankful that we have the income and situation to afford the food and supplements that we currently consume.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Here’s where I tell you all how hard running is on your body, and how it ruins your knees. And it only works your legs and lungs and not much else. A mixed cardio routine is better and lower impact, and you won’t need knee replacements by age 50.

            Bball I’m surprised your wife, given she’s an OT, didn’t tell you this!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            She does, and instead of running, she uses the elliptical in the basement or does other cardio stuff.

            My wife has given up on telling me not to run because she knows it’s my sanctuary. It’s 3-4 hours a week that I’m not worrying about anything besides getting through the run.

            The guy down the street is 75 and runs 35 miles a week on his original knees. Here’s to hoping that’s me one day.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Well you’ve had your warning then. I got a lecture from my sister, but I was already waning off running by then, and onto cardio. I only ran regularly from 2005-2009, where that was nearly my sole exercise. Started doing real cardio routines after that, and promptly shed a bunch of fat.

            My uncle was a runner, and wore through the cartilage on his knee, until it was bone on bone, and had to have major surgery at 53ish! I’ll never forget about that, though he’s no longer with us (car accident).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            “I typically run 20-30 miles a week plus some weight training.”

            Impressive. I’m targeting 20/week by running 5/mi four days a week. I don’t want to go to far beyond that as I was warned by my cousin. Evidently once you get to a certain physique you must maintain that level or bad things can happen physiologically.

            “She also has me on some sort of regiment of vitamins and other pills currently.”

            Dr. 28CL has the prescription for you. The cabinet over my sink is a supplement trove.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Corey-

            It’s probably a good idea that I diversify my cardio. There’s always HIIT workouts among other alternatives

            28-

            What do you feel are the most important supplements to take? It’s often hard to decipher the helpful pills from the snake oil.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            Email me: [email protected]

      • 0 avatar
        Sloomis

        Some women dig it. I know more than one underachieving stay-at-home (or underemployed) dad married to a go-getter overachieving woman.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Except for the dad part, he sounds like a success to me!

      Caught himself a fine breadwinner!

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Lol, that is a win for him. But now he will have to raise a child pet all the time and clean house. What does hard driving business woman see here? Maybe she needed a voluntary sap to stay home so she could still have the kid she wanted but not sacrifice important career.

        It’s a bit sick, this children-having.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          I don’t know, I just understand the attractions of basement dwelling! Especially in the summer. First thing I’ve done with new houses was set up my basement computer cave and workbenches :-)

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “It’s a bit sick, this children-having.”

          Really, it’s our only true purpose.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            If we are nothing more than biological machines, say, like viruses which exist solely to replicate. I say we are more than that, thus purpose is where you find it and not exclusively the domain of bio-automatic replication.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Not that you are wrong, but there is more too it than simply we are biological machines living in a random place of space and time. Somehow there is a tapestry, order, or fate to our lives beyond our control. I can’t quite explain it but I lived it. There are no coincidences.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “Y’all [email protected] need Jesus!”

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            Hans Reichenbach, “We should not commit the fallacy of believing that the struggle for power is controlled by a superhuman authority that leads it to an ultimately good end; nor should we commit the complementary fallacy of believing that the good is to be defined as that which is the most powerful. We have seen too many victories of what we regard as immorality, too much success of mediocrity and class egoism. We try to pursue our own volitional ends, not with the fanaticism of the prophet of an absolute truth, but with the firmness of the man who trusts in his own will. We do not know whether we will reach our aim. Like the problem of a prediction of the future, the problem of moral action cannot be solved by the construction of rules that guarantee success. There are no such rules.
            And there are no rules by means of which we could discover a purpose, or a meaning, of the universe. There is some hope that the history of mankind will be progressive and lead to a better-adjusted human society, although there are strong tendencies to the contrary. To believe that the physical universe is progressive in the human sense, is absurd. The universe follows the laws of physics, not moral commands. We have been able to a certain extent to employ the laws of physics to our own advantage. That some day we shall control larger parts of the universe is not impossible, though none too probable. It is more likely that finally the human race will die with the planet on which its life began.
            Whenever there comes a philosopher who tells you that he has found the ultimate truth, do not trust him. If he tells you that he knows the ultimate good, or has a proof that the good must become reality, do not trust him, either. The man merely repeats the errors which his predecessors have committed for two thousand years. It is time to put an end to this brand of philosophy. Ask the philosopher to be as modest as the scientist; then he may become as successful as the man of science. Open your ears to your own will, and try to unite your will with that of others. There is no more purpose or meaning in the world than you put into it.”

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “I say we are more than that, thus purpose is where you find it and not exclusively the domain of bio-automatic replication.”

            The major driving force behind much of that purpose is the desire to get laid when it comes down to it. Conciously or not.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Like it or not, we are controlled to a great extent by primal survival mechanisms.

            The quest for and the belief in a “greater purpose” or “greater being” has existed through out history along with not despite of our primal instincts.

            Entropy versus extropy or order versus disorder, random versus grand design.

            Cue Heaven and Hell…….

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Till he outlives his usefulness or she doesn’t want to put up with his crap anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Lol, I feel a little better now.

          I was feeling too driven and accomplished there for a second. It must be very unattractive that I live alone and don’t have huge debt or some lame job in a mall.

    • 0 avatar
      LuciferV8

      Is he a brony, too?

  • avatar
    TMA1

    To tie this back into cars: can we get a chart showing the upward trend in prices for Falcon xb’s since the movie came out? Maybe a story from someone who imported one? Maybe an interview with the guys at http://www.aussiecoupes.com/max.html, who will find you one in Australia.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Jack,
    FYI you are the media you seem to dislike so much.

  • avatar
    Chopsui

    I can’t help but think that if Jack had seen this before reading the feminist drivel, he’d have liked it. The only thing bad I have to say about it is that Tom Hardy sucked. WTF was he trying to do with his voice? But Max was really kind of a side character so it didn’t really take away my enjoyment of the film. I expected a mindless, badass chase film and that’s exactly what I got.

    I think Jack’s just jealous that he didn’t score the guitar player role.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I am totally jealous that I didn’t score that role. No SAG card.

      But I was frankly bored by the “action”. The same thing, again and again.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I liked Waterworld.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    I didn’t like it quite as much as I thought I would (I’m a huge fan of the earlier movies). I couldn’t get into Max’s character – he just wasn’t likable.

    That was my only real problem with it. Visually it’s incredible, and the action is surprisingly easy to follow. They just didn’t do enough with Max.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    I have to agree. the cars were cool, the movie sucked.
    Perhaps the neo commie msm ending was the most hilarious. You know they open the water pipes, so water for everyone, except you can easily predict the real outcome would be in the end no water left for anyone.

    The so called bad guy int he movie is really the only person of note. he has saved some form of civilization and tech. He has some type of societal structure where elsewhere the is none but scavengers.

    He is also obsessed with preserving or recreating humans with healthy bodies and no illness, everybody else seems to suffer from various forms of radiation indiuced cancers.

    You may note that the room where the women were kept had a piano and otehr accoutrements of civilization.

    How exactkly was the bad guy a bad guy.
    Oh right he had power and possetions.

    • 0 avatar
      Chopsui

      “How exactkly was the bad guy a bad guy.
      Oh right he had power and possetions.”

      Er, well maybe because some of those possessions included half a dozen young girls that he held as sex/breeding slaves?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      He wasn’t running a top-notch breeding program, or he wouldn’t have been contributing. When he was getting suited up, you could see all the blisters and boils on his back. And the mask was a respirator because he couldn’t breathe well enough on his own. He was as sick anybody, and selfishly planting his own diseased seed.

  • avatar
    lesabreTooth

    The movie came out over a month ago; we’ve already seen this exact argument from every 13 year old mens’ rights advocate on reddit.

    This review isn’t about movies, and it’s not about cars. It’s simply a statement on the author’s complete lack of confidence in his masculinity. Being threatened by a perceived feminist agenda in a straightforward action movie like this isn’t a concept I can entirely wrap my head around, but it looks a lot like someone just looking for a reason to be outraged.

    I’m not outraged, I’m just embarrassed. This is a huge embarrassment to the site.

  • avatar
    carve

    “Return of Kings” came to a similar conclusion about this being a feminist movie…
    http://www.returnofkings.com/63036/why-you-should-not-go-see-mad-max-feminist-road

    I expected that going in, so I just enjoyed it for the action, which was ABSOLUTELY BONKERS, especially in 3D. It’s a fun suspension of disbelief movie.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    It was the palette that drove me crazy. I’m sick of every film being orange and blue. Here’s why:
    priceonomics DOT com / why-every-movie-looks-sort-of-orange-and-blue/

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Ouch! I wasn’t expecting this negative a review. Sorry it wasn’t your cuppa, JB. I for one loved (nearly) every minute of it.

    Now go see Jurassic World with the fam! SO MANY MERCEDESES.

    • 0 avatar
      SnarkyRichard

      Saw it this morning and Jurassic World had product placement up the wazoo . Mercedes , Coke , Samsung , etc. It was about what I expected dinos eating people with some good effects/some awful . It will get a sequel as all high grossing movies do , but I won’t be seeing it in the theater . Rumors are Chris Pratt as Indiana Jones in yet another reboot- count me out for that also after they nuked the fridge in the last one . Saw Fury Road with a bunch of friends and none of us really cared for it either and wondered how RT and Metacritic rated so it high . Maybe they were all hopped on on mother’s milk ? Grossing 322 million worldwide so far that will probably get a sequel too . The best part of Jurassic World for me was the trailer for The Martian . If the movie is half as good as the book (imagine MacGyver on Mars)it will be very good . After all not even NASA can improve duct tape . Duct tape is magic and should be worshiped !

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Indiana Jones survived the nuke in a fridge because he drank from the Holy Grail in Last Crusade. Even though he gave up immortality by leaving the temple, he still had superhuman invulnerability (and, according to the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, he lived into his 90s).

        That’s my theory and I’m sticking to it!

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        “Nuked the fridge” should be this generation’s “jumped the shark.”

        Dude, I think you just started a meme.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m going to go against the grain, if there is a movie you want to see coming up make it “Heat” by Michael Mann. I caught it again over the weekend, holy crap is it good.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Heat is one of my favorites. I’ve seen it many times. The action scene to begin the movie needed no character development. It was powerful, intense, and realistic. Great way to start the movie.

      It’s nothing but great scene after great scene from there to the end, but my favorite might be when Chris is walking out to the getaway car with the huge bag of loot, relieved that he’s almost home free and a hint of a grin on his face, when he immediately switches to expertly firing in bursts on the police after the bus passes and they come into view. No hesitation, no silly antics. Just a calm professional who actually knows how to handle a firearm in combat situations going to work with the knowledge that any hesitation gets him killed and he can’t just hit targets by firing off a bunch of rounds with one arm and without properly aiming. The whole movie is done in that style. It was so refreshing to watch a movie that was taken so seriously from start to finish, including the action scenes.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree with everything you’ve said but I will add something on character development. Aside from the primary protagonists and antagonists, we don’t get much character development and we don’t need it. The film simply spins up a characters, gives you just enough information, and the runs with it. Who are Van Zant, Eady, Donald Breedan, Alan Marciano, Sgt Drucker, and of course Waingro? (who is only even in a handful of scenes). The film doesn’t tell you much and you don’t really need to know their exact motivations or backgrounds, just their actions in the plot. I fracking love how the film is able to pull that off. Similar to Pulp Fiction in this regard.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “Just a calm professional who actually knows how to handle a firearm in combat situations going to work…”

        …by using a child as a human shield. That’s not professional…it’s evil. You left that part out while you were fawning over this guy’s gun handling skills.

        But I digress. That’s what makes “Heat” so good – it’s unflinching in showing its’ characters as they are, in all their complexity and imperfection, and the cost of the lives they choose. As I recall, the same character that used that kid was himself a family man.

        Michael Mann is a terrific director…and I don’t even think “Heat” was his best work. I think that honor goes to “Collateral.” That’s a nasty piece of work.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          You’re thinking of Tom Sizemore’s character, Michael. That happens much later on in the scene. Regardless, I think it’s reasonable to assume that a professional criminal would do such a thing in that situation. They’re not exactly playing patty-cake out there. He knows the cops aren’t going to take any chances in that situation anyway.

  • avatar
    geeber

    “It is simultaneously boring and overwhelming, slow-paced yet carelessly plotted, predictable and joyless.”

    “The problem in this is that the message, in this case, is so fundamentally incompatible with reality that it strains belief…”

    “…yet, the only thing that kept me from walking out was the fact I’d paid for the large soda and wanted my free refill.”

    So it’s like the movie adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks book, only with lots of car chases?

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    Casting pearls for swine. That’s what Fury Road is.
    This film just should never have been released in the US at all. But, it took some 20 years before people realized how good Road Warrior really was.
    I just love seeing comments about MM2 from Americans going ‘why are they fighting for oil when they seem to have enough to keep their cars running all day long already’. Bonus stupidity points if your from California and ask why they’re not fighting over water instead of oil…
    But, I love it, and even if it pisses me off a bit that people just can’t enjoy it, many because they belive that it is some attempt at ‘feminist propaganda’ (luckily it wasn’t promoted as such over here) we all have different taste, some like crap films, some like Mad Max films.
    As for the whole feminism part, whoever ‘the man’ is, setting ‘modern feminists’ and ‘mens right activists’ up against each other when they re relly working for the same goal, was a brilliant move.
    As for the rest of the typical Blockbuster trash that comes out regularly from Hollywood, apart from some action scenes out of the Fast and Furious series and Transformers, there has not been anything even remotely as brutal in the theatres since…well, there just hasn’t been anything this brutal before. Fury Road uses the big screen for all that it’s worth, I dread the day I have to watch the war rig go nto the storm on a regular HD-TV screen… It sure is overwhelming, if you want it to be, there are still times to breathe, times of extreme silence, lots of humor, lots of actual acting, and insanely good cinematography and props/cars, and I guess it takes a man/woman to take it all in…or I have a serious case of undiagnosed ADD.
    (actually, just watching a ‘how they made it’ clip on Youtube is more interesting and action-filled than any of the Avengers film so far…)
    They could also easily charge amusement park entry money to let people ride in the cars from this film, or just put them in an art museum.
    I thought better of you Jack…

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    I will probably borrow the DVD from the public library. It’s not worth the price of admission to a theater. (True for most movies these days.)

    The Road Warrior is complete in and of itself. Except for Max, there is no logical connection between the cop versus outlaw biker story of Mad Max and the post-apocalypse world of The Road Warrior. The Mad Max character terminates at the end of the Road Warrior. If not dead, he is at least no longer relevant. That makes the sequels irrelevant, too.

    Frank Herbert’s Dune series is another example of a perfectly good story that stands by itself but is diminished by its sequels. The machinations in Dune could have been plucked out of Renaissance Italian history. Once Paul Atreides kills his Harkonnen rival and recovers his family’s position, the story is complete. Of the Dune movies, the best is the first part of the 2000 miniseries. Don’t bother with the second and third parts. The 1984 movie is just weird.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    “Frank Herbert’s Dune series is another example of a perfectly good story that stands by itself but is diminished by its sequels.”

    Noooo! Must read sequel novels to get Futars!

  • avatar
    pheanix

    I disagree with JB on this one. The film captures the feel and attitude of the originals (unsurprisingly, since all four are done by Miller). Unlike the originals (which I personally find boring) it’s actually great to look at. The originals were not particularly deep so this one isn’t either. Mad Max has always been about style over substance.

    Personally, I loved it because way to go and bring something that was so early 80s into a totally different era and make it feel both vintage and modern. And make us forget this was a Mel Gibson vehicle.

  • avatar
    RetroGrouch

    Thanks for the mansplanation, Jack. Alien and Aliens sucked as well for the same reasons.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Am I missing the sarcasm?

      • 0 avatar
        RetroGrouch

        Ridley Scott and James Cameron were morons. Allowing that little girl to survive on a planet full of xenomorphs is a stupid plot hole. My Y chromosome is deeply offended.

        Buck up, little campers. Hollywood will soon return to formulaic, waifish women in need of rescue by the He-Man Woman Haters Club. I hear they are rebooting Taxi Driver.

        Did the sarcasm come through a little stronger here?

  • avatar
    manbridge

    Gah….another sequel. Make that suckuel.

    Finally a decent review. Thanks!

    If the car gig peters out you can start TTAM, The Truth About Movies.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, that was successful clickbait.

    • 0 avatar
      RetroGrouch

      That thought crossed my mind as well. Jack and co. and definitely smart enough to troll us in such a convincing manner.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I mean, seriously…”Only by becoming a “feminist ally” can a man have any worth in society…”?

        And meanwhile, the top grossing film put out in 2014 was about an old school, rodeo-riding, beer-drinking, gun-toting, super-macho Navy SEAL from Texas, whose claim to fame was killing a lot of Iraqis. It even was up for best picture (which was deserved). Yep, the feminist agenda just rules Hollywood.

        And I guess Jack forgot that in Mad Max’s last outing, the evil, dictatorial, bloodthirsty leader was a woman.

        c’mon…

  • avatar
    05lgt

    For the record: there has only been one highlander movie, one matrix, two mad maxes, three Star Wars. And to anyone who disagrees, lalalalala I’m not listening.

  • avatar
    monkeyodeath

    “I suppose it’s business as usual for a generation of “men” who are obsessed with pornography, video games, and Japanese comics, and who dream of the day a strong feminist woman will come rescue them from their mothers’ basements.”

    For real? Maybe it’s more that men in this generation are comfortable enough in their masculinity that they don’t need someone else’s weakness to validate it.

    Why is it only men that are allowed to kick ass? I’m a red-blooded straight dude, and I’d much rather have a chick by my side who can fight, shoot, and fix cars rather than the kind of fragile, useless cheesecake that normally inhabits these kinds of movies. An equal partner vs. someone I have to protect. Competence, ambition, and toughness are hot — at least as long you aren’t looking for someone weak to make you feel strong.

    I’ve seen the desperate insecurity and macho posturing of the “men” in the generations before mine and want nothing of it. Super-masculine “car guy” dudes who couldn’t change an alternator belt to save their lives.

    This movie’s only preaching to you if you seriously have a problem with women being badass, or if you’re one of those people hung up on this idiotic and outmoded “natural gender role” BS.

    Or if billionaire who fights crime in a dumb-looking bat mask and cape is somehow more “realistic” to you than the idea that a woman who’s made it to age 80 years old in a post-apocalpytic environment might be a pretty tough customer.

    Otherwise, you’d think a guy into stuff like cars and guns might be stoked about a movie that could inspire more women to read his articles and demand that automakers offer a manual transmission with every car they make. The more, the merrier.

    • 0 avatar
      SnarkyRichard

      I thought Charlize Theron’s character Furiosa was the very best part of the movie . The lack of plot , character development , and scenes like the muscle bound guy ripping an engine out of a fast moving vehicle with his bare hands were incredibly stupid ! Just like the female co-star in Jurassic World going through the entire movie wearing high heels some things are just too far fetched to believe even in a fantasy summer popcorn movie .

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Thanks, JB. I can always enjoy a good bad review of a terrible movie. At least I didn’t have to waste a couple precious hours of life, as you did. Actually, I think I heard the subwoofer track leaking through the multiplex walls, though. But it didn’t distract me from “Love and Mercy,” which grabbed me and held on tight until the end. I hope you’ll review that one, probably on your personal site.

  • avatar
    Power6

    Thanks for the review Jack. I barely clicked on this, i consider Mad Max 1&2 to be completely different type of movies than thunderdome and beyond, so was not the slight bit interested. I assumed this was a bunch of over the top action scenes using a co-opted story to set it up. About like he latest F&F which was barely watchable i only stayed because free popcorn.

    Who cares what rotten tomatoes says, teenage boys are the biggest target market for movies. TTAC is for cranky old men wouldn’t expect too much overlap lol.

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    The best comment I’ve seen about “The Postman” is that it’s “Waterworld” without the water.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I finally watched this last night, in 3D.

    *Minor spoilers included below.*

    It was entertaining enough for a while. I think it should have ended with Charlize’s emotional breakdown scene after they found the old women though. After they turned around and began another monotonous action run through the desert with the invincible truck, I lost interest and left the theater.

    I didn’t get any feminist vibes from it. The women didn’t do anything more improbable than anyone else. One wasn’t even able to cut the chain, despite the sick, scrawny guy being able to do it effortlessly shortly after.

    That was the first time I watched a 3D theater movie. I didn’t like it at first but I gave it a chance and eventually forgot about it for most of the movie. The smaller, dimmer field of vision provided by the 3D glasses eventually became intolerable near the end once I got bored of watching the drawn-out action scenes. I don’t see the benefit of 3D. In exchange for not having a clear view of the entire screen at all times and putting up with cheap, poorly-shaped pieces of plastic resting on your face, you get multiple layers of two dimensional images instead of a single layer. I didn’t think it provided any additional realism over a traditional screen.

    In conclusion, I’ll avoid any sequels, as well as any other future 3D movies or silly action movies.

  • avatar
    BlisterSlim

    Fury Road is an awesome action movie. Unlike most other blockbusters these days, it has some faith in the audience and trusts you to figure out things from context and the visuals. In other words – Show don’t tell.

    I feel like most of your criticisms would be addressed by paying more attention (I mean you don’t even get the name of the War Rig right).

    The feminist angle is overhyped. The movie is notable for having competent female characters which are sadly missing from most movies, but it’s not preachy. “We are not things” is the theme for all the protaganists, not just the wives. Max himself is used as a “blood bag” and the war boys are battle fodder. This is why Joe is the villain- he treats people (not just women) like objects.

    The cars are in good shape because they’re extremely important to the war boy’s society- so much so they’re treated with religious significance. All the gas being wasted is actually commented on by the leader of Gas Town- it’s not a plot hole. Joe is obsessed with having a healthy child and will expend any amount of resources to retrieve the wives- he even leaves his Citadel undefended because he doesn’t care about anything else.

    Furiosa is a badass because she’s worked her way up from child slave to a trusted commander in a warrior society. Max has a character arc- he goes from just trying to survive on his own (kicking Furiosa out of the rig) and seems to barely remember how to speak, to risking his own life to save the other characters. It’s just that we see this through his actions instead of dialogue and exposition.

  • avatar
    DougD

    Wow, watched this on a plane this afternoon.
    I could do the suspension of disbelief (food, wastage of ammunition etc)
    I was OK with the strong female characters (motorcycle grannies who randomly leave one of their women naked in a cage tower?)
    But I couldn’t take the repetitiveness. It’s like watching the last 10 minutes of The Road Warrior 12 times back to back. I used some of my spare time to make up an alternative script for the motorcycle trip / salt flats scene:

    Max: Well, we’ve arrived at the end of the plot and I still don’t see any green stuff.
    Furiosa: This is quite inconvenient, the movie isn’t over yet.
    Max: Let’s not bore the audience by further driving across this endless wasteland. Let’s bore them by doing the first half of the movie over in reverse.
    Furiosa: We could try something different.
    Max: Nah, director says we’re only tooled up for truck chases. Let’s do it and maybe let the kid drive for a while.
    Furiosa: I’m in. Ok grannies let’s go.

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